Venice
April 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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125-137

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'Venice: April 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 125-137. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90103 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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April 1662

April 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
156. To the Ambassador at Rome.
Notification of the arrival of the Abbate Doni at Venice with letters of credence from the duchess of Savoy, and of the restoration of friendly relations between the republic and that Court. This is for information and to speak when the subject is raised.
Ayes, 133. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
The like to the ambassadors at the other Courts.
[Italian.]
April 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
157. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The Portuguese in Galicia are expecting troops from England to pit them against those from Flanders, though these last are divided between Estremadura and Galicia.
Madrid, the 1st April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
158. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
To prevent further trouble with the English ambassador with respect to this title I went secretly to his house. He received me kindly and expressed his regard for the republic. He spoke of the ship taken to serve the Turks. Appearances were bad for the English, but the Dutch Resident had a great advantage became his ship had sailed. England wishes to be the good friend of the most serene republic, but does not, on that account contemplate breaking with the Turks. I know only too well that they proceed with great circumspection at that Court in other affairs which have a connection with this Porte. I told him that I was anxious that the Turks should not establish a precedent.
Passing to other matters, I succeeded in ascertaining that his Excellency is conducting negotiations with the Barbareschi, I do not know whether by order of his Majesty or of his own motion. He told me that the newly chosen Basha of Algiers, who is now staying here, had sent to invite him to come to him to open some way to an adjustment of the differences with the English. He did not think that he could refuse this satisfaction and they conferred together in a garden together with the Aga of the seraglio here of Azamogliani. The substance of the discussion was that the king of England would never permit them to search English ships, but required that all should be safe from any molestation, otherwise these pretensions will be settled by arms and justice will be upheld by force. To this the Basha replied: Algiers and Tunis are places of the Grand Turk. The offence will be his if they are attacked and it will then be necessary to treat with and answer to this empire. To this threat the ambassador replied that his king has no thought of injuring the states of the Turkish Empire: and the truth of this will appear by this test, because if the stones of those towns are thrown down by the cannon balls the English will let them lie there and would not carry them away.
In the end his Excellency said that he had obtained a promise from the Basha that they do not propose in the future to make search on English ships and that if the king there will send some one to Algiers with sufficient powers, everything will be ratified. He told me that he had written to the king, sending Anthony Isackson, the English consul at Smyrna, who is entirely in his confidence. In spite of this he is extremely anxious because of the news that has reached him that forty English galleons are at Toulon, he does not know if it is to unite with the French fleet, or if they have gone for their own particular requirements. He intimated to me clearly that he would be greatly wronged by his king if they should attempt expeditions against the Barbareschi without previously warning him in advance, so that he might inform the ministers here, justify the action taken and perform what might be necessary.
He told me afterwards in strict confidence that his king is contemplating taking into his own hands the trade in lead and tin with this Porte taking it out of the hands of the merchants, in the certainty of deriving therefrom a large profit. If this is decided upon he will be the sole correspondent of his Majesty, conducting the business, not without considerable emolument, and the other merchants of the nation will take it patiently, disposing of their cloth. This suggestion transfixed me because of the injurious consequences to Christendom and your Excellencies. I could not refrain from giving some hint of this, but I fancy without any success but rather with offence, because the private interests of the king and the ambassador are too greatly concerned.

Pera of Constantinople, the 3rd April, 1662.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
159. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
I have again tried to stimulate the ministers here to make a good union with the English and Dutch squadrons to attempt something great against the corsairs. They informed me that the commanders and admirals of those fleets have orders for a good understanding with those of France.
Paris, the 4th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
160. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
At the beginning of February I received instructions to conclude the levy of 4,000 infantry offered by Colonel Charles di Vinder. The colonel left here for Flanders at the beginning of January, for the fulfilment, so he said, of his promises, and wrote that he had everything ready, offering Signori Cerneci and Rizzonico of Venice as securities, which the Savio alia Scrittura Donado informed me were approved by your Excellencies. I repeatedly urged the colonel to come to London to complete the transaction, but he never answered a word. Suspecting that he was unable to fulfil his promises I wrote to friends and correspondents in Flanders and elsewhere to make enquiries. The reports were unfavourable showing that he could not possibly do what he offered and that his sole object was to get the money and do nothing, as he seems to have done with the elector of Brandenburg, although he has patents of testimonials of that prince, which may easily be false, especially as I understand that he offered pledges without knowing if the merchants would back him. I thought it better to have nothing to do with persons of this sort, and let the matter drop and to try for some other.
On Saturday night Vinder arrived in London and came to me next day, apologising for the delay and trying to persuade me to go on with the negotiations. I dismissed him on the pretext that in his long absence and silence the republic had gone elsewhere. He admitted that the fault was his and said he would always be ready to serve the republic, for which I thanked him. I am exceedingly glad that nothing was arranged with him, as there certainly would have been fraud and trouble.
Another and far better opportunity presents itself in the offer of the earl of Castel Haven, of an old English family, with exceptional skill and experience in the art of war, shown by his employment with great distinction in the service of the king of Spain and the prince of Condé, and for his own prince in Ireland. He makes the enclosed proposals for a levy of five regiments of infantry, which I submit to the Senate for instructions. He is much loved and esteemed by his Majesty who will doubtless facilitate the fulfilment of his desire, and his employment may possibly serve as a stimulus for some special assistance from his Majesty, so often promised. The levy would have to be made in Ireland, and it can be done easily and quickly with the help of the officers who previously served the earl, at present without employment, and because of an act of parliament confirming those who acquired property there in the time of the rebellion, promising to provide the true owners with something else, many of the latter, who are countless, would rather serve a foreign prince and earn their bread than live in neglect awaiting the fulfilment of parliament's promise, God knows when. He can easily get the securities he offers and may possibly reduce his terms. I think it would always be more advantageous for the republic itself to hire the ships here or in Holland, where it would get them cheaper and more suited for such transport.
London, the 7th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.161. Proposals made by the Earl of Castelhaven to the Venetian Resident.
His Majesty, in consideration of the earl's services as general of horse in Ireland and governor of Munster, Leinster and the county of Clare, and of his sufferings in the royal cause, having granted him a levy of 5,000 infantry to serve under any prince he pleases, the earl as a Roman Catholic and from his sympathy for Venice in the long war against the Turk offers a levy to serve wherever the republic ordains.
The regiments shall have the same pay and advantages as other ultramontanes in the republic's service.
The earl shall levy the men and take them to Zante at an appointed term.
For the levy, clothes, transport etc. the republic shall give the earl 5l. sterling for each man.
Any losses on the voyage, in combat with the Turks or by storms shall be at the risk of the republic; all others at the earl's.
The money for the levy shall be paid in London to the earl, in three instalments, for which the earl will give pledges.
The Venetian Resident shall be present at the embarcation of the men, so that the earl may receive the money in London in accordance with the numbers certified by him.
If the republic wishes the troops to be armed here it shall contribute one pound a head for this.
The regiments shall be commanded by five colonels, the earl and four others appointed by him and approved by the republic.
For justice and the appointment of officers he shall be treated like the other ultramontanes.
That the republic may dismiss the regiments when it pleases, giving a gratuity of two pays to each man, to return home, but only to those landed at Zante.
To encourage the shipmasters to treat the men well that they be allowed to take goods from the Venetian state to England.
The earl offers to serve the republic as general with all the honours and privileges granted to ultramontanes with that title.
When the agreement is signed the earl's service shall be considered as begun.
If the republic wishes to hire the ships in England to transport the troops the earl undertakes to bring them to any port directed, claiming in such case 2½l. sterling a head.
[Italian.]
April 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
162. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
With the Court in expectation of news of the queen's coming a frigate arrived on Sunday express with news that General Montagu had not yet reached Lisbon from Tangier, so her Majesty could not sail as arranged. She proposed to put to sea immediately after the octave of Easter, considering it more proper to celebrate the Easter festivities in those parts. So the voyage should begin on Monday week and she should be in England towards the end of the present month, as everyone eagerly desires.
By the same ship came news from Tangier and Algiers. They confirm the consignment of the place to the English, that all the Portuguese garrison has gone out and those inhabitants who did not wish to remain, who with their families were transported to Faro, a coast town belonging to the duke of Braganza. They state that some English going to neighbouring places of the Moors and committing insolences, they were pursued and some slain, including one Mordant, a kinsman of the governor, from which they will learn to behave with more caution and prudence.
The other letters contain that the Algerines having complained to the Porte of the hostilities of the English and asked for help, they received from Constantinople the answer, that after the affair had been thoroughly discussed in the divan, they found, seeing that the Sultan had friendly relations with that crown, he neither could nor would help them and so they should come to terms with the English and do what would serve them best. The decision of Constantinople can only be to the good, and since it is stated to be due to the assiduity of the earl of Winchelsea, his Excellency is much praised for the renewal of the capitulations with the Porte with such advantageous additions for the merchants; according to report, which it is difficult to believe, one article provides that English ships shall be exempt from search for foreign goods, a point they have never been able to insert in any previous capitulation between this crown and the divan. As the plans of the Algerines have been frustrated one may feel confident that the English, encouraged thereby, will not relax their hostilities against those pirates, with advantage to the interests of the republic, as the Barbary forces being engaged in their own defence will be in no position to succour the enemies of your Serenity.
The meetings of parliament were adjourned the day before yesterday, but they will be resumed immediately after the holidays and continued a few days until the members are in a position to break them off until the winter. Meantime nothing more is heard of the quarrel between the Chancellor and the earl of Bristol, so it is all buried in oblivion.
The king, personally by letter, has thanked the States of Holland for their prompt assistance in securing the three regicides who are now in the Tower.
The Ambassador l'Estrade has not yet gone, as announced some time since but he is about to go, as he has already taken leave of the king and exchanged his final visits. After these he saw the king privately the day before yesterday. In view of this audience and his numerous secret conferences with the Chancellor everyone is confirmed in the opinion that some important business is in negotiation between this and the French crown, but no one can guess the truth. I will keep your Excellencies informed.
London, the 7th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
163. To the Resident in England.
Commend his office with the king about the Ravenelff brothers. It will help the Senate to make a decision of what is convenient to do, and also with reference to the satisfaction of the duchess of Mantua. Since it is reported that some one is to be sent as ambassador to France, he is to watch and see what happens.
The fisolera is completed, in accordance with the orders to the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie, and it will be sent as soon as there is a ship ready.
That order be given to the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie to have the fisolera completed for the king of England, and to provide for its prompt shipment.
Ayes, 103. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
April 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
164. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
They are expecting the Ambassador de l'Estrade back from England. At this departure of his from that Court I do not know what he may have concluded about the flag and other matters. For the rest a popular rumour was circulating in this city a long while ago that the Most Christian had acquired Dunkirk from King Charles with his money. And now one may say that place is practically incorporated in the realm of England it is perfectly plain that the report was without any foundation. But the people here, having seen in the affair of the ambassadors' coaches at London the greatness of the monarchy of Spain constrained to yield precedence to that of France, has got it into his head that his Majesty has rendered himself absolute arbiter even over other kings and that everybody ought to submit blindly to his wishes in everything.
After he has made his report and received his instructions, the ambassador will go to Holland. Lord Germen is expected from England to fetch the queen mother of England, who is anxious to be in London at the time of the arrival of the new queen. M. des Cominges is said to be preparing to go to his embassy at that Court.
Paris, the 11th April, 1663.
[Italian.]
April 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
165. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Easter celebrations only ended yesterday, according to the custom of the country; the adjournment of parliament and the Council lasted until to-day. The suspension of all business leaves me no material and I ask the Senate's pardon for the brevity of these lines. The Ambassador dell' Estrade has left Court and apparently proceeded to Gravelines of which he is governor. Nothing certain can be gathered about his negotiations here. Some say they were about Dunkirk, that the Spaniards having yielded it to the French crown they were proposing to buy it from the English. But it is impossible to say what may have been determined. In any case it is not probable that having refused to restore that place to the Catholic, who offered considerable sums, the British king would deliver it to the Most Christian, since it is more to the advantage of the English that it should be in the hands of the Spaniards than of the French, if they cannot keep it; but there is no sign that they mean to let it go, being of the utmost importance as everybody knows, chiefly for the fear and the bridle in which it holds all the neighbours, unless the scarcity of cash, from which this crown is now suffering extremely, forces it to do what at other times would prove difficult and inconceivable.
Nothing is heard of the coming of the Seigneur di Cominges, indeed it seems that the Most Christian does not think of letting him leave France until he is more assured of an ambassador going from here to Paris. It is said that Baron Hollis will be sent, but the king has not yet come to any positive decision. The appointments to all other Courts are similarly pending. Meanwhile the secretary of the French embassy remains to take charge. (fn. 1) The Dutch ambassadors who were said to be going apparently intend to remain, for the purpose of resuming their negotiations about maritime affairs with more energy. Having brought those at the French Court to a successful termination, so we hear, the States hope that this example will serve them to obtain their wishes in England also. Time will show. The secretary of Spain has instructions from his master to continue in England until further order. So the coming of the Ambassador Gamara has quite vanished and he will stay until they see what will happen between this crown and the Catholic.
Since his Majesty's return to England the severities against the Papists having ceased in part, everyone in this last Holy Week has enjoyed the practice of his religion much more freely than in past years. Accordingly I decorated the chapel magnificently, after paying my duty to the Holy Sepulchre, I had the sacrament exposed at the three feasts to pray for the assistance of Heaven in the calamitous situation of the republic. I cannot say what crowds gathered and offered their prayers, as I spared nothing to render the devotion greater, the ceremonies ending with music and with a sermon appropriate to the occasion.
London, the 14th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Constantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
166. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador at the conference reported in my last said that he had tried to obtain orders from his king to stimulate the ill feeling of the Turkish ministers here against the Austrians, to the point of open hostilities, having pointed out the consequences of the engagement of the Spaniards to support the emperor whereby Portugal would be relieved of the fear of fresh attacks. But the reply from the secret Council of London had been set forth in express instructions not to meddle in this affair, from which his Excellency concluded that there may be good correspondence between the Catholic Court and his king.
Pera of Constantinople, the 14th April, 1662.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
167. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 24th ult. The Senate is sure that he will watch to see what happens about the arrest of the English captain who plundered the Spanish barques at Cadiz. Recent letters from Ballarino report that four ships, one English, one Flemish and two French, which arrived at that port had been arrested by the Turks to convey troops and munitions to Canea; and that the English ambassador said that he would write to his king to stop the sending of large ships to Constantinople in order to deprive the Turks of this convenience. He is to use this information in the way he judges best.
Ayes, 123. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
April 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
168. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
After several weeks without news from Portugal, so that they began to be anxious about the queen especially with rumours that she would not be embarking soon because of some accident, Colonel Talbot, one of the two sent to Lisbon, arrived at the palace yesterday, having done the journey in ten days. He reports that the queen could not, for several reasons, start on the day appointed, but it was definitely fixed for to-day, and as the wind could not be more favourable it cannot be long before she appears. Accordingly the Court is busily preparing to go to Portsmouth, where the king will also go, as he wishes to receive and see his bride, to proceed afterwards to Hampton Court to stay there until everything is ready for her public entry into this city. To make room for the queen the duke of York has gone out of Whitehall with all his household and gone to live in the palace of St. James, where it is expected that his duchess will soon be delivered.
Parliament continues to sit without intermission employing the days in discussing and maturing the numerous affairs it has in hand, so that it may be able to adjourn until the winter as his Majesty desires. In parliament itself there are turbulent spirits, of whom great numbers are left in the country, and on Tuesday one proposed to renew the league and covenant, formerly taken between the people and the long parliament. But instead of support and the issue they expected, it was decided that all the papers on the subject in the public archives should be burned on the following day before the palace of Westminster by the public hangman. (fn. 2) This was done the day before yesterday, to the extreme mortification of the sectaries and especially the Presbyterians, who caused the past disorders and who desire nothing more eagerly than to see them again, hoping to profit thereby.
With no news from Tangier and Algiers it is hoped that the present winds will bring some, which is eagerly desired. It is known that the English are busy putting everything in order at the fortress, to make it secure, building a mole and hoping to attract much trade and wealth.
To assist their negotiations at this Court the Dutch ambassadors announced last week that the States had completed what their ministers were negotiating at Paris. Upon this a conference was appointed with the commissioners selected for them. But on its being discovered that the Most Christian had not yet decided anything, although there is every appearance of a speedy conclusion, the conference has been put off from day to day under various pretexts, and if the ambassadors cannot manage it before the king sets out for Portsmouth they will have to wait many months at great inconvenience, to the prejudice of their business.
London, the 21st April, 1662.
Postscript: the enclosed has just been brought for your Serenity, upon which I shall await the instructions of your Excellencies.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.169. Charles II, King of Great Britain etc., to Domenico Contarini, Doge of Venice.
Request to permit Lieutenant Col. Thomas Annand, a Scot, to depart, paying him what is due, to enable him to make the journey and to afford him a better livelihood after his labours. Dated at Whitehall, the 30th March, 1662.
[Signed] Carolus R. [Countersigned]: Lauderdaill.
[Latin.]
April 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
170. To the Resident in England.
The Senate notes the decision of the States of Holland to assemble a new fleet for the Mediterranean, to act against the Barbary corsairs and to ask the king of England to cooperate with them. He is to watch what happens in this matter and report.
With respect to the fisolera they are only waiting for an opportunity to have it shipped, and orders have been issued to the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie to see that it is done as soon as possible.
Ayes, 117. Noes, 6. Neutral, 11.
[Italian.]
April 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
171. The Proveditori of the Rason Vecchie report that they have carried out the order of the Council and have completed the body of the fisolera, for presentation to the king of England. They ask for instructions how to furnish it.
That they be instructed to have it perfected in every part, spending up to 1000 ducats, but keeping down the expense as much as possible. They are also to find shipping to take it to England as soon as possible.
That the Conservatori dei Depositi find 1000 ducats, to be given to the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie, for the fisolera intended for the king of England.
Ayes, 117. Noes, 6. Neutral, 11.
[Italian.]
April 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
172. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Reports are circulating at this Court that the negotiations of the Dutch in England are proceeding rapidly towards a conclusion on, and further, from what I hear, the Ambassador d' Estrade has arrived back from London with very scant hope of the treaty in negotiation there. Here however, I suppose for the said considerations, the sittings of the royal commissioners with the Dutch ambassadors have immediately been resumed again and it is thought that they may at length conclude the treaty. To make it clear to England that there is nothing in this alliance to her prejudice, they are proposing to leave an opportunity for King Charles to enter it.
Paris, the 25th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
173. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
England keeps up the passage from Cadiz to Tanger. The place is well supplied with fortifications and is being furnished with food. The Spaniards are providing it with the instruments of defence.
The bride who is destined to become the queen of England will depart from Lisbon with eighteen frigates, of 60 guns each, the flagship (fn. 3) having 100 bronze guns. A bridge has already been constructed from the residence of Braganza to the shore where she will embark.
I cannot venture to assert it positively, but I find certain indications that Spain may lay bare that which is not concealed, and make a reply to England answering her own treatment, and although the English have recovered in great measure their effects from the storm, yet that nation which is so attached to its trade relations with these realms and so greedy of gain, could not fail to feel the shock very severely.
Madrid, the 26th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
174. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
News is expected any day of the safe arrival of the queen on these shores if she left Lisbon as Colonel Talbot said. No news has come since. All who wish to see her land are off to Portsmouth where the fleet that brings her is to put in. The departure of the officials of the palace is fixed for the beginning of next week, but the king will not move until some days after his bride has landed, as she seems to wish it so and has intimated so much to his Majesty, to have time to rest and recover from the trials of the voyage before seeing her consort. They will then go to Hampton Court where the palace is superbly decorated to receive her, remaining until everything is ready for the reception, which will not be very soon as there is much to be done, requiring time, and the scarcity of money, from which the Court still suffers, hinders everything.
The queen mother also will not be long before leaving France for England, a ship with a part of her baggage having come into the river, and Lord Germin, who is to fetch her, is all ready to start for Paris.
The Dutch ambassadors seeing the king's departure at hand and well aware that during his absence from London there will be a truce to all business, are hastening as much as possible the conclusion of their negotiations. They have had the conference which was postponed and have met with the commissioners more than once this week, and hope in a few days to see everything arranged.
The three regicides from Holland, although condemned to death in the Act of Indemnity, have been brought to trial, in accordance with the laws of the country, to say what they can in their defence. They denied that they were what they are, so fresh witnesses had to be examined who swore that they had seen all three sitting in the Court which condemned the late king and they had signed the order for his death. So it was decreed that the sentence against them should have its course, and one of these days they will pay the penalty for their crime.
The succour for the duke of Braganza is not yet ready to be sent to Portugal, lack of money causing the delay, although Lord Inchquin is doing his best, not so much from any urgency from Lisbon as because it is getting late in the season, the present time being the most suitable in that warm climate.
Fanscio, the ambassador designate to Portugal still delays his start for the same lack of money. Nothing is heard of any appointment to other places. Hollis, who is supposed to be destined for France, is not preparing to go and there is not the smallest sign of any other appointment.
The ducali of the 1st have reached me with information of the Senate's decree about removing the Venetian garrison from Mantua and renewing relations with the duke of Savoy, which I will use as occasion serves.
The ship Zante frigate. Captain Robert Wilkinson, is now sailing towards Venice. The owners, who are among the leading merchants here, desire that when it has unladed at Venice it may without interruption continue its voyage to the Levant islands for currants. They ask me to petition the Senate to order the magistrates concerned not to detain it, but to let it go freely to lade at Zante and Cephalonia, so that they may be released from the payment of a real per migliare for the usual duties, which the customers demand, delaying the ships in other ways. I assured them of the complete disposition of your Excellencies to gratify them, as the republic wishes to encourage merchants to continue the currant trade. I also told them of the Senate's orders to the islands that English traders should be free of all charges beyond the usual duties, and given every facility and assistance. They expressed their satisfaction at this and so it may be hoped that they will resume that trade with more energy, which they have in a great measure dropped from lack of good treatment, with very considerable injury to the public interests.
London, the 28th April, 1662.
[Italian.]
April 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
175. To the Resident at Florence.
On the 1st inst. he was advised of the reconciliation of the republic with the House of Savoy. The duke now writes to inform the Signory of the selection of the Marquis dal Borgo as ambassador extraordinary. The Senate will make a suitable response. The information is sent for his enlightenment, to be used in case the matter is discussed.
Ayes, 140. Noes, 3. Neutral, 4.
The like to England, Zurich, Naples, and Milan.
[Italian.]
April 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
176. To the Resident in England.
Commend his action about the levy of Colonel Vinder and note his activity about the levy and negotiations with the Count di Castel. Under present conditions it is considered that such a large levy is inopportune, because the season is far advanced and because the men could not arrive in time at the place where they are required. He is therefore to let the matter drop, with all tactfulness.
The renewal of the capitulations between the Porte and England is confirmed by Ballarino. He is to watch carefully for anything further that may occur in this connection and for any secret negotiations that there may be between the Porte and England, to advise the Senate thereof.
Ayes, 134. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 M. Battailler.
2 It was resolved on April 8–18 that parchments containing the solemn league and covenant with signatures should be burned on the following day in Palace Yard. Journals of the House of Commons Vol. viii, page 400.
3 The Royal Charles.


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