Index
E

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1930

Pages

346-350

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Index: E', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 30: 1655-1656 (1930), pp. 346-350. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=89832 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

E

Earning, Erneing, Antony, commander of the Bridgewater, 220.

East Indies, 304.
-, importance of Cape of Good Hope for passage to, 12; ships from, 175.
-, Dutch dominate waters of, 175, 185; complaint of Dutch outrages in, committee to report on, 260.

Easter Sunday, parade of military in London on, 50.

Edinburgh castle, Glencairne imprisoned in, 172.

Edgehill, battle of, and king's clemency after, 300.

Elba, island of, pope fears English stroke against, 198.

election of members of parliament, manner of described, 256.

Elizabeth Maria, governor appointed for, 46; in Venetian fleet, id.

emperor:
-, Cromwell suggests to parliament taking title, 4; proposed adoption of title and that army shall choose, 132.
-, Sweden contemplates a Protestant, 97.

-, See Ferdinand III.

empire. See Germany.

Endymion, brings present of wine for Cromwell, 67n.

England:
-, reverence for parliament, 21–2; law of makes districts liable for robbery, 165.
-, Dutch raise loan to defray cost of war with, 41; captures from Dutch paid cost of war with, 304.
-, foreign powers sent ambassadors to, for own interests, 152.
-, causes of civil war in, 299; death of Charles beginning of misfortunes of, 301; Cromwell advocated king's death forseeing own ascendancy in, 302.
-, approval of dissolution of Long Parliament, 304; Cromwell knows how to ride, 312.
-, war with Dutch considered suicidal, 305.
-, amount paid by in taxes to Cromwell, 306; finest island in the world, abundance and wealth, 308.
-, claims right of search by virtue of sovereignty at sea, 310.
-, 1655:
-,-, expected advantage in negotiations with France, 2; could not hurt France seriously without Spanish help, 11.
-,-, vote to Protector for government of, 2; constituencies will resent treatment of parliament, 17.
-,-, peace with Portugal signed, 8; Sultan sending to, for war ships, 10.
-,-, consider all princes must seek friendship, 12, 20; Genoa anxious to stand well with, 23.
-,-, allowed to toade freely in all Spain, 18; trade beyond line by main force, 20.
-,-, adjustment with France in good tram, 18; Franco relieved of fear from can attack Spaniards, 23; French require peace with, 27.
-,-, possible intrigues with Turks, because of trade, 21; Charles in communication with malcontents in, 30.
-,-, Cromwell claims to be increasing trade of, 22; Venice desires friendly relations with, 35.
-,-, burdens constantly increased since civil war, 22; new tax on, apportioned out, 25.
-,-, insist on all rights and if necessary enforce them, 23; supported in league against House of Austria, 33.
-,-, Spain losing hope of war with France, 24; Spain unable to thwart plans, 31; courted by Spain, 97.
-,-, resents dissolution, 24, 30; difficulty and suspicion increased in, since dissolution, 29.
-,-, question of Venetian intercourse with, 30; Venice can receive great advantage from, 31; surprise at delay of Venice over, 35.
-,-, Charles supposed to have sailed for, 30; anxiety in through king's sudden move, 39; no importance attached to report of king coming to, 44.
-,-, Turks complain of helping Venice, 35.
-,-, arrests of disaffected continue in, 35; no one to leave without passport, 37, 39, 43.
-,-, can help others but aims at own advantage, 36; Cromwell to serve as scourge for, 48.
-,-, France suspected of share in internal troubles of, 39; French changing policy towards, 42; persons from France and Flanders arrested in, 44.
-,-, Charles kept advised and watching course of disturbances in, 41; order completely restored in, 45.
-,-, royalist revolt planned to break out in several parts of, 48.
-,-, demands of for French peace, 48; France wants to be free of fear of naval attack from, 52.
-,-, taxation bitterly resented in, 51; Flemings buy silk to send to, 162.
-,-, government of, requires a king, 57; restive at confusion of justice, 68; satisfied with Cromwell's changes, 75.
-,-, collection for Vaudois in, 66, 69; support may win clemency for Vaudois, 77.
-,-, count on advantage from W. Indies expedition, 69; de Haro not convinced of hostility, 74.
-,-, Spain unequal to war with, 79; puzzled and humbled by reverse at S. Domingo, 94, 113; more glad than sorry about, 109.
-,-, danger and strength being devoted to yet greater enterprises and subjection of pope, 80.
-,-, forced to contribute to maintenance of army and Cromwell's autocracy, 83; Cromwell accused of overthrowing liberty of, 102.
-,-, Sweden formidable by good understanding with, 97; Dutch fear policy to discredit them, 100.
-,-, boastful talk in of extirpation of popish inventions and idolatry, 97; a fourth of the population Catholic, 115.
-,-, capture of Jamaica restores courage of, 97; Spaniards trying to move Dutch against, 104; Spain wishes to break with, 108.
-,-, more deputies from about Vaudois, 99; has abundant means to help Venice, 113.
-,-, proposed union with Scotland and Ireland, 99.
-,-, wool from Biscay for, 104; naturally more hostile to France than Spain, 113.
-,-, discontent increasing in, 106, 126; Cromwell accused of, tyrannising over, 109.
-,-, majority desire change and confusion in, 109; taxation makes discontented and bitter, 117.
-,-, attack on Indies to divert forces from France, 113; agreement diverts French fears of, 122; France not to make peace without consent of, 141.
-,-, peace in one month with France, Sweden and Portugal, 114; importance to, of good relations with Portugal, 119.
-,-, supposed secret alliance against House of Austria, 122; talk of alliance with Dutch and Swiss, 123.
-,-, Spaniards preparing to break with, 123; war with Spain will do great harm to, 138; reasons which obliged to war with Spain, 147.
-,-, if dislodged in Indies will abandon enterprise, 125–6; Spaniards cannot do much harm to, 149.
-,-, priests to be expelled from, 129; kept hi awe by troops of horse, 158.
-,-, precautionary measures required in, 138; Charles invited to Flanders to cultivate supporters in, 153.
-,-, prepared to join France in attack on Flanders, 138; fear that France may draw back, 141; Boreel fears incursion into Flanders, 146.
-,-, accommodation with France simply peace, 145; fears of to close union with France, 146; terms of treaty with France, 150–1, 162; secret articles, 156–7.
-,-, ambassadors leaving, as no reciprocity, 152–3; question of admitting Jews to, 160–1.
-,-, French unlikely to give footing in Flanders, 157.
-,-, Sweden working in harmony with, 160; Spanish secret agent for adjustment with, 169.
-,-, precautions about entering or leaving, 160; Manning represents discontent in, to Charles, 168.
-, 1656:
-,-, safe arrival of plate fleet reported in, 169; ports of, closed for three weeks, 187; no one can leave without passport, 201.
-,-, Venice wishes to be kept informed of Spanish relations with, 170; Italians would strongly resist invasion from, 172.
-,-, arrangement to share dominion of sea with Sweden, 170; objects of union with Sweden, 182, 186.
-,-, Swiss Protestants encouraged by, 182; ambassadors from expected at Zurich, 186.
-,-, Dutch fear joint action with France in Low Countries, 186; Dutch fear of breach with, 195.
-,-, Spaniards rely on internal troubles of, 192; war against published in Flanders, 193; talk of using Portuguese fleet against, 196.
-,-, complaint over increase of excise, 194; officials to account for money received from, 211.
-,-, Barrière expelled from, 195, 207; Bordeaux returning to, 201.
-,-, fast in for success of fleet, 197; Blake sends heavy ships back to, 232.
-,-, Rupert offers services in case of rising in, 199; fear of taxing because of outcry in, 222; outcry against taxes, 224.
-,-, delight in at Swiss peace, 200; collection in for Swiss Protestants, 223.
-,-, not likely to press demands on Portugal, as needs friendship, 217; peace and alliance with Portugal, 230, 232–3.
-,-, Dutch convoy of plate to Flanders deep offence to, 217; may lead to rupture, 218; Dutch remonstrate against claim to search, 223.
-,-, clamour for parliament in, 222, 224; decision to call parliament a trick to pacify, 226, 231, 233.
-,-, alliance with Barbary corsairs, 223; naval treaty negotiating with Dutch, 234.
-,-, every means adopted for keeping under control, 224: efforts to keep quiet by fresh regulations, 227.
-,-, danger of taxes making trouble in, 231, 235, 273; will not pay farthing beyond ordinary taxes, 233.
-,-, would not suffer deprivation of rights of election, 234; Cromwell reluctant to repress by force, 235; deceived about fleet, to induce to pay taxes, 249.
-,-, foreigners arriving in to be registered, 236.
-,-, parliament likely to vest government in house of Cromwell 241; some counties refuse to elect members, 248.
-,-, reasons for Portuguese adjustment with, 242; advantage of in treaty, 245.
-,-, Dutch wage covert war on by privateering, 244; not Dutch interest to have open war with, 247–8.
-,-, cannot tackle Dunkirk alone, 246; Gamarra constantly stirring Dutch to take action against, 293.
-,-, war injuring more than Spaniards 249; longing for peace with Spain, 252; rupture with Spain contrary to laws of, 266, 271.
-,-, passionate longing for parliament, 253; progress of election in, 254.
-,-, France wants alliance with, against emperor, 259; nothing settled about, but Lockhart taking final proposals, 290.
-,-, taxation endured as guarantee against invasion by Charles, 264–5; troops kept on march throughout country from fear of invasion, 272; good reason for guarding against, 297.
-,-, parliament ordains fast in, 269; hope that Spanish gold would relieve of taxation, 273.
-, army of. See army.
-, fleet of. See navy.
-, kings of
-,-, Kent devoted to, 12; Cony contends no tax without, 62; taxation heavier than under, 113.
-,-, difficulty of carrying out without, 65, 80; parliament claimed jurisdiction over, 304.
-,-, claim on France, 171; benevolences received by, 230
-,-, See also Charles I.; Charles II.; James I.
-, merchants of. See merchants, English.
-, queen of. See Henrietta Maria.
-, ships of. See ships, English.
-, Venetian instructions to minister in, 107, 113, 122, 126, 131, 138 142, 145, 149, 153, 163–4, 168, 173, 176, 179, 185, 188, 192–3, 197, 201, 205, 208, 209, 212, 226, 229, 239, 242, 244, 247, 260, 270, 277–8, 289.
-, relation of, by Sagredo, 299–313.

English:
-, in Poland, despoiled to find help for Charles, 46.
-, at Constantinople, danger of Turks seeking revenge on, 66; ill treatment by Turks, 110.
-, fear that Cardenas may be molested by, 109, 114; southern Spain denuded by, 120.
-, sequestration of goods in Spanish dominions, 111, 114, 116, 119, 127, 135, 140, 144, 152; some imprisoned at Malaga, 120.
-, granted place of worship at Lisbon, 114.
-, at Naples, ask permission to trade, refused, 154, 162; Spaniards order reprisals on in Flanders, 187.
-, Spaniards offer facilities for trade and places of worship at ports to, 173; sequestration of goods in Spain carried out very mildly, 174.
-, power at sea likely to make Lutheranism supreme, 178; contemplate taking revenge on Grand Duke, 192.
-, union of Spanish and Dutch needed to counterpoise, 193.
-, a few take out patents to privateer in king's name, 199; Charles raising regiment of in Flanders, 263.
-, Viceroy of Naples wants German troops against, 202; offer of port to, a danger to Italy, 217.
-, reports spread to soothe, 213: in distress under taxation, 214.
-, humoursome and prone to fish in troubled waters, 235; fleet kept out to force to pay taxes, 241.
-, fondness for sugar, 243.
-, bitterest enemies of Catholic faith, 263; fear no prince but believe they excite apprehensions of others, 309.
-, still feeling effects of civil wars, 264–5.
-, Charles preferred to be in hands of, rather than Scots, 300.

English Channel, depredations of Dunkirkers in, 240.

Enkevort, Adrian count of, Baron Enkenfort, commands imperial force for relief of Milanese, 259n.

Entrance. See Happy Entrance.

envoys. See under ambassadors.

Ercole, in Venetian squadron of ships, 41.

Erlach, Sigmund von, count of, chancery of falls into hands of Lucerners, 182.

Erneing. See Earning.

Essex, earl of. See Devereux, Robert.

Europe, likely to watch development of crisis with Spain, 82; all marts of interested in safe arrival of Spanish plate fleet, 169–70; recognition of Cromwell by powers of, 171.

Eviza. See Iviza.

excise, increased on all goods and comestibles, 194.



<--Previous:
Index:
D
Next:-->
Index:
F