Venice
September 1663

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

261-265

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'Venice: September 1663', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 261-265. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90120 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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September 1663

Sept. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
348. To the Ambassador in France.
The arrival France of the English ambassador Col will afford you a motive for encouraging the best possible relations with him, and we shall be expecting to hear the news of his entry which in view of his indisposition may easily be postponed until the king's return from his journey to Lorraine.
Ayes, 97. Noes, 2. Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
349. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Recounts his visit to the English ambassador and the exchange of compliments.
This gentlemen, who is on the side of advanced years, (fn. 1) besides his birth, fortune and most noble connections which he has in London, enjoys the reputation of being one of the wisest and most accredited cavaliers, as well in the counsels at that Court when in the late troubles he proved himself on the royal side, not only generous but unchangeable in undertaking service later in foreign wars. He asked many particulars of the present campaign and the increasing fear of overwhelming Turkish power, declaring that your Serenity was winning immortal glory by such a long and brave resistance. He asked me to let him know all that happened and expressed his desire for the republic's success.
When I took leave he said that he would not make a public entry, because in London, owing to undesirable happenings, his Majesty would not consent to such functions being performed, in which some disturbance is inevitable. Continuing in the same tenor he almost seemed to apologise for the Resident Giavarina having left London in a certain manner, assuring me that the matter did not have his vote when it was brought up in the Council of State. I spoke in praise of the resident and the ambassador replied: Your Excellency need not labour the matter because I was already persuaded of it, but it is impossible to prevent ministers from wishing to gain credit for that which most suits the interests of their princes.
Paris, the 4th September, 1663.
[Italian.]
Sept. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
350. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate. Letters of the 27th from London relate that the king, after having accompanied the queen to the waters of Bath, was to proceed from thence to Portsmouth for the erection there of a royal fort near the town, and also to see a new invention and construction of a vessel which will go as swiftly against the tide and against the wind as if it had them in its favour. (fn. 2) This vessel, they write, is constructed in a manner altogether different from the ordinary, with two helms or rudders.
The sectaries of the north at the mere report of Buckingham's start, have refrained from their meetings, in accordance with the royal orders, so all is quiet for the present.
The earl of Bristol cannot be found, and therefore, in view of the protection of the queen mother, it is considered certain that he has crossed the sea.
Paris, the 4th September, 1663.
[Italian.]
Sept. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Venetian
Archives.
351. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
I recently saw the duke of Medina. In a confidential communication he admitted the difficulty of the conquest of Portugal. He feared results similar to that of Holland who found for their defence assistance from enemies and rivals of the crown. But the king was stirred by contradictory motives and so he could not give his opinion freely. When I reported the discussions and the overture of England he reported it to his Majesty, and had orders to express appreciation and to bear witness to the confidence that was always felt in the ministers of the republic. The interests of England with this crown could not continue in the present fashion. The English enjoy the trade, the outward demonstrations and the benefits of friendship, for which they give in exchange continual prejudice in acts of hostility. He had heard that at the present time the king there had appointed an ambassador to this Court of Spain, and the minister would be treated and welcomed as was fitting. It must be admitted that their manner over there of cutting off correspondence was too high handed. It does not suit to betray resentment at the time; there is no means of exacting vengeance. They must first consider what course to follow, and then about their declarations, since they are left with the offers and the loss of prestige. The marriage of England with Braganza did not mean upsetting reasons of state. It is impossible for princes to abandon the reasons of their own interest for the benefit of others. Batteville had proceeded in too headstrong a fashion and had formed the opinion that those realms, although brought back to obedience to their master, still retained the strongest disposition for trouble and a readiness to revolt.
I was very glad to have the opportunity of hearing these sentiments, not only to have knowledge of the most secret counsels, but also suspecting that the departure of the republic's minister from London at a time when there was some opening for a projected adjustment with England, had given rise to impressions remote from the truth. Accordingly in the ensuing conversation I took occasion to speak of the willingness of the most serene republic to serve the interests of his Majesty.
That Irishman who went off to England for negotiation, does not return, and indeed there is no certainty of anything. The advices in the possession of the duke of Medina are from Flanders, and this makes one believe that the nomination of an ambassador to this Court may also be a trick of the English, who at the moment are contemplating quite contrary designs, to seize the fleet, if they can, succour Braganza and maintain the trade.

Madrid, the 12th September, 1663.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Sept. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
352. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The London letters of the 7th report that the king has again proceeded with the queen to the waters of Bath. A most rigorous decree has been published against any one who shall communicate with the earl of Bristol. (fn. 3) It is now stated that he is certainly in Flanders. Many troops have undoubtedly been dismissed in England, by the king's order, to save the expense, although they had been dispersed in various garrisons. In the month of October the royal household is to be reformed to economise expenditure, chiefly in the matter of public hospitality. A decree has been issued in which strict obedience is enjoined to certain laws and ordinances favourable to the increase of trade. Also that the earl of Carlisle, selected as ambassador to Muscovy, who departed with a present, in particular of a number of horses picked out to be presented to the duke, has been met in the Baltic, to the universal relief, as previously rumours had been circulating which boded little good for his journey.
Moledi, the Irishman, who was sent two months ago from Spain to negotiate in London some composition about Tanger, is staying on there idle, not so much because of the exile of the earl of Bristol as because the greater part of the money destined for this in the banks of Antwerp has been disposed of to assist the emperor.
The English ambassador has returned my visit, but in a private capacity. He was unable to contain himself or to conceal from me his disgust at the bad treatment he had experienced from the customs officers here in insisting by force on searching his belongings.
Paris, the 18th September, 1663. [Italian.]
Sept. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
353. To the Ambassador in France.
Commendation of his action in visiting the English ambassador and in responding to his expressions of goodwill. It will be very helpful to cultivate such perfect sentiments in the ambassador personally, and also to make known upon every occasion the unalterable regard of the republic towards that crown.
With regard to the republic's ambassador elect to his Majesty, if on the occasion of other visits the conversation should turn on that subject, he is to explain to the ambassador that the minister has been detained up to the present time by his own private affairs which have prevented him from proceeding to his embassy, but when once he has disposed of these he will undertake the journey when opportunity serves; the object being that when the report of the coming of a qualified minister reaches his Majesty, with the expression of the republic's cordial regard, he will be moved by this lively testimony to appreciation and to making a response. He is also to try and find out about Viscount Facombrige, or whether they speak of anyone else coming.
Ayes, 117. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Sept. 25.
Senate,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
354. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate
From London on the 13th inst. we learn that their Majesties were proposing to return to the capital by way of Oxford. The duke of York, following the example of the king, had reduced his expenses, causing no little discontent among the people, in view of the ancient splendour of England.
The parliament of Scotland, seeing the duties increased on some of the things which go from that country into England has increased proportionately the impost upon others which come to Scotland from thence, so that the benefit or whatever the object is may be mutual. The same parliament of Scotland has called a national synod, (fn. 4) the name given there to an assembly of bishops and archbishops, according to the style practised in London, with a corresponding decision to punish all those who shall refuse to abjure the covenant. It has been stated that Lord Midduson and Lord Neueburgh have been declared incapable of holding any public charge in that kingdom. (fn. 5)
It is reported from Marseilles that an English ship has reached Smyrna with an English envoy for Constantinople to procure the mission or reception of an ambassador from Portugal at the Porte. (fn. 6)
Paris, the 25th September, 1663.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 He was born in 1599.
2 Probably the invention of Thomas Toogood and James Hayes Cal S.P. Dom. 1663–4, page 223.
3 Proclamation of 25 August, for the discovery and apprehension of the earl of Bristol. Steele: Tudor and Stuart Proclamations Vol. i., page 408. No. 3386.
4 Parliament met on Aug. 21–31 at Holyrood and passed an act for a general synod. The Newes Published, Sept. 13.
5 See Cal. S.P. Dom. 1663–4, page 264.
6 This is perhaps a mistaken report of Rycaut's mission. He arrived at Smyrna on 15–25 August. Hist. MSS. Comm. Finch Papers Vol. i., page 269. But he was coming to England by way of the Barbary States.