Venice
January 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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91-101

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'Venice: January 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 91-101. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90100 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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January 1662

1662.
Jan. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian.
Archives.
107. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The corsairs dispose of powerful armaments, and if the squadrons of England and Holland should go away these seas would be left without traffic or commerce.
Madrid, the 4th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
108. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I am still in bed and unable to send much for lack of material from being unable to go out, and because of Christmas which causes a truce to all affairs. I have found out nothing about the embassy, despite my efforts, so it is probable that nothing definite is settled.
Disabled by gout the Lord Chancellor has been unable for several weeks to attend the Council, parliament or any other place of affairs. Being better he went a week ago to the House of Lords where he expressed the wish to have a conference with the House of Commons. They were at once sent for, and he then dilated, with the eloquence and erudition he commands, on the great danger to which this country has recently been exposed of relapsing into past infirmities through the conspiracies planned by the sectaries, joined with many of the disbanded officers and other disaffected persons, all they had done with their pernicious designs and the remedy applied by the king, by the imprisonment of most of them. He added what else was necessary to induce the members to apply their minds to consider the means for destroying and preventing such detestable dispositions. As parliament was rising on the following day and would not resume its sittings until after Epiphany, ten days hence by this style, and considering the need to leave some committee during this interval to attend to affairs, twelve lords and 24 of the Commons were at once appointed to sit daily and make careful inquiry into all the things notified by the chancellor, to report subsequently to parliament when it reassembled, so that it might take the necessary steps. (fn. 1)
Meanwhile it was proposed in committee to raise a new army under the duke of York. They are now considering this to see if it shall be brought before parliament, and in any case it is not known what that body may decide. It would not be inopportune because in this way they would prevent all imaginable disorders, as no one would take the risks if he saw established forces sufficient to spoil his plans, and they could in this way provide for the many who are in want who, rendered desperate from need, become malcontents and throw themselves into the arms of the sectaries or others to get wherewith to live.
The ships for Tangier and Lisbon sailed with a favourable wind, but after they had gone some way it turned and they were driven back to England, to the extreme disgust of the king, to whom this fleet costs about 1500l. sterling a day. They must now wait in port for another chance. They take orders to Montagu, who is to bring the queen, to make quite sure first of the possession of Tangier, and that it is really in the hands of the English, and to see on board all the money to be paid by the duke of Braganza as dowry. After this, and not before, he is to embark and accompany the bride to England, from which it may be conjectured that they do not trust absolutely to the promises of the Portuguese.
To take possession of what the Portuguese are to hand over in the East Indies six powerful ships of war are being prepared, (fn. 2) which will escort a larger number of merchantmen under the command of a good captain. It is not yet known who this will be, but it is expected the earl of Marlborough will be chosen, a man of birth and ability, with the best experience in navigation.
Letters from Flanders report the arrival there of the Madrid courier with news of the disappearance of all discord between the crowns over the affair of the coaches and the adjustment of all differences, which is greatly to the interest of Christendom, but the particulars are not yet known. For this the marquis of Fuentes was preparing to go to France as ambassador extraordinary, and we hear that an express has been sent to Batteville with the Catholic's orders, but he has not yet appeared. When he arrives I will keep the Senate fully informed.
London, 6th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian Archives.
109. To the Resident in England.
Send him a copy of the terms of settlement with Colonel Carlo di Vidmer for a levy of 4,000 men. The Senate counts on him to settle the point of a donation. No mention being made of his salary, they have granted him 150 ducats a month.
Ayes, 69. Noes, 3. Neutral, 15.
[Italian.]
Jan. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian Archives.
110. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Mons. de l'Estrade has already set out for London with all Francia. speed, to the exercise of his embassy. From what I have been able to gather he has commissions to settle various points and particularly about the flag and other matters when the French and English fleets chance to meet. From what I hear he will soon be back with the reply. Some believe that he is also to treat about a union of some kind against the Barbareschi.
Paris, the 10th January, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
111. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The decisions of England regarding Batteville have also reached the Court this week, the heralds of imminent troubles and very plain indications that in addition to the succour to Portugal the English are contriving greater mischief against Spain. The government here is greatly disturbed, being torn between anticipations and deliberations. They have decided upon some naval armament. The Count of Castriglio has been told off for this, but without money the decision will languish and considering the lack of the necessary materials, they have not the means to carry out what they propose. The Count of Castriglio told me of the application which he is devoting to the matter, the orders sent to Biscaglia and Cadiz with remittances of money and the assurance that in April next they will have twenty-six ships, including four which should come from Flanders.
The ministers believed that the fortress of Tangier had undoubtedly been handed over to the English, because the governor of Ceuta wrote as much; but this week it is announced that the transfer is postponed, to arrange terms for the purchase of the goods of those inhabitants who refuse to remain under the heretics. The town of Gibraltar, imperilled by the neighbourhood of these forces, has sent here for reinforcements of troops, for money and for commanders to resist any attempt.
Madrid, the 11th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
112. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I am better though I have not recovered my strength; but I have been able to go out. I have told the Secretary Nicolas what your Excellencies charged me in the ducali of the 5th November about his Majesty's interposition for peace and I ventured to suggest to him the hope cherished by the Senate to see themselves assisted by this king with vigorous forces in imitation of all the other princes of Christendom and in accordance with what he said to the ambassadors extraordinary and to me several times. I enlarged upon this in a tactful manner. The secretary replied that his Majesty offered his interposition as a testimony of his old standing friendly feeling towards the republic and because the Ambassador Winchelsea asked for orders and permission to negotiate, as the circumstances were favourable. He knew the difficulties in the way, seeing the immoderate pretensions of the Turk with more to the same effect, from which it may be conjectured that it all derives from the ambassador who is vain and interested and who suggested interposition moved in part by his good will to your Serenity, but more by the hope of private advantage, for the reasons I intimated when he was preparing to go to the Porte. On the point of succour I only got the usual replies from Nicolas of the king's goodwill, the impossibility to show it now because of domestic affairs and his intention to act immediately he is in a position to do so, for which I thanked him duly.
I also carried out the commands in the ducali of the 26th November and 2 December with the traders about the trade in currants at the three islands, assuring them of satisfaction and encouraging them to continue the trade. They expressed their pleasure at the intimation, so it is to be hoped that the despatch of ships to the Levant for this cargo will be more abundant in the future. So far this year but few ships have gone owing to the lack of security for navigation, due to the insolence of the Barbary corsairs, who infest the sea, and especially those of Algiers, who by reports arrived this week have taken 22 sail of several nations in the Strait of Gibraltar, going and coming, of which eleven belong to this nation, despite the presence of the fleets of England and Holland in those parts. Moreover all the ship captains complain that they are obliged by your Excellencies to waste time at Venice after unlading to wait to take on board biscuit and other provisions or munitions, to be taken to Candia or the fleet, to their serious loss, as not only do they receive nothing for hire but waste time and arrive late at the islands for the currants, so most of them prefer to give up the business altogether rather than suffer such losses.
London, the 13th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
113. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
No news having come of the fleet in the Mediterranean for a long time, the merchants published the day before yesterday, I know not on what foundation, that peace had been made between the English and the Algerines although two days before news had come of the capture of the 22 ships reported. The report says that the Barbary folk sent deputies to Tangier, where General Montagu is, to obtain the ratification of what Vice Admiral Lawson had arranged with them. That Montagu had at once sent to Lisbon for the English consul at Algiers, (fn. 3) who had withdrawn to that city during hostilities, to have him present at the revision of the treaties and the ratification. I have tried to discover from Secretary Nicolas how much there is in this, but he said he had nothing on the matter and had no news from Montagu which makes me believe that the traders spread these reports from interested motives, because they would like them to be true; but I will keep on the watch.
I also tried to learn something about the appointment of Viscount Facombrige but Nicolas told me that nothing had yet been decided either for Venice or for any other Court. The vulgar have spoken about the viscount because he is very fond of Italy and would like the post, but the king has not decided anything. But others assure me that although he is not appointed he has his Majesty's promise to be the one if a choice is made.
The ships for Tangier and Lisbon are still lying at anchor. In addition to the contrary winds which detain them it is found that the greater part of the provisions on board has gone bad for want of being properly seasoned and smelt so that it had to be thrown into the sea, to prevent sickness among the men. So they are making fresh provision, which is being urged on by the Court so that the ships may sail as soon as possible.
Sir Fanscio who went to Lisbon some months ago as resident arrived back at Court unexpectedly on Tuesday. The reason for his return is not known. It is supposed that it may be because all the things promised by Portugal to this crown are not going well. And indeed the dilatoriness with which they proceed to fulfil the agreements and the misfortunes which have happened to the ships are evidences of no good augury. The chancellor is accordingly distressed as he alone desired this marriage and the alliance being the one who digested and arranged everything.
The delayed despatches reached the Ambassador Batteville at last the day before yesterday, as the marquis della Fuentes received permission from the French Court to proceed to his embassy at Paris, and he sent them on in obedience to the Catholic's commands. They bring instructions to the baron to leave England, so he is hastening his preparations to start his journey as soon as possible. With these despatches he had letters for his Majesty giving the reasons for his recall and the appointment of his successor. He has told the Master of the Ceremonies, to inform the king and it will be interesting to see what his Majesty will answer and if he will give him audience to receive the Catholic's letter from his hands or if he will arrange otherwise.
London, the 13th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
114. To the Resident in England.
There is great occasion for satisfaction in that the king has ordered his ambassador at Constantinople to prevent English ships serving the Turks. It is a great point and one which merits the utmost care in advance, to the end that such a mischief may be removed. The possibility of an adjustment between England and the corsairs of Barbary is of the utmost importance, although it is contrary to all reason because of the many injuries which those same corsairs have inflicted. He is to keep a close watch to find out if these reports are confirmed.
Ayes, 181. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Jan. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Constantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
115. Giovanni Battista Ballarino. Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The deputies of the Borbareschi have not yet appeared in this city. From, what is observed they avoid an encounter and involving themselves in disputes with the ambassador of England so that they may not be obliged by the Vizier to some composition contrary to the intentions of the Basha of Algiers. Nevertheless his Excellency is expecting them well furnished with arguments for defence. He is trying to have the matter referred to the Cadilleschieri. He claims in the first place to make it appear that they were the first aggressors against the English ships, which came to trade and not for hostilities to that port. These corsairs are bringing the usual tribute with a considerable present for the Grand Turk including a silver vessel which the king of Portugal was sending as a present to the king of England.
Pera of Constantinople, the 17th January. 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
116. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England. to the Doge and Senate.
Last week I reported the orders that had reached Baron Batteville about presenting his master's letter. The king, on hearing from the Master of the Ceremonies what Batteville had told him, immediately sent the Secretary Nicolas to the ambassador's house to receive the letter which the baron at once handed to him without making known any of the commissions to which the letter refers, hoping that the king might summon him to audience to learn what the letter did not contain. But they have made no sign, so in obedience to his instructions he is hastening his departure and it seems likely he will start at the end of next week, crossing to Flanders, to stay there until further order.
Meantime they think of leaving here the secretary of the embassy (fn. 4) until the arrival of Don Stefano di Gamarra, if indeed he comes to England, as it is supposed that his coming will depend on what is judged fitting by Batteville, who is on the spot and who is best acquainted with the nature of his affairs at this Court, the other having orders not to move from Holland unless he is summoned by the baron, who. it appears, inclines rather to keep a resident here than an ambassador, chiefly because of what may happen when the queen comes.
On Saturday, with all diligence M. de L'Estrade. the Most Christian ambassador arrived at the Court and on Wednesday evening he saw the king privately. Your Serenity will have heard the chief reason for this precipitancy from the spot, touching the flag in an affair between French and English ships, and it is not known what will be arranged. The point is delicate and will be very difficult, especially as there seems no way of compromise since the English have long had it that the French should lower the flag on meeting their ships and there is no sign that this king will voluntarily surrender what has been enjoyed for hundreds of years, especially as up to the time of Cromwell France agreed without difficulty to this sign of respect and humbleness.
They say that in addition to this L'Estrade claims that England shall lay aside the marks and title of king of France. This also will be a difficult point and it arouses the misgiving that such claims proceed from quarrels between the two crowns, which God forfend, to the end that their forces may be employed where they can win more glory and merit than in a contest that would only rejoice the Turks.
Fanscio brings word of the miseries of Portugal and of the eagerness of the queen to cross to England. She urges the despatch of the vessels to fetch her which still He at anchor in the Downs. She writes to the king and seems inclined to take one of Montagu's ships out there, without a special mission from here, evincing a desire to save the expense and what else is done to celebrate her coming. She even asked the general for a ship but Montagu refused on the ground that he could not obey her without the precise order of the Court which he had not got. Here they do not wish her to embark before the money of the dowry is on board, the collection of which involves no small difficulty, in spite of the many taxes imposed. Here they commend Montagu's refusal of the ships, else he would have been punished, as happened lately to some captains returned to England who were dismissed their posts for having escorted towards Brazil a Portuguese ship at the instance of the bride, without having received orders from here.
Durazzo who has been many months in London with the character of ambassador extraordinary of the republic of Genoa, suffering from a quartan fever, has had to remain incognito hitherto. In spite of his sickness he has contrived covertly and by bribing the ministers who most favour him to have an earl at his entry and to enjoy all the prerogatives at his reception of crowned heads, although at first every one opposed it. But having corrupted the Master of the Ceremonies, who is excessively greedy of money and the chancellor, who does everything at Court, who does nothing without money and who rules the king as he pleases, he has carried his point. This will cause trouble to the crown here because Savoy, Florence, Holland, the Electors and many others will claim equal treatment. His entry was appointed for Wednesday but is postponed because the manner of his reception is known, which hitherto had been kept secret.
It was indeed absolutely denied by the ministers when the Cavalier Guasconi, a Florentine, who acts here more than the Resident, an inexperienced youth of no ability, (fn. 5) went to the king and represented the wrong done to his master by treating Genoa better than the Grand Duke, enlarging on all the other considerations which might have prevented this treatment of Durazzo. He did the same with all the Council and with the chancellor. As he gathered from the king and councillors every disposition to avoid prejudicing the Grand Duke in any way he hoped that all the hopes of the Genoese had vanished, while the chancellor told him sharply and roundly that no one could give orders in another's house: that his opposition alone would have induced them to give Durazzo satisfaction. The Grand Duke had been too friendly with Cromwell, sending him wine and other presents, with more to the same effect, indicating his disposition to favour the Genoese. The matter being brought before the Council on Wednesday it was decided as the chancellor wished, and to-day Durazzo has made his public entry, having gone to Gravesend where he was received by the king's barques and by the Master of the Ceremonies and later at the Tower by the earl of Carlisle and the coaches of the Court, with all the honours customary with the ambassadors of crowned heads. Yesterday he advised all the foreign ministers of his arrival in England and of to-day's ceremony. He sent to me, but I shall not make any sign and shall continue the relations usual between the minister of your Serenity and the one of that republic.
London, the 20th January. 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Jan. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
117. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The deputies of Algiers, arrived at Adrianople, brought forward their arguments in opposition to those of the ambassador of England. But when he had brought evidence to show that the provocation and the first attack were from the side of the Barbareschi, the latter were not able to deny the truth of this. They received a certain amount of rebuke from the Grand Vizier, and without asking judgment of the Cadilischieri they were urged to make an adjustment with that nation, which would be gladly embraced by the ambassador; but there is a lack of confidence and up to the present nothing has been decided with positive formality.
Pera of Constantinople, the 23rd January, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
118. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
M. de Cominges is destined to go as ambassador to England in place of M. de l'Estrade, who apparently is to take the place of M. de Tum in Holland.
Paris, the 24th January, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
119. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Their suspicions of England are constantly on the increase, and although the government does not flatter itself, the blow will fall before it is expected. However, the governor of Cadiz has proceeded to the strong places of the Spanish coast and to Gibraltar and orders have been sent again to Gamara to proceed to his embassy.
Madrid, the 25th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
120. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king read the letter of the Catholic, which Batteville handed to Nicolas, as reported, and finding that it contained nothing of substance but that all was referred to what Batteville would tell him orally, he sent back the secretary to the ambassador's house on Tuesday morning to say that his Majesty had received the letter and wished to know when he proposed to make his resignation. Surprised at this Batteville replied that he did not understand the use of the word resignation which was not proper for ambassadors. He had none to make. He was glad the king had seen his master's letter. In accordance with its terms and with other instructions he only had to make ready to go. He was hastening as much as possible and being nearly ready asked his Majesty for a passport and some convenience to cross the Ocean in safety. He would have liked to see the king before leaving to receive his commands and perform the usual formalities, but in view of what Nicolas had told him on the 25th November he could not do this for his own reputation or that of his master. He left the secretary of the embassy here until further order from Spain. At this point Nicolas asked if Don Stefano di Gamara was coming. He said he did not know, but while he was in Flanders and until he was back with his king at Madrid he was always the ambassador in England. If another comes he will bring letters for the king and everything requisite. If his Majesty wished to answer the king's letter he would see that it got safely to Madrid.
Nicolas went and reported everything to the king and yesterday morning another leading minister of the secretary of state went to the ambassador and said that the king, understanding his haste to get away had sent him his passport, which was quite ample. After this he at once began to lade his goods on a ship hired by him in the Thames, and to carry himself and his household he has the use of a barque of the duke of York, very swift and safe, to cross to Flanders. It is the same that took his Highness to Dunkirk and which has taken divers gentlemen to France and elsewhere along the coast. The messenger then explained that the word resignation only meant when he wished to take leave of his Majesty. He then referred to what Batteville had said about leaving the secretary and of always being the ambassador in England, inferring that he was going to Flanders on some pressing business of his master and would return to London. Batteville replied that leaving the secretary was an ordinary formality and he certainly would not return again to England. He thanked his Majesty for the passport and his Highness for the barque; in a few days he would certainly be gone.
One may gather from this a desire here to reopen relations with Batteville, but something checks them from being the first. But they have to do with a man at once spirited and sagacious and there is no sign that he will take the smallest step unless he is asked. He thinks that with the present circumstances with France England has more need of Spain than Spain of her and it is their affair here to suggest projects which they may consider likely to further their interests. Batteville will be the firmer since there is no doubt that all the demonstrations against him were merely to curry favour with the French, and there was never the smallest evidence, as the Court itself now admits, so he has some reason for being stiff. On the other hand, knowing English pride and obstinacy, it is doubtful whether his firmness is proper and prudent, and with the door opened by both parties and with ample room for the reintroduction of confidence it is not easy to say who should be censured and who praised. In this contest between two obstinate parties one can only wait to see the issue.
London, the 27th January, 1662.
[Italian.]
Jan. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
121. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
It is confirmed that besides the question of the flag the Most Christian demands that England shall give up the lilies and the title of king of France. But here they mean to keep them and it is said that orders have been sent to all captains of ships on pain of death to see that all foreign ships pay the respect due to the English, as practised for so many hundreds of years. It seems that the Ambassador l'Estrade will shortly be leaving Court. They say he is going to Holland with whom, it is stated, France has concluded an offensive and defensive alliance as well as with Sweden also, against this country. It is certain that nothing is talked of here except a rupture with the French, either from the natural hatred of this nation for that or because things seem more disposed at present to hostilities. Time will show. Meanwhile every good Christian will pray God to avert hostilities between Christian princes and to turn their animosity against Ottoman barbarity which becomes more and more formidable and threatens one day the ruin of Christendom. Thus in spite of the English and Dutch fleets in the Mediterranean the Barbary corsairs are constantly making booty and become powerful without suffering any injury of consequence. News has come recently of the capture by the Algerines of the Charity and Friendship, belonging to this mart, which were coming from the Levant islands with currants, together with the Benvenuta, which fought for several hours and succeeded in escaping to Leghorn. I do not neglect to intimate that all these injuries call for vengeance, as directed in the ducali of the 31st December, but it is to be feared that the indications of hostilities with France will cause them to come to an adjustment with the Barbary folk which God forfend.
The Ambassador Durazzo had his first audiences with all the royal formalities. (fn. 6) The ministers here are now beginning to repent granting them, as the Dutch, the Electors and others will want the same, while they fear that the crowns and Venice will claim a higher distinction, such as the accompaniment of a marquis.
The Secretary Brun has been to me to-day in the king's name on behalf of old Galileo's son. I told him your Excellencies had given the most positive orders to the Captain General at Sea for the ransom of the slave and it would certainly be done at the first opportunity; and that Galileo had received some payment a few months ago which showed the good disposition of the republic to satisfy him. Brun replied that instead of many thousands of pounds sterling that are owed to him, only 1,000 ducats had been paid, not worth 150l. although 3,000 ducats di banco had been voted six years ago, which he had never been paid. The sum is quite trifling in view of what is owed. He asked me to pray your Serenity to make some larger payment to help a man who is reduced to misery through this debt alone. I could only promise to report everything to your Serenity.
London, the 27th January, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
122. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
For the requirements of the squadron of ships which are armed and ready 200,000 crowns have been sent to the duke of Bofort, who when he left the Court received secret commissions and particularly of the course he should take in the event of encounters with the English fleet. From what I have been able to gather on sound authority under the seal of the utmost secrecy, the royal orders were never to strike his flag or veil his sails to the English, and rather to lose his ships. But the fact that Bofort has not yet embarked makes one believe that after the king had reflected better on the disorders which might ensue from the execution of his commands when these fleets should meet, he suspended Bofort's departure in order to see what openings and expedients the Ambassador del'Estrade might find in London with King Charles, which might be embraced by common consent. Some speak of the possibility of proposals that in the Ocean the French shall lower their flag to the English and that in the Mediterranean the latter shall do the same to the French.
Paris, the 31st January, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The conference was upon the bill for the well governing and regulating of Corporations and took place on 19 Dec, o.s. The committee was appointed to meet at the chancellor's house four days later. Journals of the House of Lords Vol. xi, page 355. Journals of the House of Commons Vol. viii, pp. 339–40. The latter contains an abstract of Clarendon's speech.
2 Only four ships are mentioned in the records of the East India Company, viz.: Dunkirk, Leopard, Mary Rose and Convertine. Sainsbury: Court Minutes of the East India Company 1660–3, page 169. See Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, pp. 168, 237.
3 Robert Browne.
4 Don Alonso Rancano, in a letter in French of 2 June he signs himself Alphonso Rancano et Luazes. S.P. For Spain Vol. xliv.
5 Giovanni Salvetti Anterminelli, son of the old resident Amerigo Salvetti.
6 He had his public entry on 10–20 January from the house of Abraham Williams in Palace Yard, and his first audience on 13–23 January, to which he was conducted by the earl of Bolingbroke. Kingdom's Intelligencer Jan. 6–13 Mercurius Politicus Jan. 9–16.