Venice
March 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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113-125

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'Venice: March 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 113-125. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90102 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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March 1662

March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
139. To the English Ambassador at the Porte.
Thanking him for the invitation of the minister of the republic to the christening of his son and conveying the best wishes of the Signory. They desire their minister to express this, accompanying the office with something more, with which he is charged, as, a trifling token of their goodwill and regard for his Excellency's high qualities in the confidence that he will ever continue to grow in the opinion and affection of the Senate, with the continued experience of his courteous regard for them.
Ayes, 126. Noes, 0. Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
140. To the Grand Chancellor at Constantinople.
Note the friendly disposition of the English ambassador. He should be thanked and this friendliness cultivated, especially for stopping the ships of his country from serving the enemy. Commend his action in accepting the invitation to the christening, after taking due precautions in the matter of religion. The Senate has thought fit to correspond to his friendliness with the enclosed letter. He is to present this together with the present of four robes of gold brocade which he will find in the little box attached to these present, as a token of the republic's cordiality and to conciliate even more nearly the goodwill which the ambassador shows.
Commend his reply on the question of mediation, and whenever this subject is brought up again he is to act in a similar way, evading the question and letting it drop, the more so as the ambassador certainly has no instructions from the king or from the ministers, as it appears he meant this to be understood at first, so that it is plain his offer proceeded solely from his own particular forwardness.
Ayes, 126. Noes, 0. Neutral, 8.
[Italian.]
March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
141. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
These waters were scoured during the last campaign, by Montagu with the English fleet and by Ruiter with the Dutch one. But the operations did not correspond with the strength of these nations, because Montagu under Algiers thought more of compensation for losses than of attacking the root of the mischief. Holland made no attempt on fortified places and won no considerable advantage at sea. The number of vessels taken to Barbary was very large; a serious loss to the English; but all the powers of Europe are interested. Commerce suffers seriously from this vigorous piracy.
Amid all these contentions they are carrying on negotiations with the emperor, with projects passed on to London. But any sort of action is difficult because those folk have no fertile fields except the sea and gather no harvest except violence.
The fortress of Tanger will afford an opportune refuge for the English besides keeping the fleets at the Strait, to continually harass and imperil the corsairs and give security to trade. Moreover the Moors on the mainland are divided among themselves into factions, disturbing all the part of Africa subject to Morocco. There are divisions and tumults in the town itself.
Madrid, the 1st March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
142. Giovanni Cornaro. Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The fleet of England has already arrived at Tanger with 5,000 foot. They write of the landing and of 600 horse. Some of the ship have proceeded to Lisbon, others have entered the Strait. The port is already proclaimed free to all the nations. They are devoting their attention to the erection of the mole. to the fortifications and to the civil government.
Madrid, the 1st March. 1662.
[Italian.]
March 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
143. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England. to the Doge and Senate.
After various rumours in London of the safe arrival of the English fleet in Portugal, word came yesterday from Dover, through merchants that it had reached Lisbon on the 14th February, without any mishap. But the Court has no news or the house of the earl of Peterborough though everyone hopes it will prove true from the general desire to see the queen here, and it is probable she will be in England before many weeks. Meanwhile, the king wishing to help his brother in law, recognising that it will not be to the advantage of England either, after this marriage, to let the Catholic conquer Portugal, has decided to send a succour of 1,000 horse and 3,000 foot under the command of Lord Inchquin, an Irish Catholic, who is now getting the men together. The troops will be all veteran, so they are sure to render excellent service, if they are well kept and paid punctually, England only supplying the men. It seems that these troops will land at Porto to fight on the side of Galicia. where the Spaniards claim to have the greatest forces, and for which the troops which lately left Flanders were destined, though they will not soon be fit to render service owing to their sufferings in the late storms, and it is not even known if they have left these shores.
If these measures are taken, as there seems no room for doubt, a rupture between this and the Catholic crown is to be feared, which must seriously prejudice the interests of Christendom against the common enemy, or the king of Spain will have to come to some adjustment with the duke of Braganza, since difficult as the enterprise of Portugal has been hitherto it will become most difficult in the future when he will be opposed by England as well.
Sir Fanscio will soon be going back to Portugal to remain there as ordinary ambassador. He is getting ready and will make the voyage at the earliest moment.
Since the king's return this city has been most insecure through the number of thieves who have entered it, and now especially when everything is excessively dear they do great mischief. Not a night passes that they do not break into houses and render families wretched. To remedy this the king has lately issued a proclamation. (fn. 1) But it has availed nothing for although it includes highway robbery there were yesterday taken to prison here two sons of the earl of Dorset and some other gentlemen of noble family, some even members of the present House of Commons, taken on the highway a few miles from this metropolis, accused of having robbed and murdered a wayfarer. (fn. 2) If the murder is proved by witnesses, as seems likely, the law must take its course and they will pay for their crime on the gallows. They can only escape by the king's act of grace, to which his Majesty does not seem in the least inclined, owing to his resolution to see those who commit such infamies punished, whatever their rank.
There are still no couriers and I have been without the ducali for several weeks. This is due to the unceasing bad weather and to contrary winds. On Monday the wind blew so strongly from midnight until midday of the following day, that it did much damage in this city, where there was scarcely a house that did not suffer. Many were blown down. Several persons were killed. Numbers of trees were uprooted. Ships were swamped in the Thames and many persons drowned. Some triumphal arches, set up a year ago for the king's coronation, and still standing for the queen's entry, were demolished, causing greater destruction in the neighbouring houses. In short the weather has been so terrible that no one remembers the like in England, the day on which Cromwell died, which was said to be most extraordinary, was certainly not to be compared with this, which caused such terror among the people that no one knew where he was or what he was doing. Even the royal palace was seriously damaged in many places. While the wind was blowing its strongest, fires were discovered in three apartments there. The alarm being given in the city the noise of the drums and trumpets to assemble the troops only served to increase the terror, but when the wind dropped they were able to put the fire out, though it did no little harm. They have not yet been able to find out, whether it was accidental or due to the malice of the fanatics who only seek to forward their evil designs.
Amid the universal ruin in this city, which will cost many thousands to repair, I also have suffered serious loss as the front of this house is blown out and a corner of my own room has fallen, involved with two adjacent houses which have completely collapsed. I escaped by miracle, as I was nearly buried by the stones which touched and broke the bed where I was sleeping, threw down a wardrobe where I kept money, clothes and other goods of some value, all smashed to pieces. Of 1507. sterling in it I have only recovered a trifle the rest being in the hands of the people who in the confusion hastened to the spectacle, and among the stones and furniture there is nothing that will be of any further use. Of the many misfortunes which have happened to me in my long service at this Court, this is certainly the worst stroke, likely to cripple me permanently, and I hope that the Senate will assist me with its customary generosity.
London, the 3rd March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
144. To Queen Caterina of England.
After the happy restoration of King Charles to the throne of England, the goodness of God has given him her Majesty for his bride. The republic from its friendly relations with the royal house of England has cause for particular gratification at this happy event. The Resident Giavarina, whom they ask her graciously to receive, will express their sentiments.
Ayes, 116. Noes, 1. Neutral, 16.
[Italian.]
March 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
145. To the Resident in England.
Enclose letter for the queen. When she arrives he is to follow the example of the other ministers in presenting it with a suitable office. Note that Prince Rupert is at the Court. He is to observe the prince's proceedings and report thereon.
Ayes, 116. Noes, 1. Neutral, 16.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costaninopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
146. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
Great confusion has arisen over the hiring of ships for the service of the Grand Turk. English and Flemings try to throw the blame on each other, and this has induced the Dutch Resident to try and get his own ship released from the obligation to take Janissaries. He now speaks strongly against the English ambassador as the cause of this general prejudice. This is far from being the truth, for I find that his Excellency could not do more, having become very suspicious of the fidelity of his dragoman Draperis. The Dutch minister had a great advantage; but it cost him over 1,500 reals.
Pera of Constantinople, the 7th March, 1662.
Postscript: The English ambassador has just been to see me. He tried to persuade me that all the mischief was due to the Dutch minister. That the Turks had released the English ship, but owing to the offices and presents made by that minister he had to admit defeat. He hoped to hear that the English ship had fallen into the hands of your Excellencies' fleet because the example would serve to check the violence of the Turks and the machinations of the Christians in the future. I replied in general terms, pointing out how greatly the reputation of his king and of himself were concerned in the matter. He said he would write to Court so that strong decisions might be taken and the Turks abstain from further molestation.
Italian; deciphered.
]
March 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
147. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
A courier of Flanders brings confirmation that the ships which left Ostend with troops were driven on to France and England by the fortune of the sea. Only one of them reached Galicia.
The English continue to supply themselves from the ports of Spain. They are stocking Tanger with food and munitions. Courtesy is being shown and commerce continues between the nations, but they are very nervous about the fortress of Gibraltar and of the great strength of so many ships within the Strait.
Batteville has already arrived in Flanders. Gamara is not proceeding to Italy. It is announced that the queen hopes soon to sail from the port of Lisbon. One might say that this also is not credited, such is their constancy in believing in disunion among the Portuguese and risings in England. But there is an absence of news.
Madrid, the 8th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
148. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
News has come at last of the safe arrival of his Majesty's ships at Lisbon and Tangier, to fetch the queen and to take troops and provisions for the fortress where Sir Richard Stayner commands by order of general Montagu, with 500 sailors, until the arrival of the governor. They have given new names to the streets, positions and ports and say it is a delightful and pleasant place, the territory vast and fertile especially for wheat, the vine, currants, oil and other fruits, oak and other timber suitable for building ships being abundant. In short they paint it as one of the finest situations in the world, to encourage the people to go there and live, in the hope that those who are down in their fortunes and who wander about idle will go there without difficulty, whereby the increase of navigation will benefit the king's revenues through the customs duties paid on the commodities coming from those parts to England.
The Spaniards have worked hard to prevent his Majesty gaining these great advantages, which will so much increase his power, especially at sea, for it has now come out that if the king of Morocco, who borders on the Tangier territory and desires the best relations with the English, had not prevented the passage of the troops whom they designed to throw into the fortress, they would have got in without difficulty, as those within, bribed by Spanish gold, would have admitted them freely. But the Catholic did not succeed in carrying out this plan, which would undoubtedly have served to avert the accidents which may occur with the English established in those parts.
The envoys to Lisbon, Montagu, a nephew of the general, in the king's name, and Colonel Talbot for the duke of York with all the rest were received with great demonstrations of joy. (fn. 3) When the fleet appeared it was saluted by all the guns, for three miles round, and they received the best treatment. They performed their duties with the bride at public audiences, and in ten days they expected General Montagu from Tangier, who in the capacity of ambassador is to bring the queen here. Expecting her appearance shortly they are hurrying on with the preparations at Court, giving the oath to the servants etc. The countess of Suffolk, of the house of Howard, is appointed to the first place with her Majesty. The duchess of Buckingham, the dowagers of Richmond and Ormond and the countesses of Shrewsbury and Castlemaine are appointed Ladies of the Bedchamber with many others of high rank to elevated posts.
The despatch of Lord Inchquin to Portugal is confirmed, with 1,000 horse and 2,000 foot instead of 3,000, to be taken from England, Scotland and Ireland. It is believed that the men will be ready to embark in a few days.
An express has reached the Spanish secretary from the marquis Caracena with complaints against the governor of Dunkirk for preventing the Catholic's subjects in the neighbourhood from cultivating the land, and behaving like an enemy rather than as a good neighbour. He asked the king to put a stop to this, which can only cause disturbance. The king promised to do so and is now with the Secretary Nicolas urging the despatch.
Don Stefano di Gamara, who was to have come here in place of Batteville is understood to have left Brussels for the Hague to transact some important business with the States, without thinking any more of coming to this Court. He received express orders for this from Madrid, where they seem to have acted on Batteville's advice who represented to his Catholic Majesty how improper it was to send another ambassador to England when they had never responded to the extraordinary and ordinary sent there, and for many other reasons, especially now that the queen is coming when a secretary or resident is sufficient to do all that is wanted. So Gamara is not coming and it is probable that the secretary will remain some time, at least until they see what is going to happen between this crown and the Catholic. There is great cause to apprehend a rupture and many declare that the armament now busily preparing in the ports of Spain is aimed against them here. This is the more feared since they heard of the stopping of Gamara, which was not very pleasing news to the Court.
Besides the damage done in the city by last week's storm, which was incalculable, we hear that it wrought great destruction in the country as well, with the total ruin of many families, and the loss of countless lives, the roads being blocked by fallen trees so that they could not be used.
With the arrival of the posts at last, the ducali of the 4th and 11th February have reached me with all the papers concerning the sentence issued by the Council of Quaranta al Criminale against the two English brothers Ravenscraft for the incident against the Consul Jones. I will find out what his Majesty thinks of the affair and report to the Senate.
London, the 10th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
149. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English fleet, having left Tanger, has put into Lisbon. A numerous squadron of ships is left within the Strait. With some reliance on the season Montagu will sail away from Portugal with the royal bride.
The majority of the inhabitants of Tanger have proceeded to Portugal, not being able to suffer the rule of England. The port of Tanger will afford a safe refuge; art being called in to remedy the defects or nature. It will be capable of accommodating fifty ships and with an open free mart they have no doubt about the nations crowding thither for the commerce of the Indies, promptness in trading, greater facilities, and freedom from the charges which the merchants experience in the ports of Spain.
Madrid, the 15th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
150. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge And Senate.
By the news the Court has from Lisbon it is calculated that the queen embarked on Saturday the 1st March by this style, and in that case she will soon have crossed the Ocean, the wind being favourable to waft her speedily to England. They speak and think of nothing else in the city and the preparations for her reception, though these are slow, especially at the Court, owing to the general scarcity of cash, without which nothing can be carried through. Accordingly the king noticing that since parliament resumed its sessions little or no progress has been made in public affairs which are under discussion, but that all the time is spent in private business, and knowing the need for the former to be digested and matured first, summoned the house of Commons to Whitehall on Saturday. There in the Banqueting Hall he pointed this out and urged them to devote more energy to this, establishing first the question of the yearly revenues of the crown and recommending to them decisions calculated to consolidate the quiet of the kingdom, so that before Easter they may be able to adjourn, resuming their sittings in the winter. He ended by intimating that within the month he expected his bride and he wished them so to arrange everything that the reception should be with the utmost pomp.
Returning to Westminster parliament immediately devoted itself to the despatch of the matters recommended by the king. Dealing first with the revenue it was proposed and carried to impose a new tax of two shillings on each hearth to be paid yearly. This is the tax that England contributed to the pope in days gone by when it was Catholic. The burden will certainly be excessive, especially in the present state of affairs when everything is at exorbitant prices, so probably the people will find it difficult to habituate themselves to it.
When the queen is known to be at hand the king will immediately leave London to meet her and bring her to Hampton Court, where their Majesties will stay for some weeks, until everything is ready here for her public entry. In giving the oath to her Majesty's servants, a dispute has arisen between the earls of Manchester and Chesterfield, the former Lord Chamberlain of the king, the latter to the queen, both claiming that the function pertains to himself, Chesterfield being merely appointed and not yet in the exercise of his office, while Manchester has been Chamberlain a long while. This has delayed the giving of the oath and as the question could not be settled it was referred to his Majesty, who so far has come to no decision. Meanwhile everyone is quoting arguments and precedents, but it is expected that the king will decide for the earl of Chesterfield, since he is destined to serve the queen.
A certain Collonello, a Jew merchant, who passed here as agent of Portugal, has failed this week for many thousands of pounds sterling and run away from London, no one knows where. Through this many other leading traders have failed. The king himself has suffered to an appreciable amount which the Jew was clever enough to get from him by having it withdrawn from the exchequer to another public treasury from which he subsequently withdrew it. (fn. 4)
We hear that some English ships with patents and commissions from Portugal have taken some Spanish barque at the port of Cadiz, which was waiting for a favourable wind to take it to another Spanish port. The merchants here are much disturbed about it from the fear, which is constantly growing, of a rupture between this crown and the Catholic, as they desire nothing better than peace and a good understanding with the king of Spain which enriches and renders them powerful, while from enmity they get only disadvantages and ruin.
In accordance with the instructions in the ducali of the 4th February, I had a favourable opportunity of learning the king's opinion about the affair of the brothers Ravenscrafft. I told him all the circumstances including the efforts of the duchess of Modena on their behalf. The king expressed his pleasure at the communication and his regret for the ill behaviour of his subjects, while blaming the procedure of the consul, of whom all the merchants complain bitterly, and these propose, I fancy, to remove him. He thanked your Serenity for the communication and assured me that the Senate might do what they pleased to gratify the duchess; he had no objection to make and was fully satisfied. These brothers are of a noble and influential family in this country, loved and esteemed by his Majesty for the sufferings, imprisonments and losses incurred under the rebels, in the royal cause, and in pardoning them I can assure your Excellencies that you will do a favour to their old, declining father, who has no consolation but these sons, putting them ail under an eternal obligation to the most serene republic.
I took this opportunity to refer again to the question of the ordinary embassy, obtaining the king's assurance of his intention to send one to Venice as soon as he was in a position to do so, which means when he has money, which at present he lacks. On this point nothing has yet been decided, for Venice or anywhere else, but it is hoped that some decision will soon be taken, especially as while men continue to say that Viscount Facombrige will go to your Excellencies they are beginning to talk of Baron Hollis being nominated for the Most Christian Court.
When I was taking leave of his Majesty, as he thinks of nothing and calls nothing to mind more frequently than his amusements on the water, of which he is very fond, he asked me if I had any news of the fisolera, which he is evidently looking for very eagerly from what he has heard of the agility of such craft. I told him it was ordered and should be completed by now, but the delay in despatch must be due to lack of opportunity which is ordinarily rare in Venetian ports for England.
London, the 17th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
151. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters No. 325. He acted rightly in following the example of the other ministers in going into mourning for the king's aunt the queen of Bohemia. The Senate feels sure that he has offered condolences to the king. He may enter in his accounts the 38l. incurred for expenses.
Ayes, 127. Noes, 3. Neutral, 7. It requires 4/5ths.
In the Collegio:
First vote, Ayes, 18. Noes, 1. Neutral, 4.
Second vote, Ayes, 18. Noes, 2. Neutral, 2. It requires 4/5ths.
[Italian.]
March 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
152. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
In Toulon twelve large vessels and eight galleys are making ready, but I do not believe that many vessels will be in readiness for this campaign besides those which are already at sea now. To these may now be added a ship belonging to Fouquet, which has arrived in the ports of England. There the Ambassador de l' Estrade is having it equipped to join with the squadron of Bofort. That is in the main composed of great ships with tops, which are incapable of chasing the corsairs.
Paris, the 21st March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
153. Francesco Giavarina Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Great is the clemency of God which does not allow crime to go unpunished. He thus allowed many of the regicides to fall into the hands of justice, although they escaped to remote countries. Three of these rascals, Miles Corbet, John Barkstead, governor of the Tower of London under Cromwell, and one Okey a colonel under that usurper have been discovered in these parts by Sir Douning, his Majesty's resident in Holland. Learning that they were living at Delft he lost no time in asking the States for permission to have them arrested. Obtaining a written order for the ministers at Delft he went there in person to see it carried out. Taking all necessary precautions he entered with the Dutch officers a certain house and surprised them all together in one room, over the fire taking tobacco and drinking beer, according to the use of the country, as although they did not lodge together, they often met, possibly in order to plot more mischief. He had them arrested and obtained leave from the States to have them transported to England. One of his Majesty's ships happened to be in Holland ready to take them, (fn. 5) so they are momentarily expected in this city, where they are most eagerly looked for, that the sentence, already pronounced against them, may be carried out.
The capture of the Spanish barques at Cadiz being confirmed, the duke of York, as Lord High Admiral, has sent orders to the English consul there (fn. 6) to have the captain of the English ship arrested, for having taken commissions from Portugal without permission and committing this insolence in the port. This might argue a desire to preserve the peace with Spain, but the succour supplied to the duke of Braganza shows the contrary, especially as it now appears that the troops will be paid for three months by this king, after which they will pass to Portuguese pay. The orders for their enlistment have certainly been issued but progress is very slow due to the lack of cash which makes everything languish in this kingdom once so opulent.
The Ambassador l' Estrade, who is destined for Holland, is about to leave and will proceed to France before going to the Hague, leaving his secretary in charge here until the arrival of his successor, M. de Cominges, of whose coming nothing is yet heard. During his stay in London his Excellency has rarely seen the king but has often been with the chancellor, with whom, three days ago he spent more than four hours in close conference. The reason has not transpired but some imagine it refers to the journey of the Most Christian to Alsace, to alarm and intimidate the house of Austria which it is the policy of France and this country to enfeeble, if not by deeds then by apprehension and jealousy.
In a dispute between this crown and the States of Holland over the capture of two English ships by the Dutch with Portuguese goods and commissions of the duke of Braganza against the Dutch, of which the English claim restitution, no settlement has yet been found, (fn. 7) as the Dutch say they are lawful prize and the States altogether object to restitution. This holds up the negotiations which the ambassadors of that republic have been conducting here for a long while, who see that a decision is constantly postponed, especially as the king is now going to Hampton Court for the queen's coming, during which time there will be a truce to all affairs of every kind, especially those of Holland, for the settlement of which they seem to be waiting to see what will be decided in France, as the negotiations of the Dutch with these two crowns are connected and are concerned with nothing but fisheries and other maritime interests. So the ambassadors have written home asking permission to give their houses a rest in the interval, and it is said this will be granted. When they go they will leave the secretary in charge, (fn. 8) and no ambassador will be left in London of all that were here, only residents and secretaries. Seeing the eagerness of these ministers to leave England, which is shared by everyone else who resides here, owing to the instability, obstacles and dilatoriness encountered in negotiation and to the excessive expenditure rendered necessary by the scarcity of everything, which is constantly growing worse, it is the general opinion that they will not come back here again, unless there are evident signs of a successful issue to their negotiations.
Besides Collonello many other Portuguese Jews established in this mart have failed for very large sums of money whereby many of his Majesty's natural subjects suffer serious losses. The merchants of London have petitioned parliament to forbid people of this sort from living in England, pointing out the harm they do to the mart, in accordance with ancient laws on the matter, banishing all those now domiciled here. Parliament has taken up the question and the king, who is much concerned at the misfortunes of his people, has said publicly that if the bankrupts do not make full restitution he will have no more Jews in England. So it will be interesting to see the issue of this affair, which is of some consequence, especially now when the queen will be a Portuguese and naturally anxious to support those of her nation.
London, the 24th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
154. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Some of the troops returned from the Levant have embarked on the fleet. But it seems that the idea of that Barbary expedition which they were contemplating has been dropped. Nevertheless it has been stated that his Majesty has sent money to buy a number of ships in England; but I do not know if this is very well authenticated.
Paris, the 28th March, 1662.
[Italian.]
March 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
155. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Everyone at Court is most impatient to hear of the queen's departure from Lisbon so that they may know the time of her arrival in England, but nothing has transpired since the letters recently received from General Montagu from Tangier, informing the king of the arrival there of the ships sent with the Governor Peterborough and of his own imminent departure for Lisbon to wait on her Majesty for her journey to England. Nothing has come since and as the general promised to send an express when she was ready to embark and the wind was favourable they are sure to have the news before she appears. Meantime they are sending men and goods to Portsmouth to prepare the necessary quarters as she is to land there, nor do they slacken their preparations both here and at Hampton Court.
The three regicides from Holland arrived on Sunday evening and are now in the Tower, well guarded. It is generally expected that the sentence long since pronounced against them will be carried out. They have been examined, but far from repenting of their crime they glory in it and show a disposition to do all that has happened in this country if they were in a position to begin again. This proves their animosity and the power of the devil over them.
Parliament is working energetically to despatch the business it has in hand so that it may adjourn until the winter, as his Majesty desires, but as it is impossible to finish everything before Easter it is thought that the suspension will be prolonged until after the holidays.
There have been serious disputes these last days in the House of Lords between the Lord Chancellor and the earl of Bristol, going so far that they exchanged very sharp words. The Chancellor proposed a clause in a bill which is all but completed, in the matter of religion, (fn. 9) tending to the advantage of the Presbyterians, urging that the king desired it and that it was suggested in his name. Bristol, who is a Roman Catholic, opposed. He is a most eloquent orator and the Chancellor's equal in prudence, wisdom and sagacity. He showed that the king did not at all wish such a pernicious and scandalous point to be discussed in parliament. Upon this the two attacked each other and the dispute lasted several days, and is not settled yet as the house is still debating whether the clause shall be inserted or no. Even if it should be carried by virtue of the authority of the Chancellor, who though no Presbyterian supports that party because it is strong, to have it on his side in case of need, there is not the smallest sign that it would be passed by the Commons, on account of the animosity of the majority there against the Presbyterians and of their rancour against the Chancellor, for which reason they would always oppose any deliberation which they knew him to favour. The question is very important, chiefly in respect of the Catholics of this country, so I will keep it in view.
We hear from Holland that the States have decided to equip a new fleet with the intention of humbling the pride of the Barbary pirates and of the Turks, who support the thieving of those rascals. To do this the more surely they propose to ask this king to join with them to extirpate this accursed brood. God grant that this pious resolution be carried out and supported by every Christian power.
With the ducali of the 4th are come my credentials for the queen, which I will keep to present on her arrival.
London, the 31st March, 1662.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Proclamation of 30 Dec, o.s., enjoining ordinary observance of the statute of Winchester, 13 Edw. I, on account of the numerous and audacious robberies in London and Westminster. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 194. In February orders were issued to the sheriffs to see that this was observed. Mercurius Politicus Feb. 13–20.
2 Charles Sackville, lord Buckhurst, Edward Sackvile, Sir Henry Belasyse, John Belasyse and Thomas Wentworth, arraigned for the murder of John Hoppy, a tanner, near Waltham Cross on 18–28 February. Kingdom's Intelligencer Feb. 17–24. They were convicted of manslaughter at Middlesex Sessions and subsequently pardoned. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 340. Lord Buckhurst was member for East Grinstead and Sir Henry Bellasyse member for Great Grimsby. Return of Members of Parliament Part 1, pp. 524, 529.
3 Edward Montagu eldest son of Lord Montagu of Boughton, and Richard Talbot, afterwards earl of Tyrconnel. They arrived in Lisbon on Sunday, 26 January, o.s., in the Royal Charles. Kingdom's Intelligencer Feb. 17–24.
4 A warrant of 11 January to pay 4,100l. to Coronel, borrowed of him by the king was suspended on 28 Feb. until he had satisfied Giles Lydcot, as Coronel had failed and retired from the Exchange. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, pp. 241, 290.
5 The Blackamore pink, Capt. William Badiley. Pepys: Diary Vol. ii., pp. 203, 205; Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 316.
6 Henry Rumbold. See his letters of 24 February, 1662. S.P. For. Spain Vol. xliv.
7 The Experience taken near Lisbon on 27 May, 1660, and the Charles taken in St. Martin's Road in July, 1660. Kingdom's Intelligencer Feb. 20–7. There are several references to these ships in S.P. For. Holland Vol. clxv., notably on 3 March and 2 May, 1662.
8 P. Cunæus. S.P. For. Holland Vol. clxvi, 17 Nov., 1662. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1663–4, page 596.
9 The bill for uniformity in religion was discussed in the Lords in the week beginning 17 March, o.s. According to Pepys the dispute was over a proviso that Clarendon wished to introduce, giving the king power to dispense with the act. Diary Vol. ii., page 207. Clarendon made a violent attack on Bristol on the subject of the penal laws, and Bristol threatened to beat the chancellor. Brit. Mus. Add MSS. 27962Q, ff. 176,179. See also Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 324, which corresponds more with what is stated here, viz., that the king wanted power to dispense with ministers using the surplice and making the sign of the cross.