Venice
November 1659

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1931

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85-96

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'Venice: November 1659', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 32: 1659-1661 (1931), pp. 85-96. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90050 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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November 1659

Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
83. To the Resident in England.
We are glad to know what you tell us of the decision of the Council of State to fetch the earl of Arundel to England. The letter from the government has not yet reached us, but you will keep us informed of what happens in this affair.
Ayes, 92. Noes, 1. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Rettori.
Venetian
Archives.
84. To the Rectors of Padua.
You carried out the instructions touching the earl of Arundel with great punctuality and we commend your diligence. You will keep on the watch to see if anything fresh happens and report everything to us.
Ayes, 92. Noes, 1. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
85. Gio. Battista Nani, Venetian Ambassador extraordinary in France, to the Doge and Senate.
There has been an imbroglio over the king of England on the frontier. A person who arrived by night and well received by Don Louis was believed to be the king, but it was the son of the Marquis de los Balbases. Nevertheless King Charles is in Spain. As a precaution he circulated the report that he was travelling by way of Bayonne while he took the other by the district of Foix and after suffering from some slight indisposition he found himself at Saragossa, reaching Fontarabia in diligence from there in four days.
Meanwhile four English individuals passed through Bayonne (fn. 1) accompanied by a courier of their queen, and they expressed great disgust at not finding the king in that neighbourhood. It is believed that they are persons who have some intelligence favourable to him, as the affairs of that country are again in some commotion. I hear that this king is treating with M. de Turenne to engage him for his service with a good body of troops, in case peace is effected between the two crowns, but it is not yet quite certain whether France will consent so soon to deprive herself of so distinguished a person.
Paris, the 4th October (sic), 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
86. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The army officers continue to meet all the week at the palace of Wallingford, the residence of General Flitud. After much discussion on the question of the government it was resolved on Wednesday night that a committee of 23 should be set up immediately to deal with all affairs of state during this interval. Flitud, Lambert, Desbero and many other army officers are nominated; some of those who belonged to the council of the late Protector are included with two or three citizens of London, but the majority are soldiers. This body bears the title of committee for the safety and preservation of the peace of the commonwealth. It is to consider the establishment of some form of government and to report the result of its deliberations in six weeks to the council general of officers for further consideration and confirmation. In the mean time it is to have all the authority and power exercised by the late council of state, with power to treat with ambassadors and other foreign ministers, to suppress rebellion, to raise troops, to dispose of vacant fortresses, to change appointments, to call offenders to account, which means royalists, to compound for their property, and to enjoy the most ample prerogatives.
This council general has been sitting uninterruptedly since. Yesterday and to-day their time has been spent in discussing and issuing a declaration upon the motives and reasons for the present changes and the course to be followed in the future. Everyone is anticipating this with the utmost curiosity and the foreign ministers will then be informed of the decisions taken. Yet in spite of all that has happened and may yet come there can be no solidity for the government. The general opinion, borne out by all appearances, is that Lambert will unseat the rest and raise himself to the highest post. Just now he allows Flitud to go before him and behaves in exactly the same way as Oliver did with Farfas, knowing well that he can easily achieve his intent, since he is a man of spirit and very crafty (huomo di spirito et assai scaltro) while Flitud is occupied with his devotions as an Anabaptist and of unexampled frigidity. The majority of the committee are dependents of Lambert, his partisans being 16 or 17 while the rest of the 23 are more attached to Flitud.
In Scotland it seems that Monch is not disposed to concur in the action of the army here and his letters give cause to believe that he will rather support parliament than otherwise. For this reason, in addition to the mission of Colonel Cobbet to inform the army there of what has happened some cavalry has been despatched in that direction this week under Colonel Talbot to oppose Monch and force him to accept the wishes of the army here. At the palace they announce that all will be arranged when Monch fully understands the reasons for these transactions, but outside it is rumoured that he is determined not to concur, that he has put under arrest the officers most suspected of favouring this party and has also secured Barvich, on the border of Scotland and England, but this needs further confirmation.
Overton, the governor of Hull, does not seem entirely satisfied either, but in the end he will yield to superior force. Some regiments in the outskirts have done so this week, which seemed inclined to support the parliamentary party against the army. To discredit the latter all the members of the late congress have gone to their homes in the provinces and are doing their utmost to persuade the people that if parliament is restored they will soon see such a government set up that all the nation will be contented and happy without taxes or other burdens. They make other liberal offers which can make no impression as it is the sword that rules and that will predominate until everything is differently arranged.
It has proved impossible to arrange a settlement of the differences of the two Northern kings, the Swede refusing absolutely to agree to what was arranged at the Hague between the mediators, in virtue of the alliance between the Dutch and the Dane. They are now busy at Amsterdam preparing a supply of food to provision Copenhagen. It seems they are urging this state to send the Dane 30 ships of war and 16 to 20 thousand measures of coal, of which there is abundance in this country, alleging that England is bound to succour Denmark by the agreement at the Hague which provides that the mediators shall assist whichever of the two kings accepts the adjustment against the other, who refuses. But now the government which made the treaty has fallen it is probable that the treaty itself will fall through and that little will be thought about it as they have other matters which touch them nearer to occupy their attention.
London, the 7th November, 1659.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Rettori.
Venetian
Archives.
87. To the Rectors of Padua.
Besides what has been written touching the earl of Arundel we have to inform you that we have received letters from our Resident in England accompanied by some from the parliament asking us not to permit him to go to another state, but to cause him to be guarded at Padua so that he may be subsequently sent to London with security. We desire you to find out what orders those who direct the earl's affairs at Padua may have received, and whether his mother and relations consent to his removal, sending us a full report.
Ayes, 102. Noes, 1. Neutral, 10.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8. Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
88. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 17th October, with information of the proposed decree of parliament upon credentials. If this is done he is to consult some of the other ministers, but without committing himself. In every other case it will be necessary by adroit conversation and taking information with the ministers of Denmark and Sweden, to find out their sentiments about this pretended treatment, but to take no steps meanwhile before receiving further commissions from the Senate.
The letter of parliament touching the earl of Arundel has arrived with his despatch and in due time it will be answered. He will keep the Senate informed of all the particulars of this affair and find out with discretion the sentiments of the earl's mother and his other relations.
Ayes, 104. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Nov. 13. Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Padova.
Venetian
Archives.
89. Bernardo Donato, Podesta of Padua, to the Doge and Senate.
In reply to your Serenity's instructions of the 8th inst. about the earl of Arundel, we find that the earl's mother and brothers are absolutely opposed to his going to London. Further, the earl of Northumberland, Lord Arbert, son of the marquis of Voster, Sir Onsloco, M.P. and Richard Norton, gentleman, trustees appointed by parliament for the earl of Arundel, write on the 17th ult. to the intendant of the earl's household that parliament, at the instance of malicious persons, having issued an order to fetch the earl, the council of state had directed that the estates of the Arundel family should be taken away and placed in the hands of persons chosen by themselves, and on representations from the earl's brothers, persons were deputed to hear what they had to say. The trustees also requested that no further proceedings should be taken until they were heard. By another letter of the 18th ult. the intendant is informed that parliament has written to your Serenity to learn the real condition of the earl, which indeed is not such as to admit of a journey to London without manifest danger to his life, as an incurable maniac, attested by the physicians who attend him. The earl's mother and brothers are absolutely opposed to his removal, because when he reached London they would take away the estates, under pretext of religion, and if he died they would take two thirds of the revenues because the mother and brothers are Catholics, that being the English law, so in all the letters the relatives say that they on no account wish to risk the earl and that they rely much upon the piety of the most serene republic. This is all we have been able to find out.
Padua, the 13th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
90. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The council general of officers having decided on a declaration or manifesto stating the motives which led to the present changes in England, a long printed document was issued last Saturday containing a quantity of reasons to justify to the world and the nation the proceedings of the army of which I have already reported the chief, and they are substantially the same, though differently expressed, as those used to justify the expulsion of parliament. With this declaration they annul all the acts and orders which were passed in parliament the three days before the dissolution upon the cashiering of the nine officers, the commissioners to control the army, the order not to pay customs, taxes or other impositions. The people are advised to ignore these acts as if they had never been passed, to prevent all the mischief that might be caused if they acted otherwise. They conclude with the statement that it is not the intention of the army to impose on this republic any military or arbitrary government but to form a free one satisfactory to all and to this end they had set up a committee of safety which is charged to prepare in a brief space a form of government which is better adapted to a free state or republic, without a single person, king or house of peers.
In pursuance of this decision the persons nominated to form this committee began their meetings a week ago. They drew up a proclamation for the continuance of the judges and of all other persons who administer public charges, which was published on Monday with the usual formalities and so everything goes on as before and will do until fresh decisions.
The committee has appointed some of its members to consider the question of government and they are now labouring at this but one cannot find out definitely what form will result. Some say that the 50 counties of the kingdom are to nominate 6 persons each from whom the council of officers will select three who will represent their county and thus compose a body of 150 persons to govern with the title of parliament or senate, from which will be taken the council of state and other magistracies required. Some talk of other forms but so far nothing definite can be asserted.
Monch in Scotland still refuses to concur with the military here in their proceedings. After cashiering certain officers from his army, replacing them by others and securing Barvich and other strong places in the country he has issued a proclamation that he means to support the parliament and endeavour to restore it by force, inviting the people to unite with him and vindicate the liberty of the nation and the privileges of parliament itself. He has accordingly gathered his army together, consisting of some 8000 effectives, horse and foot, and is marching on Newcastle in order to occupy it.
This sad news of which there was some whisper last week, has been very bitter to them. They at once devoted themselves to the necessary measures. The despatch of Colonels Cobbet and Talbot has been already reported, the former is said to be kept prisoner by Monch and the other cannot yet have reached the frontier. Besides this they have directed a large force from all parts of England which has been marching in that direction all the week. General Lambert is selected for the command and he started for the north yesterday. He is charged to try and persuade Monch to a reconciliation with the army here, to which end they have despatched to him two colonels and two ministers or preachers (fn. 2) to inform him of the state of affairs here and mediate with him to avoid the shedding of blood and prevent the evils that would result from another civil war. If they cannot succeed in this they will have to appeal to arms which will be the worse from being in the winter in the coldest and most rugged parts of the kingdom.
It is impossible to predict what will be the result of these fresh differences, but it must appear soon as if Monch persists in his opinion the quarrel cannot be settled without an appeal to force. Here they are much afraid that Monch will declare for the king, for if this happened it could not fail to be extremely advantageous for the Stuart interests because all his Majesty's supporters would join Monch and render his army formidable. Time will show; we are only at the beginning, but I will keep the Senate well informed.
Some of the lords suspected of complicity in the Chester affair and confined in the Tower were released by the committee yesterday. (fn. 3) In addition to a security of 10,000l. sterling each of them pledged his word not to attempt anything against this state.
After a long illness Mr. Brascio, formerly president of the court which condemned the late king to death, died on Monday, lamented by all those who govern at present.
Your Excellencies letters of the 4th and 11th October have reached me this week via France, with instructions about the audience I never had and which need no longer be discussed.
London, the 14th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
91. Alvise Molin, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
According to the news from Copenhagen an English galeot had arrived there with quite recent letters from parliament to its commissioners leaving it at their option to return home or to stay on, and directing them to urge the king of Sweden to accept the peace arranged for him with so much advantage and on the other hand to intimate that he must not expect any succour from England. The commissioners left with these instructions to see the king, together with the French ambassador Terlon. It is not believed there that any other English fleet will arrive this year, because the season is so far advanced, but this does not prevent the English commissioners from being held in great respect and practically the arbiters of the whole of this business.
Pressburg, the 14th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
92. Gio. Battista Nani, Venetian Ambassador extraordinary in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The king of England, perceiving that he had achieved nothing for his interests has been staying at Fontarabia in the deepest depression and undecided whether he should pursue a fruitless journey to Madrid; but he seemed inclined rather to return to Flanders to take advantage, from closer quarters, of the opportunities which the revolutions of England may provide for him.
Paris, the 18th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
93. Giacomo Querini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
King Charles of England has been given quarters at Fontarabia and in the king's name 12,000 doubles have been paid to him. Don Luis has employed all his arts to commit France against the government of England, but the Cardinal by introducing numerous difficulties studies to see that the Catholic is kept diverted by that most important war.
Madrid, the 19th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
94. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The committee of safety assembles regularly labouring at the question of the establishment of the government but it will find it difficult to provide a durable and safe form. No intimation has been given to the foreign ministers here, so they remain idle, taking no notice of the committee or anything else until they hear from the palace what decisions have been taken, but this can only be when they have decided what form the government shall take. What this will be God alone knows. Those who have it in hand are so perplexed and confused that they certainly do not know what they are to bring forth from their knowledge that nothing will be permanent until things return to their original state and these realms are governed by a monarch again. Among the numerous forms discussed they have also considered the possibility of recalling King Charles and restoring him to the throne under the conditions previously arranged with his father when he was a prisoner in the isle of Weit, but what they will decide is not yet known as everything proceeds with the most rigid secrecy. In the general opinion, no matter what direction they give the government, Charles will be in England before the spring and will finally enjoy what belongs to him legitimately. I have been told in all confidence by one in a position to know that Lambert and most of the superior officers of the army are disposed to give the king his own back again, and are secretly treating with him and trying to advance their fortunes knowing full well that he is bound to return and that without him these realms will never enjoy quiet, and that if they do not put the sceptre in his hands it will be restored to him by foreign forces, of which these people have an unspeakable dread. So they will prefer, thereby serving their own interests, and under the sting of conscience, to take a step which they may consider generous and magnanimous but which will only be just and reasonable, rather than wait to be compelled by force and arms which would involve no little shedding of blood. Time will show but all good men will pray the Almighty for the realisation of these things.
The army under Lambert sent against Monch is marching north with all the speed that the present very cold weather allows. Monch has imprisoned Colonel Cobbet who was sent to him and has sent all the officers dismissed from his army to some remote island, (fn. 4) so he means to persist in his decision to support parliament against the action of the army here. Since yesterday evening however they state that Monch seems inclined for an adjustment. They have issued some letters to General Flitud from the commissioners sent to Scotland to mediate reporting the inclination of that general to listen to the proposals they have to make and that he has nominated three officers of his army to come to London to negotiate a settlement. (fn. 5) The commissioners state that they have Monch's word that his forces shall not advance further, and they ask that Flitud shall give similar orders to the English ones. A letter from Monch to Flitud has also been printed in which he confirms the appointment of the three to negotiate, but says nothing about abandoning his intention to support parliament, indeed he seems to insist on vindicating its authority. We shall soon see the result of the negotiations conducted during this armistice, and I will duly make report to the Senate.
The common council of the city of London is divided upon the present situation of the country, part being for the army and part desiring the re-establishment of the parliament. Those who govern are very uneasy on this account and the army has for this reason posted guards of infantry at the gates of London and sent some companies of horse and foot into the city. Flitud, Desbero and other officers went recently to the common council and represented the danger to the nation from these intestine discords and from the fear of invasion, urging them to unity among themselves and the most friendly relations with the army to prevent all the ills that may befall. The answer dealt only in generalities with a promise to defend the city well, and so they took leave of the common council, which did not give them all the satisfaction they hoped for on that occasion.
To prevent the collecting of troops by any one soever a proclamation has recently been issued by the committee of safety that any one who ventures to collect soldiers without precise orders from that committee or Flitud will be reputed a disturber of the public peace and an enemy of the republic and dealt with as such. This step is due to the numerous meetings frequented by certain members of the dissolved parliament at which they discuss how to raise forces to resist this army. Following this order commissions have been issued this week by the committee for levying an infantry regiment of volunteers to consist of 1000 effectives. They also propose to raise some cavalry. With these forces, which can be assembled in a moment and those already in existence they expect to constitute a firm defence enabling them to resist any shock which may threaten to disturb the peace and liberty of this republic.
London, the 21st November, 1659.
[Italian: the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
95. Francesco Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Cardinal is at Dax to drink the waters, with a report that he is to confer there with the king of England and with Lord Germen and the Abbot of Montegu, favourites of the queen of England, sent thither with speed to treat upon the serious interests of King Charles, her son. But apparently this cannot stand as it is without confirmation, and does not agree with the news received the day before yesterday that the Cardinal has changed his mind and is going to Court this evening.
Toulouse, the 22nd November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
96. Gio. Battista Nani, Venetian Ambassador extraordinary in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ambassador Locart has thrown himself with great diligence into the government of Dunkirk in the crisis of the present revolution of the kingdom and of the peace between the crowns. It is believed that he will want to make his fortune by offering the place for sale, and at the same time he is so far won over by the Cardinal that he will not dispose of it except in a way satisfactory to this crown. He has said that he is sure to have always a good garrison of 4000 soldiers there, and that if the sea is kept open there is little fear of the Spaniards re-entering the places which France renders to him in those parts.
Paris, the 25th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
97. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The three commissioners of General Monch arrived in London from Scotland on Saturday evening to negotiate a settlement of the differences between his army and the English one. They were taken at once to the house of Lieutenant General Flitud with whom they had long conferences that same night privately, always expressing their desire for a friendly adjustment to avoid bloodshed and prevent other terrible consequences that a new civil war would involve. Three officers of the army were then nominated by this side to treat with these commissioners, and they all entered on their negotiations on Monday morning. After three hours the conference ended, the accommodation being arranged. This was ratified by the council general of officers and signed by both parties on Wednesday night, when it was immediately sent to General Monch and a copy to Lambert. Thus in a moment and without difficulty peace has been made between the armies which at first seemed most difficult and all but impossible. The terms as made public so far are as follows, nothing being said about the dissolved parliament which is buried in silence, the army of England having prevailed on this point:
That both sides renounce the pretended title of Charles Stuart and all others of his family.
That the government of these nations shall be as a free state or republic, without king, a single person or house of Lords.
That the universities shall be reformed and preserved.
That all officers, soldiers and others of both sides shall be pardoned for all that has happened in the late differences and everything completely forgotten.
That the officers imprisoned in Scotland shall be released immediately.
That the armies of both sides shall immediately withdraw and be distributed in quarters considered best for the security of the republic against the common enemy.
In addition to these articles they also discussed the civil government of these nations and something was settled between the commissioners, but so muddled that no one can understand it and consequently no one would venture to apply it. They decided that a committee of 19 persons shall be set up, five for England and five for Scotland who shall not be members of the army, and three each for England, Scotland and Ireland who shall be, except one for Ireland of the three; they also nominate the persons who are all experienced and well versed in present affairs. These nineteen or nine of them are to meet to determine the qualifications of those who are to sit in the coming parliaments or assemblies of the people. Two major officers of each regiment of the three nations, an officer of each garrison and ten naval officers are to meet together on the 6th December next, English style, as a general council, to advise and discuss the model or form of the civil government to be prepared, which will then be presented to the assembly. Seven each from the armies of England and Scotland are to meet on the 1st December, old style, at Newcastle to decide about the officers who were recently dismissed, or who have laid down their commissions here and in Scotland, who are to be selected by Lambert and Monch for the purpose.
Such are the events in this distracted kingdom which will certainly never return to order until the wheel returns to its original place, otherwise this oppressed people will never enjoy quiet or repose, being reduced to misery by the interruption of trade and by the numerous calamities which surround it. It is still the general opinion here that in a brief space, in one way or another what I have intimated before must happen.
The committee of safety is labouring with extraordinary vigilance at the question of government, but what will happen cannot be known until the meeting of the council general arranged for the 6th prox. by the commissioners of Scotland and England.
Meanwhile in the unspeakable scarcity of money they do not know which way to turn to get together any amount of it. The country will not pay any more either taxes or contributions and cannot be compelled without parliament unless they use force, which would be too dangerous, and would undoubtedly cause a general rising at this time. The city of London to which they applied for a loan or at least to suggest some means of raising money, refused absolutely saying they were so weary and disgusted with these forms of government that it is impossible to raise a farthing. This distresses the rulers exceedingly, as may be supposed, as lacking money they lack everything. They are plotting and scheming how they can raise some amount and they think of trying whether they can find a thousand of the richest merchants ready to accommodate them with 100l. sterling each. But this is considered very difficult if not impossible, but the Senate will comprehend how great is the penury when they are reduced to beg 100l. from one and another.
In addition to the regiment of foot and horse to be raised in this city they have decided to raise others in most of the counties of 1000 effectives each. This is to put them in a position to preserve themselves against the various influences which are about (dagli influssi che soprastano) of which they are in great dread, but without money it is impossible for this to take effect; the old regiments grumble too much for lack of pay, threatening to pillage and commit other outrages, without getting more troops together which would only add to the grumbling and ill humour and lead to something deplorable.
Governor Locart has returned to Dunkirk from the French Court and is expected in London at any moment. His coming will deserve attention and I will do my utmost to find out what he brings, sending full particulars to the Senate.
London, the 28th November, 1659.
[Italian.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
98. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his despatches. Satisfaction at his having kept back the letters of credence to parliament, avoiding this audience which they wished to give him with an unusual form and prejudicial to the most serene republic.
Owing to what has happened the request about the earl of Arundel has fallen through, and so the family will receive no prejudice, deserving as it is and much beloved by the republic for the friendly disposition it has always shown to our ministers, as you intimate.
Ayes, 127. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
99. Francesco Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The king of England of a certainty has not seen the Cardinal at Dax or anywhere else; the latter always evaded a meeting in view of the good understanding which is maintained with England, so that up to the present one does not perceive the slightest imaginable disposition to change. The king departed and proceeded incognito to Paris, where he saw his mother and conferred with her, going on from there to Brussels. The envoys of the queen of England, Germen and Montegu, negotiated with the Cardinal at Dax, but without any profit or resolution, the Cardinal insisting on the principles mentioned before and he told them openly that in the present state of affairs he could do nothing for the advantage of King Charles.
Toulouse, the 29th November, 1659.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Lord Culpepper and Mr. Berkeley went after the king to Bordeaux. Clarendon: State Papers Vol. iii., page 573.
2 General Whalley and Col. Goff, with Mr. Caryl and Mr. Barker, ministers. They started for Scotland on 1–11 November. Mercurius Politicus Oct. 27–Nov. 3.
3 The Committee of safety on 2 Nov., o.s., ordered the release of the earl of Northampton, Lord Falkland, Lord Castleton, Lord Herbert son of the earl of Worcester, Lord Charles Howard and Lord Bellasis. Mercurius Politicus Oct. 27–Nov. 3.
4 Monk sent the officers in custody at Tantallon castle to Bass island. Mercurius Politicus Nov. 3–10.
5 Col. Wilkes, Lieut. Col. Clobery and Major Knight. Mercurius Politicus Nov. 3–10. They arrived in London on 22 November. Bordeaux to Mazarin, 24 Nov. 1659. P.R.O. Paris Transcripts.