Venice
November 1663

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

267-270

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: November 1663', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 267-270. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90122 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

November 1663

Nov. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
359. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Letters from England of the 29th bring unfavourable news about the health of the queen regnant there. I sent at once to the English ambassador to inquire. I think she can be no worse or an express would have been sent. For the interests of Portugal this would be a loss too considerable for any one who acts or who charges himself with commitments to support them.
The fanatics and other malcontents of England, besides the fresh movements in several parts of the country, but which have broken out by arrangement, especially in the parts of York, Lancaster, Notingham and Chiester, have obliged the king, even in the city of London itself, to double the guards. The royal troops have been under arms for three nights running, without ever separating from their corps or their station, seeing that the principal foundation of these insurgents consists and is composed of the troops left by Cromwell, who have no occupation, as the king does not trust them.
Lord Richard Fanschau has been chosen a member of the royal council, and honoured with a most rich portrait of the king, set in diamonds, and with a gold chain, as a token of appreciation of his services in the embassy to Portugal. He was on the point of starting for the new embassy, at Madrid.
The parliament of Scotland, before separating, by a notable act in the royal favour, has decreed that 20,000 foot and 2,000 horse shall always be ready to serve his Britannic Majesty, marching whenever it is the royal pleasure, without distinction in the other forces of his Majesty. To please the king it has also decided that the family of the duchess of Monmouth should change their name to Stuart, and consequently be highly privileged.
The States General are apprehensive lest under the pretext of the capture of Cananon, a short distance from Goa, before the publication of the peace with Braganza, (fn. 1) the Portuguese may revenge themselves by turning to piracy in the Ocean, and particularly in the Channel, a route which the Dutch cannot avoid, situate between France and England, not only with the tacit consent of King Charles but with his connivance, since already two English vessels, armed for war, displaying and producing commissions and the flag of Portugal have captured a very rich Dutch merchantman.
Paris, the 6th November, 1663.
[Italian.]
Nov. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Ceffalonia.
Venetian
Archives.
360. Christofolo Cabriel, Venetian Proveditore of Cephalonia, to the Doge and Senate.
The money for the duties of the new and newest imposts for the exportation of currants amounted to 13,663 reals; there will be more to come because of other ships to take the currants which are left over and which undobtedly will shortly be exported. The Flemish and English merchants compete willingly to purchase them, and my sole object is to see that they are well treated, despatched and relieved of any sort of grievance.
Cephalonia, the 8th November, 1663.
[Italian.]
Nov. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
361. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The improvement in the health of the queen of England has relieved the whole Court, because of the present friendly relations between the two kings and the two nations and because of other consequences for the support of Portugal, for which, on this side they are already taking steps to do and attempt every thing. The Ambassador Holles sent to tell me the good news and I sent back the secretary with my reply.
Paris, the 13th November, 1663.
[Italian.]
Nov. 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci.
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
362. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
According to the last letters from London the queen has completely recovered. The disturbances have ended by the arrest of two colonels in the county of Chester. (fn. 2) King Charles was making a new levy of 5000 soldiers for Portugal, according to what some say, or in the opinion of others for his own greater defence and security in the country; and that as there are 8,000 foot and 500 horse in Tanger, and 22 frigates most admirably armed for war, some solution was expected, because, matters being adjusted with the Moors, all these troops cannot stand idle at such great cost to the king.
From Portugal Braganza was pressing for help with extraordinary insistence, both towards England and also turning in this direction. So far no positive resolution has been taken here. Paris, the 20th November, 1663.
[Italian.]
Nov. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia,
Venetian
Archives.
363. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador sends me the enclosed note, which shows the gratification felt about the Ambassador Mocenigo. The gentleman who brought it told me that they no longer talk of sending Viscount Falcombrige as ambassador to Venice, who is involved in difficulties over some private consideration, and King Charles will correspond to Sig. Mocenigo by the choice of another person, very soon. He told me that there was no further trouble about the entry of the ambassador. I asked him what was the practice in London. He told me that the coaches of the king and the queens go first and are followed immediately by those of the new ambassador, as the duke of York does not send his.
Paris, the 27th November, 1663.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.364. Lord Holles to Monsieur the Ambassador of Venice.
Proposed to call upon him but has been detained at home by some small affair. Pleased to inform him of the queen's perfect recovery. Upon the report that Sig. Mocenigo has been chosen as ambassador to England, his Majesty's secretary sends word that no doubt one will be sent to Venice. The person has not yet been chosen. Assures him of the king's great esteem for the republic.
Paris, Friday morning.
[French.]
Enclosure.365. London, 15/5 November, 1663.
The feast day of our lord mayor having arrived, it was celebrated in the usual way. The French ambassador had been among the first to be invited but as he did not come until three in the afternoon he found that the tables were filled and that the dinner had got as far as the second course. (fn. 3) He took this in such ill part that although all the guests rose from table to allow him to take the place which is his due, he nevertheless withdrew at once, as if some one had affronted him. They tried to disabuse him of this in sending to him to make excuses very civilly, about the regret which the lord mayor felt at his displeasure over an incident in which they had no intention to disoblige him, but on the contrary to render him all the consideration due to his character.
Several expresses come from the north have assured the king that the malcontents of those parts had a veritable plan to rebel and that among them were several persons of consideration. They had since given each other watchwords whereby they might be recognised. These were: Religion, Providence, Jehovah and Liberty. As some of them have already boasted that they have Lambert at their head, orders have been issued to keep him fast and to observe him more closely in his prison than has been done. They also boasted that Ludlow is in England; but he does not put in an appearance. The rebels are for the most part Anabaptists, Independents and Fifth Monarchy men. The leaders, who are Major Salway, Henry Nevil and some others have been brought prisoner and put in the Tower. This does not prevent their accomplices from spreading abroad scandalous libels, of which many have been found posted up, notably at Neuport House in the isle of Wight. They are to observe the 27th inst. as a fast day, to give a better colour to their evil design. Colonel Hutchinson, one of the clique has also been brought prisoner to the Tower.
The queen's health becomes better and better. As the plague is suspected at Amsterdam and at Hamburg they have issued orders that all ships coming from thence shall do quarantine at Gravesend before they come here.
Endorsed: Biglietto di Londra.
[French.]
Nov. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
366. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to Doge and Senate.
Mons. di Lionne told me that a friend wrote to him from Amsterdam that 15 Dutch ships, 6 English and two French had fallen into the hands of the corsairs of Algiers, so it seemed to me that they might at least admit that the navigation of the Mediterranean is lost, and the Ottoman forces will be rendering themselves invincible on land if things go on at this gait. He told me that such happenings were monstrous. I remarked that if they feared no power at sea they would think even less of buccaneering on land. He replied that this was only too true, but when they desired a union with the Dutch and the English, the latter made agreements while the former wished to deal separately for their own interests.
Paris, the 30th November, 1663.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Cannanore in Madras taken by the Dutch on 6 February, 1663. Foster: English Factories in India 1661–4, pp. 115n, 221. It is over 200 miles from Goa.
2 Apparently Major John Duckenfield and Captain Driffith are meant Cal. S. P. Dom. 1663–4, page 298
3 Comminges reported to his king that he had arrived at the appointed hour. Jusserand: A French Ambassador at the Court of Charles II., page 76.