Venice
June 1661

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1931

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295-309

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'Venice: June 1661', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 32: 1659-1661 (1931), pp. 295-309. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90069 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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June 1661

June 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
353. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I ask the indulgence of the Senate for not writing last week owing to the absence of material through the absence of the Court, which for several days has been diverting itself at Hampton Court, and by a serious disorder caused by the inclemency of the weather, which has been exceptionally unsettled and disagreeable this year. I resume now that I am somewhat better, though still unable to leave the house. Owing to the reasons aforesaid I have been unable to fulfil the instructions contained in several ducali, but will take the first opportunity to do so.
After the announcement of the Portuguese marriage the Ambassador Batteville dismantled his house and announced that he was going because he had nothing more to do, and attended to the adjustment of his private affairs. But he knows that this marriage has been concluded (although many of those most conversant with the secrets of the Court are doubtful about it, notwithstanding what has happened and the distribution of all the appointments depending on the future queen) solely by the caprice of the chancellor who, won over by the Portuguese, has thought to avenge himself in this way for many offences which he pretends he has received from the Spaniards when he was at Madrid in the king's name, and later in Flanders when his Majesty, abandoned by all, took refuge under the shadow of the Catholic. At that time it appears that the Spaniards tried to have him put out of the royal Council because they found him disaffected and not favourable to their affairs. He knows that it is far from being approved by the people; some and especially the merchants, who will suffer most from the rupture with Spain, blame him openly, considering the mischief that may result to this country if they come to fresh hostilities, interrupting the trade which so greatly enriches England, which needs it more than the states of the Catholic which can maintain themselves without the commerce of this kingdom from which they do not derive great profit. Reflecting that, notwithstanding all that has passed, these objections of the people to the marriage may produce some good for his interests Batteville has decided to suspend his departure and to wait and see what advantage he can gather for his master.
In the mean time he has never been to Court or to see any of the ministers, but withdrawn to his house has attended solely to arranging his private affairs for his departure. This behaviour with the announcement of his going and the dismantling of the palace, which could only indicate offence and presage hostility, has so disturbed the ministers, who fully understand what loss for England a rupture with the Catholic will mean, and so terrified them that it appears that those who had the largest share in the late business now wish that they had never touched it and that it had not gone so far. So being uneasy at Court about the proceedings of Batteville, who is prudent, determined and unyielding, they have been considering how to prevent his going; but seeing that this could not be done without offence to representation, they have adroitly intimated to him, by a third party, that his departure would displease the king, that England does not intend to infringe in any way the friendship with his master, and the like, indicating a friendly disposition.
Taking exception to the ambassador not asking for audience they have taken soundings to know if he would go if he were summoned by the king to which he would make no difficulty; but as this seemed to be going too far they would like to see the ambassador do it, but he remains determined never to agree to it, as before. Being most anxious to introduce new business with him the king finally sent one of the secretaries of state to him to suggest that he should go to see his Majesty, but he answered that he had nothing to say or propose to the king and did not know on what grounds he could ask for audience. All his affairs were settled and when he was ready to leave he would ask for it to take congé. He was the king's servant and so forth. If they had anything to say to him he was ready to listen and report everything to his master. He had spoken, treated and given memorials upon several affairs and they had never replied to him upon one, so perceiving that he had nothing more to do here he wished to go, enlarging on other similar things. The secretary on returning to the palace will have given an account of the answer, but we do not hear what has been decided thereupon.
Meanwhile, with the Court inclined to renew negotiations with Batteville while he suspends his going so as not to lose any opportunity which fortune might send him, if he felt quite certain that Braganza would not have assistance either directly or indirectly from England against his master, it seems likely that the Spaniards would make no fuss about the mere marriage and that they would shut their eyes. But there is every reason for believing that the Portuguese would not have gone into this without the certain hope of assistance and protection. But if the news is confirmed that has reached London by sea of advantages gained by the Spaniards in Portugal with the revolt of some places owing to taxes they wished to impose and the capture of some fortress towards Galicia with the entry of Don Giovanni into the enemy country, putting all to fire and sword, this might serve to alter their resolutions at the palace especially as it seems they are beginning to feel doubtful of the fulfilment of the promises made by Portugal and of the great advantages they were to derive therefrom. So there is no certain knowledge and everyone is in the dark and there is no learning the articles which must have been agreed. Time will disclose more in a matter of such importance and I will keep on the alert.
Meanwhile the Senate can easily understand how matters proceed at a Court where the chief refers everything to ministers who rule according to their caprice and for their own private interests without considering the welfare of the state, acting only for money, after the practice of Constantinople. The king listens to all and promises to all, but performs nothing whatsoever, his sole delight being in play and recreations with pleasure in certain trifles which cause remark and general amusement (con diletto in certe bagatelle che causano l' osservatione e riso di tutti generalmente), and he possesses little firmness or stability in himself, like the climate of the country.
As they do not observe at this Court the formalities which are customary in all others, no foreign minister has been informed of the decision about the marriage so no one has taken notice of it or congratulated the king, apart from the ambassadors of Holland who recently went to compliment his Majesty in public audience. It is very possible that being near at hand they wrote to their masters and have received a reply. Denmark and the others have not made the slightest move, and they say they cannot do so without orders from their masters. I mention the matter in order that I may have instructions.
In five or six weeks the king is to leave London to visit divers parts of the realm, intending to remain away for several months. I therefore ask for instructions whether I shall follow the Court or continue here, where there will no longer be a parliament, which is to terminate its session before the king goes, as has been decreed and recently directed by his Majesty, to be resumed later when he returns. So there will be no news of importance. In any case the expenses will be heavy and the inconvenience great, travelling with so many people, though I am ready to do as directed.
The mother of the Elector Palatine and the king's aunt, known as the queen of Bohemia has arrived here from Holland. (fn. 1) I have not seen her and shall not until the Senate directs me how to treat with her in the matter of title. She claims that of Majesty. Some may give it to her, but Spain only treats her as a daughter of England, merely calling her “Highness.”
They continue to arm the ships which will be under the command of General Montagu, earl of Sandwich. It is said they will be more numerous than I wrote, to put them in a posture of defence in case of a breach with Spain; but the shortage of money, which is extreme, causes great delays. Some of them will serve to go to Portugal, so they say, to fetch the queen. For this journey they say the duke of Ormonde was destined, but he is trying to get out of it, which is an additional reason for thinking that the affair will not come off, as if there was good hope of it Ormonde would not refuse such an opportunity from which he might derive no little advantage. Others declare that they are to go to the Mediterranean to convoy merchantmen, to protect them against the Barbary pirates and to take down the pride of those of Algiers, who will not consent to the peace with this crown except on the disadvantageous conditions which his Majesty will not accept, and who continue to injure and harass the traders.
The Resident of Denmark has asked me to importune your Excellencies again for the grant of certain privileges which I reported, answering him as instructed by the Senate, several months ago. I do so in these lines. He professes his deep regard for the republic.
London, the 3rd June, 1661.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
354. To the Ambassadors extraordinary, Correr and Morosini, in England.
Acknowledge their letters of the 1st. Commend their zeal in the public service and wish them all prosperity in their journey. Anticipate the best results from their zeal and experience.
Ayes, 124. Noes, 1. Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
355. To the Resident in England.
After the coronation the result of the marriage negotiations is awaited with curiosity. The meaning of the arming of ships merits attention. It is to be hoped that the report is true that they are to go against Barbary. The king's refusal to agree to the articles of peace with Algiers gives grounds for this report. The Senate looks to have precise information from him on the subject.
Count Strozzi is appointed to take the place of Count Collalto and will start soon. The Count will cultivate his goodwill in his own interests, and the resident is to respond, for the public advantage.
The ambassadors extraordinary have started and are likely to arrive before long.
Ayes, 124. Noes, 1. Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
356. Domenico Vico, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The Marquis Salviati is back from his embassy to England and went to Court at once to make his report to the Grand Duke. He told that Duke that he was satisfied with his reception; but they are angry with him about his behaviour. Among other things, when he was in the king's presence for the first time, he covered himself before his Majesty signed to him to do so, nor did the king himself do so.
An English ship has arrived at Leghorn, which, as they write, is bringing home an ambassador of the king after a long residence at Constantinople. (fn. 2)
Florence, the 4th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
357. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Monsieur and Madame returned from Colomba the day before yesterday….
The queen of England seems to be satisfied with the marriage, but really she desired and hoped that in the end it would take place with Mademoiselle. But King Charles, remembers that when he was without his kingdom she told him that she would rather live a rich princess than be his wife and a poor queen, and would not have him, so at the present time he has not wished to make any advances to her, although his mother has worked hard over it.
Lord Germen has not yet arrived at the Court to give an account of this marriage, as was expected. It is believed, however, that this delay is caused merely because the strengthened garrison of Dunkirk has extended the contributions as far as the appurtenances not only of the king of Spain but also to Borburgh and other places pertaining to this crown, so that his Majesty remonstrated about it to Lord Germen, who replied that this disorder had grown without any participation or consent of the king, his master, and that he would immediately sent him word so that those who had offended should be punished and good order and government be established for the future. Consequently he is waiting for the reply in London so that he may come with it to the Court, which has immediately sent troops to reinforce the garrisons of the fortresses and frontiers.
It would seem that they are now regretting that they left Dunkirk to the English, as it will always be a stone of offence for both crowns.
Moret, the 7th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
358. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The contingencies of Portugal and the negotiations of England in respect of the marriage are the most curious and important questions here, the sole object of their industry and conversation in these parts… While matters on the land side seemed to be propitious, fatal auguries against the success of this undertaking are seen from England, with the negotiations for the marriage. Great efforts have been made to divert that king from this resolution, and they tried to buy the ministers with gold…. The king of England has written of his aversion for this marriage, and the courage of the government here revived in the belief that it would not take place. But this night an extraordinary has arrived at Court from Batteville and it is understood that the conclusion is certain. The particulars are not divulged and indeed it is not yet absolutely certain but I have sound corroboration and also from the instances of Batteville himself to know the king's will about his return and the agitation into which the ministers here have been thrown.
Madrid, the 8th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Milano.
Venetian
Archives.
359. Thadio Vico, Venetian Resident at Milan, to the Doge and Senate.
Madame de Parma (fn. 3) is very ill pleased with her daughter-in-law, the duke's new bride… She has declared that if the marriage of one of the princesses, her daughters, to the king of England could take place, to forward it she would give out of her own pocket 200,000 crowns and more, without deranging herself greatly. It is known that in the time of her regency she amassed a great deal. But her hopes are diminishing rather than growing, as the English are inclining more than ever to the side of Braganza as well as the leading ministers of that government, persuaded by his gold, or failing that to the alliance with the Princess of Nassau, according to what we hear this present week. If this should be verified it would contradict the news published previously by the royal ministers here and by the governor himself, that the treaty, especially for the marriage with Portugal, had been overthrown by the Spanish ambassador in London.
Milan, the 8th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
360. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Although it is announced that the fleet which has been preparing for several months is to sail with all speed, none of the ships has yet left the ports. The chief reason for the delay is the shortness of cash at Court, which could not be greater. Fifteen which are almost completely ready are beginning to work towards the Downs to await the general there, and to take on further provisions to complete their supplies, and then spread their sails towards their destination, which is not yet absolutely certain. But in the common opinion they are to proceed to Africa to visit Tanger and the other places which the Portuguese have promised to England as the dowry of the Princess Catherine, in the neighbourhood of the Strait of Gibraltar. Having reported on this and taken possession, finding things correspond with the offers of Braganza, they are to proceed to the Mediterranean against the Algiers' pirates who are becoming increasingly troublesome to the traders of this country and of every other.
In spite of these reports, which may be true this squadron causes no little uneasiness to the Spaniards and Dutch, especially as it is to be followed by another and more numerous, which is being prepared, and so their ministers keep on the alert, to discover the real objects, but all in vain owing to the great secrecy observed at the palace. The most powerful argument against these squadrons being intended for any extraordinary enterprise is that they have not put on board any exceptional number of troops, when it is about to sail, and there is no appearance of provision beyond the ordinary, and such embarcations could not be carried out secretly or without being known to everyone. Time will bring more exact knowledge.
The Ambassador Batteville continues to watch for any advantage he may derive for his master from the disposition here to avoid giving occasion for a rupture to the Catholic. Results not dissimilar might possibly ensue, as in spite of the marriage announced they seem to show no inclination to listen to the requests of the minister of Braganza to raise levies, here, in Scotland, Ireland or wherever it least incommodes the king. He has been unable to get this and an answer would be still further delayed if certain and important news should arrive of the doings of the Spaniards in Portugal, for which they seem to be waiting, as a guide to their decisions either for or against Braganza.
Although Batteville keeps his house without seeing any one, he is at work underhand, trying to upset the negotiations of Mello, and make them appear unsubstantial and absurd. Indeed they feel very uncertain at Court although they try to dissimulate. There are councils and meetings every day, without it being possible to find out what they discuss, but one may conjecture that it turns upon the present affairs with Portugal, in which they become more and more doubtful about the fulfilment of the promises. For this reason they keep secret all the articles arranged, which must needs be settled because the king has said so with his own lips, but all appearances point to the contrary in spite of the efforts made to give the impression that everything is done without the slightest doubt about the execution.
The marquis of Caracena, governor of Flanders, perceiving that they are constantly sending troops across to reinforce the garrison of Dunkirk, for which they are daily beating up for recruits in London, to get volunteers to fill the companies, has brought down to the coast and to the neighbourhood many of the Spanish forces who are in that province, to watch the proceedings of the English and prevent them from scouring the country, as it seems they claim contributions from the surrounding places, which they had before peace was made between the Catholic and his Majesty.
By decree of parliament the Covenant or Alliance sworn by the people against the king and monarchy has been burned recently in public by the hangman (fn. 4) with many other acts of the Long Parliament, with all the papers containing decrees in relation to the late rebellion and confusion. By another decree of parliament, the day before yesterday, the 29th May by this style, was celebrated as his Majesty's birthday, he having completed the 31st year of his age and the first of his restoration.
In obedience to the ducali I spoke to the king about refusing ships of this country to the Turks, thanking him for the prudent direction to the minister and asking him to renew the instructions for other occasions. He answered that he was glad that his minister at Constantinople had given satisfaction to the republic. He wished it to apply to all other occasions, as appeared by the orders given later, and he would repeat the commissions more strongly. He added more showing his goodwill. When I told him of the coming of the ambassadors extraordinary he seemed quite pleased, as he did about the sending of the gondolas. I introduced this with remarks to show him the regard of the Senate for him, his House and the whole nation.
The ship Frigate Madonna, Captain George Hosie, is now sailing to Venice on behalf of some merchants of this mart. When it has reached Venice and has unloaded, the interested parties would like it to be able to continue its voyage to the Levant Islands to take currants, without hindrance. They request me to ask the Senate to direct the magistrates concerned that the ship shall not be detained but allowed to proceed to the said parts on their business. I made no difficulty about obliging them assuring them of the disposition of your Serenity to gratify them.
London, the 10th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
361. The Proveditori delle Raggion Vecchie report that an English ship at Leghorn is ready to take the goods for the gondolas to England. As transport by land would cost rather more:
That the said magistracy take all proper means so that the gondolas and goods aforesaid shall arrive in England as soon as possible.
Ayes, 107. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
362. To the Ambassadors extraordinary in England.
We wish you expressly in our name to congratulate his Majesty on so happy an event, his marriage, assuring him of the pleasure which the republic has received therefrom, as it will from every other prosperity that may befall his royal house.
Enclose what the Ambassador Boreel said to the Ambassador Grimani about the affairs of England.
Ayes, 113. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Royal Letters,
Venice.
Public Record
Office.
363. To the King of Great Britain. (fn. 5)
Supreme satisfaction of the republic at his Majesty's restoration to the throne from which he has hitherto been held back by fatal destiny. Almighty God, who always protects a just soul, has brought about this most happy result, for which all good men sighed and which is particularly appreciated by the republic from its great obligations to his house. The Senate in the uplifting of their hearts desires to omit nothing to assure him of their sentiments and is causing these presents to be delivered by the Resident Francesco Giavarina, to whom they beg his Majesty to give full credence in this and in all other matters. Desiring for him perfect prosperity and the blessing of Heaven.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Coll. Correr
Cod. 1490.
Museo Correr.
Venice.
364. Angelo Correr and Michiel Morosini, Venetian Ambassadors extraordinary to England, to the Doge and Senate.
We have begun our journey and shall travel by Augsburg to Cologne and shall then decide on the most convenient port for our embarcation. Unless anything of importance occurs we shall not importune you with our correspondence or repine at our laborious and expensive journey, except to say that our means are not equal to the burden.
Trent, the 11th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
365. Domenico Vico, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
Upon the news of the conclusion of the marriage of the Princess of Portugal and the king of England and how the Spanish ambassador has already left London in disgust, men of intelligence here are much inclined to fear that we shall soon be hearing something, principally to the prejudice of the Catholic king. They foresee that the power of England and that of the ministers of another faith who have great influence over the mind of that king, will daily grow in strength. So already the Medici princes here speak of this marriage with some feeling saying that it cannot fail to generate evil consequences to Christendom, since now it is stated that the Portuguese are opening the doors to the heretics in that country, threatening the preponderance of the Catholic faith, now that the bishop is dead at an advanced age, (fn. 6) that most virtuous prelate who up to the present has kept the whole kingdom well disposed towards the worship of God.
Florence, the 11th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
366. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The marriage of the king of England, the manner in which he has lured the Spaniards into believing that his thoughts were far removed therefrom, the secrecy with which the negotiations have proceeded, the confidence that they felt here about their ability to prevent it, the negotiations with Parma and all that has happened in this affair form a subject that arouses great passion as well as great interest. Accordingly various juntas of state have been held these last days at the house of Don Luis and their most secret consultations have resulted in the despatch of couriers to Flanders and to the Spanish seaports. Their apprehension about the peril to the fleet is as great as the importance of the matter in question. They calculate on its arrival in August, and they are much afraid of the English ships. Orders have accordingly been issued for the despatch of caravels and to stop them at the Canaries, or to change their route in order to avoid the snares which may be laid for them.
Orders have been sent to Batteville not to leave, as it behoves this government to adapt its policy to its strength. They do not cease to count upon the ease with which that people is wont to revolt, torn as they are by so many differences of religion and interest. It will be very difficult here to get ships together for sea, and any negotiations that may be introduced with Holland will also have to encounter great difficulties.
Extraordinary couriers from Flanders from the Marquis Caracena represent that the English keep increasing at Dunkirk and lay the country under contribution. But the troops destined for those parts are being stayed, and the couriers, who have been sent back with great haste, must have taken the orders for this.
Madrid, the 15th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
367. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The warships, which for so long have seemed about to start are still tossing at anchor. As the precise time of their sailing is impenetrable all this procrastination only serves to increase the curiosity about the real motive, as so far we have been unable to find out its destination. I have reported the most probable, but everything at this Court is subject to alteration, even when established, so no one would venture to be positive in a matter of this nature, and we must wait for the squadron to sail.
Nothing further has happened this week about the king's marriage but everyone is curious to see what will follow because the fear that Braganza will be in no state to fulfil his promises and the secret proposals which the Spanish ambassador keeps making are calculated to encourage the belief that it will all go up in smoke. Nevertheless the Council is constantly meeting to alter and decree what is considered most profitable, although they have never yet published any of the articles agreed upon, which all would like to know, to see the advantages which it is desired to have credited, to remove suspicion from the people. To confirm what has been told to them they have appointed the earl of Peterborough governor of the fortress of Tanger, which is said to have been conceded to this crown by the Portuguese, and they flatter them with other appearances, so that if it comes to a rupture with Spain the people may agree more readily in the hope of the advantages offered by the Portuguese, though at the moment it is impossible to know what they are.
The king having offered his mediation between the Portuguese and Dutch at the instigation of the minister of Braganza here, it seems that England expressed a desire to have the negotiations here; but the States, recognising the request as too absurd, have intimated that while they are ready to treat with the Portuguese to come to some agreement they cannot consent to have their affairs dealt with anywhere but in Holland, and not in England. As they wish some one to take part from this side in the negotiations at the Hague, they have suddenly nominated Sir [George] Douning as Resident with the States, who discharged the same office for Cromwell, and despatched him immediately with instructions to support and faciliate that adjustment, which is quite as difficult to effect as it is easy to imagine the marriage with Braganza being upset by Spain, seeing the conditions which may be proposed by the Catholic to the king here and the chancellor, who is the one who does everything at the moment in England.
Parliament follows behind and hastens the despatch of the bills which it has in hand, which all concern the particular affairs of the kingdom all in order to end the session by the time that the king is to make his tour of the kingdom.
The parliaments of Ireland and Scotland are also deliberating upon what they consider best for the quiet and tranquillity of those countries. Following the example of England in dealing with the chief of the late rebels they have recently had beheaded in Edinburgh the marquis of Argyle, the leader of those disturbances, (fn. 7) and with him have been put to death various other criminals, and so they are making them all pay for their detestable actions.
London, the 17th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
368. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ship Benvenuta, not having despatched its affairs was obliged to stay on for more than a month at this port, but the Grand Vizier, with an unexpected order, sent a chiaus to the house of the English ambassador in order that he might cause it to depart immediately for Calamota near Maina and there land ten pieces of artillery for the security of that place, with the design of using it as a place for trade. The ambassador found it advisable to obey and at the present moment the ship is all ready to sail.
His Excellency of England has declared to me his feeling of disgust at finding himself compelled to fall in with the wishes of the Grand Vizier and to humour him, even in matters which are likely to prejudice your Excellencies .. but in such occasions of ships he could not help making a show of forwardness in order to avoid greater mischief. I thanked him and asked him to confine himself to things which would turn out least harmful to the most serene republic, because these barbarians, with their natural insolence, if they are obliged in one thing, do not offer thanks, but, taking up an attitude of ownership and command, claim much more on other occasions.
The ambassador expressed the utmost willingness to oblige me and then went on to ask my opinion of his dragomans. He said that he was extremely dissatisfied with Draperis, whom he had caught lying more than once, and who secretly encouraged the Turks to make demands to the detriment of Christendom. I answered him cautiously, because the matter is a delicate one. Nevertheless he has written to England that the dragoman who accompanied his predecessor may come at once, proposing to use him in affairs of state and the others for matters of trade. If he really does so there will inevitably be much greater disturbances and quarrels in that house.

Pera of Constantinople, the 20th June, 1661.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
369. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
To the general astonishment the courier sent some weeks ago with the news of the Braganza marriage does not return from Madrid to the Ambassador Batteville. Until he comes nothing can be learned or imagined of what will happen between this crown and the Catholic. But he is expected at any moment and we shall soon be enlightened. In the mean time the Privy Council continues to meet frequently about present affairs with Portugal but as they are involved with many obstacles and subject to much altercation nothing is decided and nothing can be learned.
The fleet remains motionless, but there are signs that it will soon spread its sail's, as General Montagu left London yesterday for the Downs where all the ships lie at anchor, waiting for his arrival and the first favourable wind to carry it to its destination, of which nothing certain can be gathered. But I hear on good authority, and I know that the king himself said so, that it is to be employed in the first instance against the pirates of Algiers and will then be ready for other enterprises. But I cannot be positive as all deliberations are subject to alteration in this country. When Montagu has started he will open his commissions, which were handed to him sealed, and he will then learn what he is to do.
It is said that Mello, the minister of Braganza, will sail with this squadron and be landed at Lisbon. The motive for his journey remains hidden, but the wisest men are of opinion that he means to persuade the government of Portugal to agree to several particulars which are claimed by England in the treaty, for as the ratification of this has not arrived from Lisbon it is supposed that obstacles have arisen and that his presence in Portugal is necessary to remove them.
The governor of Dunkirk, substituted by his Majesty, (fn. 8) immediately on entering on his charge claims contributions from the neighbouring places belonging to the Most Christian and the Catholic. For France the English ambassador at that Court has sent the remonstrances of that monarch; and for Spain, the marquis of Caracena having reported everything to the baron de Batteville, that minister made complaint at a special audience, when the king assured him that he would give the necessary orders to prevent trouble and confusion. The Council is accordingly considering what steps to take and how to keep up Dunkirk which can hardly be maintained without these contributions. As these cannot fail to cause disturbance, we must wait for time to show the result.
Parliament continues to hasten the despatch of its business. This week it took up a very ticklish matter of no easy digestion, concerning the Catholics of this country, from whom a petition has been presented to be exempted from certain oaths and from the severe treatment to which they are subjected. Several days have been spent in discussion without any decision so far. To-day also they are at work on it, but we cannot discover what the result may be, as there are many pros and cons, the matter being one of great delicacy and of no small consequence.
Word has come of the safe arrival of Douning at the Hague who has gone as resident with the States, but it appears that the negotiations between their High Mightinesses and Portugal, which were believed to be well advanced, are now more troubled than ever, so the adjustment which they wished to see between those two countries seems likely to be difficult.
London, the 24th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
370. To the Resident in England.
Express sympathy with him over his illness, and hope that he has recovered. Complete satisfaction with what he has done. He is to observe closely the subject of the king's marriage and what is said about it. The ambassadors extraordinary have received instructions to congratulate and will pay suitable respects to the Princess Palatine, the king's aunt. It will not be necessary for him to follow the Court when the king leaves London as there is no likelihood of business of any great importance, and on account of the expense; so he may await his Majesty's return to London.
Ayes, 93. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Coll. Correr
Cod. 1245.
Museo
Correr,
Venice.
371. Angelo Correr and Michiel Morosini, Venetian Ambassadors extraordinary to England, to the Doge and Senate.
Since leaving Trent we have not troubled your Serenity, but having arrived here yesterday we propose to give an account of our journey, which we might call prosperous but for the increased heat of the season. The duke of Wirtemberg was the first to manifest his friendliness by sending presents, intimating the readiness of his brother to enter your Serenity's service. At Heidelberg the Elector Palatine abounded in civilities, recalling the obligations of his family to the republic, especially when he was a prisoner in France. His father's difficulties had disabled the House and prevented him from helping against the Turk. He praised your constancy in supporting the war and hoped victory might yet result. He believed that you had suffered great detriment from the report that the soldiers were badly paid, for on the peace a considerable supply might have been drawn from Germany, though now the emperor may need them in Hungary. A diet would be necessary to give some decided turn to affairs, though his Majesty avoids this on various pretexts. The Princes of Germany are certainly disposed to unite against the common enemy, though they need quiet rather than to expose themselves to fresh troubles. He had offered 100 horse to his Majesty and regretted that he could not raise more. Speaking of England he said he scarce knew what might be hoped from that king, busied as he is in his domestic affairs and in profiting by his connection with Portugal, which he thinks may rekindle trouble in Christendom unless diverted by the prudence of the Spaniards. His mother was in England and he would urge her to support our negotiations. We made a suitable reply.
For Hungary we learned that the emperor had asked for 4000 foot in the pay of the Archbishop of Munster, and other troops have been sent that way. The movements of the Swedes stir the jealousy of these princes of the Rhenish league and they are eagerly waiting to see if those arms will weaken the Muscovites, in which case the common cause might hope for the best resolves from Poland.
At Frankfort and here we were suitably received but the magistrates of the former complained that under pretext of sanitary regulations their goods at Venice were much delayed, with heavy costs. They showed us the perfect health of those parts and said that all suspicion of Antwerp was removed as no wares now leave that mart. They asked your Serenity to consider the matter. Owing to the difficulties the trade has for some time gone another way, and might go entirely to Leghorn, with the danger of never returning. We assured them that their nation was particularly loved and favoured by your Serenity, and sanitary regulations were necessary and important. But such complaints gain ground daily and it might be to the public advantage to seek to satisfy these merchants.
The Count of Furstembourg, dean of the Chapter, high in the favour of the Prince Elector, gave us a most courteous reception and the nuncio reminded us of his appeal to the electors of Cologne, Mainz and Treves to assist the emperor and found them all well disposed to act against the common enemy. We assured him of the republic's regard.
At Augsburg we met Sig. Alvise Contarini, nephew of Sig. Simone, who came from the Court at Vienna to join us, and gain experience. With the same object we have in our company the brothers Marc Antonio and Alessandro Zeno, Gio. Batista Sanuto and Count Francesco Martinengo, with a son of me, Correr. We also met here Sig. Lorenzo Tiepolo, son of Sig. Marin, who is returning home after frequenting the principal Courts of Europe. To-morrow we shall go on to Dunkirk, where we have decided to cross.
Cologne, the 25th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genoa.
Venetian
Archives.
372. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge and Senate.
An English ship has put in at this port, which left Lisbon last month in a fleet of six with a cargo of 2500 chests of sugar in addition to many clusters of diamonds, grape pearls and other goods. Two of the ships were destined for Venice, two for Leghorn and the other two for this city. These six English ships off Cape Gatta encountered six Barbary caravels by whom, they allowed themselves to be run aboard without any resistance and taken to Algiers, where all the goods were taken from them belonging to every nation except the English, to whom, indeed they paid double hire and allowed them to keep what they asserted to be on their own account. They also made slaves of seven passengers, among them one Palavicino, a Genoese gentleman, and Bartolommeo Mora, brother of your Serenity's consul at Lisbon, who has ransomed himself with 4000 reals. This mart is highly indignant about it, being interested to the amount of 120,000 reals.
Genoa, the 25th June, 1661.
[Italian.]
June 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
373. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Lord Germen has arrived at the Court at last, but he does not appear as ambassador; accordingly he has seen the king in private, and has immediately gone away.
Moret, the 28th June, 1661.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 She reached England on 16–26 May, Green: Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia, page 404; and came to London on the following day. Kingdom's Intelligencer May 13–20.
2 The Plymouth. Winchelsea wrote on 18–28 March that she had sailed eight days ago with Mr. Bokenham, ex-consul of Smyrna, and Sir Thomas Bendish S.P. For. Turkey Vol. xvii.
3 Margarita de' Medici, dowager duchess, widow of Odardo I duke of Parma. Her son Ranuccio II married Margaret daughter of Victor Amadeus I duke of Savoy in 1660.
4 On 22 May, o.s., in divers places in London. Evelyn: Diary, page 276. The places were the New Palace, Westminster; Cheapside and the Old Exchange. Mercurius Publicus May 16–23.
5 Not entered in the register Deliberazioni, Corti, for this year.
6 This probably refers to Manuel da Cunha bishop of Elvas, who died on 30 November, 1658.
7 On 27 May, old style. Mercurius Publicus May 30–June 6.
8 Andrew, lord Rutherford, appointed in May. Cal. S. P. Dom. 1660–1, page 606.


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