Venice
February 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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101-112

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'Venice: February 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 101-112. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90101 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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February 1662

Feb. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
123. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
They are saying that Batteville will be staying on in London, because the author of the late unfortunate incident may be able to correct it himself by behaving in the opposite way, and will be in a better position to pluck the satisfaction of France (et in maggior modo spicchi la sodisfattione della Francia). The courier whom the ambassador keeps all ready to depart, takes this decision. The Spaniards commend the line of conduct adopted by Batteville. There is nothing more to be said except that the constitution of the present times is such that even blows delivered straight at the heart are not considered an offence. How Batteville can remain on in England after what the king there has said, no one knows. When a thing is decided with a certain object, ingenuity leads it to another. Dissimulation and the utmost mystery are not always advantageous because reputation maintains respect and with it, the state.
Madrid, the 1st February, 1662.
[Italian.]
Feb. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
124. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador got back here from Adrianople yesterday, and immediately sent me word. With regard, to his affairs I have to report that they have been adjusted and the capitulations of the English with the Porte have been signed by the Grand Turk in precisely the same form as was practised under King Charles I, with the addition of some advantage for the merchants. For example they are left free to accept or not the letters of exchange which come from Turks or other inhabitants in this empire. The Captain Basha is forbidden to make search on the ships of that nation that he chances to encounter, and it is their fixed determination that the English shall be treated with respect by the Barbareschi. This, according to the ambassador, is expressed much more vigorously than is usual; but it will not be strong enough to bridle the corsairs or prevent them from continuing their violence. The deputies of Algiers were sharply taken to task by the Chacaia of the Grand Vizier for what they had done against the galleons of England. But the strongest representations of his Excellency for the punishment of the guilty rascals and for strenuous orders did not achieve their purpose. He said that the deputies wished to come and visit him, but were not admitted. He assured me that it was a special object of the Grand Vizier to be on good terms with all the princes of Christendom, so that he might wage war well in one place alone.
The ambassador said further that the trade of the Portuguese at the marts of the Turk and the residence of a minister of their nation would be readily conceded by the Grand Turk at any time they pleased. He had already obtained a firm promise of this, but not in writing, as he had requested, for his own security. In any case he had forwarded the news to his own king and to the king of Portugal. His Excellency remarked, however, that England stood to suffer a certain amount of injury from this introduction, because a new nation here of the Portuguese merchants might make great profits and damage his own people; that friendly relations between princes are not perpetual, but change their aspect from one day to another so he would not wish to play the game of foreigners to the detriment of his own king.
The ambassador told me of the efforts of a Granatino to get a Spanish minister admitted here, and the imperial resident and Panagiotti are working to the same end. What increases my astonishment is the open lack of confidence between this resident and the ambassador, who was not visited by him during an uninterrupted stay of two months in that city… The ambassador remarked to me that it is not to the advantage of either the Germans or the Spaniards to engage in a war with the Ottoman House.

Pera of Constantinople, the 2nd February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian: deciphered.]
Feb. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
125. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ship detained by the Turks to send provisions to Candia, (fn. 1) was sealed by order of the Caimecan two days before his Excellency's return. I sent to urge him not to submit to such action with the danger of further violence, and asked him to approach the Emino with some present. He did so and sent to inform me to-day that he was hopeful of getting the ship unsealed as the Caimecan and Emino had drawn up a joint arz showing that other vessels were ready to take munitions and troops to that island.
Pera of Constantinople, the 2nd February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Feb. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
126. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Besides his passport and the ship to cross to Ostend the baron de Batteville at the moment of his departure received the greatest honours from the Court, his Majesty offering him coaches and barques, which is unusual with ordinary ambassadors. Yesterday after dinner accompanied by the Master of the Ceremonies he passed through the city to the Tower in the king's coach and six accompanied by other leading gentlemen of the Court and proceeded thence in a barque of the king to Greenwich. There he went on board the duke of York's vessel, and with a favourable wind he will leave the Thames to-night and reach Ostend to-day. Everyone is sorry here, for his high qualities and the liberality in pouring out money, which won him the affection of all the people here. He did not see the king or take leave, as he did not think it proper to ask audience after what had passed, and they did not offer though they say frankly that if he had asked he would have had it. So nothing was said and there was no present as they feared he might refuse it, as indeed he would have done. The king would certainly have called him to audience as easily as he gave him all the other honours, but the chancellor shut his eyes and ears to the latter and prevented the former, with scant consolation and no approval from the city and generality.
No other minister has come in place of Batteville. Don Stefano di Gamara remains at Brussels and nothing more is said about his crossing the sea. The secretary remains in charge here until further order.
As the departure of Batteville came about because the Catholic wished to please the Most Christian, who wanted him away from here, so when France saw him delaying his departure she suspected that the Catholic's orders were merely pro forma, so M. de Liona wrote from Paris to the marquis de la Fuentes, saying he heard that Batteville had taken another house in London for six months, although he spoke of leaving, and the Most Christian suspected that he meant to stay until the queen came, and then go, saying he did so out of respect for her and not to gratify France, telling him that he could not be received at Paris unless the agreements made at Madrid on the subject were fulfilled; so Fuentes sent an express to Batteville to hasten his departure.
They are anxiously waiting to hear if any encounter occurs between the French and any of the ships of this country and to see what happens about the flag. The Most Christian has undoubtedly directed it not to be lowered, and here it is ordained that foreign ships shall do as usual. On the question of the title and arms they no longer speak so warmly so it is thought that the pretension may lapse, as they may not consider the present occasion suitable especially as since the report they seem the more determined here to keep what they have. The Ambassador l' Estrade is leaving here soon, to stay in Holland and the Sieur di Cominges will come to London in his place.
The ships to fetch the Infanta and for Tangier left a week ago yesterday, and as the wind has been favourable it is thought they will be near their destination. When the Infanta arrives I will guide myself as to expenses by the ducali of the 10th December. I shall have to go to meet her to perform the customary duties and so I notify the Senate for such resolutions as are needed for the letters of credit and other things.
The ducali of the 7th December have reached me this week. I will treat as instructed about the levy offered by Vinder, and will keep the Savio alla Scrittura informed.
London, the 3rd February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
127. To the Resident in England.
Commend his office with the Secretary Nicolas about his Majesty's proposed interposition. Whenever the subject is mentioned again he is to endeavour to evade it, as the Senate has well considered the matter and that it all derives from the English ambassador at the Porte.
The Senate notes the general character of the replies about help. He is to revive the memory of this as opportunities present themselves, to obtain some advantage in the grave state of affairs that now exists.
Commend his encouragement of the merchants to continue the currant trade. He can always assure them of good treatment. He can rebut the complaints of the captains of ships that they are obliged to take cargoes for the army and Candia, because this is not required unless they give their consent voluntarily, and upon due payment, thus removing the bad impression which is very harmful to the interests of the state. He is to keep on the watch about the appointment of an ambassador.
Two Englishmen, John and Francis Ravenscraff, were condemned by the Council of Forty alla Criminale for wounding Giles Jones, the consul. As the Duchess of Modena has made request to the Signory for their liberation, the Resident is to find out what is his Majesty's feeling about the matter and all other particulars, so that a decision may be taken as to what is convenient, upon a solid basis.
Ayes, 97. Noes, 2. Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Feb. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
128. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
There is no news as yet of the duke of Boffort putting out to sea, and as a matter of fact this delay proceeds solely from the difficulty about the flag. My informant told me that not only were the king's orders such as I reported, but the duke was to get the English to dip to him. As this is directly contrary to what King Charles steadily claims, then, if there is no adjustment of the matter by compromise, or if they do not change their orders and ideas here, Boffort must remain in port or else, by exposing himself at sea he will hazard an engagement with the English disadvantageous to himself because they will always be the stronger. However the negotiations are continuing at London, to find a middle way and some compromise. The king of England also is trying to adjust the matter, but as the successful issue of the adjustment with Spain has swollen their pride at this Court, it makes them uphold their pretensions with the more energy. On the other hand such a dominion is set over the sea and the English will not abandon it upon any consideration, more particularly as they always find themselves with naval forces so enormously superior to the French. Thus this important affair is exceedingly involved and it is impossible to foretell what the issue will be.
Paris, the 7th February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
129. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
From Cadiz they are continually transporting food and munitions to General Montagu off Tangier. A number of barques have left with beams and planks to build quarters for the soldiers of that fortress. The ports of Spain not only afford a refuge to the English but provide the places occupied with munitions and food, a state of affairs wherein necessity imposes the most severe dissimulation.
Madrid, the 8th February, 1662.
[Italian.]
Feb. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
130. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Parliament has resumed its sittings, spending all its time in reviewing accounts, in putting straight irregularities, in ordaining remedies for abuses in the customs, in seeking for better order in the administration to keep in check as much as possible the wildness of the people, grown untameable by past liberty and so preserve the peace and tranquillity that England now enjoys, as the only way to render the country powerful and formidable at home and admired and feared abroad by her neighbours and other powers more remote. They have also considered the formation of a new army, the better to secure the quiet of the realm, differing in form, from what has been used before, but the question has met with several difficulties and remains undigested with no sign of a decision agreeable to the intentions of the proposer, who would like to see it decided.
As the wind has not continued favourable long enough for the ships for Portugal and Tangier to reach their destinations it is feared they may have had trouble to finish their voyages; but it is believed that they will have arrived and they are waiting for definite news. Assuming as undoubted the delivery of Tangier to the English they are hastily lading some ships with munitions of war and food to be sent to those parts as soon as possible, as they foresee a considerable dearth at that place.
Nothing is heard about Algiers, as no news has come for a long while. All the rumours of the affairs with France have ceased and they are anxiously waiting to see what may come of an accidental encounter with the ships of that country as every one feels sure that it will afford a cause of offence, well aware that this cannot be to the advantage of either crown at the present crisis. It would be desirable that they should join forces to extirpate the Barbary corsairs, who are such a nuisance to navigation and trade, and thereby humble the pride of the Grand Turk.
Monday was the thirteenth anniversary of the sentence of death pronounced against the late King Charles. It was only right that the day should be celebrated with something exemplary against the regicides who still survive. Baron Mounson, Sir Mildmay and Colonel Walops who had a large share in that sentence, were taken from the Tower, where they are sentenced to imprisonment for life, dragged through the city at the horse's tail to the place of execution, made to pass under the gallows, with ropes round their necks, and there deprived of all their honours, their arms being torn to pieces by the hangman. After being made to kiss the gallows they were taken back to prison, whence they will be taken every year, on this day, for the same performance, so long as they live.
Yesterday being the anniversary of the king's execution was spent in devotions in church and in fasting according to the use of the country, with all the strictness the religion they profess allows, imploring Heaven to bless the nation and preserve it from similar evil influences.
At this time others concerned in that hateful deed are to be put to death, having been sentenced by the common court of justice and sentenced again by parliament. Some of them will be burned to ashes after being hanged, as it only needs the fire to consume for ever the memory of their barbarous actions.
Prince Rupert has been at Court for some weeks, having come with the permission of Caesar, in whose armies he holds some command, on condition of returning to Germany when the season is more suitable for operations of war.
Count Rangoni has come for complimentary offices with his Majesty in the name of the duke of Modena. (fn. 2) He comes from Paris where he performed similar duties with the Most Christian.
London, the 10th February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberiazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
131. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 20th ult. Note that the ambassador of Genoa has received the honours usually accorded to the ambassadors of crowned heads. Desire him to keep a close watch on all their procedure and on the course which is adopted by the ambassador of France. Commend his conduct in having no dealings with this minister of Genoa, and he is to persevere in this course.
Ayes, 103. Noes, 0. Neutral, 16.
[Italian.]
Feb. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
132. Giovanni Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
Forwards news from Adrianople.
On the 14th December the ambassador of England has been permitted to come here, agreeably to his requests, it is thought in order to negotiate for the introduction of the Portuguese at this Court.
On the 16th January: The ambassador of England has renewed between the Sultan and his king the usual capitulations and has conducted other negotiations for his nation, with which he will return to Constantinople in a few days' time.
Vienna, the 12th February, 1662.
[Italian.]
Feb. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
133. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
With regard to the affair of the flag, it is reported here that the matter is settled and that they will dip it first to the French. Lione told me that the fleets will avoid a meeting, and in any case they will salute each other reciprocally without claiming that either is bound to do it to the other. Although he did not tell me in so many words that the English will be the first to do it, he talked all round the subject in his conversation with me. I know, however, that the queen of England said with feeling to a confidential friend of mine, who congratulated her on this adjustment: Although I am issued from the House of France, yet I am the queen of England. It cannot be true that the agreement has been made in the form stated with the king, my son, because he cannot give up his right or renounce the prerogatives which pertain to him, and which he will always uphold, as is fitting. But this much is certain, he will never wilfully seek a quarrel by causing the French fleet to be followed by his own to force it to lower its flag. But if the French fleet chooses to avoid encounters and as the sea is very wide, there will be no occasion for untoward incidents, which I am certain will be equally avoided on this side.
Paris, the 14th February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
134. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
When it was supposed that the ships for Portugal and Tangier had reached their destinations and that the news might be received at Court, word came that they were unable to get out of the Channel with the good fortune with which they sailed, four being separated from the squadron and carried to Ireland. Nothing is heard of the rest and it is hoped that they have continued the voyage prosperously. Consequently they are eagerly waiting for definite news, and they are forced to admit that every misfortune has descended on these ships, which have suffered so many disasters since they were ready to sail.
The Spanish troops embarked in Flanders who sailed from Ostend at the same time as the English ships, on their way to Galicia, by order of the Catholic, to join the army his Majesty has there against Portugal, have also been unable to get out of the Channel through contrary winds. The ships with the troops on board have thus been dispersed and some have been cast on the coast of England, arriving in a very bad state, and of others there is no news yet. The gale in the Ocean has been very fierce these last days, and we hear that it has been no less so in the Mediterranean, it being reported that the Barbary corsairs have suffered much from it, especially the Algerines who are said to have lost 11 ships of war and some merchantmen which they had captured; that the mole there had been seriously damaged. That seven merchantmen had left Algiers for Bogia to get timber to build ships. Having word of this Vice Admiral Lawson was pursuing them in the hope of capturing them, as with the opportunity of the present consternation of the Barbary folk he had given chase to other ships of theirs, and they are eagerly waiting to hear if he has taken them, as they should desire nothing less than the total destruction of this fierce and troublesome folk, which might easily be done if the forces of France should unite with the English and Dutch already there. But the French squadron has not left port, the Admiral Boffort, who is to command not having embarked, and they think a union impossible here because of the question of the flag, as it is thought that the French and English will avoid meeting so that there may be no occasion for disputes. But as it is desirable that they should incline here to so holy a work, I will keep an eye on their deliberations, obeying the Senate's instructions of the 21st January, and will take convenient opportunity to insinuate the convenience of such a resolution and of pursuing more vigorously than ever the efforts against the unbearable audacity of those barbarians.
The above particulars about Algiers have come from Tangier, adding that the Turks, alarmed by the report of a naval expedition of the Most Christian, apprehending a landing and attack by land, have sent 8 ships to Constantinople to urge the Sultan to send some troops to their defence. That the Algerines had five ships ready to sail, three of them of small account, having only 8 guns each, three galleys complete, six ships building and one launched but without its masts and other fittings necessary for navigation. The same letters, which are of the 19th January, state that General Montagu is there and has succeeded in opening correspondence with the king of Arzela, who commands absolutely in those parts, so that the English can land freely in the lands of the Moors for the provisions they need, having commerce and trade with them and receiving every sort of favour without any hindrance soever.
Having performed all the functions for which he has sent the Ambaassador Durazzo took leave of the king lately with the formalities enjoyed at his entry. (fn. 3) He also bade farewell to the ministers and magnates of the Court and is about to start home. Although he had notified all the foreign ministers resident in London of his coming, only the ambassadors of Holland received him. No one else had any dealings with him or showed any act of confidence because seeing what he had gained here he claimed to be an Excellency and to be visited first by France and all others, but no one except the Dutch made the slightest move. The secretary of Spain, left at Court after the departure of the baron de Batteville, who is said to have arrived safely in Flanders, recently had audience of the king and the duke of York and has discharged the necessary formalities with the ministers and others of the Court, receiving from the king and everyone else abundant testimony of affection and esteem.
London, the 17th February, 1662.
[Italian.]
Feb. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
135. To the Resident in England.
Commend his efforts to stir the English to take vengeance on the corsairs. As opportunities present themselves he will insist on the same ideas, laying stress on their insolence and the injuries which England daily suffers at their hands.
Approve of his reply to the Secretary Brun about Galileo. Letters have been sent several times to the Captain General to procure his liberty by every possible means, so that if it has not been achieved, that depends solely on the goodwill of the Turks. In the payment of the debt owed to him, steps will be taken to satisfy him by instalments of the largest amounts possible, as will be done with the remaining part, already allotted.
Ayes, 78. Noes. 1. Neutral, 14.
[Italian.]
Feb. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
136. Giovanni Capello, Venetian Ambassador at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
Our hopes have been disappointed about the departure of the Flemish ship Fortune, which was laded and left for Venice, but was subsequently seized at the Castelli. It shares the same fortune with two other ships, one English (fn. 4) and one French, which, by order of his Majesty, are to receive troops from here to take to Kenny and other garrisons in the kingdom and then are to continue their delayed route. In this fashion they are proceeding to send succours and to garrison the fortresses.
Pera of Constantinople, the 21st February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Feb. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
137. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
No news has come of the fleet which recently left these shores, to the general surprise. They are the more anxious to hear because the furious winds which blow, so that no letters have arrived from anywhere this week, and the heavy gales which are reported to continue at sea make them fear misfortunes like those which befell the squadron of the Catholic from Ostend. Some were driven to England, as reported, but when the indications appeared favourable again they spread their sails and put to sea. But they had not gone far when they were surprised by fresh storms, and forced back to land, at Torbay, Plymouth and other ports of the west country, extenuated by toil and weakened by fear. Almost all the household of the marquis of Caracena has perished with the ships that carried his equipage, including his most precious goods and the soldiers on board. When these ships reached the English shores it seems they did not find the governors and others ready to grant them all the commodities they desired after their experiences, so the Spanish secretary asked the king for orders. His Majesty graciously obliged by sending letters to the earl of Bath, governor of Plymouth, and others to receive these people with courtesy and friendliness, allow them to make the necessary provisions and supply them with every convenience and assistance, and further, if any of Caracena's goods are recovered to restore them to the owners without making any claim. (fn. 5) While the Spaniards are distressed at the misfortunes of these troops whose experience and bravery they expected to facilitate greatly the enterprise of Portugal, the Portuguese and their supporters take comfort thinking that these misadventures and delays will damp their spirits and postpone the ruin with which the Castilians threaten them.
By a royal proclamation all the money coined in the country during the troubles by parliament and Cromwell was recalled and readily brought by the people to the mint to receive in exchange other money, and was immediately recoined with his Majesty's effigy. But despite the alloy made with other metal and the issue of so much coin which had been kept hidden, from which they probably hoped for a greater abundance, they do not find the slightest relief, indeed the scarcity is more sensible than ever. The king is considerably affected by this, as the taxes lately imposed by parliament do not produce the results expected, the people being destitute of gold and keeping the little they have for their own needs, while the returns from the customs and duties are made inconsiderable by the great booty taken by the Barbary corsairs and by the diminution of trade. He was obliged this week to apply to the city of London for a loan of 200,000l. sterling, but as they had not the means to supply such a sum, some individuals were found who did so with good assignments to secure repayment.
Besides money there is an inexplicable shortage of everything else, eatables and every other use, bread in particular, the price of which has doubled in a few weeks and continues to rise, so that if God's hand does not save this country there is good reason for fearing some evil influence in the coming summer. The extraordinary weather of this season leaves no choice but to look for either pestilence or scarcity, especially as it seems that always, after the coronation of any king, this country has been afflicted by a similar scourge. To prevent this, after observing fasts of late and imploring the mercy of Heaven, the government has turned its attention to human remedies. For this they have ordered the observation of Lent, which began the day before yesterday, which was not kept before, to render the supply of meat more abundant at the proper time, and to allow others to derive greater profits from the fisheries and they show earnest application to preserve the country from the dangers that threaten.
To remedy the high usury of the moneylenders and pawnbrokers, whose exorbitant demands rise to 70 per cent., to the ruin of the people, in contravention of the laws and contrary to the divine precept, it is proposed to establish in England a Monte di Pietà, such as exists in so many other parts of Europe. They are now discussing the question in parliament (fn. 6) and it is thought that it will be carried, though it is claimed that the rate of interest will have to be 15 per cent, which is high, but at any rate more tolerable than what they submit to at present.
Having performed the formalities for which he came Count Rangone is now about to return to Italy. The ambassador of Genoa is here incognito and will leave in a few days. A certain Marquis Gabbiano, his comrade, left London for Paris at the end of last week. The reason is said to be curiosity to see the ballet and other things to be celebrated at that Court at the close of carnival; but a confidential friend assures me that Durazzo adopted this pretext, but his real object was some business and chiefly to try and get the same treatment from the Most Christian as he succeeded in getting in England, thanks to the money expended.
The queen of Bohemia, his Majesty's aunt, after being confined to her bed for several months with a serious illness, ended her days the day before yesterday, at the age of seventy. (fn. 7) For this the Court is full of sadness and in mourning. After it the king will receive the condolences of the foreign ministers, which I will offer in the name of your Excellencies. Following the example of the other ministers I shall have to wear mourning, and for this I have expended exactly 38l. sterling, which I ask permission to enter in my accounts.
London, the 24th February, 1662.
[Italian.]
Feb. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
138. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
Finally the Grand Vizier has decided to satisfy himself by sending certain number of troops to Kenny on the English ship which was destined for Leghorn. (fn. 8) All the efforts of the ambassador to avert this mischief have availed nothing. He offered 2,000 reals which the merchants of his nation would have paid down promptly, to be allowed to send their goods to the destination without hindrance or danger. He adduced in his favour that there were other French vessels in this channel and a Flemish one at the Dardanelles. These were allowed to go free while his were pitched upon, against all reason. Such partiality would not be well received by his king, and so no more merchant ships would come here.
After hearing these arguments the Caimecan jointly with the Emino made an arz, as I reported. The reply of the Vizier arrived yesterday. He orders the seizure of the Flemish, ship and of one of the French ones also, to make use of all three, so that no distinction shall be made. Everyone protests, but without any success. A chiaus went to inform the ambassador and the two residents of the order. They have not yet begun to embark the troops, which it is believed will not exceed
900 Janissaries.
The English ambassador promised to give direction to the captain of his ship, that under the pretext of watering at a suitable place he will give the Janissaries every possible chance of escaping. The Resident of Holland states frankly and scandalously that the Turks are masters and it is necessary to obey them. My offices with the French resident have proved fruitless.

Pera of Constantinople; the 26th February, 1661. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 The Maidenhead, Captain Kempthorne. Hist. MSS. Comm. Finch Papers, Vol. i., page 179.
2 Count Lottario Rangoni. His letter of credence dated at Modena on 8 December, 1661. S.P. For. Italian States.
3 On Saturday 1–11 February. Mercurius Politicus Jan. 30—Feb. 6.
4 The Maidenhead.
5 Seven ships were driven into Torbay, two wrecked in Bigberry bay, one stuck at Anchorstones but succeeded in getting into Plymouth with a loss of sixty men. There was so much sickness that at least 400 were thrown over board into Torbay. Kingdom's Intelligencer Feb. 10–7. The officers were so discouraged that they returned to Ostend with the remnants of the fleet. Letters to the earl of Bath were sent on 13–23 February. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 273.
6 A bill for the register of pawns and sales. Journals of the House of Lords Vol. xi, page 372.
7 She died in the early morning 13–23 February at Leicester House, at the age of 65. M. A. Green: Elizabeth of Bohemia, pp. 409, 412.
8 The Maidenhead.