Venice
November 1662

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

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204-216

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'Venice: November 1662', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 204-216. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90110 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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November 1662

Nov. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives
268. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The negotiations of the Ambassador d' Estrades in England are a source of constantly increasing suspicion and jealousy that some negotiation is on foot to the prejudice of their interests here. On this side they are without news, and betray their curiosity. Some envoy of ordinary condition has been despatched to that Court to make investigations, not to negotiate. They understand that the acquisition of Dunkirk by France for a great outlay of money is near at hand. They cannot contain themselves in their denunciation of the dissimulation of France, for bargaining about what does not belong to her, and England, which is trading to others what rightfully belongs to Spain. Cardinal Mazarin offered Don Luis 800,000 crowns so that he might recover those territories and drive the English back across the water. Now France is making fast the conquest for herself. She deceives with the pretence of friendship and correspondence, and the dominions of others serve for her own interests. They are also apprehensive that this treaty means advantages for Portugal, and the tardy counsels of Spain cause them to suffer injuries.
I am always meeting with expressions of a desire for agreement, mingled with doubts of sincerity and sentiments of anger against the king of England, who, guided by the evil counsels of the chancellor, goes a long way in his ingratitude in return for the well known and friendly demonstrations of the Catholic king. Meanwhile the outcome has proved favourable to the Portuguese with the withdrawal of the two Spanish armies of Estremadura and Galicia.
The duke of Albucherche has not put out to sea. English frigates have united with the ships of Portugal and they will be ready for a fight; but the winter season will decide the contest by obliging them to remain shut up in port.
Madrid, the 1st November, 1662.
[Italian.]
Nov. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
269. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The kingdom of England which in past years was the theatre of many spectacles is in danger of seeing a repetition. The malcontents are always at work and their numbers are constantly increasing and it is to be feared that they may yet succeed in bringing tears to the eyes of this people which are not dry from their late troubles. The sale of Dunkirk is very unpopular not only in the kingdom but in this city, where the traders in particular make the greatest outcry, thinking only of their private gain, considering that place as very advantageous for trade, as indeed it was, being the key of the Low Countries and France, and calculated to keep the neighbours in check, especially now when by the general account it need fear no attack, if it is well supplied, thanks to the fortifications and other works carried out by the English.
The soldiers of the garrison, although they flatter themselves with the hope of being placed in garrisons in this country, are afraid of being disbanded and grumble as do those from thence who fear they will have to give up their places to others who are to come from beyond the sea. Either the one or the other will have to be dismissed and so increase the number of malcontents, adding fuel to the fire, if for nothing else to give occasion to be taken again into service and increase the army and be ready for eventualities.
The king often issues proclamations and tries by good measures to keep his people in obedience, but when they seem to be producing good results it is seen that they do little good and that the disaffected prosecute their designs with greater resolution. In this city or in the neighbourhood is Ludlo, who had the chief command in Ireland in Cromwell's time, a leader of the sectaries, a bitter enemy of the monarchy, and condemned with the other regicides. He is wandering about encouraging his followers and trying to bring about fresh revolutions. On Sunday night indeed it seemed to have begun, as the alarm being given in London, the mayor, not feeling safe, sent to the Court for help, which at once sent a company of foot and one of horse. This did not please the trained bands, who consider themselves able to defend the city without assistance. They began to murmur and arousing suspicion of themselves, have been obliged to stand on guard all the week and to exert themselves more than usual.
Besides this infamous libels are cast about the city almost every day and night against the king and Court, and especially in the palace of Whitehall, which shows the dissatisfaction of the people and the great licence which is taken. Indeed the discontent is general and everyone complains of the king and that he allows himself to be governed by ministers while he cares for nothing, attending only to his hunting, his lusts and other amusements, which are not well interpreted. Money there is none, and they demand it of the people; but these declare openly that they will not contribute any, as indeed they paid so much at his Majesty's return and they cannot see how it has been employed except in favouring some who were the worst enemies of the crown, who now have the chief posts at Court, and in the increase of certain vices which are disapproved by the sectaries, who all claim to be saints and that all they do is by divine inspiration.
Things are indeed in evil case and if they wish to pacify friends as well as enemies it will be necessary to begin with a general reformation in the Court, which is already being discussed, substituting ministers who are less greedy for money and give greater satisfaction to the people. But as everything here moves with incredible slowness, it is impossible to foretell what will happen, unless necessity, which is very great, forces them to act. There is murmuring against the chancellor who tyrannises over the people, especially over their purses, as all business passes through his hands because of the great seal. It is asserted that a long list of charges against him is being prepared to present to parliament when it resumes its sessions, pointing out the extortions and other wrongs done to the people since he was in England, to demand justice.
Meanwhile it seems he has been accused to the king of having in great measure encouraged rebellions, since he and the Secretary Nicolas, his creature, gave his Majesty to understand, when disturbances were heard of, that it was nothing, and made light of it, belittling what was done to pervent mischief, and now it is clearly seen that the peril is evident. They say that this was the chief reason for the resignation of Nicolas. This was believed to be spontaneous and voluntary, but it is certain that it was forced and that the king desired it, although for eyewash he made him a gift of
1000l. sterling, putting in his place, despite the chancellor, Sir [Henry] Benet, his bitterest enemy, but a very loyal servant of the king. He is now at his post, having recently taken the requisite oaths. There can be no doubt that this person together with his Majesty, with whom he could not be higher in favour, is to employ all his wit to cast down a minister so proud, and domineering (non vi e da dubitare che non habbia questo con sua Maesta, presso cui non puo esser meglio in gratia, ad impiegar tutto lo spirito per giettare a basso un cosi feroce dominante ministro). It is easy to see, owing to his interest at Court through the marriage of his daughter with the duke of York that he cannot stand really well with the king since it is clear that he has made him marry a lady who gives little hope of offspring, with consequences that may be imagined, and which may in the end be his ruin. People already talk publicly about his being deprived of his post and raising him to the rank of duke, so that he may no longer aspire to offices of gain. Time will show; meanwhile for the good of the king and kingdom it is desirable that the power of this cruel favourite should be abased, which is desired and hoped by all, especially as nothing violent is durable.
London, the 3rd November, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
270. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have not been able to find out anything more about the letter written against me, and I cannot even say if it has gone, so I am anxiously waiting for instructions. That the Senate may know the extent of their malice I will report what has happened since. Thomas Chiligri, sometime resident at Venice, sent on Saturday to tell me that he heard the king had written against me to the republic. He regretted this but might remind me how he was treated, at Venice, glorying at this incident which he wishes to have believed to be in revenge for what your Serenity did against him. (fn. 1) The same day a certain person came twice to this house who is unquestionably a spy of the chancellor, to ask, the first time, where a Spaniard was lodging, who had arrived, he said, a few days before from the Court at Madrid; the second time he told his interlocutor that he knew he had dined with me that morning. When told it was not so and that nothing was known here he went back.
I sent word to Chiligre that I knew all and thanked him for the information, the other answer was given without the least passion. That some one has come from Spain seems beyond doubt but I have not seen him and know nothing of the matter. They say that an Irish friar has recently arrived in a ship from Bilbao
, (fn. 2) and is staying in hiding to wait for a favourable opportunity to disclose his business, which is believed to concern the relations between this crown and the Catholic. God knows what will happen. Now that the English and Dutch have come to terms and it is reported from the Hague that an adjustment has been made between the States and the Portuguese, it is much to be feared that these two nations will finally remove the mask and support that cause strongly against the king of Spain, especially as France urges it, and it is also good policy as it does not suit any of them that the Spanish monarchy should be aggrandised by the acquisition of Portugal.
A certain Calogero
(fn. 3) named Logotesi of Calamata has arrived here recently from the Morea with letters signed by six bishops of that kingdom inviting his Majesty to take that fertile peninsula. They tell him that if he sends a fleet with 15 or 20,000 combatants, he would find, 20,000 of their people ready at Brazzo di Maina to receive them at landing and conduct them to the places most easy to conquer. Within the country he would find 12,000 effectives who would take arms to support his Majesty and free themselves from the Turkish yoke. The number of Turks is not great. In fine they describe the affair as very easy and to persuade the king talk of the glory of such an enterprise. His Majesty received the letter and handed it to one of his chaplains who speaks a little Greek to translate it. But not fully understanding it he sent for one Anastasio Comeno of Zante, a subject of your Serenity, who is here asking alms for some of his fellows who are slaves, he says, in the hands of the Turks, from whom I have learned all the above particulars. The Calogero says that he has taken similar letters to the king of France and the most serene republic but both said they had other matters to attend to, so he came here in the hope that his Majesty would support those who sent him. What the king will reply is not yet known.
A ship has been sent to Dunkirk to receive the money which France is to pay for the place. It seems that the soldiers who are to take possession are to take the money with them and hand it over to the English garrison to be transported here. For the rest M. dell' Estrade continues at Court, and while no announcement is made concerning his negotiations I learn on good authority that they extend to what I reported last week, but what the result will be no one can say.
The ducali of the 6th bring me the decision about the levy of the earl of Castelhaven. I will follow out the instructions and report what I have done, as also about the instrument of Hays and Togood, who have not yet been able to make the experiments owing to the detestable weather, which still continues.
London, the 3rd November, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Nov. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
271. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters No. 358. What is there said about the embassy extraordinary to France gives us cause to know definitely what may have happened about Viscount Facombrighe, of whom the king himself told you a long time ago that he was destined to come to us. Referring to other letters we wish you to continue your efforts to find out the real state of the case. If Malo is not leaving Antwerp, it will be as well to make no change about the letters.
Ayes, 110. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
272. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The ratification of the treaty about Dunkirk having reached the Ambassador dell' Estrade from France, he at once changed it against his Majesty's which was sent by express to Paris at the beginning of the week; and on the return of the messenger it seems he is to leave for Dunkirk of which he is appointed governor. They say the Most Christian will go there in person and the duke of York, the one to receive and the other to hand it over. It will contain all the guns and every other provision, which is not scanty, and he will get in exchange the 500,000 doubles. They prefer to have it here in white money instead of gold, which generally is very low whereas fine silver can be coined into the currency of the country. Meanwhile Alderman Blackwell, (fn. 4) one of the richest merchants in the country and one with whom the Court is dealing, has set out for Paris, to weigh the money and stamp the sacks and have them transported to Dunkirk.
In view of his approaching departure Estrade is urging on his other negotiations which he would like to see concluded first for the advantage of his master and his own glory. They consist of an offensive and defensive alliance between England, France, Sweden and Portugal. This is undoubted, but the issue cannot be predicted. No one comes out publicly against it. Many think that it will end as in the case of Dunkirk, which would never have been sold if the Spaniards had had some one here to make offers and keep the matter in suspense. It is true that there was Veit, but he said nothing to the point, and on the other matters Caracena disowns him having written to a person at Court that he made the overtures of his own caprice, without orders. It is not clear why he disapproves of Veit's negotiations, who is known to have written instructions from the marquis.
The person from Madrid reported last week is now in London. Everyone confirms it and indeed it is asserted that he has had several secret audiences of the king. This cannot be definitely asserted, but if it is true he might be able to thwart the negotiations mentioned. If it is not indications point to the French achieving their intent as the chancellor is opposed to the Spaniard and attached to France and greedy of money, by means of which he will carry through this affair as he did that of Dunkirk, which certainly has increased the number of his enemies, who clamour against him. A minister of Spain is desirable here to speak and oppose the designs of the French. The people who are naturally more friendly to that crown, do not hesitate to manifest their partiality publicly otherwise the interests of the Catholic at this Court are bound to go badly, Spanish stolidity being matched by French vivacity.

The sectaries proposed to make fresh disturbances in this kingdom, which is certainly on the edge of new dissensions, but the plot was discovered which was to be effected simultaneously in this city and elsewhere in England, either yesterday or to-day, and to prevent disorder they arrest daily hundreds of Quakers, Anabaptists and other fanatics, of whom they apparently intend to send the leaders to the plantations of America, to rid this island of so great an infection. Meanwhile they are all standing to arms in London and in the country. In some counties of the West some bands of the enemy actually appeared, well mounted and armed, but were easily dispersed.
The day before yesterday, when the annual ceremony of the new mayor is celebrated in London, his Majesty would have been in great peril if God had not allowed the designs of the malefactors to be discovered. The king and queen were to have gone to a certain spot, prepared every year, to observe the feast, but it was found that some of the trained bands of the city meant to make an attempt on the king in passing, and neither was there, but seven of the officers of the bands have been arrested, suspected of being concerned in this barbarous design. (fn. 5) They are being examined; and the secretary of Ludlo having fallen into their hands, they are extracting not a little from him, various directions having been found which clearly show their impious intentions, which were to set fire simultaneously to several parts of the royal palace and other principal places of the city, to reduce everything to ashes. To provide for everything and enable them to bring to nought the designs of the enemy they are forming new regiments of horse and foot, but unless God intervenes the affairs of this country are in a sorry plight.
The weather having been favourable this week Messrs. Hayes and Togood had an opportunity to test their instruments and were able to do so to the satisfaction of all present, showing clearly that they can easily do all that they claimed in their paper. Accordingly I handed them the patent granted by the Senate. They expressed their thanks and the hope that the concession would prove very advantageous to both public and private interests, especially as their apparatus costs much less than the pumps now used. The instruments are in the form of bellows which with very little force draw up and spurt water in no small quantity to any height required. The method of drying ships from the bottom is certainly admirable. They made several holes in the hull and with the bellows speedily pumped out the water, which they cause to issue from the bottom or from a side, under water without a drop entering from without, clearing the ship so that the holes can be mended and the ship continue in service without danger. They will send some of the instruments at the first opportunity and depute an agent so that they can be put into use.
London, the 10th November, 1662.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
273. Organa sive machina quas solas Ser. Venetiarum Resp. Jacobo Hayes et Thomae Togood Anglis faciendas exercendas et utendas per Litteras Patentes datas die xxiii Septembris MDCLXII cum privilegio praecepit et concessit sunt instrumenta quaedam ad formam speciem et similitudinem Follium diversorum generum quae aquam imbibunt et emittunt absorbent et ejiciunt sive detrudunt sicut folles usitati efflant ventum sive aerem.
Signed, 30 October, 1662.
Jas. Hayes
Thos. Toogood.
Nov. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
274. To the Resident in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 20th ult. Regret the affair about the beer. The Senate can decide nothing without further information. He is to report if other foreign ministers enjoy a similar exception and privilege. Have received no report about any suspicion of plague at Tangier. Commend his reply to the duke of York. To assure his Highness of the republic's regard for the king and that English ships will always receive the best possible treatment.
The Board of Health will be informed about Tanger, to be on the watch, and he must obtain full information from the merchants.
That the passage for the resident about Tangier be sent to the magistracy of Health.
Ayes, 93. Noes, 0. Neutral, 6.
[Italian.]
Nov. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
275. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Nothing further is known about the treaty with England. The industry of Colbert shines conspicuously on this occasion, as he is carrying out a prompt payment of five million francs without having to take them from the treasury, where his Majesty keeps in deposit his reserve of ready cash. Before the acquisition of Dunkirk it was arranged by M. de l' Estrade with King Charles, to hand it over in consideration of the payment of two or three million down and the rest within two years, but as the king wished to have all the effective money at once, he agreed to forego the interest which might be due on that amount of money for the time in question, which was estimated to amount to from 340,000 to 450,000 francs. This sum he agreed to deduct from the said five millions. Accordingly Colbert, to have this money ready, caused all the customers and those who have the farms of the king to pay the said two millions on account of what they have to disburse, and for the rest he found other individuals, who were content, for the aforesaid advantage, to supply the cash at once, with the certainty of having it back at the time prefixed for recovering it. Here they are expecting a fresh courier from London with the news of the exchange of ratifications and of the arrangements made for consigning the money and for the evacuation of the place, of which M. de l' Estrade has already been declared governor, a just decision which his merits have well deserved.
Paris, the 14th November, 1662.
[Italian.]
Nov. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
276. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
To delve into the machinations of the sectaries, which is the sole business puzzling the Court at present, the king has appointed the earl of Loderdel, secretary of state for Scotland, and Sir [Henry] Bennet to examine the prisoners, who are countless, and their numbers are increasing every day owing to the constant arrests. They have gone to the Tower of London and there prosecuted with energy their important task. No one would confess, but they have been convicted by evidence, notably that of a minister or preacher, who from zeal for the king laid aside the clerical garb for that of a soldier, the red jacket worn by all the army, and mingling with the infantry and feigning to be on their side, was able to penetrate deeply into the conspiracy which he revealed to the general and others in reward for which he has been raised by the king's bounty to some high position in the Anglican Church. Their villainy being thus made known, they are being tried and there is no doubt that many of them will end their days on the gallows.
It would have been a sanguinary affair. There were 12 desperadoes to assassinate the king, some of whom have been seized. This was arranged on several occasions when his Majesty was at Hampton Court and frequently went hunting, but something always occurred to prevent it. They also meant to murder the duke of York, General Monk and Major General Brun, to surprise the Tower, burn the royal palace and the city, massacre the nobility and the richest citizens and thus turn everything upside down.
In spite of the discovery of these particulars which disclose the transactions of these seditious folk the king is not yet satisfied and does not relax his efforts to probe as deeply as possible, for as the conspirators do not make confession or disclose any of their accomplices there is reason to fear that some persons of rank have a hand in these rebellions and devise these crimes while pretending to be friends, for secret enemies are more dangerous than open ones. It is not unlikely that the Presbyterians have had a share in these contrived dissensions, since there is no one who is not fully aware how fatal they are to this afflicted nation. It is true that they do not conspire against the life of the king, but to oblige him to do as they wish, to profess the religion of Calvin and similar ridiculous claims, which have caused all the past troubles. It is certain that if the other sectaries started the work, they would join in supplying the strong arm, money which they have in abundance and advice, many of them being of great wit and capacity, and would try to realise their intentions.
Without awaiting the return of the messenger from Paris, M. dell' Estrade has gone to his government of Dunkirk, leaving imperfect the other negotiations reported. His departure may have been hastened because he did not find support for his proposals or for other secret reasons, but their failure can only redound to the advantage of Christendom in view of the vast designs of the powerful and most wealthy crown of France, which have rarely been found propitious to the general good of Christendom.
On hearing from Paris that the king's journey to Dunkirk was postponed because the queen was near her delivery, the journey of the duke of York is completely given up. The queen mother opposed it strongly, declaring that with the kingdom disturbed and the cabals of the disaffected it was not wise to expose the sole heir to the throne even to a short journey, as although they whisper that the queen is enceinte there are no infallible signs; so the king agreed and changed his mind about his brother's going.
Besides the regiments of horse quartered at some distance from the metropolis, which are being brought nearer to London because of the imminent dangers, they are daily beating up for more infantry, and a regiment of horse from Dunkirk, of old soldiers, has taken quarters at the gates of London, so it would appear that they have no reason to fear any attempt of rebel conspirators.
Belling, the Catholic destined for Rome, left this week, going straight to his destination via France. (fn. 6) He will stay there as agent for the queen, in whose name he will move for tho promotion of the Abbot Obigni to the red hat, for which dignity he is well fitted by his examplary life and great qualities, being of a royal house with the same family name as the king. But there may be opposition at that Court as during his stay in France ho showed a strong leaning to Jansenism, condemned by the Holy See, which he is now said to have entirely given up.
The ducali of the 30th September ordered me to recover what was due by the captain of the ship Speranza. I wrote to Holland and learned that it was expected shortly at Amsterdam from Genoa. I am sending this evening to Tamagno, my correspondent there together with the information that reached me with the ducali, so that he may take steps for the recovery.
London, the 17th November, 1662.
[Italian.]
Nov. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives,
277. To the Resident in England.
He is to encourage confidential relations with the Ambassador l' Estrade. He did well to write to Amsterdam about the Speranza. The captain is a prisoner at Leghorn, but his resources are too slight for him to make amends for the treason. It will therefore be necessary to proceed against the ship.
The Senate recognises the reasonableness of his desire to leave that Court and will gratify him as soon as possible. In the meantime they are sure that he will mitigate any displeasure, with the adriotness which he has hitherto displayed. He is to try and find out definitely whether Viscount Facombrige is coming.
Ayes, 139. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives,
278. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Dunkirk is reported to have been transferred on the 27th inst. and the money was paid in the place itself on the entry of the French. I understand that since there were among the troops in the garrison some who objected to the cession, King Charles caused them to march out, and the Most Christian, with the consent of the other, retained for his service some of the regiments already present in the place. To make sure of his new possession in every possible way the king immediately caused the officers of his household to march in that direction, with the musketeers and other soldiers of his guard, to proceed thither himself, post haste, within a few days.
Paris, the 21st November, 1662.
[Italian.]
Nov. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
279. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The most important news at present concerns the conspiracy, into which they keep going deeper, by arrests and information gathered from them. Other familiars of Ludlo besides his secretary have been caught this week, and it is to be hoped they will get him also, which could only be for the advantage of the country, as he is the most active of the fanatics able with his counsel, activity and money to encourage evil humours and renew the dissensions in England.
Nothing can be said about the negotiations left unfinished by M. dell' Estrade. But I know he hopes to carry his point and that M. di Cominges, who they say will soon arrive as ambassador in ordinary, will put the finishing touches without much difficulty, chiefly with the chancellor, who does everything and is entirely French. They say that Lord Hollis will be leaving here before long to go to Paris as ambassador. As he is a Presbyterian, which means a natural inclination to the French side, there is no doubt he will do his best to facilitate any satisfaction they may desire over there.
There is no one here for Spain to counteract these most important negotiations of France. One has come, as already reported, who is Patrick Moledi, an Irishman, who has some commission from the Catholic to arrange for the mutual sending of ambassadors, and they say he has more than once spoken privately with his Majesty about it. The result is not known, but one sees that he is not much considered. I fancy the Spaniards persist in the punctilio that having sent two ambassadors without any response from here, the Catholic crown cannot in honour send a third. Here they do not care and treat closely with France, while everyone is amazed at the indifference of Spain. I recently heard an important personage at Court say that if the example of Dunkirk did not open the eyes of the Spaniards and teach them to make greater case of this nation, they would see more changes in the course of time, intimating the projects of France which have the strong support of the one who predominates absolutely at Court and may look for success equalling the desires of the proposers.
The money for Dunkirk is awaited here with great eagerness by all, and especially by the troops, whose pay is in arrear for 6 months, from which one may easily imagine the grumbling that is heard. M. dell' Estrade should have arrived at Dunkirk by now and the money also from Paris, escorted by musketeers, so the cession should soon be completed and the money embarked for England.
Of the troops in Dunkirk, besides the five companies which arrived here last week three have been sent to garrison Garnsey and others are coming over to be divided among the garrisons here. All the Irish will remain behind in the pay of the French. The regiments which were placed by Cromwell under the command of Locart who was then governor, and which continued to serve there, are to be disbanded.
Lord Inchiquin has arrived at Court from Portugal. He gives the worst account of that service and does not commend the treatment received. He reports that the English who went are nearly all dead of hunger and the barbarous treatment of the Portuguese, owing to which, he declares, every foreign subject in their employ had gone away in disgust. He kissed the queen's hand and gave her an account of her brother's affairs, telling her he had noticed a great devotion among the people for him, but disunion among the nobility, which was bitter hearing for her as it was impossible to augur anything but ill.
His Majesty has recently created his natural son duke of Monmouth. (fn. 7) He came over with the queen mother and is loved by his Majesty as he really deserves, having an elevated spirit and all the best qualities (essendo di spirito elevato et di tutte le migliori parti).
The king has honoured the prince of Denmark, who has been staying in this country for many weeks and is now going to France, by making him a knight of St. George, investing him with the habit of the order, with all the customary formalities and privileges. (fn. 8)
London, the 24th November, 1662.
[Italian.]
Nov. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
280. To the Resident in England.
Note the arrival at the Court there of the Calogero from the people of the Morea. He is to keep a close watch for any resolution of the king in this important affair. The Capitano da Mar in his last letters, reports that he has given permission to Colonel Anand to leave the fleet when he pleases. To inform the king of this that he may see the attention paid to his intercession.
The Senate has decided to give ear to his request and to permit him to leave the Court, proceeding thence to his residence with the Swiss, there to relieve the Secretary Sarotti. For this they enclose his commission and the usual letters of credence. He is to perform the usual offices with the king and queen, the duke of York and others, telling them of the coming of the Ambassador Mocenigo, in the assurance that his Majesty will respond by sending his own ambassador to Venice. Before he sets out he is to try and get some one whom he can trust to write the news of those parts to the Signory's ambassador in France, so that he may be able subsequently to advise the Senate of affairs there.
Ayes, 136. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Nov. 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
281. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The king's departure for Dunkirk is suspended on news arriving from M. dell' Estrade that the English governor has written that he cannot be sure of handing over the place on the day appointed, because he is expecting money from Ireland to pay the troops. So the king is waiting for the arrival of a fresh courier. Meanwhile at Calais the English agents and experts sent there by King Charles have been engaged in counting all the crowns sent there in that sort of money for the amount agreed upon, and they have found a certain amount of false coins, which will be changed for them. It looked as if this manner of cutting the money showed an extreme lack of confidence, but the English apologised, saying that King Charles wished to have this money recoined as English and that was why they cut it, and if it chanced that some turned out to be spurious, this was the way to test it and have it changed at once without difficulty or dispute.
It is said that the king of England is thinking of sending a subject of suitable rank or an ambassador to the Most Christian when he is at Dunkirk, and his Majesty will respond by sending one himself. They say that this will be the Count of Vivona, son of the duke of Mormart, who is one of the first gentlemen of the bedchamber. (fn. 9)
Paris, the 28th November, 1602.
[Italian.]
Nov. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
282. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
English frigates and Portuguese ships have, these last days, disturbed the mind of the governor about the voyage of the galleons and vessels, which should have spread their sails to proceed from Cadiz to America, and many are of opinion that capital so precious should not be exposed to the risk. But after considering the loss that would be occasioned by the delay, when the goods were already laded, they decided that the ships should go, escorted by 15 ships of war of the squadron of Montesarchio, and by others which under the name of a fleet commanded by the duke of Albucherche have finally been made ready.
Madrid, the 29th November, 1662.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 He was dismissed in June, 1652, to please parliament but on the pretext of having abused his position in order to smuggle. Vol. xxviii. of this Calendar, pp. 247–50.
2 His name is given as Patrick Moledi in Giavarina's despatch of 24 November, below. In a letter to Bennet of 12 April, 1663, he signs himself Patricio Muledi. The letter is endorsed by Bennet “O'Moledy.” S.P. For. Spain. Vol. xlv.
3 Presumably a Greek monk.
4 Edward Backwell; his commission is among the state papers dated 20 October, old style. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 523.
5 The state papers contain the names of seven persons arrested at this time who seem to have been officers or ex-officers, viz.: Capt. Foster, Ensign Tong, Captain Lee, Colonel Kenrick, Captain Elton, Lieutenant Col. Kingsley and Tobias Wickham. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, pp. 540–1.
6 His pasport is dated 29 October, old style. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 530.
7 By warrant dated 10–20 November. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1661–2, page 552.
8 He was elected a companion of the order on 6–16 November and invested on 8–18 November. Nicolas: History of the Orders of Knighthood Vol. i, page 252. Mercurius Politicus Nov. 6–13. The prince was staying at Exeter House. Id.
9 Victor de Rochechouart, comte de Vivonne, son of Gabriel de Rochechouart, duc de Mortemart.