Venice
September 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1932

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182-193

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'Venice: September 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 182-193. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90108 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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September 1662

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
238. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Grand Duke of Tuscany was much concerned about the forms observed towards the republic of Genoa at this Court. His representatives here are considering what can be done in the matter. Besides the Resident there is the Cavalier Guasconi, (fn. 1) who may almost be considered an Englishman, as he took arms on the royal side against the parliament in the late dissensions and came near being shot by the rebels, so he was knighted by the late king and has received other prerogatives and benefits from the present. He is a man of ability, sharp and very off-handed. Believing that it will not be difficult to obtain a decree from the Privy Council that the recent treatment of Genoa must not be considered a precedent, but due to a mistake, they prepared the way for this by appropriate insinuations. To show the custom of other Courts they have obtained certificates from the Masters of the Ceremonies at Vienna, Paris and Madrid stating that the Genoese ambassadors have never at any time received better treatment than those of France, Spain and Venice, and specifying the differences. With these they hope to put things straight, for at the worst the attempt can do no harm, and if they succeed it will be an admirable service even for those who facilitated the royal treatment of Genoa, who were at the last not altogether pleased with the behaviour of the ambassador and repented of what they had done, and at present they might easily observe different offices towards that republic.
Nothing has reached Court about the affairs of Barbary. Ruiter has returned to Algiers to obtain the revision of the capitulation recently agreed upon there. He claims the same freedom of navigation as was granted to the English. It appears that the Barbary folk refuse to enter upon other negotiations before the expiry of the six months' truce between them and the Dutch.
The negotiations of the Dutch here remain undecided and the ambassadors do not move in spite of their insistence. I have nothing to add about dell' Estrade of any consequence. It is confirmed that his business is about Dunkirk, especially as he has made presents of great value, consisting in clock dials set with diamonds and other precious stones to the duchess of York to win her husband, who is generally disposed to gratify the Most Christian crown, and her father the chancellor, who directs everything and can give notable assistance in this also.
Baron di Batteville, lately ambassador here, who has been staying in Zeeland, passed through the isle of Wight on his way to Spain. Because in Holland he bought ships and made other provisions of war, the Portuguese ambassador there made serious complaint to the States stating that by the treaty between them and his master, which only requires ratification, they ought not to allow any Spaniard to make any provision to be employed against his master. The Dutch told him that the laws of the country allow any one to make any kind of provision with his own money, and if he also wished to buy there would be no difficulty.
The governor Peterborough has again left for Tangier taking with him a quantity of provisions and of munitions of war. Sir Fanscio has also set out recently towards Lisbon to his post as ambassador. With him went many of the Portuguese who came to England with the bride, not very pleased with the Court, which they did not find so liberal as they had expected.
The widowed queen has recently presented the queen consort with a complete head dress of diamonds and emeralds, with a watch dial to match, estimated to be worth 12,000l. sterling, of extraordinary beauty and incomparable workmanship.
A very important person of this country has given me the enclosed memorial in French, asking for the grant of a privilege to Messrs. James Hayes and Thomas Togood to practise their inventions in the dominions of the republic.
Hampton Court, the 1st September, 1662.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.239. Memorial upon a new method of forcing water from one place to another, invented by James Hayes and Thomas Toogood, with a petition to the republic of Venice to grant them a monopoly for a term of 21 years.
[French.pages.]
Sept. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
240. To the Resident in England.
To endeavour to give some sort of satisfaction to old Galileo about his debts. His agents will always be heard here.
Although the fisolera for presentation to the king of England has long been ready. an opportunity for sending it direct to England has only recently occurred. It is now being put on board the ship Fregadon del Zante which is about to leave this port, and we trust that it will arrive soon and safely.
Ayes. 110. Noes. 0. Neutral, 0.
Antonio di Negri, Secretary.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
241. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
It is stated that an individual of the secret circle has been despatched from here to England to enable the Sieur de l' Estrade, who is the cynosure of all eyes, to depart whenever he wishes, and in such case the person in question will remain at that Court until the arrival of the ordinary Ambassador Cominges.
Paris, the 5th September, 1662.
[Italian.]
Sept. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
242. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king's return and the state entry of his bride into London took place by water on Saturday last, with extraordinary pomp, after dinner. Their Majesties were met at Chelsi by the mayor of London and all the bodies of the city in various barques especially prepared for the purpose and accompanied to Whitehall with a great concourse. The Venetian gondolas, which the king wished to have always beside the royal barge containing himself, the queen and others of the blood royal, made the greatest show and won universal applause. Triumphal arches at prominent points were noticed along the river, on which speeches were recited in honour of their Majesties and the royal house. This splendid function was ended by fireworks at night before the palace, illuminations and other rejoicings, celebrated generally. I also celebrated in a moderate and decent manner, and throw myself on the charity of the state for my expenses in this and other ways.
On Wednesday the queen mother also proceeded to London, from Grinvich, to her palace of Sommerset, where she will spend the rest of her life, as she does not propose to leave England or London any more. As a culmination the king caused certain prisoners to be released, including some of the Quakers, arrested for refusing to conform in religion, only detaining those who refused to take the oath of allegiance. So all has passed with universal satisfaction, especially as with the queen's entry there is no immediate prospect of any fresh expenditure, unless it be the birth of a prince, of which there is not any sign, to the grave disappointment of the king and all the Court.
In the midst of the rejoicings, the Presbyterians, who only seek to disturb the country anew, tried to upset the tranquillity of the ceremony. Sunday by this style was St. Bartholomew's day, the date fixed by the Act for uniformity in religion. Many who did not think fit to abandon the dogmas of Calvin and others considered by them as leaders in the true way, abandoned their churches and pulpits of their own accord, which were immediately provided with others, and some were expelled by force. In some churches of this city there was some disturbance that same Sunday morning, as when the preachers preached the congregation mutinied, dragged the minister from the pulpit, tore his priest's robes and pulled to pieces the books of common prayer, singing indecent and derisory songs instead. Every night since it has been necessary to stand on guard to prevent any disturbance, so the king will be obliged either to lay aside clemency and make an example by cutting off evil humours, or grant liberty to the Presbyterians, who certainly will never keep tranquil. They are very rich and if they are not tolerated they will not pay taxes, so it is thought, chiefly for this reason, that his Majesty will have to take the latter course.
Fresh obstacles are constantly arising to prevent an adjustment between this crown and the Dutch, which inclines one to believe that neither of the parties desires it, and as other negotiations are being transacted in the mean time, that it will end in a rupture between the two powers. The ambassadors say they will leave in the course of next week without waiting for any further conclusion and with them it is believed M. de l' Estrade. In addition to the question of Dunkirk it seems that his negotiations extend to a marriage by means of the king here between a princess of Orleans and the duke of Braganza. It is positively asserted that he brought great sums in cash to be supplied secretly by the king here to the duke, to postpone the fall of Portugal as long as possible, as that would by no means suit the interests of the Most Christian crown. But these negotiations are conducted with such secrecy, both here and in France, that it is impossible to get authentic information.
The earl of Peterboro has recently left for Tangier, taking with him provisions, money and engineers to build the mole, which the English mean to erect there. According to skilled opinion they will spend a great deal of money and effect nothing of consequence. Two ships are ready to take back to Lisbon the people who came with the queen. There will remain only Donna Maria of Portugal and Donna Elena, the queen's nurse, with some musicians, without whom it was not possible to appease her.
A strange duel has taken place recently between Henry Jermin, nephew and heir of the earl of St. Albans, and Thomas Howard brother of the earl of Carlisle, captain of the king's regiment of guards. As seconds the first had one Rolins and the other the son of earl Dillon, an Irish colonel of infantry in France, all four Roman Catholics. (fn. 2) Jermin was severely wounded and is not yet out of danger, and Rolins was killed on the spot by Dillon. The affair has made a great stir at Court, especially as Jermin and Rolins were servants of the duke of York, being his steward and treasurer respectively. The other two have escaped. If they are taken their lives are forfeit by the laws of the country. Accordingly orders have been issued to the ports and other places for their detention. The countess of Shrewsbury was the cause, a very beautiful lady. Howard being jealous of the better fortune and purse of his rival.
In obedience to several ducali. including those of the 5th August. I continue to urge the merchants here to engage in the currant trade at the Levant islands, promising them the best treatment and every advantage.
London, the 8th September. 1662.
[Italian.]
Sept. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
243. To the Resident in England.
The Senate looks to receive more definite news from him about the affairs of Barbary. The Ambassador de l' Estrade may have some negotiations with the Dutch on his way to London. He is to keep on the watch to find out as much as possible.
If Malo goes to Spain the Resident may choose the route for despatches that he considers to be best. He is to thank the king for the exception made in the proclamation against mariners. He has permission to enter the expense of 10l. to be included in his account.
Ayes, 135. Noes. 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
244. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The affairs of Barbary, as the most interesting of those being at present conducted by this country and the Dutch, keep every one in great expectation. On the side of the English they seem undecided and dormant, but on the side of the States they continue with great warmth. We hear that the ship Julius Caesar, belonging to Amsterdam, when carrying a cargo of currants from Zante to that town, was engaged in the Mediterranean by two Tripoli ships. After suffering serious injury and perceiving the impossibility of resisting the superior force of the pirates, to avoid capture they fired the magazine and blew up, involving the Admiral of Tripoli, to the terror of the Turks and a considerable loss to the merchants. (fn. 3)
As regards the English we learn on good authority that Sir [John] Lawson has done nothing with Tripoli and Tunis, as in obedience to the king's orders he has proceeded to Tangier to support the interests of the English crown in Africa against the Moors who are trying to interrupt the quiet which she is making every effort to establish there. It has thus been necessary to leave unfinished the business with the Barbary folk, to be renewed the moment they are free at Tangier. So the pirates, taking advantage of the opportunity will claim search and other violence against the ships of this country, which are only free of the Algerines by virtue of the late agreement, those made with Cromwell being in force for the other Barbary folk.
This week there seems to be better hope of a settlement of the Dutch negotiations here. A week ago, late, the ambassadors received an express, and though we do not know what he brought, it is believed that it will facilitate the decision of the negotiations, because they and the English commissioners have since had frequent conferences, and it is stated that on the evening of the day before yesterday everything was settled, and that nothing is now wanting save the signatures of the parties.
The Presbyterians are constantly showing themselves increasingly unquiet and troublesome. Unable to tolerate the recent Act of Uniformity they are uniting with the other malcontents and sectaries and seek every means to kindle a new fire in England. Various plots which they were contriving in London and other parts of this realm have been laid bare, with great difficulty, with the imprisonment of many delinquents, including some of the Quakers who were released last week. The mischief is that all those arrested and those who agitate are persons of base condition, the great and rich Presbyterians, not a few of whom have great authority in the Privy Council, conform outwardly, dissimulating and to some extent condemning the efforts of the malcontents, but at heart they cherish an inveterate hatred for the Episcopalians, and secretly they add fuel to the fire, causing those who have nothing to lose to appear the criminals, and so cloak their wicked intentions. The situation is certainly very ticklish and there is good reason to fear fresh disturbances in this afflicted country.
Some of the Presbyterian ministers have presented a petition to the king to have liberty to practise their religion, but after the matter had been carefully discussed in the Council it was decided that they should not be tolerated in any fashion and that strict orders should be given for the punctual execution of the Act of Uniformity. (fn. 4) So it will be interesting to see what happens. It is impossible to foretell anything good as the bitter feeling has gone too far and things are moving exactly as they were when the war began in the time of the late king.
To be in a state of defence in any eventuality, in addition to the army, which is very strong consisting of 10,000 combatants, horse and foot, all good troops, and the trained bands of the towns and counties, they have decided to form three regiments of horse, under the command of the earls of Northampton, Cleveland and Strafford, (fn. 5) old soldiers who have always been on the royal side, entirely composed of faithful veteran officers. This is because they are not able to place entire confidence in the army, of which the duke of Albemarle is commander in chief, because of the diversity of faiths in it.
The Presbyterians are playing the malcontent in Scotland also, but the parliament which is still sitting in that country is taking all the soundest measures to crush every kind of disturbance. The son of the earl of Argyle, leader of the Presbyterians there, who was executed a year ago as guilty of high treason, has recently been condemned to be beheaded, as guilty of the same offences as his father. If they proceed with such vigour against the leaders of the party they may weaken the inferiors, who will consequently become less capable of making disturbance.
The earl of Castelhaven who some months ago offered a levy to your Serenity and who is now in Ireland with the Viceroy Ormond, asks me to-day to write to the Senate to repeat the offer for the coming campaign. He intends in the coming year to take some foreign service and before approaching any other prince he wishes to make his offer again to your Excellencies, from whom he begs for a definite answer. I thanked him and promised to pass it on to the Senate.
London, the 15th September, 1662.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
245. To the Ambassador in Spain.
The Resident Giavarina, in his letters of the 25th ult., reports a conversation with the Abbot Obigni. You will understand the extreme delicacy of the affair, the guile (fallacia) of it and the exceptional dexterity that it requires and that you will in any case have shown, in getting questions of this kind to the ears of the duke or other ministers, solely in the way of confidence and simple communication, employing all your powers to show that the relation is not accredited by us in any sort of way, although the republic desires with all sincerity of heart the satisfaction and prosperity of the Catholic crown. You will enlarge upon this with sentiments calculated to conciliate their goodwill.
Ayes, 161. Noes, 1. Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
246. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters Nos. 351, 352. The Senate is anxious to know the essence of the negotiations of Estrade, recognising the importance of the particulars he has reported. It also desires particulars of the determination of the Dutch ambassadors to leave, with the danger of a rupture, which would be of much consequence in the present state of affairs.
With respect to the confidence of the Abbot Obigni, if he speaks again on this subject or something similar and if he makes any proposal, the Resident, without committing himself, is to forward all particulars to the Senate which will then be able to give him the instructions which are considered necessary.
Ayes, 161. Noes, 1. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
247. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
It is impossible to find out about the negotiations of M. de l' Estrade; one makes conjectures, in addition to there being something about the support of Portugal, that there may be some negotiation for an alliance which he is treating for between the king here and the English one. This seems the more likely because of the way the ministers here procrastinate over giving the treaties to the Dutch which France wishes the States to guarantee, when they might easily wish, supposing the treaty is made with England, to include that country in this guarantee, and that would account for the delay. If this should happen the United Provinces would wish to consider carefully whether this might not turn to their prejudice and whether if the union of this crown with the two greatest naval powers of the world should ensue it would not render this kingdom so much the more formidable not only by land but at sea also.
Paris, the 19th September, 1662.
[Italian.]
Sept. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
248. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
This Court has received no confirmation of what was written from England that the journey of M. de l' Estrade to London was about the business of Dunkirk, which the French are proposing to buy and then to restore to Spain in exchange for the fortresses of Artois. I also observe here suspicion and apprehensions that some secret transactions may be on foot in favour of Portugal. Appearances and the discourses which, are published do not always conform with the secret counsels of princes. But no treaty taken up irregularly will ever be conducted from this side with Portugal.
A good number of Frenchmen engage themselves in the army of Don John, but once they have received their pay, they flee to Portugal and return to France, exactly as happened with the English troops who were in the enemy's army which is in Castile, and with eight pieces of eight they facilitated their passage and desertion.
French ships at Cadiz have left for Tunis, but to the English of Tanger they do not allow pratique, in spite of the vigorous representations made by the consul of the nation. The Duke of Medina Celi however permits provision of food and other things to the English frigates which arrive in that port.
Madrid, the 20th September, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
249. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The negotiations which the Dutch ambasadors have been conducting at this Court for so long are at last concluded. To-day they were signed by the king and themselves and now they only require the ratification of the States, which will not be difficult to obtain. The contents of this agreement are not of the consequence imagined, as they only confirm and continue the ancient friendship and the adjustment of something between the two nations which happened in the Indies. (fn. 6) But nothing is said about the fisheries, which is the most important point, of the prince of Orange, or of navigation, so in the general opinion the peace will not last long, and that in spite of this accommodation it will not be long before there is an open rupture.
The negotiations being ended the ambassadors are now about to start for Holland, and will leave London to-morrow from what they say. On Monday they took leave of the king and queen and of the duke and duchess of York. The following days have been spent in visits to the magnates of the Court and foreign ministers. On Tuesday they came to me and I returned the visit yesterday. Besides formalities they expressed the esteem of the States for the republic and their desire for close correspondence and the re-establishment of the relations which previously existed. I replied courteously without entering into particulars, obeying the ducali of the 2nd September, 1661, for such a case, which has never occurred in all the interval, nor have the ambassadors ever referred to the subject although we have met on many occasions.
M. del' Estrade is not going with the Dutchmen as expected, but will remain here. Nothing more can be learned of his negotiations. They say that the money offered for Portugal is to maintain a body of 6000 infantry of this nation at the cost of the Most Christian but in the name of Britain. But there seems no disposition on this side to engage themselves further in that cause. All the additional succour which it was said this king would be sending has cooled off and it is believed that reasons of state will prove stronger than kinship. Commander Morgan who recently went to Lisbon with the troops, is already back here and even Lord Inchiquin would gladly do the same, a clear sign that the men are having a thin time (segno evidente che magre vanno ivi le cose per le militie.)
Suspicion is still rife in the country owing to the loud murmurs of the malcontents over religion, some for not being rewarded according to what they consider their deserts, some because they do not think things are going as they should and generally for the lack of money; in short the whole body is full of evil humours. A short time will show whether they will be purged or quiet down. Meanwhile in famous and seditious libels have recently been scattered against the king and the present government calling on the people of England and especially the city of London to do their duty in observing the oath for the league and covenant made at the beginning of the troubles, pointing out the grievances and heavy impositions which they now have to bear, the shrinkage of trade and many other miseries to which they represent the nation has been subjected since the king's return, and thus inciting the people to fresh disturbances. But rendered cautious at their own expense in the late revolutions, it may be hoped they will not second the wicked intentions of these desperadoes, to prevent which the Court will not neglect to take every precaution.
In Ireland where restless spirits are beginning to swarm again, the duke of Ormond is engaged in putting things in a good state. It seems he means to change many of the officers who commanded the army of that country, having discovered that their intentions were not good and that they were more inclined to trouble than to quiet.
In obedience to the ducali of the 19th August I thanked the king for his declaration about the sailors in the service of your Serenity. I took the opportunity to assure his Majesty that Signor Mocenigo would soon be starting for the embassy here, and expressed the state's satisfaction at the definite promise to send Viscount Facombrige to the republic in the same capacity. The king said he was glad that Sig. Mocenigo would soon be on his way. Lord Facombrige was certainly destined for that embassy; he is now in Yorkshire, where he is lieutenant, (fn. 7) on some business of the crown, and he will soon summon him to London to give him the necessary instructions and will send him at the earliest moment to Italy, where he is to function en route with Savoy, Florence, Genoa and other Italian princes, and will then reside with the most serene republic.
London, the 22nd September, 1662.
[Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
250. To the Ambassador in France.
Instruction to obtain a passport from the States through the Ambassador Boreel for the noble Piero Mocenigo, who is about to start for the embassy of England, because without this he cannot undertake the journey.
Ayes, 129. Noes, 2. Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
251. To the Resident in England.
To devote his close attention to the treaty made by the Vice Admiral with the Barbareschi and to report the issue of the negotiations. Enclose patents for James Ays and Thomas, (fn. 8) to be given to them only if they clearly demonstrate that they can do what they claim.
Ayes, 123. Noes, 2. Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
252. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters No. 354. The captain of the English ship Speranza, who was employed to take munitions to the fleet, failed to fulfil his obligations. Instructions were sent to Genoa and to Leghorn to compel this captain to give satisfaction, but they remained without effect. The Senate understands that he is sailing for England. The resident is to try and obtain satisfaction. The affair is of great importance and will require all his ability.
Ayes, 169. Noes, 1. Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
253. Francesco Giavarina. Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The ambassadors extraordinary of Holland only left London on Monday, leaving a secretary in charge here, (fn. 9) without the smallest formality, even in taking leave of the king, to avoid a dispute about the person who should conduct them, as they have always been accompanied by a baron, and at their coming they had Lord Craven; but now they would have claimed an earl, because of what happened with the Genoese ambassador Durazzo.
M. dell' Estrade remains in London, but is expected to be leaving soon for his embassy in Holland. On Monday he sent post to Paris Battaglie, who was his secretary during his embassy, with despatches to the Most Christian on the present negotiations, and on the reply they say he will be going. His negotiations are kept so secret that they are inscrutable. One can only make guesses and I hope that I have not been wrong in the particulars sent. They say that no progress has been possible to gratify France on the two points, the maintenance of 6000 troops in Portugal and the marriage with Braganza, or about Dunkirk, for which, it appears, l' Estrade offered two millions of livres Tournois. But here they will not consent and indeed they cannot make any move without parliament.
To show how far they are from any disposition to hand over Dunkirk to the French strict orders have been sent to the governor there to have the work on the fortifications there carried on with energy and without intermission. They are well advanced, money having been sent over for the purpose, and they hope during the coming winter to render the place impregnable. As an additional precaution they have decided not only to increase the garrison by sending companies in place of those despatched to Lisbon, but to change some of the regiments, whom they are sending across the sea, and dividing out among the garrisons of Portsmouth and other fortresses, sending in their stead brave veteran troops, with clothing and other supplies for their benefit.
They are also sending ships from the Downs to take the place of others under Vice Admiral Lawson, which need to return to England. In the future his Majesty's ships in the Mediterranean will supply themselves with food and other requirements at Leghorn and other ports of the Grand Duke of Tuscany such being the king's decision and the order of the Admiralty, there having apparently been some arrangement with the merchants of the nation who live at those ports, which permits them to get these provisions cheaper there than elsewhere.
The eldest son of the king of Denmark has recently arrived in London, aged about eighteen. (fn. 10) He is making a tour of the world to study the customs of other Courts and gratify his curiosity. Although he comes without a suite and wishes to remain incognito during his stay he has seen the king and been visited by the duke of York, the great men at Court and the foreign ministers, including myself. Yesterday he left to see the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and other interesting places, served with the king's horses and coaches and by many lords of the Court.
In obedience to the ducali of the 26th August I delivered the letter of congratulation to the queen mother, with a suitable office. I also told the king what I was charged to say about Lieut. Col. Annand, old Galileo and the fisolera. His Majesty asked me to thank the Senate warmly, and to express his obligation, especially for the fisolera which he awaits with great impatience. He also asked me to beg your Excellencies to console this deserving old man by the effective payment of a part of his heavy credits, saying he would feel personally obliged to the Senate for what it might do for his relief.
London, the 29th September, 1662.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Bernardino Guasconi, known in England as Sir Bernard Gascoigne. He took part in the defence of Colchester against Fairfax and was condemned to be shot on its surrender in August, 1648; but on consideration his life was spared. He was granted a pension of 1000l. on 3 Dec, 1649, and received letters of denisation in October, 1661. Gardiner: Hist. of the Great Civil War Vol iv, pp. 202–4, S.P. Dom. 1660–1, page 291; 1661–2, pp. 132, 515.
2 See Pepys: Diary Vol. ii, pp. 311–2. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1001–2, page 463.
3 Attacked near Cape Spartivento, the captain, John Johnson, escaped safely to shore. Mercurius Politicus Sept. 4–11.
4 A petition of the Presbyterian ministers to be continued in their station was presented to the king on Wednesday, 6 September. He summoned the Council to consider the matter on the following day when the petition was rejected, mainly by the efforts of Sheldon, bishop of London. Kingdom's Intelligencer Aug. 25–Sept. 1.
5 Commissions were issued on 1–11 September to the earls of Lindsey, Cleveland and Northampton to be colonels of a regiment of horse each. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 475.
6 This seems to refer to the handing over of the island of Polaroon, by article 15. The treaty, dated 14 September is printed in Dumont: Corps Diplomatique Vol. vi, part ii, pp. 422–7.
7 Lord lieutenant of the North Riding.
8 e.i. James Hayes and Thomas Toogood. See page 183 above.
9 According to Aitzema they went on Sunday 24th September, leaving the secretary, Peter Cunaeus, in charge. Saken van Staet en Oorlogh Vol. iv, page 921.
10 Christian afterwards King Christian V. He was sixteen, having been born in April, 1646.