Venice
October 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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193-204

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'Venice: October 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 193-204. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90109 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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October 1662

Oct. 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
254. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 15th ult. His close attention is required to the matter of the Barbareschi, especially in respect of the pretensions of those pirates upon the ships of that nation in the truce, and to the negotiations of Lauson. With regard to the levy of Castelhaven, the republic can get better terms on this side; so he is to let the matter drop, expressing appreciation of the offer, so as to leave the said Castelhaven favourably impressed.
Ayes, 86. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
255. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at Constantinople, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ragusan ambassadors have gone in state to visit the English ambassador, who promised to respond and to render them like honour. he now announces his wish to accompany the Grand Vizier on his proposed journey to Belgrade. To this end he makes skilful but vigorous representations to the Reischitab, encouraged by the hope of a mutual assignment from the Sultan's treasury of at least 100 reals a day, asserting that there is precedent for it in the case of another English ambassador, who accompanied the Sultan Soliman on his expedition to Hungary. (fn. 1) He announces that in such case he desires the reals to be of 9 drams weight, as he receives them from his merchants, so he says, and with this good example to console the whole city, which is suffering greatly from the scarcity of ready money.
Pera of Constantinople, the 10th October, 1662.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
256. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The secretary of M. de l'Estrade (fn. 2) arrived from London with despatches for the king and was at once sent back. From what I gather negotiations are being pressed forward to obtain possession of Dunkirk, in exchange for a great sum of money. People differ as to the amount, since some say two millions of francs down, while others speak of three millions, two as the dowry of King Charles's sister and one to be paid after a short interval. It is possible that these three millions are mentioned to make a greater show, and that in reality the amount will not be more than two millions of their livres here. It seems that as the place was incorporated by the parliament of England, King Charles cannot alienate it without that body. However, they speak of some device they have contrived, to do it in the form of a pledge and give it to the Most Christian in that way. Here, once they get it into their hands it will suffice, because, whatever happens, they will have not only the argument of the large sum of money to show, but also that of arms, and when they are in possession the strength of these will supply the jus major to keep it. We shall soon see the issue of Estrade's negotiations, for while, in truth, there are strong arguments to persuade that the king of England will not deprive himself of so important a place, yet pure reason cannot always succeed in fathoming the real state and interest of princes, and there would be nothing to marvel at if we saw the king get rid of it, because it may be said that the French, in the first instance, agreed to give it to the English against their own interests.
It is uncertain how the Spaniards will take the news. The Spanish ambassador, indeed, with the ministers here, very skilfully affects ignorance of these reports that are circulating. He merely intimated to them that he had heard that the Chancellor of England, M. de l'Estrade and the ambassador of Portugal had met and had a long conference. He offered no objection to this and affected to believe that it was not true.
Paris, the 10th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
257. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
In the total absence of news I was obliged to let the ordinary go last week without my usual despatch. This week there is not much but I will report the little I have collected. Battaglie returned from Paris on Sunday evening. What he brought cannot be learned. They say that since his arrival an agreement has been reached about Dunkirk and that England will hand it over to the French on payment of 400,000l. sterling, but this cannot yet be asserted definitely. Those who claim to know most about the secrets of this crown are of opinion that the report is false, and that the affair will never terminate in this way, unless the money, which the Court needs extremely, does not tempt them to a course to which, under other circumstances they would not descend. Time alone can disclose the truth.
The merchants have recently spread a report that the Catholic king has issued an order that English ships shall not be admitted to the ports of Andalusia, Malaga and other parts of his dominions which ordinarily are accustomed to go there every year with salt fish to take away wine and fruits. The merchants are greatly perturbed as this would mean serious loss to them. But it may be without foundation as I know on good authority that there has been in London recently an Irishman named Weit, (fn. 3) who has been a long while in the Spanish service in Flanders, sent by the marquis of Caracena to some individual on private affairs but with instructions to find out covertly if there is any inclination to re-establish confidential relations between the two crowns. It seems the Spaniards assert that the Catholic having sent two ambassadors to England, without any reciprocity from this side can only indicate an unfriendly disposition here. But it seems they have assured Weit that if the Catholic will nominate another ambassador for England, they will immediately send an embassy extraordinary to Madrid, and they have already sounded some members of the leading families, of those whose purses are best furnished to see if they will take up the burden, as the Court being without money would select some one who could make a splendid appearance at his own cost.
We hear that there are daily desertions from the forces sent to Portugal, which the Spaniards facilitate by money. It also seems that quarrels have arisen between the English and the natives, and in an encounter four of the former were slain, but more Portuguese. While this is a bad beginning for friendly relations with that country, it may assist those with Spain, as the feelings of the people also will be hostile to helping Portugal.
An Irish Catholic named Belling, a creature of the chancellor, (fn. 4) is shortly to be sent to Italy, privately, without any character. He is apparently going to live at Rome to treat secretly with the pope about the promotion of this Abbot Obigni, the queen's first almoner, to a post in the Sacred College, and it is believed he may achieve this without much difficulty. This would be excellent for the Catholics here, since to obtain such a satisfaction from his Holiness, which the king and chancellor seem ardently to desire cannot fail to be advantageous to all who depend on the church of Rome, with the hope that the penalties against them may be abated, although they are not at present carried out with the zeal of past days.
As Malo writes that he has postponed his voyage to Spain I am not making any change in sending the despatches, in accordance, with the ducali of the 9th September, just arrived.
London, the 13th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
258. To the Resident in England.
When Viscount Facombiggie is at liberty from the affairs of the crown and has been summoned to Court to receive the necessary instructions, he is to observe carefully that nobleman's proceedings and report to the Senate for their enlightenment.
Ayes, 84. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
259. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
I have received letters from the Resident Giavarina containing the desires expressed by the Abbot Obigni. I told the duke of Medina of the quality the lady claimed for herself and how the lord chancellor refused to treat with her. Without committing myself, but generally, I gave him reason to believe that this was a favourable opportunity to embrace some negotiation. The duke was very pleased and could not have spoken more courteously. He went at once to tell his Majesty and then came back to thank me again. Subsequently he showed great surprise that this is published by the lady. He does not know why and reflects that if negotiation is intended it was only right that he should know it, but the knowledge should not be confided to him alone. If it was an English invention it was useful to learn that they had a disposition in favour of negotiating.
I have sent to Giavarina what the Abbot Obigni asked for, but more knowledge is necessary to enable the convenience and interests of these princes to be introduced with more security. The duke asked me what minister your Excellencies had in England. I told him that Giavarina had been resident for six years and was a man of ability and experience. I added that Sig. Mocenigo was going there soon, as ambassador.
Madrid, the 16th October, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
260. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Although the ministers here do not make any statement about negotiations of M. l'Estrade, I have heard that they are very displeased to learn of the revelations that have been made in that connection about the acquisition of Dunkirk, as they are afraid of what may happen and that the good friends and servants of the king of England and those who have little love for France, may try to upset it. So far as I can learn, having committed themselves so far, they are determined that the blow shall not be made in the air, and they will try every means possible to ensure their intent, and I fancy that in the alliance with King Charles they offer to introduce conditions most advantageous for him, so that he may give them Dunkirk.
Paris, the 17th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
261. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Foreign ministers at this Court have always in past times enjoyed certain privileges for the wine and beer consumed in their households, a certain portion being allowed them free of taxes. I have enjoyed this without dispute until the present. I lately paid a brewer for the quantity of beer he had sold me giving him a note for the duty, which amounted to 4l. 5s. 9d. stating the amount of beer received by this house, to show to the commissioners for collecting the tax, to have it allowed, in the usual way. Many weeks later he came to tell me that the commissioners would not allow it and that I must pay him. I told him I had never done so all the while I had been in England, as the commissioners would find if they consulted their books. He insisted that they would not allow it. So several months passed, but lately, growing impatient, he has presented a petition against me to the Council, (fn. 5) saying that I claim exemption from the duty and asking for a declaration whether I am to pay or no. The Council directed that the petition should be shown to me and that I should be informed that exemption from the duty on beer was not granted to any one soever. I told Sir [Edward] Walker, one of the secretaries of the Council that I was claiming nothing new. I had never paid, the money was a small matter but it was a question of maintaining a privilege always enjoyed by ministers. If they meant to break it I asked for something in writing under his hand to show that I was not abandoning a privilege of my own accord.
The secretary repeated what I said to the Council. On hearing it the chancellor became angry, for he is an imperious and irascible man, and calling the Secretary Nicolas, directed him to write a letter to your Serenity that the king is not satisfied with me and wishes me to be recalled. The king was present and many of the Council, but all are afraid of the chancellor and no one ventured to open his mouth and contradict him. I have this from Sir Valcher, (fn. 6) who was in the Council at the time and says he was charged by the chancellor to inform me. I cannot discover whether he has actually written, but in any case that can only facilitate the release I long for.
It seems absurd to take such a step for so slight a reason, and there must be other motives. In all my time at this Court I have conducted myself in a seemly manner and have given no one cause of offence except to ask for this in writing, which is what has so stirred the chancellor's bile. No one will contradict him. The king himself is afraid of him and lets him do what he likes, as is shown by so many things which have happened in this country since he became predominant. My conscience is clear. If I had done anything to offend his Majesty I should deserve not only recall but punishment. But the fact is the chancellor is not entirely friendly to your Serenity. As he is double faced and crafty he cannot be trusted and I could not say to whom he is friendly unless it be to those who give him presents and money. All the rest, with one accord complain of him.
There is also Chilegri, sometime resident for this king at Venice, who claims to have been affronted by the republic. He is an assistant of the Bedchamber and an intimate of the chancellor and loses no opportunity for revenge, speaking very ill of the Senate, and so adds fuel to the fire. In view of the malice of this man, who has all the authority
, I have paid the brewer, to avoid his seizing my goods or other insolences.
Such is the incident, in which I hope I have not merited the indignation of your Excellencies, who may see how far the chancellor's malignity will go in writing thus against me, when he has no cause of offence. In visits I have always shown him every respect and he has responded with courtesy, which I now see was all dissimulation. I am trying to find out why he is so incensed against me. Your Serenity will see that it all comes from the pure malice of this predominant and feared minister, as the terms of the enclosed request from the duke of York show clearly that the king has no ill will against me.
I took the opportunity to tell his Highness that I understood his Majesty was writing to your Serenity against me. He said he had heard nothing about it and would speak to the king. I do not know whether he has done so, but when I know what more is imputed against me I will demand audience of the king to clear myself. I will not venture before I have full information, as I will not risk a refusal to gratify one who does not wish me well. If the letter comes, though I do not know by whom it will be sent or who will present it, I beg your Excellencies to release me from the vexations and inconveniences of this fatal country, directing me to leave at once, and to direct the prompt payment of what is due to me, so that my uncle Girolamo may supply me with money to pay my debts here, which amount to little less than 4000 ducats di banco, which is all my substance, while I am seriously affected in my health, as the climate does not suit me, so that I may not be exposed to the malicious animosity of a man enraged without cause and to the fury of a barbarous, insolent and impertinent people, especially over the satisfaction of debts.
London, the 20th October, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
262. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The evening of the day before yesterday the duke of York sent his secretary Coventry to ask me to go to St. James' palace, where he lives, as he had something to say to me. I went yesterday after dinner when his Highness said that the Spaniards, who do not wish to break openly with England, were seeking means to harass her. Under the pretence that the plague was at Tanger they had forbidden any ship that had touched there to enter their ports, as all the ships of this nation are accustomed to do which pass the Strait, and thereby interrupted trade with the English. To cause greater disturbance the suspicion was so spread abroad that the report and Spain's resolution reached Toulon, where they would not grant pratique to any ships of the king of England who were there for provisions and other things. They were now about to send more ships to the Mediterranean. These would no longer have affair with Algiers, as an agreement had been made, but with Tunis and Tripoli. They would need the ports of the princes of Italy and especially of Leghorn and others of the Grand Duke for victualling. The king feared that the malice of the Spaniards might play him the same trick there as in France, and had directed him, as Lord High Admiral, to speak to the ministers of the Italian princes here to assure them that Tangier is perfectly healthy, and the report only comes from the Spaniards, and to get them to write to their masters to prevent them from refusing pratique to his Majesty's ships. He knew that if the most serene republic took such a step Florence, Genoa and the others would do the same, and so he asked me to write and assure the Senate that Tangier was perfectly healthy and even if there was suspicion, the time consumed by ships from there to any of the ports of Italy would suffice for quarantine. He would speak to the ministers of the Grand Duke and Genoa to the same effect. By so doing I should greatly oblige the king.
I was much astonished at hearing this at the very time when I understood that the king was writing against me, and I mentioned it to the duke and obtained the reply reported. I promised to report to your Serenity and was sure you would gratify his Majesty in every possible way. Sanitary regulations were very delicate and important especially in Italy, where the warm climate makes such a scourge more deadly than in colder parts, and every prince was obliged to go warily. I then took leave. As I know that the matter is important I will make inquiry of merchants and others whether there really is any suspicion of Tangier and inform the Senate.
The most important of the negotiations of M. dell' Estrade touching Dunkirk, has been settled by the sale of the place to France for 5 million francs, equivalent to over 400,000l. sterling. Two of these are to be paid immediately upon ratification, and the other three in two months. It is not yet certain whether the place is to be handed over to France at once or only after full payment. The articles will be kept secret at least until the ratification. Meanwhile M. dell' Estrade stays on and his frequent conferences with the chancellor make it believed that there are other negotiations on foot of consequence.
At home everything is quiet thanks to the good arrangements to prevent any disturbance by the ill affected, both here and in Scotland, where it appears the bishops were received with hisses and murmurs. So the liturgy of the church is brought to a uniformity, much to the joy of the Episcopalians, but causing regret and anger to the Presbyterians and other sectaries.
This being the usual time for the election of the mayor of this city the Common Council has chosen Sir John Robinson, lieutenant of the Tower, a rich and talented man, so great advantages and abundance are hoped for the city under his rule.
To fetch the ambassadors from Muscovy they sent the frigate Monk to the mouth of the Baltic, and it is supposed that the ambassadors will have gone on board and that they should arrive in England before long. Accordingly they are preparing quarters and other things for their reception and entertainment. It is said they are bringing very rich presents for his Majesty and the ministers.
The prince of Denmark has returned from the country and though he wishes to continue incognito the king insisted on lodging and defraying him, and will do so long as he remains in England. He has tried his hardest to avoid this, but without effect, so he has been obliged to submit to his Majesty's wishes.
With the ducali of the 23rd ult. I receive the patent granted to Hays and Toogood for their instrument to force water from one place to another. Next week I expect to see the experiments and will report to the Senate and I will then hand them the patent.
London, the 20th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
263. To the Resident in England.
When another Dutch ambassador arrives at that Court he is to observe carefully the negotiations which are conducted with him and the formalities observed, for the enlightenment of the Senate. He is also to keep on the alert to discover the truth about the negotiations of M. del' Estrade, and further to make careful inquiries as to the instructions given to ships which are to proceed to the Mediterranean.
Ayes, 83. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
264. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
A courier arrived on Friday from M. del' Estrade with news of the conditions for which he is treating. These were approved and sent back, with orders to have them settled and put into execution. It is understood here that Dunkirk has been purchased for five million francs, the munitions in the place being included, payment to be effective and without any compensation. Estrades offered hostages as security, but King Charles declared that he would be satisfied with the mere word of the Most Christian, and would hand over the place on that alone. This has greatly pleased the king here, who has sent back some part of his troops in that direction. If there is no further hitch in the agreement M. de l' Estrade is to go thither to take over the place and introduce the garrison and the troops which are advancing on information received from him. His Majesty also thinks of going thither himself with all speed, if the matter is settled quickly, otherwise he will wait until after the queen's confinement.
Paris, the 24th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
265. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English frigates which came out with the governor from London to the waters of Tanger have betaken themselves to Alcantara di Sale, in Africa, which is straitly besieged on the land side by Benticar, leader of the Moors of the faction opposed to Gailan and the followers of Spain. Owing to this and because the place is ill provided and very hard pressed, its fall is expected, the contrary party being powerless to introduce succour. Last year the Spaniards allowed food and munitions to be transported from Cadiz, but now the union of England with the Barbareschi prevents this being done.
Madrid, the 25th October, 1662.
[Italian.]
Oct. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra,
Venetian
Archives.
266. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I can add nothing further about the brewer's petition. I have spoken about it to the Secretary Nicolas, but he will disclose nothing. I cannot even learn if he wrote to your Excellencies. I remonstrated gently about the wrong done to me, as I knew I had not offended his Majesty. But as he will unquestionably repeat everything to the king I thought it best to say nothing more on the subject and to let it sleep until the state's orders reach me. Some one has told me that they certainly have not written and that the chancellor only acted thus in order to frighten ministers and oblige them not to speak or complain if they do not obtain the privileges they enjoyed before, as he and the treasurer intend that they shall be taken away for ever, and that there shall be no more advantage for beer and wine, which were the only privileges in England, as in fact there has been none since his Majesty's restoration. These ministers think to show their efficiency thus and their desire for economy. Foreign powers should take example and treat their ministers similarly, certainly ministers with the republic enjoy advantages granted no where else.
If they have written it is because the chancellor may really wish me to go, as I do myself, for the following reasons. I am informed that M. dell' Estrade has done me an ill turn with the chancellor. This is because a year ago when the affair of the coaches happened at the Tower he suspected that an old Englishman, who in his youth had fought in the armies of the Catholic King, who frequented this house, had taken part in the affair and had remained in retirement in this house for some weeks, from fear, although I know he was innocent as his advanced age would show. From this I hear that his Excellency, although he never gave me any sign of it, came to suspect that I was more friendly to the Spanish party and had spoken about it to the chancellor. Add to this that I did not visit the ambassador of Portugal, although I had been covertly urged to go, which I could not do without express order of the Senate, following the example of the ministers of Brandenbourg, who did not recognise Portugal but visited the ambassador immediately on the announcement of the marriage with the present queen. This may have offended the chancellor, especially as I visited the Catholic ambassador, as your Serenity's ministers should do.
Now that M. dell' Estrade seems to be negotiating something of consequence they do not want me here, as with such suspicions they might fear unfavourable reports. From a confident I have found out that the French are proposing at this Court an alliance between France, England and Sweden against the House of Austria, which they expect, from the relationship, to include Denmark also, and as they would like to have some prince of Italy of whom the republic is the most important, if the matter goes forward and is concluded at this Court, when the chancellor gets his money, and the Senate has to be approached, they do not want to have anything to do with me.
These are the only motives to induce them to procure me the ill will of your Excellencies, but as the fault is not criminal I hope that I shall not be condemned, and will procure me no other punishment than that which I myself desire, my recall. I count on this the more as it is of slight consequence if the post remains vacant for some months until Sig. Mocenigo comes, indeed it would be better, as if the above particulars are correct and they want something from your Serenity they will the sooner send an ambassador to Venice, of which they have talked for so long while things remain as before.
London, the 27th October, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
267. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have been making inquiries whether Tangier is really free from suspicion of the plague and I find that the authors of the report really were the Spaniards, for the purpose represented and that the place is unquestionably healthy.
The cession of Dunkirk being decided, owing to the Court's need of money it has been agreed to abate something of the amount promised, to receive the rest immediately in cash, and so the prompt payment of 500,000 doubles will give the French immediate possession of the place, which is in excellent order from the works which his Majesty has had carried out there. Merchants of France and some of Flanders have come over to arrange the time of payment, as the king does not want remittances from Paris, but that the money shall actually be brought to England and deposited in the Mint. Some difficulties have arisen about the guarantees, but will not be difficult to arrange and cannot upset the agreement. Meanwhile the governor of Dunkirk and many of the officers of the garrison have come to London to receive their orders, being sorry for what has happened, from the private advantage they drew from the place. It is believed that all the troops from there will be divided among the coastal garrisons, as previously decided, in exchange for others who are there and who should be changed for several reasons.
The success of the arrangements to prevent the evil intentions of the fanatics is shown by some of them falling into the toils every day. Forty-six were taken one night recently, all together in a secret place in this city where they were devising their wicked plans. (fn. 7) Besides the persons numerous papers were found, from which not a little can be learned of their machinations, which is all to the advantage of the crown.
Very old and incapable Sir [Edward] Nicolas who has long sustained the heavy burden of secretary of state, has decided to resign. In his place Sir [Henry] Benet will be appointed, who was resident in Spain, a man of wit and ability, affable and courteous, possessing several languages, greatly beloved by the king, and competent for the position from his knowledge of the interests of foreign princes. As he does not enjoy the chancellor's affection, that minister has tried many devices to hinder his rise. To ruin him he had a letter taken to his house, all in cipher with a signature in Spanish to render him suspect of correspondences with the Catholic. But he did not understand the characters and being very astute, conceiving whence it came and to parry the stroke, at once flew to tell everything and show the letter to the chancellor himself, thus firing the mine prepared for him and surmounting all the obstacles put in his way.
The Resident Douning has come to Court from Holland. The reason is not known unless it be about the negotiations recently concluded with the States and the ratification which is now being dealt with actively at the Hague and which is expected to be settled above that already agreed between Holland and Portugal.
As Vice Admiral Lawson is about to proceed to Tripoli and Tunis to arrange an agreement with those pirates similar to that with the Algerines they expect to hear soon of some progress in that affair which so far has remained dormant.
As the weather has been bad I have not yet been able to see the instrument of Hays and Togood tested. As soon as the weather allows the experiment will be made and the Senate shall be informed of the result.
By the ducali of the 30th September I am instructed to obtain what the captain of the ship Speranza appears to owe to your Serenity for munitions laded at Venice and not consigned to the fleet. The ship is not English and certainly is not here, and it is not known if it will come. As it is Dutch I am writing to Amsterdam this evening to find out if it is there or in some other Dutch port, so that I may be able to give the necessary orders, or if the Senate listens to my plea for recall I can myself attend to the matter on the way through to Switzerland to the post to which I was appointed so long ago.
London, the 27th October, 1662.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The reference is to Sir Edward Barton. See Hist. MSS. Comm. Finch Papers Vol. i, page 319. He served with Amurath III, not Soliman, in the campaign against Maximilian in 1594.
2 The Sieur Batailler. He arrived on the 7th. Estrades to the king, 9 Oct. 1662. P.R.O. Paris Trans.
3 Probably Ignatius White, mentioned in a letter from Brussels of 16th August, 1662. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 462.
4 Richard Beling. This mission was the occasion of one of the charges made later against Clarendon by Bristol. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1603–4. page 199.
5 The petition of Robert Rodgers to be cleared of the excise for beer delivered to Giavarina or to be allowed to proceed against him for the same is in S.P. For. Venice Vol. xlv, dated 24 September.
6 Sir Edward Walker, garter king at arms, clerk of the Council.
7 Under date Oct. 13, o.s., there is mention of a, list by Stephen Harris of forty-five persons apprehended at an unlawful meeting in Southwark. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 514.