Venice
January 1663

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

225-228

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'Venice: January 1663', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 225-228. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90112 Date accessed: 27 August 2014.


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January 1663

1663.
Jan. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
293. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Resident Giavarina has asked me to get him a passport. That is all he is waiting for before setting out. I hope to get it soon. I have also asked the Ambassador Boreel for a passport for Signor Mocenigo and I am expecting to hear from him.
Paris, the 9th January, 1662. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
294. Alvise Grimani, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Some months ago, after the capture of Garumegna by the Spaniards, I reported that an individual had been sent from this Court to England. (fn. 1) This was the truth, although as he cut no figure there he was not recognised by everybody. Subsequently he proceeded thence in an English ship to Portugal, where, after observing the state of that country and having discharged his commissions, he returned to France. His name is Colbert Taron. The Ambassador Cominges was sent to England immediately afterwards, which makes it likely that this circumstance supplied the motive for so speedy a despatch, since here they consider the upholding of Portugal to be a national interest.
Paris, the 14th January, 1662. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 19. Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
295. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The Turks propose to use Flemish ships sailing for Cairo to transport passengers and goods. Other ships of the same nation and the English as well which arrive from time to time at this mart or at that of Smyrna may be employed for the service of the Turks. Although I have made the strongest representations to the ministers of Great Britain and Holland upon the necessity of preventing this most grievous prejudice I seem to find them very little inclined to gratify me in the matter. They both have recourse to generalities, promising, indeed, to try and avoid this obligation, but declaring that if the Grand Vizier employs violence, it will be impossible to refuse. In such case they say that if the fleet of your Excellencies meets with these ships, it ought not to make search on them, because the Archipelago is not the Adriatic Sea. These are the exact words of the English ambassador to Padavino, when he spoke to him on the subject by my order.
Pera of Constantinople, the 19th January, 1662. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
296. Francesco Giavarina, Venetian Resident in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I let the two last ordinaries go without writing, as I was expecting to set out on my journey, waiting only for some relaxation in the severe weather which is more bitter than has been known for a long while. In the mean time the Muscovite ambassadors have had their first audience; although their chief is not fully recovered I thought it right to call on these ambassadors, especially as one is to go to Venice. They had audience last week with great outward formalities, but were only introduced by Sir Cotterel, master of the ceremonies, and the earl of Loderdale, whose title is Scotch and who is only considered in England as a baron. They learned this afterwards and complained, saying that their master, one of the first monarchs in the world, has been treated worse than his peers. After their exposition, which was made to the king and queen jointly in the great hall, richly decorated for the occasion, they presented the gifts, in the names of the Grand Duke and Duchess, the eldest and second princes and their own, consisting of two Persian horses, a quantity of sables, black fox, ermine and other precious furs, teeth of sea horses, rich carpets, cloth of gold of Persia, some pelicans and other live animals all brought in procession by 165 persons with great ostentation, themselves in superb raiment covered with jewels, pearls and other precious ornaments. While they were in the presence, which was more than two hours they would never cover, though the king asked them to do so more than once. They had been told before that they might do so if they wished, and they must not claim that any ambassadors who might go to Muscovy should not be allowed to cover before the Grand Duke. After the first audience they had a private one in which they asked for commissioners to conduct the negotiations which are for the resumption of trade, to demand the repayment of a considerable sum which the Grand Duke lent to his Majesty during his exile, and other affairs, of which nothing can be learned.
I called upon them the day before yesterday in the morning, when the usual compliments were exchanged. After this the second in the embassy, named Gioanni son of Effonassey, surnamed Zelebousky, a jovial and courteous person of birth, so he says, told me he was charged to go to your Serenity and the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and would start for Italy as soon as he had finished here, which he hoped would be in a few days. He asked me to write so that orders might be given to ensure his messenger going unmolested. I assured him he would be welcome and told him of the assistance the republic had from foreign princes. He said he was astonished that your Excellencies did not send an ambassador to his master, who so greatly prized the friendship of the republic. I told him of the great preparations and menace of the Ottomans, especially in Dalmatia, the recent success at sea over the Caravana of Alexandria and the scanty foreign assistance. I let the other point drop, which was easy as everything was done through an interpreter.
There is nothing of consequence here. The Ambassador Cominges arrived in Court some days ago. Though he remains incognito and is in perfect health he is conducting in secret the negotiations he has in hand, which are said to be the same as dell' Estrade projected. Any further particulars will be sent to the ambassador in France by Sig. Riccardi, whom I shall leave furnished with the necessary instructions. In response to the arrival of Sig. Cominges Baron Hollis will soon be leaving for his residence with the Most Christian.
Having completed all his business with the Turks of Barbary Vice Admiral Lawson has returned with many ships of his fleet, leaving only six beyond the Strait, under the command of one Smith. It is understood that this squadron will cruise about the Mediterranean for the protection of trade and to keep those corsairs in check, their bad faith being known, as in spite of the peace they do not give them complete confidence.
By direction of the Levant Company the President (fn. 2) and two of the members came to see me yesterday morning and after wishing me a good journey asked me to convey to your Serenity their respectful thanks for the great boon conferred on the whole nation by the removal of the duty on currants, from which they are now relieved. At the same time they complained of two other burdens which give rise to great interruption in the trade, namely a certain tenth and another duty for the ransom of slaves, which are not paid on the currants themselves and from which they would like to be relieved, to enable them to prosecute that trade with greater hope of advantage. I thanked them and promised to make report to the Senate, not forgetting to assure them of the predilection of the state for the whole nation.
In the last ducali of the 2nd December I am told that the agent of Messrs. Hayes and Togood should present himself to your Excellencies so that you may be able to issue the necessary orders for the execution of the decree. They have chosen Signori Marco and Gio. Battista Moens, merchants at Venice to attend to their interests and have asked me to give them a few lines for your Serenity so that they may present themselves to receive the orders.
London, the 19th January, 1663.
[Italian.]
Jan. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
297. Alvise Grimani and Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassadors in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The individual who went to Portugal obliged General Sciumbergh to stop there and many other leaders and officers who were in that service and who wished to leave. For the rest it is impossible to obtain any authentic information about what he negotiated in secret; but it may be considered certain that these and those of M. de Cominges at London are all directed to the upholding of Braganza. He already derives a considerable advantage from the diversion caused to the Spaniards from the obligation to attend to their affairs in Italy in these quarrels between France and Rome.
The ministers here have said to me, Grimani, that at Madrid they complain about the king's purchase of Dunkirk, because they say that Cardinal Mazarin offered to Don Luis a loan of 800,000 crowns of his own money, to recover it, and for the Most Christian subsequently to buy it almost amounted to a breach of faith. On this point they excuse themselves, saying that even from this the purity of their motives shines forth and the sincerity of the Cardinal's dealings, since he offered the money to the Catholic to recover it, because he wished to get it out of the hands of the English, but without committing himself to anything else; and if the offer was not accepted it was not to be expected that the king of France should lose a favourable opportunity to get it out of the hands of the heretics, as he was bound in conscience to do, besides interests of state which indeed counsel him to keep far from the heart those evil humours which might do it mischief.
Paris, the 30th January, 1662. [M.V.]
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Apparently referring to his despatch of Sept. 5th, 1662, No. 241 at page 184 above.
2 Sir Andrew Riccard was governor of the Levant Company at this time.