Venice
January 1664

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1932

Pages

276-282

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: January 1664', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 33: 1661-1664 (1932), pp. 276-282. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90124 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

January 1664

1664.
Jan. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
377. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
There is nothing from London this week except that the Danish ambassador Cester, (fn. 1) who was in Paris, had his first audience, without other public ceremony. He is expected to take leave soon as he came to that Court more for compliments than affairs. The earl of Bristol remained hidden by many of the first party, but more and more encouraged and protected in the kingdom. He is waiting for the approaching meeting of parliament to bring forward fresh charges and to prosecute the old ones against the Lord Chancellor Hyde, as many see clearly and with regret the growth of the chancellor's authority, the more so because there seems to be scant hope of offspring from the queen regnant.
Paris, the 1st January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
378. To the Ambassador in France.
Commend him for encouraging confidential relations with the English ambassador. Satisfaction at the reputed intention of that Court to pursue and fight the corsairs. He is to encourage age the idea, interest of all Christendom and for the security of trade.
Ayes, 108. Noes, 1. Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Jan. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
379. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador called on me on Thursday. He spoke to me about the representations made to him about precedence; but he had refused to consent to any innovations. He would await fresh instructions from King Charles, being most determined not to prejudice the dignity of the crown.
I spoke to him later about the preparations of the Turks. In answering me nobly upon every particular the ambassador said that he knew full well the infamous behaviour of an English engineer, who in Hungary has supplied the most certain advantages for the progress of the Ottoman arms. He deplored the greater number of French and other nations, renegades and volunteers, who in the act of serving the Turks make themselves more barbarians than the barbarians themselves, as the latter declare themselves against God by nature, while the others do it by choice. He swore to me that it was the duty of every one to devote himself with the utmost zeal to supporting the generosity of your Excellencies. He protested that King Charles is arming at the present time 45 frigates furnished for war at every point, to send them to the Mediterranean, and he would show his most Christian heart.
I asked him for news of the Court and about the Portuguese ambassador who is arriving in Paris. (fn. 2) He said their Majesties are in perfect health. The ambassador was momentarily expected and he would let me know when he arrived. Lord Lanschau (sic), the ambassador for Madrid, had gone with the fleet and Vice Admiral Lauson had orders to land him at Cadiz, by his swiftest frigate, and to pursue his voyage without interruption towards the fortress of the corsairs, a place with scanty defences and believed to be weak, to strike them a shrewd blow, pursuing them everywhere. He added: I hope that they will do it, for such is the resolute determination of the king. Our ships are built for war and not for trading and English troops do not fly from the ordeal of a fight, either by sea or by land, at least that is my own recollection from my experience of past actions in our time. Up to this point he had spoken with complete frankness, but when I wished to refer to reciprocity about ambassadors he took his leave.
Paris, the 15th January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
380. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Relations with England continue in the same state as before. The Irishman who is treating for Spain (fn. 3) continues his stay in that country. The ambassador destined to this Court has not started. The remittances of money to London have not been taken up. I do not perceive any sound foundation in the business; it was promoted previously by hopes of the concession of free trade in America to that nation. When this is proposed to the Council of the Indies it will encounter insuperable difficulties. The duke of Medina told me he had received word that the ambassador is on the point of starting.
Madrid, the 16th January, 1664.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
381. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Two fleets have already set out for the Mediterranean, consisting of 23 ships of war and meanwhile they are preparing a third of great strength. King Charles, by means of his ambassador at Constantinople, has obtained the free consent of the Porte to his punishment of the corsairs of Barbary, all of them, without exception, since the Grand Turk disapproves absolutely of the piracies practised by them and the breaches of faith they have committed, but only against the English nation, so far as we have learned up to the present.
Paris, the 22nd January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Jan. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
382. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador does not arrive. The money remitted to London has not been expended. There is a report that the ambassador has gone to Lisbon. The French are watching the affair very closely.
Madrid, the 23rd January, 1664.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 25.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Busta,418.
Venetian
Archives.
383. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Resident at Constantinople, to the Inquisitors of State.
After the arrival of the ship Asia at Smyrna it is said by some that Gobato is at Mantua, while others say he is at Leghorn, and others again that he is coming here. God grant that his return, even without funds but with the support of England, may not increase the troubles and perils of the state. Your Excellencies may rest assured of my intense application to this serious matter.
Adrianople, 25 January, 1663. [M.V.]
Postscript: I became more and more convinced that Gobatto had written to the English ambassador and to Draperis that peace between the most serene republic and the Turk was very near and that I had particular commissions on the matter. In addition to this it is unquestionable that the reports which arose by reason of the assurance stated to have been sent by me in public about the corpse of the Most Excellent Capello, dishonoured in the house of the English ambassador, (fn. 4) originated with letters written by Gobato to the ambassador, because some words about pissing on the corpse were written from Constantinople privately to some one over there, and being reported to Gobato were subsequently passed on by him, with amplifications to the ambassador, pointing out that I had sent it publicly and had it signed by the Provincial, by Mascelini, against whom Gobato had always declared his hate.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Enclosure.384. Command addressed to the Castellan and the Cadi of Mouths of the Dardanelles and to all the Commandants of the Same.
Be it known that the Ambassador of England having presented an arz setting forth that whereas his surgeon, Thomas Gobatto, an Englishman, is about to set out he has asked me to issue this my command, so that it whatever part the said Gobatto may arrive, it may be known that neither he nor his goods shall be molested, and so I ordain and command.
[Italian; copy.]
Jan. 25.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Busta, 418.
Venetian
Archives.
385. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Resident at the Porte to the Inquisitors of State.
I have had taken down in writing the depositions of the three dragomans about the supposed authors of the accusation laid against me before the Caimecam of Constantinople.
Adrianople, the 25th January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Enclosures.386. On the 10th January.
Deposition of Domenico Sanguinazo, dragoman.
Had been sent by his Excellency to the Capichi Aga of the Caimecan of Constantinople, about a month ago. Asked who had falsely accused his Excellency, answered that a tall Christian mingled with the petitioners, and would not say any more. Later on Acmet Celibi who is most intimate with the Capigi Aga told him clearly that it was the English ambassador and Zorzi his dragoman, (fn. 5) who had made the denunciation to the Caimecan of Constantinople about those statutes. In confirmation a certain Ismeil Aga who was in Constantinople at the time of the attack, told me clearly that the day before he had seen the English ambassador go to audience of the Caimecan, who left for his villa afterwards and on the next morning the attack on the house took place.
On the same day. Deposition of Michael Parada, dragoman.
That the denunciation was made by the English ambassador and Draperis. This was to be kept quiet, but Acmet Celibi confirmed it.
On the same day. Deposition of Ambroso Grillo, dragoman.
More than two months ago a messenger reached the English ambassador with letters from Smyrna. The day after there was great whispering among the English dragomans Draperis and Piron that letters had been written to Venice about the dishonour shown in the English embassy to the corpse of the Ambassador Capello. They spoke in an unseemly way of his Excellency, saying that they had poisoned the dragoman Laborda, a Frenchman, and a Janissary, with other fancies, full of malice, showing that the messenger had brought letters from Gobato. In those days one heard nothing from the English and in the English embassy than cries of Gobato, Gobato, for whom they waited and longed as the Jews do for the Messiah. Meanwhile on Sunday and Monday morning the English ambassador went with Draperis to audience of the Caimecan, taking him a present of robes. I cannot say if he was long engaged with the Caimecan. Returning from the audience the ambassador went later in the same day to his villa. On the morning immediately following more than six hundred persons were seen at the house of the Bailo attacking it with violence, setting guards, sealing the rooms, imprisoning the women who were taking care of it, and hunting also for the men. Two ordinary figures of a man and a woman were removed from the house and carried to the Caimecan, a charge being laid against his Excellency of having with these and with the three women, reputed witches, and with priests and prayers, procured the death of the Grand Turk and of the dowager Sultana. Informed his Excellency and the matter was settled at Adrianople. On returning to have the house unsealed, saw above all Draperis and other dependants of the English embassy, looking half dead both in appearance and in speech. Must also state that was pressed very hard for an assurance that the corpse in question had been well treated in the English embassy but would not do it without express order from his Excellency. Immediately the order arrived he acted upon it. Common talk at Constantinople points to the complicity of England in the affair.
Deposition of Ismail Aga Spai, on 15th of the same.
Was at Galata when he saw the English ambassador on his way to audience of the Caimecan, and the next morning the attack was made on the embassy of the most serene republic. Recognised clearly that all the mischief came from him, knowing that Zorzi Draperis could not bear to hear the Venetians mentioned.
[Italian.]
Jan. 25.
Inquisitori
di Stato.
Busta, 418.
Venetian
Archives.
387. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Resident at Constantinople, to the Inquisitors of State.
The decree of the magistracy which prevents Tomaso Gobatto from coming to this country is an act of extraordinary prudence and a veritable inspiration of God, who knows that his mind is unjustly prejudiced against me, far no other reason than because I prevented very dangerous trafficking in the house of the republic in time of war. Assuredly his appearance, backed by the English, would have caused some inevitable mischief of the most serious kind, if at a distance he had the power by his letters and false inventions to draw on me the ruin which excited astonishment and fear among all Christians, and it is easy to imagine that when near at hand he would attempt something with the incitements, gifts and promises of the English ambassador, who full of secret poison, instilled in him solely by this unquiet spirit, in conjunction with Draperis, would seek the extermination of the house and of me personally in every way. I have left nothing undone in the way of tact, mildness and courtesy which might serve to lead him into the good way, but without success. This much is beyond question, that Gobatto is awaited with impatience and with so much eagerness that the ambassador and his servants do not know how to contain themselves, sighing and saying every day, When he comes we shall see, as a sort of threat. The last letters which Draperis had were of the 1st August, long before the decree of your Excellencies. Since then I have not succeeded in learning anything and I notice that every one is very reserved in speaking, no one, not even my confidants, venturing to write to me at present from fear that the letters may be intercepted. I have thought it advisable, to put matters straight and to obtain some information, to cause a report to be spread that it is the intention of the republic that Gobatto shall stop at Venice and not come here, and that if he does come his stay will be prevented by me. Up to the present this report has proved successful because through my silence I note that their impudence has been put to shame. But if he does come he shall be received, welcomed and protected. As he is a man of very volatile mind I have no doubt but that he will say something which he does not know, to the manifest detriment of the state and of me personally. In short I do not think that the atmosphere here is good for Gobatto, for his own sake also. I have observed distinctly that since the treachery practised by Foster and by the captain of the English ship, which by arrangement with the corsairs made themselves masters of the property of others with the secret assistance and protection of the ambassador, having observed also an unjust resentment against Armenians and Jews, he fell in love with that nation recognising that this was a good way to get rich quickly. He caused himself to be called English in a passport of the Turks, an unheard of thing, all for the purpose of committing the ambassador and of making their relations more intimate, to the shame of everyone else. He is certainly lively but extremely imprudent, full of evil impulses and impetuous. This matter is of the greatest consequence for the interests of the state.
Adrianople, the 25th January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian; deciphered.]
Jan. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
388. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador still delays making his public entry, chiefly because of the claims to precedence put forward by the princes of the blood. He quotes the precedent of Sir Edmond, who was ambassador extraordinary in 1615. (fn. 6) Here they adduce the usage with the Spanish ambassadors, but Lord Holles retorts that he serves King Charles and was not sent here by the Catholic. Others interpret this affair as an irritant encouraged by the idea that they will find their relations with this Court by no means good, a notion instilled by the reports they have of negotiations between England and Spain.
I know that the ambassador at his entry declared that he would not claim any exemption; but he did so because he wished the same to be done with Mons. de Cominges in England. He had orders from King Charles to go to public audience without any other entry but in the following week the order was withdrawn. Moreover last week he went incognito to see Marshal Turena, possible about the affairs of Portugal. The marshal had word from his servants that the ambassador was coming. He said that it would be in order to see his wife, so the marshal himself went out by the back door, as he did not wish to be seen. Your Serenity will perceive from all this that behind these pretensions there is some hidden cause that may easily lead to an explosion at some moment.
Paris, the 29th January, 1663. [M.V.]
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Hannibal Sehested. Letter of King Frederick to Charles of 12 Sept., 1663 S.P. For. Denmark, Vol. xvii.
2 Francesco de Mello. marquis de Sande, who went to France to arrange a marriage between King Alfonso and Mademoiselle de Montpensier or one of the younger daughters of the duke of Orleans. Prestage: Diplomatic Relations with Portugal, page 83.
3 Patrick O'Moledy.
4 In his despatch of 3–13 January, 1663–4, Winchelsea refers to the false depositions obtained by Ballarino about his dealings with Capello's body. S.P. Foreign, Turkey, Vol. xviii.
5 Giorgio Draperis.
6 Sir Thomas Edmondes. He was ordinary ambassador in 1615, but returned to France in 1617 as extraordinary ambassador.