Venice
October 1661

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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49-62

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'Venice: October 1661', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 49-62. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90097 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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October 1661

Oct. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
58. To the Resident in England.
Have to inform him of a success which has attended the forces of the state in an engagement with the common enemy on 27th August last, the Captain General having made a junction with the Maltese galleys and scattered the Turkish fleet. (fn. 1) 1,600 slaves have been freed and about 3,000 of the enemy slain, and accordingly the very considerable succours which the Turks were trying to introduce into Canea were turned away.
He may impart this happy event to his Majesty and the principal ministers, with suitable remarks to make them realise the steadfastness of the republic in defending itself and in inflicting the heaviest losses on the enemy of the Christian name.
Ayes, 113. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
59. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Some of the subjects are agitating so that orders may be sent for a junction with the English and Dutch fleets in order to attack with greater force and destroy those barbarians and their nests as well. I have been told that in the instructions to be given to Neuseses there will be orders to have a good understanding with those admirals, and to operate jointly with them or separately, as circumstances may dictate. But from my conversations with the Dutch ambassadors here I have gathered that while Vice-Admiral Ruiter will cooperate readily in cruising about to clear the seas of the corsairs, he will not do so for an attack on Algiers, Tunis or any other of their places, out of respect for the Grand Turk, because of the trade and the fear of upsetting it, and the French are not strong enough to attack these places with any hope of success.
Moret, the 4th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
60. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
On Saturday last, at dawn, to avoid observation, I went to assist at the function, as desired by the English ambassador. I was received ceremoniously by his Excellency and we all arrived together at his villa of Gerlichioi about noon. After an exchange of compliments I was entertained at a rich banquet. I was then taken to see the new born child and paid my respects to Madame. I was asked to name the child and it was arranged that it should be called Charles Mark. The christening took place in the apartment; after which I was conducted back.
With respect to public affairs the ambassador told me that a consultation had been held about the admittance of an ambassador of Portugal to the Porte, after which he had an intimation from the First Vizier that if an ambassador or other representative of that crown comes, he will be well received. His Excellency remarked that this is not sufficient, and it is necessary to have such a declaration in writing, with the catscerif of the Grand Turk and with the capitulation which should be granted for trade and other occurrences. To obtain these he proposed to go in person to Adrianople to have something more definite and formal, on which he could build. Before setting out he was awaiting a ship from London with instructions and supplies of money, without which nothing effective can be done, indeed it will be necessary to dive pretty deep, because he is very apprehensive of the obstacles which the imperial resident will put in his way, with the help of a most important fund of gold. The Chiecaia of the Vizier, who is deep in the minister's confidence, had said to him “We shall swallow good mouthfuls from the Germans and afterwards, if it suits our purpose, we shall make war on them just the same.”
The ambassador said nothing more to me about his proposed mediation, perhaps because he now knows rather more than at first about the difficulties, realising that he will not be able to profit thereby and that he cannot come out of it with credit. I begged him not to allow ships of his nation to serve the Turks. This he promised, speaking with so much vehemence that he was almost weeping. He showed me letters in which the king addressed him as cousin and others in which the Grand Duke called him Excellency.

Pera of Constantinople, the 6th October, 1661.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 6.
Inquisitori di
Stato
Busta 418.
Venetian
Archives.
61. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Resident at Constantinople, to the Inquisitors of State.
The English ambassador has communicated to me important particulars under the seal of profound secrecy, namely that the imperial resident, in a most confidential communication with his Excellency, complained bitterly of the Dragoman Panegioti and went so far as to admit that he had orders from the Court to take his life (confesso tener ordini dalla Corte di levarlo di vita), if it could be done cautiously without danger of causing trouble with the Turks. But he said this was a great matter which he lacked the courage to attempt because of the consequences, as it would become hard for him to find anyone to serve him, but above all because his house would not be safe or his person if the Turks got wind of such an act of violence. The news seemed to me to be most extraordinary and if it had come from some one of lesser rank I should have given it scant credit. But the ambassador has repeated his assertion and I cannot believe it to be false, since there is no reason for fabricating such a tale as this. In the mean time I shall keep my eyes open.
For the rest it is very easy to see from the effects how much trouble and mischief are introduced by the dragomans in these parts. We know already the end of M. Chilet, dragoman grande of France, when he came with his son, who had him knocked on the head, having convicted him of treachery. The English ambassador has not concealed from me that he has half a mind
(che sta in punto) to stick a dagger into Draperis for the same reason. I say nothing about the dragomans of the republic; I try to keep them loyal.
Pera of Constantinople, the 6th October, 1661.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
62. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Letters have been received from the fleet beyond the Strait of the 8th September, from which it appears that the previous reports were all false because the English have not been beaten and there was no adjustment. Hostilities were falling into the background, but God grant they may increase, to the benefit of Christendom and the republic in particular. The letters relate that General Montagu, in obedience to the king's orders, left the fleet on the 13th August for Lisbon with some sail, leaving in command of the rest of the fleet Vice Admiral Lawson, a brave soldier, experienced in the military art and in navigation as well. When passing the Strait Montagu had encountered four Barbary ships, which he engaged, sinking two, and one was forced to run itself aground on the coast of Tituan. Lawson, putting out to sea with some ships, leaving the others to pursue hostilities against Algiers, had captured two enemy ships with a Genoese laden with oil, which the Barbary pirates had taken a few days before. One of these carried 24 bronze pieces and was commanded by a renegade. They made 125 slaves on this occasion and released more than 30 Christians of various nations. He returned later to Algiers to attend to the enterprise there. The differences would not be settled very soon as the pirates showed steadfastness in their resistance and courage and would not yield as easily as was expected. They do not hear that anything of moment has happened under Algiers. The Court is greatly delighted at the news and expects better at any moment, especially as they have the co-operation of Vice Admiral Ruiter, who is there with a powerful Dutch squadron with the intention of remaining in those parts for the destruction of the pirates, having for this purpose established a magazine at Malaga where he has provisions for more than a year.
The ten ships making ready here to go to Algiers to replace those now there, have not yet sailed, and it seems they are waiting for further letters from Montagu. They have decided here to keep some ships at the Strait and to have others cruising in the Mediterranean to hunt pirates so these, being also pursued by the Dutch may the more easily be driven off and extirpated. It is believed that the English will remove from Algiers where they cannot do the hurt they would like, owing to the precautions taken by the Barbary pirates, and are merely exposed to attack and great inconvenience, whereas by keeping the sea they are bound to win advantages and harass the enemy considerably.
The message so eagerly awaited from Portugal has also arrived at last. Russel, interpreter of the Ambassador Mello has come. He is a priest of English nationality, who has lived a long time at Lisbon. He has conducted all the negotiations so far, and as a reward has been nominated by the duke of Braganza to a bishopric in the Indies, (fn. 2) for which they are asking the Pope's confirmation, and God knows if they will ever get it. He brings satisfaction upon all the points of the treaty, fair words and great promises, but for money, which is the most important, nothing definite is heard. They speak of some bill payable by Jews of Amsterdam but it does not seem to be to the amount promised and expected or to be met with the promptness that is desired seeing the scarcity of cash. A few days will bring more light to this affair, which I will keep in view.
Presbyterians and Calvinists, who have always been fatal to this country, as the past miseries clearly showed, of which the scars remain, are still studying how to rekindle the fire, working in conjunction with fanatics and other turbulent spirits whose object is to overthrow the Episcopalians and destroy the Anglican Church, although they dissimulate and play the hypocrite. These designs being discovered by his Majesty, to prevent the disorder which might ensue, they have taken suitable measures, arresting some of the leaders in this city and the country and laying hands on a number of horses which belonged to them. In this way they hope to preserve the peace of this sorely tried country.
The entry of the ambassador extraordinary of Sweden is fixed for Monday. There may be bloodshed owing to the quarrel between Spain and France for precedence, unless His Majesty intervenes. Yet the Ambassador d'Estrades announces that he has instructions from the Most Christian to send his coach, stating that he was reproved for having obeyed the king at the entry of the extraordinaries of Venice, and in that case the Catholic ambassador will have to send his, so that he might not seem to be giving way. But whoever gets the place nothing will be decided as it will not settle the rival claims of the two crowns for precedence, which can only be done with much bloodshed and disturbance.
In obedience to the ducali of the 25th August I have spoken with Col. Carlo de Vinder about the offers to your Serenity. His claims may be seen by the attached proposals. (fn. 3) I find that he has risen through all the grades to the rank of Colonel, under the command of divers princes, for which he holds patents and testimonials to his services and ability in the art of war.
Sig. Alvise Contarini has recovered his health and strength, and after observing the customs of this Court and country he has recently left London for France to make himself familiar with the style of that great Court and fit himself to serve his country.
London, the 7th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
63. To the Resident in England.
Regret the state in which the gondola arrived. Commend the measures taken by him to repair it. The cost will be allowed in his accounts. The king's pleasure makes the Senate the more satisfied about its arrival. It will help to conciliate his goodwill. This must be cultivated by the Resident with every opening that presents itself, for the public advantage. The Senate rejoices at the engagement between English ships and Algerian pirates and hopes that this will lead to hostilities with the Turks.
Ayes, 91. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Archives.
64. To the Resident in England.
The question of the charges on currants has been taken in hand and instructions given to the Proveditore of the Three Islands, Mocenigo to abolish all that have been introduced against the laws of the state. He is to let this information reach the merchants, urging them to resume and continue their trade, giving them assurance that they will have every advantage and assistance and that they shall suffer no possible prejudice.
Ayes, 77. Noes, 11. Neutral, 21.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
65. Domenico Vico, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
News has come from Alicante that Montagu is gone with six ships to Lisbon to join with the fleet from England and fetch the queen. Vice Admiral Lawson remains off Algiers with sixteen ships, divided into squadrons, hunting for Barbary corsairs. He has already taken some which he has sold to the Spaniards, but putting to death Christian renegades.
Florence, the 8th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives,
66. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
No further letters have reached the Court either from the fleet or from Portugal, and there is nothing else of importance in the present most sterile season. No one is able to find out anything more that was reported about the messenger recently arrived from Lisbon. He certainly brought a bill of exchange on Amsterdam, but for not more than 100,000l. sterling, which is insignificant and does not come up to the promises or their needs. However, since they are to give pledges for what remains to be paid and security for the entire fulfilment of all the articles, it seems that the earl of Peterborough, is getting ready to go as governor to Tangier to which he has been appointed, though it would seem that not only the commandant but all the inhabitants object to the handing over. However there is no harm in trying, so it is thought that they want to see here what will happen, especially as the Portuguese promise to give it safely into their hands in spite of all reports to the contrary. For this they are daily beating up in this city to get troops to go under Peterborough's command to garrison Tangier but there is no great rush, as every one fights shy of that employment and they would all rather stop at home than go to so different a climate.
According to custom on Monday, 30th September, old style, they elected the mayor for the coming year to take charge of the good government of London. They chose Alderman Federick, a rich, wise man, well affected to the king and all the royal house. (fn. 4) So the most precise direction and the greatest splendour are expected in the exercise of his office, of which according to ancient custom, he will take possession five weeks hence which is usually done with great pomp, ending with stately banquets and drinking, according to the custom of the country.
On Monday was the public entry of the ambassador extraordinary of Sweden, very stately and decorous for the train of coaches and his large household. Yesterday he had his first audiences of his Majesty and the Duke of York, under the forms used with the ambassadors of crowned heads. Foreseeing disorder owing to the rival claims for precedence between the ambassadors of France and Spain the king sent to tell them that he hoped they would not send their coaches, to avoid disturbance, which in present circumstances, from the residue of evil humours in the city, could not but produce evil consequences, to his own personal interests also. France replied that he could by no means obey his Majesty as he had precise orders from his king to send his coach, threatening his head if he did the contrary. The Spaniard expressed his readiness to do as his Majesty desired, but this was impossible if the other refused to keep his coach at home. The king seeing that he could not prevail, although he might have come to some other resolution, and urged by the French ambassador to let him be, allowed this, obtaining a promise from both ambassadors not to allow any of their household to carry firearms, forbidding his subjects to interfere on either side, and sending to the Tower, which is the usual place for the reception of foreign ministers, several regiments of horse and foot of the guard, to prevent the English from intervening in the quarrel.
The French ambassador got together all the French in London, no small number, and forming as it were an army of several hundreds, on foot and horse, sent his coach so accompanied. The Spaniard collected the Flemings and Walloons, who are not numerous, and with very inferior forces sent his coach followed only by men on foot, armed with swords and sticks, without any firearms. Arrived at the spot and the coming ambassador having mounted into the royal coach the parties immediately began to fight for precedence. The French attacked the Spaniards, using muskets, pistols and carbines, contrary to the promise given to the king. The Spaniards met the attack with courage and finding by chance some bricks where they took up their position they seized them pelting the French and making them retire, and so with stones, sticks and swords drove them off three times, and in this way won the post and kept them always away from their coach and from the horses, guarded by three men each, the harness being chains covered with leather, to prevent its being cut, so that they could not receive the slightest hurt. The French, who had not taken such precautions found themselves in a moment in pieces, four of the six coach horses killed and the other two in a sorry state, so the coach was unable to follow the others. The Spanish one went alone escorted by a crowd, which came out of all the shops, applauding the event with words and cries, showing great affection for Spain, even ringing the bells in some places, and followed the coach to the very embassy, where, to get rid of this numerous rabble Batteville had to employ money. There is no doubt that with the money for the people and the pay of those in his service Batteville spent more than 1000l. sterling.
On the two sides six or seven were killed and many wounded, including the brother-in-law and son of the French ambassador, the first with a sword in the leg and the other with a stone in the stomach. As an indication of the inveterate hatred of the English against the French it was noted that the coach on its return to the embassy, although it followed another route was followed by a crowd throwing mud and making indecent and improper remarks. This happened also because a few days before the insolent footmen of Estrades had had a scuffle with some watermen with some fatalities, and because, a la mode de Paris, they will not let any one alone.
The next day the French ambassador went to audience of the king complaining of the English who were so much against him, but he does not seem to have got a satisfactory reply. They say that because of the animosity shown against him in this city he thinks of going to France, leaving his secretary here to attend to the embassy, but this is not certain.
The Ambassador Batteville has also seen the king and the ministers to inform them of the incident, and it seems that all are satisfied with his behaviour. I heard his Majesty say to the nephew of Marshal Turenne, who is here, that Estrades, as a good soldier should have gone to see the site before the action, as Batteville had done, who went some days before to the Tower on the pretext of a walk, to view the place where the skirmish would take place.
The king fearing that a second quarrel might take place on the day of the Swede's audience, issued an order in Council the day before yesterday that in future ambassadors arriving shall be accompanied only by his coaches and those of his subjects and that the foreign ministers should give up sending theirs, charging the Lord Chamberlain to inform the ambassadors and other ministers here of this decision. And so yesterday no one sent coaches to accompany the Swede to the palace.
Yesterday at Court the Secretary of State Nicolas drew me aside and said he had orders from the king to speak to me. He went on to say that the Ambassador Winchelsea had written to his Majesty that he had offered his mediation to your Serenity for an adjustment with the Turk. He was sure the Senate would accept and he promised himself every success with the Turks. The secretary added that Winchelsea did not say what foundation he had in this affair, but nevertheless the king will offer your Serenity his mediation because of his special regard for the republic. He assured me he would always be ready to give his minister such orders and instructions as would be most advantageous to your Excellencies. I expressed appreciation of his Majesty's zeal for the cause of God with other suitable remarks, thanking the secretary for the offer without committing myself, promising to inform the Senate. I am sending by Antwerp, to be sent by the extraordinary, so that this may reach your Excellencies the sooner and you may send with all speed the reply which, I gather from Nicholas, will be eagerly awaited by the king.
London, the 14th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
67. To the Resident in England.
Commend his office with the king. With regard to what his Majesty intimated that he thought he might be obliged to make war on these same Turks because of the insolence of the men of Barbary, the Senate cannot but desire that this may be the result, since it would afford relief to them and would be of grave prejudice to the Barbareschi. He is to keep a close watch on what is done and make report.
Commend his reply to the duke of York about the complaints of the captain of the ship which took the Ambassador Winchelstra to Constantinople. The Senate has carefully deliberated on such questions, and to dissipate similar inventions it is only necessary to add that express orders have been sent to the Islands for the good treatment of all ships, and especially those of the English, and that they are to receive every courtesy and facility in their trading.
Commend his action about the ship Angelo. The Senate is glad that his Majesty has been informed about it. He is to try to obtain a decision about the robbery by Algerian pirates in collusion with the English captains. He is also to keep on the watch about the appointment of an ambassador, and to report what is determined in the matter.
The Senate is very pleased about the present of the gondola. With respect to the king's wish for a fisolera, they will give orders for one, to show, in this also, their regard for his Majesty.
That the paragraph from the Resident's letter touching the complaints of the captain of the ship which took the Ambassador Winchelstra be sent to the Proveditore of the Three Islands, Mocenigo, that he may consider the matter and take action in accordance with his instructions.
Ayes, 87. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
68. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
On Saturday evening a courier arrived from England at the Court sent by the Ambassador de l'Estrade, who writes to the effect that he sent his coach to the entry of the Ambassador of Sweden, in accordance with his instructions to take up his position in front of that of Spain. The better to carry this out, in addition to his numerous Court he had a number of men brought over to London from Gravelines, so that he had a great many more than the other, and accordingly he hoped to achieve his purpose. But in the event matters turned out differently, because the Ambassador Batteville quietly distributed money to the common people of that quarter. At the first skirmish between the men of the ambassadors these rose in favour of the Spaniards against the French, so that the latter had the worst of it and so the coach of the Spaniard was able to take precedence at its will.
Greatly stirred by this incident the king conferred with Liona and Teglie and some others that very night and came to the decision which your Excellencies shall hear. The Count Fuendalsagna was to have come on the following day to take leave, but the Count of Brienne sent to tell him that the king would not receive him and that he must tell Caracena not to pass through this kingdom, or the Marquis Fuentes either. The Count was much surprised, saying that he was quite in the dark and asked the king for an explanation, but his Majesty would not be moved.
With regard to Batteville they believe here that he did not act of his own caprice, but by order of the king, his master. I have gone about trying to calm them down and doing my best to dissipate this opinion by various considerations, telling them that the Catholic cannot possibly have taken such a step in the present state of affairs, so unfavourable for him, with the marriage of the king of England to the Infanta of Portugal. It is said that the king is determined to send to Madrid to demand satisfaction.
Moret, the 19th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
69. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
There is still no news of the fleet, causing extraordinary distress. They hope to hear something soon since it is known that General Montagu, who went to Lisbon has returned to the fleet to pursue hostilities with greater vigour. The ships to reinforce Montagu and replace others are still floating idly at anchor. They say they are waiting for letters from Montagu the better to regulate their despatch, but the real reason for the delay is the lack of cash, as the sailors and other men will not move before they receive their pay. Without money it is indeed impossible to carry through the numerous things begun, to wit, this expedition, the equipment of other ships to fetch the queen, the assembling and sending of troops to Tangier, and the pay of the guards here, who are already creditors for twenty weeks, not without complaint and murmurs.
In spite of various statements there seems no longer any doubt about the coming of the queen. They are getting on with the preparations for her reception, but slowly because of the shortage mentioned. They are appointing musicians for her chapel and the officials who will attend her here. They are selecting those of the king's chamber who are to go to Lisbon to attend her on her passage to England. They are nominated, but it is not known who they are. The king confers daily with Russel, who recently came from Portugal, arranging all these matters and attending to whatever else is required.
When she comes it will be interesting to see what the Spanish ambassador will do. Everyone supposes that he will remain at the Court, dissimulating and keeping a close watch on the queen's proceedings in order to work upon the king and render vain the effects of any pleading of the bride on behalf of the duke of Braganza, her brother, who seems to have great hopes of England when his sister is here to ask for help.
Since the affair last week between the households of the French and Spanish ambassadors, both have proceeded very warily, keeping soldiers at their gates to prevent any disorders, since the French are enraged at what happened at the Tower and are only waiting for a chance of revenge. M. de L'Estrade took leave of the king and set out the day before yesterday for his government of Gravelines. He has not seen any of the foreign ministers or performed any of the formalities usual on leaving. It is said he will go to Paris and return to England in a few weeks. But his people are so detested for many insolences that several believe he will try to have another sent in his place, and that his king will grant this without difficulty.
The general of the Posts (fn. 5) here has been to see me to-day with complaints against the master at Venice, asking me to inform your Serenity. He says a new impost has been put on letters leaving Venice for England, which was never done before; and from information received it was without the order or permission of the Senate as it was only done with the letters for England, so he says, and not for other parts. I said I knew nothing about the matter but from what he had read in the gazettes from Venice there seemed to be a disposition to increase the charge for letters by a soldo each, and if this had been decreed by your Excellencies, it would be general and not for England alone. He said the increase they were made to pay was not a soldo but a giulio (fn. 6) for each letter and pressed me again to inform your Serentity.
London, the 21st October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
70. To the Resident in England.
Commend the effort made by him to incite the duke of York against the Algerine pirates. He is to cultivate the duke's goodwill as much as ever he can so that he may be kept always well disposed to the interests of the republic. The Senate will do all that is possible for the relief of John Elisman, for whom the king has spoken. Ballarino from Constantinople reports excellent relations with the English ambassador. This gives the Senate infinite satisfaction and they inform the Resident so that he may make it known generally at the Court and seize a favourable opportunity to acquaint his Majesty therewith.
That the Five Savii alla Mercanzia be directed to inquire into the reasons for the arrest and imprisonment of John Elisman, so that a decision may be taken thereupon.
Ayes, 74. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
71. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Marquis Durazzo, who was resident of Genoa here and was destined to be ambassador extraordinary to England, on the supposition that he would contrive to have more than usual honour there, had started off in that direction, but learning on the road that the difficulties were great and might be called insuperable, he decided to leave his train behind and proceed to London incognito, to achieve by dint of his presence there the attainment of his desires. If this proves unattainable it is believed that he will return, after merely satisfying his curiosity to see England, instead of performing the embassy.
It is believed that M. de l'Estrade may arrive at this Court almost any day, but without any quarrel with England.
Moret, the 26th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
72. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Admiral Ruiter recently left Cadiz to cruise as far as the Strait against the corsairs. His permanence in these waters has been with the object of securing the fleet against the designs which it was feared England might have, secure the safety of their own property and inflict on the Africans the greatest possible punishment for the intolerable hindrances which they place in the way of trade and the mischief they do at sea.
Madrid, the 26th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
73. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Although they remain without definite news of General Montagu they have some particulars through merchants via France which, if confirmed, cannot fail to benefit the interests of Christendom. The letters themselves have come having been sent from the fleet to their fellow countrymen at Toulon. They say that the English continuing before Algiers so troubled that place that the inhabitants had taken alarm and risen in revolt and they were killing each other. Six hundred had perished; fifty of the leaders had been sentenced and executed. The Basha himself had sought to prolong his days by flight and had escaped from the fury of the populace with his family but at sea he fell in with one Captain Sellake. and was arrested and taken prisoner to Villafranca. God grant the news may be confirmed.
Nothing can be said about Portugal, because nothing has come thence since Russel's arrival. There is said to be some difficulty about the letters of exchange which he brought, so that for some days the preparations for the marriage seem to have slackened; and if there are indeed obstacles to this satisfaction they will suffice to upset the treaty between that crown and this government.
The earl of Peterborough was all ready to start for Tangier, but waited because he had not received cash to pay the men he has enlisted and was to take for the garrison there. They assigned to him some of the money which the Portuguese are to pay on account of the dowry, but with a glance at the difficulties and fearing that it will be impossible for the duke of Braganza to fulfil his promises, he will not move before he is paid. He has got together 1,000 foot here, but all inexperienced country men who will die fast, but few of the old disbanded soldiers having cared to take up a service reputed unlucky and not suited to their constitutions. At sea they should be joined by 2,000 Irish, who have been staying in Flanders, and so he will take 3,000 effectives and some horse, but few in number.
Although the king has made many orders for the restoration in Ireland of the goods of many gentlemen who were dispossessed in the time of the rebellion. yet these have never been obeyed by those now enjoying the property by usurpation. The rightful owners have made lively representations to the king for a more prompt remedy to relieve their miserable condition, and he referred the matter to the Council. This body has spent some days the present week over it. but with no decision so far, to the intense disgust of these unfortunate individuals.
The recent affair between the households of the ambassadors Estrade and Batteville has greatly incensed the Most Christian. The English ambassador in France has sent an express with an account of all the representations made by that monarch to the Count of Fuendalsagna, etc., but your Excellencies will receive this direct. From what this minister writes l'Estrade complained to the Court as much of the English as of the Spaniards saying that the latter were supported by the former in that affair and it seems that the Most Christian complained to him about it and demanded that those who had done this should be punished. But nothing can be done here because in obedience to his Majesty's orders no one intervened for either party, unless by accident, and some English who were actual servants of the Catholic ambassador and wore his livery. Those who ran after the coach after the incident did so not because they had defended it at the Tower, but from the hope of profit in accompanying it, which they got, everyone being proportionately rewarded. God grant that this sinister accident may not upset the peace between the crowns, from which the interests of your Excellencies would suffer seriously.
The ducali of the 1st reached me a week ago. I have carried out the instructions therein, informing the king and the leading ministers of the successes of the glorious arms of the republic against the Turk. The king was exceedingly pleased and spoke highly of the glory of the republic's arms. He confirmed his determination to go on with the hostilities begun against the Barbary corsairs and his anxiety to do something for the relief of your Serenity so soon as he is in a position to do so making the same observations as he did to the ambassadors extraordinary several times repeated to me, showing his undoubted goodwill, but it can effect nothing for lack of means. I thanked him with suitable remarks and will do what I can to cultivate his friendly disposition.
London, the 28th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
74. To the Resident in England.
The Senate rejoices at the news of the injury inflicted by General Montagu on the Algerine pirates. Great advantage may still be won if the English are supported by the Dutch fleet. He is to keep his eyes open about this as well as to see if other ships of that nation are to proceed to the Mediterranean to hunt these same pirates.
Colonel Vinder's demand for 25 crowns per soldier is excessive. The Savio alla Scrittura will write to tell the Resident what is necessary about this matter. His Majesty's ambassador at Constantinople continues his friendly bearing towards Ballarino. The republic is greatly indebted to his Majesty for this, and he is to express this to the king when an opportunity offers.
Ayes, 79. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
75. Domenico Vico, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
There is no confirmation of the capture by the English of five Turkish ships. On the contrary news came yesterday that the Barbary corsairs have plundered a large English ship and a French vessel not far from Leghorn. The Turks declare generally that they mean to go raiding against all the powers because of the molestation they recently received from the English under Algiers.
Florence, the 29th October, 1661.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
76. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Yesterday at the same time a gentleman arrived from Fuendalsagna for the king and a courier for the ambassador here, the Archbishop of Ambrun, with the disagreeable news of what had happened in England and of the headlong resolutions of the French king. The French ambassador threatens war and demands satisfaction. The nuncio tries to calm him. Such things ought not to lead to war. Don Luis has met the ambassador again this morning. Has sent this that the Senate may know that the ambassador has orders to demand satisfaction, but not to leave, and that the French demands will become more moderate with negotiation, while the Spaniards will facilitate an accommodation.
Madrid, the 30th October, 1661.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 At Scios. Kingdom's Intelligencer Aug. 26th–Sept. 2nd.
2 Dr. Richard Russel was made bishop of Cape Verde. Evelyn: Diary, page 280. Gams: Series Episcoporum.
3 Not in the file.
4 Sir John Frederic.
5 Col. Henry Bishop was postmaster general.
6 A silver coin worth sixpence, named after Pope Julius II, by whom it was first struck.