Venice
August 1660

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1931

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178-189

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'Venice: August 1660', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 32: 1659-1661 (1931), pp. 178-189. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90059 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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August 1660

Aug. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
190. Gio. Battista Nani and Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassadors in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The king gave audience yesterday to Lord Craff. It was complimentary in character and the ambassador explained that the king's resentment was solely with Bordeaux personally and he professed the utmost esteem for the king. His Majesty declared himself perfectly satisfied. So by these exchanges friendly relations are set on foot between the two crowns.
They are anxious here for the queen of England to hasten to England, in the belief that it will do a great deal to make things smooth and to mitigate the aversion which the king there manifests very plainly towards this crown.
It is certain that King Charles has introduced into Dunkirk a governor in whom he can confide; and those troops who served under his flag while he was staying in Flanders are Spanish in sympathy. Moreover that garrison has renounced the contributions which it used to exact from the territories subject to Spain.
Paris, the 3rd August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
191. Giacomo Quirini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Sir [Henry] Benet will present letters of the king of England which distinguish him with the title of resident. He claims to be different from the other ministers in the ceremony of his audience and I fancy his claim will be allowed. In the mean time he has long and frequent sittings with Don Luis, orders being sent in the name of his king for the ports of Spain and Italy, enjoining that nation to desist from all acts of hostility against the Spaniards, so that everything is progressing towards reunion and a sincere friendship between the two countries.
Instructions have been sent to the Prince de Ligni not to leave London before the arrival of the Ambassador Batteville.
Madrid, the 4th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
192. To the Resident in England.
The Senate notes the decision to send regiments to Dunkirk and the steps taken to hold the place. He is to be on the watch for any negotiations for its restitution. The opposition of the Turkey Company may stop the earl of Winchelsea from going to the Porte. He is to keep himself well informed and to find out if there is anything fresh about the French ambassador leaving that Court. It is necessary to discover what pay the colonel expects, and to report. He is to try to find out if the king has informed the powers of his return to the possession of his realms, advising the Senate of all the particulars he picks up on this subject.
Ayes, 119. Noes, 3. Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Aug. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
193. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
This week parliament has devoted its attention to a bill for the continuation of the customs and other extraordinary impositions on all imports and exports. The vote on the customs expired last Tuesday by virtue of a decision of this parliament at the beginning of the session, so they have worked hard in order not to lose the benefit afforded by the duties and the result is expected soon. It is expected that the export duties on many things will be reduced, and the import duties increased, especially on wine, of which they consume an incredible amount, which all comes from France, Spain and Naples (dal Regno).
The act of indemnity has passed the lower house and gone recently to the peers, who are discussing it very minutely. Considering the number 20 excepted in it too small they have voted that all who pronounced sentence of death against the king, 72 in all, shall be excluded from the benefit and lose their property, and instead of many deaths their posterity will have to suffer for the monstrous crime. That house is now engaged in excepting many others who were judges and condemned to death many private individuals for nothing but being loyal to their lawful prince. This act also is expected in a few days to the universal consolation of the people who are longing for it.
Every day sees the arrest of some fresh person found to have evil intentions against the present government and in this way they prevent all manner of disturbance that might be contrived against the quiet which these realms now enjoy through the restoration of their sovereign, a blessing for which all good men daily thank God. In Scotland also they have arrested some who contemplated making trouble, and so they cut at the root of every poisonous herb before it can spread.
Since his first audience the Portuguese ambassador has had no other. Before taking further steps he is apparently waiting for the return of his secretary, who was sent to Lisbon with the conclusion of the treaties arranged with the late council of state and he will treat in accordance with the instructions that are brought to him. But the imminent arrival of the ambassador extraordinary of the Catholic may cut the thread of all his hopes.
Although everyone considers peace with Spain inevitable when the ministers of that king arrive who are expected, with Dunkirk left in English hands, all are curious to see what will happen with France, as a rupture between these two countries, which have always been rivals, seems more and more likely, as emphasised by various things that have happened. I am keeping my eyes open and will keep the Senate well informed.
With reference to the marriage proposal of the envoy of Brandenburg, I find that he only made the suggestion, but seeing that they did not listen he let the matter drop without going any further; the rest was merely compliments and congratulations.
The merchants of the Turkey Company never answered the king's letter about the Constantinople embassy, but on Monday they went to him and asked him to leave the minister now at the Porte as a sudden change would injure the Company. The king replied that he was resolved to recall the one now at Constantinople, being determined not to leave him there, and he had already told the Company his will about the successor. So the earl is safe to go and says it will be soon. He is getting his things ready. He came again to see me yesterday to offer his services declaring that this was the chief reason why he desired the post. I assured him of the public appreciation and await instructions in the matter.
London, the 6th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
194. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Secretary at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
Reports have arrived here recently of the return of the son of the late king of England and of his entry into London, amid general satisfaction. The French ambassador informed me that he had heard nothing from the English ambassador. I decided to send Padavin to ask if a ship were leaving so that I might have my despatch ready in time. The next day his Excellency sent his dragoman Draperis to inform me of the happy event, as it would be for the most serene republic also, since it meant the addition of a sincere friend and perchance not an unfruitful one, such were his own words. I replied suitably referring to the ancient friendship between the republic and his Britannic Majesty, enlarging in praise of the present king.
The next day I sent Padavin, and similar compliments were exchanged. He only added that the smiling aspect of affairs which the Turks thought they saw for their interest from the parliament of England was all changed as that crown will now be all for the most serene republic; and although the Grand Vizier is somewhat angered with him, matters will adjust themselves in an agreeable fashion if they wish it.
I was astonished at his having let out so much, since the negotiations for an alliance with England were conducted with profound secrecy; but as the business has utterly fallen through and everything already disclosed, the ambassador may have thought this hint apposite as an assurance of his total aversion to conclude anything. He went on to speak of the insatiable pretensions and vast ambitions of the Vizier.

Pera of Constantinople, the 10th August, 1660.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Aug. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
195. Gio. Battista Nani, and Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassadors in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Lord Germen has arrived from London and brings word to the queen of England of her reinstatement in the goods and revenues which she originally enjoyed. He is also treating with her about her return to the country. He is charged to pay respects to their Majesties here. This has also been done by a gentleman of the duke of York, (fn. 1) who has arrived but has not yet assumed the title of ambassador. He is to return to London very shortly and will then come back as ambassador extraordinary for compliments, and will then remain on at Court as ordinary.
Paris, the 10th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
196. Giacomo Quirini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Exceptional honours paid to the English resident at his first audience. In the matter of negotiations he makes no difficulty about the restoration of Dunkirk and Jamaica, it being recognised that the acquisition was by usurpation and an act of tyranny and that the peace between the two countries was broken merely by the caprice and in the interest of the Protector Cromwell. Extraordinary hopes are built upon this foundation. Orders have been sent to Caracena to be open in his relations with the English ministers since it is recognised that there is a definite need to renew the ancient peace, which has suffered injury in many ways from the Dutch in the commerce of the Indies.
Madrid, the 11th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
197. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Your Serenity's despatches of the 10th July reached me on Monday by the ordinary of France with the names of the ambassadors extraordinary and instructions to inform the king; the post of Flanders came on Wednesday with those of the 23rd with letters of credence for the queen mother and the dukes of York and Gloucester. In accordance with these instructions I informed his Majesty on Tuesday of the selection of Angelo Correr and Michiel Morosini, two distinguished and experienced men, to show the Senate's regard. The king expressed his pleasure, said the cordial feelings were returned and was gratified by the selection made. He told me he well remembered Corraro when he was ambassador in ordinary here in his father's time, over 20 years ago. (fn. 2) The credentials for the dukes I presented yesterday, speaking as instructed; the others for the queen I am keeping by me until she arrives. The dukes were delighted and received me personally with the greatest cordiality. When I told them about the ambassadors they were very pleased and the duke of York spoke highly of Morosini saying he had known him at the French Court when he was ambassador there for the republic. (fn. 3)
The day before yesterday I was at the palace and stood near the king when I saw the ceremony of touching for the scrofula. He went through this with exemplary patience, touching over 200 and giving each one a piece of gold, according to custom. This done his Majesty rose and began to talk to me and so continued with great geniality, passing through the palace to a gallery overlooking the river, keeping me in conversation always at his side. He asked me what news I had of the affairs of Candia and the army, so I seized the opportunity to tell him of the precarious state of that kingdom and the determination of your Excellencies to defend it and tactfully intimated the great weakness of the state, trying to make an impression on his Majesty to produce some good result. I was unable to give him any news as I am completely in the dark and never hear any except what comes by the gazettes which is untrustworthy, so it would not be amiss to send me some sheets of advices from time to time which would enable me to speak with authority.
The king told me he was most sorry for the condition of the Senate; it was a shame to Christian princes to allow this poor republic to perish so miserably; he hoped soon to be in a position to show his sentiments effectively; he would always be ready to do so when God provided the means. Such were the king's very words, for which I thanked him most cordially in your Serenity's name, telling him that the Senate felt confident of receiving from him assistance such as would console and relieve all Christendom. But glad as I am to find his Majesty so well disposed I am saddened by my fear that when it comes to action the interests of the merchants will prevail. Your Excellencies will consider the matter and give me suitable instructions.
London, the 13th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
198. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king, impatient for the passing and announcement of the Bill of Amnesty went in person to the House of Peers a week ago to-day, and in a long and learned speech repeated his most lively instances for the speedy despatch of this Act. He pointed out that the House of Commons had taken too long over it and so it was necessary that the Lords should not indulge in such tedious procrastination. He thanked them for making an exception of the regicides and begged them to lay aside every other kind of animosity. He conjured them to settle it promptly, adducing many urgent reasons for despatch. In consequence of these strong representations of his Majesty the Upper House spent all last week over the Bill, excepting new persons and making several amendments, but it does not yet seem to be ready for the king's assent. All men are hanging upon its appearance and they hope to have this satisfaction soon.
On the Saturday following the king went again to parliament and there gave his assent to four bills, two dealing with the customs and excise, or extraordinary charge upon all goods entering or leaving the realm; the third reinstating a magistracy which existed under the past kings and was abolished by the rebel Oliver (fn. 4) ; and the fourth to restore the marquis of Ormond to all the honours, lands and possessions in Ireland as he enjoyed them on the 23rd October, 1641, before he was despoiled by the voracity and greed of the rebels.
The ambassador of Portugal had a private audience of the king on Monday; although his secret is not definitely known it is conjectured that he asked for help and for the confirmation of the treaties concluded here with the Council of State. He declares that he is very hopeful, saying that he obtained many fair promises from his Majesty; but all men believe it an invention, and the envoy of Spain is in no wise disturbed. He told me himself that he had such definite assurances from the king that he would have no dealings with Portugal that could inflict the least harm on the Catholic crown, that he did not care if the other had audience every day. There really seems to be an excellent disposition both here and in Spain for an adjustment, and we hear that an armistice between the two nations has already been announced at Madrid whence the Court seems to have sent orders to all the ports of Spain not to molest the English at sea or elsewhere, but to treat them kindly and abstain from all acts of hostility. Meanwhile the ambassadors extraordinary and ordinary are coming bringing instructions, so the envoy declares, which leave no doubt about a good peace between these two powers.
We hear that Lord Craff has been admitted to audience of the Most Christian and offered apologies for the king here for the treatment of Bordoes, late ambassador here, so the ill feeling between the two Courts seems to be mitigated and no doubt good relations will soon be re-established.
Old Galileo here desiring nothing but to see his only son ransomed from the Turks and to receive the money due to him for his son's services in the fleet, and finding that nothing came of the numerous promises given him by the Senate, has petitioned the king and his privy council, setting forth the affair and imploring protection. His Majesty and the Council have decided to take the matter up and accordingly Sir Brun, one of the secretaries of the palace, has been to this house to-day and shown me the enclosed order of the Council, urging me strongly to recommend the case to the Senate for the most speedy despatch, telling me that the king is deeply concerned and very anxious that the poor old man shall receive satisfaction. I told him of what the Senate has done for the speedy payment of this debt and the efforts of the Captain General at Sea for the sons's ransom, saying what more I could to impress him with the excellent intentions of your Serenity towards the whole nation as well as this family.
I may add that Galileo has obtained his Majesty's permission to get Brun to charge John Druynesteyn, merchant at Venice, to take up the matter for Galileo with your Serenity and to report what success he has. These orders are going to-day; I have seen the secretary's letter; and as his Majesty shows so much anxiety for the relief of this family your Excellencies cannot do wrong if you shut the old man's mouth by the prompt payment of his debts, which will please the king greatly. I refer all to the wisdom of the Senate. Galileo has appointed Thomas Massey, captain of the ship Nortomberland his agent to treat for his son's ransom with the Captain General, and has asked me to write to his Excellency in support.
London, the 13th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.199. At Whitehall, the 25th July, 1660.
The petition of Thomas Galilee having been read this day, resolved that one of the Council's secretaries shall go to the Resident of Venice and strongly recommend the case, urging him to write to his superiors.
Edward Walker, Secretary.
[Italian from the English.]
Aug. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
200. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Parliament moves so slowly that it affords no material for comment. Both Houses continue to dispute over the Bill of Indemnity and over a poll tax they think of imposing, and these disputes have prevented the decision of any other business. The Privy Council too is only dealing with internal affairs of no consequence, in listening to numerous grievances of the people, and in receiving daily congratulations from the more remote provinces and islands on his Majesty's happy restoration, and asking pardon for obeying the late governments, which is readily granted, so great is the king's clemency and mercy.
In the land forces and county militias constant changes are made, in replacing officers and cashiering soldiers who do not seem entirely well affected so these forces are placed in loyal and faithful hands in Scotland and Ireland as well as in England, complete quiet reigning in all 3 kingdoms, in their satisfaction at his Majesty's return, for which they have expressed their joy and consolation to the king. To restore their ancient rights it is proposed to re-establish shortly in each country its national parliament, and Lord Robert is already nominated as viceroy in Ireland, a man of integrity and wide experience, whose employment is expected to prove very advantageous to the crown.
The ambassador of Portugal continues to treat and urges that England shall not abandon his master's cause against the Spaniards. He makes liberal offers, but I cannot find what they amount to. What the result may be remains unknown but his hopes are matched by the confidence shown by the partisans of the Catholic that his Majesty will never support the interests of Braganza. We shall soon see, and I will keep my eyes open and report to the Senate.
The Prince de Ligne, who is preparing his equipage in France to come here as ambassador extraordinary of the Catholic, is said to have received ample instructions from Madrid for treating for peace with England. There is no longer any doubt of this, especially if nothing is said about Dunkirk, as some assert. We hear of some one being sent from France to congratulate his Majesty on his happy return and act as precursor to a state embassy, though we have not yet heard of any one being appointed. Thus all the differences which seemed to have arisen between the two crowns are settled and nothing more is said about them here.
The courier of Paris has brought your Serenity's missives of the 17th July with instructions to find out about the report from Constantinople that the English are treating for an offensive and defensive alliance with the Turk. I have made careful enquiries among those who would know of any such thing, if it existed, especially among the merchants, and I can find no indication of anything of the sort. I will continue to prosecute my enquiries with caution and advise the Senate, as well as of any decision about Dunkirk, on which I am keeping an eye.
With regard to Constantinople it is not impossible that something was on foot in the time of confusion under the late violent governments, when they were ready to make friends wherever they thought it most advantageous, without regard for religion or the interests of Christendom, possibly started by Bendis, English ambassador at the Porte; but it is unlikely that anything so absurd should happen now. In view of the upright intentions of the king there is every reason for believing that his Majesty would disapprove of any transaction of such character.
I gather that a certain Thomas Azarli, who appears to have claims to a sum of money on the caisse of Zante and Cephalonia in the right of one Andrew Brumhal, deceased, has applied to the king for a letter to your Serenity requesting that he may have satisfaction. If he gets this I fancy he will have it presented to your Excellencies at Venice.
London, the 20th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
201. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 30th July. His Majesty's suggestion of a collection throughout the kingdom with the certainty of obtaining a quantity of money is recognised as evidence of his zeal and application. For the moment, however, the Senate cannot say anything definite, as the question calls for some consideration. He will report if there are good grounds for expecting success in this business, with all possible particulars, but acting as if for himself and with the necessary reserve, without committing the state in any way.
Ayes, 140. Noes, 1. Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
202. Giacomo Quirini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
From the approaching reconciliation with the English the Spaniards are proceeding to confidence, as they wish to introduce into their dealings a mutual assistance of armed ships against the kingdom of Portugal; but the resident of England has replied that first of all it would be desirable to renew the treaty of peace of 1656 between this Court and the king his master, and then, by offering money, the Catholic will easily receive every conceivable satisfaction.
An English merchant passing through the Court has obtained from the king the restitution of two ships taken by the Majorcans, (fn. 5) so that the privateer captains are arrested at Majorca, and the ships sailed away towards Majorca itself.
Madrid, the 21st August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
203. Giacomo Quirini, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Two English frigates recently arrived at San Sebastian for the Baron di Batteville. Being anxious to reach London before the Prince de Ligni, he intends to travel via France, and will only send his baggage and some of his household by sea. They bring heavy news of the establishment of the Portuguese ambassador in London and his obtaining audience through a gift of 50,000 reals. They feel the news terribly here, seeing the crown committed, with three ministers in England, while they fear to see that entire confidence which they expected and hoped from the king is to be shared between Castile and Portugal. The consideration that most disturbs the minds of their lordships here is that they cannot upset with gold what Braganza is contriving with an abundance of gold, and if he continues to tickle the Northerners by methods so potent there is no doubt whatever that he will obtain from those realms, I will not say assistance, but every imaginable facility for defending himself stoutly.
Madrid, the 25th August, 1660.
[Italian.]
Aug. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
204. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
As a result of the many speeches of the king in parliament and of several messages sent by him to both Houses for the more speedy despatch of the Bill of Indemnity, the House of Lords, desiring to gratify his Majesty, has quickened its pace over the Bill and after completing it has just sent it back to the Commons for the acceptance of its amendments and alterations. But this does not suffice for its publication, so universally desired, as fresh discussions have started over the additions made by the peers and serve to delay further a work of such consequence.
Three days ago parliament asked for a loan of 100,000l. sterling from the city of London. While expressing a readiness to oblige the city seems to object and find it impossible before the act of oblivion is quite definite, as no one will part with his money before he sees how he stands there. As the need for money is urgent and they must get a considerable sum advanced by the city, this will serve to hurry on the amnesty. When the act is completed and London has advanced its loan they reckon to pay the army what remains due to it and to disband some regiments. It is thought that the army may be reduced by 10,000 effectives, all good veteran troops.
Foreseeing this and desiring employment some officers have recently approached me; as if the most serene republic wants troops this will be an excellent opportunity for getting as many as she requires, and they would be glad to serve her in the war with the Ottoman, for which his Majesty's consent can easily be obtained. Being without authority I merely thanked them and refer to the Senate for instructions. The men would be excellent, but the lack of money may stand in the way, as it is bound to be very costly. If the officers would undertake to bring the men at their own cost, i.e. with money paid to them instead of to the soldiers to be spent in drink and trifles, without your Excellencies making any outlay at embarcation except a capitation grant, until all engagements are fulfilled, it would be a great advantage for the state.
The envoy extraordinary of Sweden, who has lived a long time at this Court only presented fresh letters of credence to the king on Tuesday, when his Majesty received him with the usual formalities. The ambassador extraordinary of Denmark, expected at Court for so many weeks, has at last reached London. (fn. 6) He maintains incognito, but it is believed that he will soon make his public entry.
I have been trying hard to find traces of the Constantinople affair, but have discovered nothing and from the sentiments generally expressed it seems impossible that there has ever been any idea of an alliance between the English and Turks. I will however continue my enquiries and report what I learn.
Two more ducal packets have reached me since via Flanders, which is much shorter and quicker than by France, the first a week ago of the 30th July, and the other of the 6th inst., the day before yesterday. In accordance with the instructions I spoke to the king at once on Saturday, asking him to except from the proclamation all his subjects serving the republic in the present war with the Turk. His Majesty agreed that the request was most just, he would do so willingly; the proclamation was not intended to recall the English in the pay of your Serenity, but the many serving Sweden, who cruise about the ocean with commissions of that king, plundering the friends of this crown. He would give the necessary orders in the matter. I spoke subsequently to the secretary of state, but since Tuesday he has been kept in bed by the gout and does nothing. I keep on friendly terms with the earl of Winchelsea, who is preparing for the embassy to Constantinople and thinks of starting in a few days. He seems very devoted to the public interests and I do not doubt that he will act vigorously for them whenever it is necessary.
With regard to Dunkirk and the departure from this Court of the French ambassador, nothing more is said, the ill feeling between France and England being assuaged, and nothing definite can be stated about the town before the Spanish ambassador arrives.
As instructed I have asked Col. la Coste, who offered his services to your Serenity, what monthly salary he wants. He only asks what you give a colonel or lieutenant general of artillery, as shown by the enclosed sheet. He asks for a categorical reply and a speedy decision.
I am making enquiries whether the king informed the princes of his return to these realms, but I do not find that he has done so except to the king of Spain, to whom he expresses special obligations. I do not think these formalities will be observed, since his Majesty has not now ascended the throne, but has had it for 12 years, though kept out of it during the late conflagration.
I presented the letters of your Excellencies to the dukes of York and Gloucester, who recently sent their answers here by their secretaries, to be forwarded to your Serenity. They intimated that the Senate gave them the title “Highness” without the “Royal” due to the king's brothers. I noticed the replies were in French and with titles unsuitable for the republic. I told the secretaries who replied that it was a very long time since the king of England had brothers and they did not know what titles to give to foreign princes. When out of the kingdom they had always written to everyone in French and used the titles employed by the dukes of Orleans and Anjou in France, and they will continue to do so.
In accordance with the instructions of the 19th June I spoke to the king about the insolence of the English ships off Zante upon which I had been unable to get a favourable reply from the President of the Council. His Majesty disapproved of the action and promised me strong orders to prevent it in the future, but I was never able to get his commissions carried out by the secretariat. Instead of forwarding his Majesty's orders, the secretary told me last week that this was a matter that concerned the duke of York as Lord High Admiral of England. I gave the duke an account of the affair and he also disapproved strongly, telling me that he would issue the necessary instructions. I have thus obtained the enclosed order, laying special stress on the question of health and directing the ships of this nation to do nothing prejudicial to the most serene republic. These ships may now be coming home, but your Excellencies can keep the order to use when required, and it will serve for any craft in the Mediterranean which proves troublesome. His Highness observed to me that if water or other provision was needed he had no doubt the republic would allow it freely, to which I agreed.
London, the 27th August, 1660.
Postscript: Count Dillon, an Irish Catholic, has just been to see me. He wishes his eldest son Charles to serve your Excellencies and offers a regiment of 800 effectives, now on foot, of which he can dispose at will. I enclose his offer for the Senate's consideration. Another Colonel of the same family offers to go to Venice at his own cost to make proposals to your Serenity.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.205. James duke of York etc. to the officers and mariners of his Majesty's ships employed in the Mediterranean.
Owing to complaints from the Venetian Resident of neglect to observe the regulations of the Health Magistracy, order to do nothing, on arriving at a Venetian Island or port, to the prejudice of the republic, but to conform to the laws and customs of the place in the assurance that water and other requirements will not be denied.
Dated at Whitehall, the 15/25 August, 1660.
By command of His Royal Highness, William Coventrye.
[Italian from the English.]
Aug. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
206. Gio. Battista Nani, and Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassadors in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Two persons are selected by the Court here to go and congratulate the king of England are about to start. One is Ruvigni, to offer congratulations on behalf of the king. He is expected to be welcome as a Huguenot, and may stay on as ambassador. The other is Vagliac, (fn. 7) who goes in the name of Monsieur and who will try to get something done to forward his marriage with the Princess of England.
Paris, the 31st August, 1660.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Henry Jermyn, nephew of the earl of St. Albans. He had audience of their Majesties at Paris on 2–12 August. Mercurius Publicus Aug. 9–16.
2 He was ambassador in England from October 1634 to July 1638.
3 Ambassador at Paris from 1648 to 1652.
4 Act for Nominating Commissioners of Sewers, 12 Chas. II, cap. vi. Statutes at Large, Vol. v. p. 206. Journals of the House of Lords, Vol. xi, p. 110.
5 The Reformation and Free Trade, belonging to the Levant Co. John Vassal acted for the Company. S.P. For. Arch. (Levant Co. Court Bk.) Vol. 151, f. 385. S.P. For. Spain Vol. 44, letters of 18 July.
6 Frederick van Alefelt. He arrived in London on Thursday, 23 August, o.s., according to the Parliamentary Intelligencer (Aug. 20–27).
7 Jacques d'Aubusson, seigneur de Villac.