Venice
October 1663

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

265-267

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'Venice: October 1663', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 265-267. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90121 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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October 1663

Oct. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
355. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English letters of the 27th ult. contain that Lord Richard Fanshau has returned to London from his embassy to Portugal, accompanied by Lieut.-Colonel Hornwod, (fn. 1) who left Tanger with news of an agreement between the English and the Moorish Prince Gayland. They add that the mole of Tanger has made such satisfactory progress that a fleet of 200 sail will now be able to shelter there. This is considered very important, since the position and the refuge there will count for a great deal at sea.
The fanatics at Chichester, having entered the Anglican churches there committed many outrages. (fn. 2) Inquiry was being made so that they might proceed to inflict a well deserved punishment. It is considered certain that this will make an impression, because their sect in those southern parts seemed to be weak and tottering.
The Court at London rejoices at the good health of their Majesties, but there is universal regret at the delay over the news of the queen's pregnancy, which is so greatly desired.
Paris, the 9th October, 1663.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
356. To the Ambassador in France.
Commend his office with the English ambassador about the despatch of an ambassador from that crown to correspond to the republic's choice of the Ambassador Mocenigo. The Senate will wait anxiously to hear what further answer he gives, to guide them in making their decisions. In the mean time, on all occasions, he will continue to harp upon the same theme of the republic's regard for his Majesty, and try to find out as much as he possibly can in this affair.
He did well to suggest help against the Turk, and he must keep this up on every opportunity, as it may help in creating a favourable disposition for the time when the ambassador arrives at the Court.
Ayes, 95. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
357. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
I called on the English ambassador. After compliments I spoke of the injuries inflicted upon the most serene republic by the common enemy. In his reply he said that he would do his utmost to promote cordial relations between two countries which were such old friends. I told him of the public esteem for him personally, whereat he seemed much gratified. I referred to the appointment of the Ambassador Mocenigo and of the Signory's desire to increase reciprocal correspondence. I told him that Sig. Mocenigo had been detained at Venice by private affairs, but these were now disposed of and he proposed to set out at a suitable moment. The ambassador promised him a cordial welcome. I took this opportunity to suggest that the king could show his friendship by supporting the republic's most just cause. To this he replied in a confidential manner that his Majesty had been asked to interest himself both from here and by other princes as well, but all had been refused, but he assured me that the same considerations do not militate in helping and assenting to the requests of the republic, because the object and the need are seen to be legitimate, and because in England at the present time they can dispose of the sort of troops proper for such employment, indeed it is in the interest of the king himself to get rid of them in this way. He asked me twice if Sig. Mocenigo had started. I said I thought not seeing that the season was advanced. He seemed pleased about this, possibly because he did not wish the ambassador to appear unexpectedly in London; but he assured me again that he would be welcome, and that the king will certainly respond immediately.
Paris, the 16th October, 1663.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
358. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador, not having succeeded in bringing off the satisfaction which he claimed, has obtained commands for the Tunisians and Algerians that they are to renew the peace concluded between the English and the Barbareschi, with an undertaking that they will not search their ships. These commands cost his Excellency 2000 reals, and as the cash for this was not ready he sent a man of his to Constantinople to ask for it with importunity. To this end the dragoman Piron came ten days ago with two purses of French pieces of eight (ottavi), but these being refused he was constrained, in the end to give some of them after some disputation. Before going to London the ambassador's secretary (fn. 3) will go to Tunis and other places of Barbary to make delivery of the commands aforesaid so that they may be admitted and the settlement corroborated with solemnity.
The possible existence of connivance between the English and the corsairs is strongly suspected and, discussed, for it is certain, that the designs of both of them aim at greedy advantage of every kind, without being restrained by considerations of any sort.

Adrianople; the 24th October, 1663.
[Italian; deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 Col. Henry Norwood. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1663–4, page 271.
2 See Cal. S.P. Dom. 1663, pp. 277, 284–5, 299.
3 Paul Rycaut. Hist. MSS. Comm.: Finch Papers Vol. i., page 276 He arrived at Tunis on the 8–18 September, in the Bonadventure, Capt. Berkeley and sailed thence for Algiers and England. The Newes Published, Oct 29.