Venice
April 1664

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1933

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1-13

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'Venice: April 1664', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 34: 1664-1666 (1933), pp. 1-13. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90152 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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April 1664

1664.
April 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
1. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Last week the English ambassador at length performed his first and public office at St. Germain and on the following Monday the king proceeded to Paris so it is said that the short stay of the Court there had no other object than to settle this affair. He went on Wednesday, accompanied only by the coaches of the Court, to the house of the chancellor. The princes did not send and took no part in the affair. The ministers say it was because they are away from the Court. The ambassador seemed satisfied and greatly relieved. The Court pretends to have lost nothing with him. On the following morning the Count of Armagnac went to fetch him to audience, with the usual honours. After dinner he visited the queens and in the evening he was conducted back to Paris by Bonoil, the introducer. Only one point remains to be noted. Lord Holles, although ambassador extraordinary, made it known that in a matter of generosity they would be content to conquer by generosity itself, but on a point of punctilio he was obliged to stand out for the honour due to his office.
The banquet on Wednesday was a very poor affair (assai scarsa), but the royal officials who took upon themselves the charge of such matters made ample excuses, assuring them that it would be made good on the following day, and this was very well received. But on the following morning three tables were laid with forty-two places. The first two were laid completely, and the third, which stood somewhat in front of these two, was to be served from them. When the ambassador sat down the number at table exceeded forty. The gentlemen at the last table kept silence, although nothing was ever brought to them to eat, thinking that the cooks were unable to serve up for so great a company at one and the same time. But when they saw the first two tables being dismantled to serve their own, they rose to their feet and proceeded to the place of the ambassador himself, complaining loudly of the insult shown to the English nobility, with declarations of increasing audacity. The ambassador endeavoured to quiet them by address, but these gentlemen only became the more wrathful. They said that up to the moment when it reached the ears of his Excellency they would have been ready to obey him and protested that if they had acted otherwise they would have been unworthy subjects of King Charles to suffer themselves to be treated in France like lackeys. Accordingly they immediately betook themselves to an inn to buy themselves a dinner and to noise abroad the wrong done to them. The fault is certainly due solely to the greed of the contractor, but all the same the jest is rather an ugly one, and it has not been much discussed so far.
The ambassador sent at once to inform me of his entry and I responded with a formal visit, our previous meetings having been rather in the nature of friendly conferences.
Parliament had its first meeting on Friday the 28th. The Earl of Bristol, who is more active than ever against the Chancellor, will afford occasion for close observation, for while he is ostracised by the king, not to say hated and menaced, he is correspondingly backed by secret but powerful support.
In the second place everyone is devoting attention to the decisions which will be taken by agreement with regard to the claims against the Dutch, whose wealth and trading are greatly envied, not to speak of the well known and habitual quarrels over the injuries received from the usurped fisheries.
By royal patent the treasure of goods taken from those guilty of high treason has been conferred upon the Duke of York.
The fanatics, particularly those in Scotland, at York and at Cambridge, continue their meetings which are directed, for the moment, against the episcopal dignity, that is in appearance, but really in order to subvert the well rooted monarchy. Accordingly with the troops they have been trying to put a stop to their meetings and to separate the congregations which they were making.
The Earl of Carlile reports his arrival at Moschua, where he says he received extraordinary honours, such as had never been shown to other ambassadors.
Paris, the 1st April, 1664.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.2. Intelligence of England.
London, 26/16 March, 1664/3. Our company royal of Guinea has received very good news of its business notwithstanding the hindrances which the Dutch strive to put in their way. We have news that our fleet under Sir John Lawson has arrived safely off Lisbon. The Earl of Lauderdale has been made governor of Edinburgh castle in the place of Middleton.
A ship newly arrived from the Barbados reports that everything there was in good order and that there were more than seventy good ships in the havens. By this same ship Prince Rupert has received letters from the governor of St. Christofre informing his Highness that his brother, Prince Maurice, who has been thought to be dead for the last eight or ten years, is still alive in the West Indies, and that he was going to send a ship to the place where he believed he might learn for certain. (fn. 1)
The brother of Lord Bellasis is raising a regiment of English to lead them for the service of Portugal.
The difference between my Lord Chancellor and the Earl of Bristol is practically adjusted, on the understanding that the latter is to abstain from taking his seat in parliament during the session, and for that period he will travel outside England, returning later. Lord Montagu has been very ill but is now better and able to set out on his way back to Paris.
[French.]
April 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
3. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The chief attention of the Court is directed towards the appearance of the English ambassador. (fn. 2) He arrived at Cadiz last week with five frigates of his nation, and was received with extraordinary demonstrations of honour and rejoicing. The firing of cannon, public quarters at every place, the escort on his journey, the festivities and games wherever he passes, all announce him not as a mere ambassador, but as the first instrument of the felicity of Spain. The Court severely blames Medina, the author of the demonstrations. The other ambassadors, if they do not complain of the difference, can at least claim the use of these innovations for the future. If no settlement is reached these demonstrations, as evidence of the desire for his offices, may encourage him to make claims and create difficulties. I cannot help repeating what I have already written, that I have always found in the ministers here a strong inclination not only for good correspondence with England, but for some adjustment with Portugal.
The ambassador is known in Spain, where he previously acted as secretary to Bristol. On this occasion he went first to Lisbon. It is said that he left a considerable succour of troops for Braganza, and with this merit he presents himself for the embassy and receives acclamations and honour. The Duke of Medina spoke to me at length on this subject. He attributes the manner of the reception to the people of Andalusia, who are very eager for the continuation of the trade, the genius of the Spaniard being no different from that of the English.
Medina takes pride in this work as his own, the affair being introduced in London after the conversation of the Abbot Obigni with the Resident Giavarina. But I can see that they have misgivings about difficulties and obstacles in the progress of the negotiations. The first point, so far as I can gather, is the claim for free trade for the English nation in the West Indies. With regard to the ambassador personally, although he is a gentleman by birth, he has been taken from the sphere of the merchants, and this has obliged the king by the title of Lord of the Council of State, to render him fit for his employment. (fn. 3)
The second point is the hope of some adjustment with Portugal, and there is no lack of opinion that it will be arranged. England, which is so deeply interested in trade and which has obtained great advantages from the Portuguese in the East Indies, believes that she will obtain the same in the West from negotiations with Spain, and by constituting herself mediator in the present quarrels, draw profits from every quarter. While the Catholic king makes difficulties about adjusting his differences to the advantage of Braganza, he is correspondingly disposed to satisfy the English; but the Council of the Indies, and that of the Inquisition, the latter in respect of heresy, the former to avoid cutting Spain off from the sole trade which she enjoys, render the transaction difficult and thorny, over which it is possible their hopes have been unreasonably excited.
As a matter of fact I do not find that there is any definite negotiation, merely an approach towards confidential relations with the English. Nevertheless the Duke of Medina considers some middle way (temperamento) to be necessary. The continuation of this domestic war is the ruin of the monarchy.
Medina himself has told me that Galian, the leader of the Moors in Africa, is asking them to let him come to Spain. He is informed of their dealings with the Barbareschi. From another quarter I have heard that this same Galian has offered the Spaniards to co-operate for the capture of Tanger and to drive out the English. The question was debated a long while in the Council of State, but it was rejected, the chief motive being not to irritate the English.
Madrid, the 2nd April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Costantinopoli.
Venetian
Archives.
4. Giovanni Battista Ballarino, Venetian Grand Chancellor at the Porte, to the Doge and Senate.
The secretary of the English ambassador (fn. 4) has come back from his master, who was about to start from here, provided with a rich and most handsome pavilion which, in default of a house, he had supplied to him by the merchants. He is at present staying at the villa, under the plea of indisposition. His change of mind, which causes general astonishment may be due to the bitter remarks of the Turkish ministers, who do not want him here. It is more probable that his secretary brought him unfavourable replies about the peace with the Barbareschi, which, though procured at great cost, has not had the slightest effect, and in order to make more stir about it he had sent to his Britannic Majesty. This is confirmed by the knowledge that he sent the capitulations to Draperis to be shown to the Turks. Certainly this English dragoman is much humiliated and dreads some misadventure from the ministers here, who think nothing of making threats, and indeed are freer with them than ever, when they are stung.
The ambassador has heard from Smyrna that some Christian ships, he may think that they belonged to your Excellencies, have made search of an English one which was with the convoy, and having found on board a quantity of steel, tin and lead, destined for the benefit of the infidels, they detained them as contraband, to the amount of
150,000 reals. (fn. 5) This has caused a great commotion owing to the considerable advantage which private individuals receive, and the ambassador in the first place, from the disposal of such scandalous merchandise. I understand that His Excellency said that he would write to the king and Council in London to demand compensation.
Adrianople, the 3rd April, 1664.
[Italian; deciphered.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
5. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
By the death of Sagun Aga Gheilant, governor of Algiers, on 13th February, who was a bitter enemy of the Christians, the choice of a much less barbarous chief is expected. Accordingly the Dutch fleet for the Mediterranean has been held up, and there is some fear of a fresh peace with the Barbareschi. We also learn from England that a small frigate has been sent to Vice-Admiral Lawson, likewise to treat for an accommodation with them, so there is good reason for fearing that from one good thing greater mischief will result for the rest of Christendom.
Paris, the 8th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
6. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador has been to call on the ministers and the chancellor, but he announced that he would not be the first to visit the princes of the blood. So it seems clear that he means to have it generally understood that the ministers of England will not give place to the princes of the blood in France unless similar honours are accorded to those of the royal succession in England.
The first meeting of parliament took place on Monday in last week. The king expressed the satisfaction he felt at seeing the members of his realms gathered together, and in respect of the universal intention to promote the public welfare he promised to do his part not only for the quiet and repose of every one but for the successive proposals for the encouragement and advancement of his dominions through industry and the trade to be procured in the future. To conciliate the love of his subjects the king made the request that they should make careful inquiry to find out who they were who had published that it had not been in the king's mind to desire the convocation of parliament or to co-operate for securing their reunion, since the facts proved the contrary, and consequently this pernicious and vain imagining had been promulgated by the malcontents.
In the second place the king declared with vehemence that for the public repose it was necessary to be on their guard against conspirators, who in the interval between the meetings of parliament had devised impious designs against liberty and against the continuance of that good rule which issued from the government, designed for the safety of the people, with the service of God.
In the third place the reasons were set forth to show why the subsidies granted up to the present have not sufficed by a long way to meet the expenses, which are inevitable for the maintenance of the forces and to provide for other necessary occurrences. Thus at the same time they brought forward the objections, to which they could apply a remedy by a decree of the two chambers, without laying further burdens upon the people. The lords, ecclesiastical as well as lay, were urged to do this, all consisting in a like act (tutto in simil atto consistendo.) (fn. 6)
But the one thing which may greatly upset affairs and the generally entertained presumption of a happy issue of the assembly, consists in the pertinacious hostility, which becomes more and more outspoken, of the Earl of Bristol against the Lord Chancellor Hyde. This has gone so far that the Earl of Northampton, one of the leading nobles of the realm who openly supports him, has presented a letter of Bristol, in that lord's name to the House of Lords, and it has been declared that it shall be received and read. Thus while previously they were searching for the earl by the king's order in several houses and places, to lay hands on him by force, now one of his supporters is beginning to protect him and to promote what he is working for in the mean time. It may well be feared that this will make the greater impression upon the Lords, since the venality of the Chancellor is well known, supported as he is by the royal patronage and his relationship. So this will be the subject of all those obstacles which Fortune once again is choosing to put in the way of the calm which is so greatly desired in that vigorous country.
Paris, the 8th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
7. Giacomo Erizzo, Venetian Proveditore of Zante, to the Doge and Senate.
With regard to the duty of the new impost I find it impossible to farm it out, and all my persuasions with the inhabitants here have proved unprofitable, because no one means to take it up owing to the example of others and the ruin which has been seen to have overtaken many families of this place.
Zante, the 31st March, 1664, old style.
[Italian.]
April 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
8. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Count of Cicendorf presented letters of the emperor to the States General at the Hague. If Cæsar is not helped by England it is believed that the strongest reason which will restrain the United Provinces from taking steps to render some secret assistance will be to deprive the English of the opportunity of making known such a proceeding to the Porte, which might take away that rich Levant trade which the Dutch have and enrich therewith the Admiralty and company of merchants of London, which seek nothing better than such a conjuncture. Accordingly they conclude that Cicendorf will depart with a reply or intention which will be equivalent to a promise from the States to do as much as the Count of Kinighsech will obtain in London from King Charles.
Paris, the 15th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
9. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Prince of Condé sent a gentleman to congratulate the English ambassador on his arrival. The latter was in doubt about prejudicing himself, but in the end he responded.
I enclose the news from England, which I have not had time to translate into Italian. I have just heard that the Earl of Bristol is trying to escape from the kingdom, being abandoned by everyone, according to what Madame declares. If this is so appearances point to a happy issue to the present parliament.
Paris, the 15th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.10. Intelligence from England.
London, the 28th March /9 April. On Tuesday the 22nd the Earl of Northampton delivered to the Speaker of the House of Lords a packet addressed to him by the Earl of Bristol, which he absolutely refused to open, but sent it to the king in order that his Majesty might have the first perusal and judge if the contents were proper to be communicated. That same day a bill was read in the House of Commons to prevent the frequent capture of English ships by the Turkish pirates, by supplying them with crews and guns beyond the ordinary. Another was read later for the better observance of Sunday. Likewise an act tending to remedy the abuses which are committed in the formalities and administration of justice, and to prevent the useless delays and expenses which ensue. Finally a fourth to reform the manner of electing the deputies who compose the parliament, which will meet at least once every three years. (fn. 7)
On Wednesday the 23rd the king sent to thank the House of Lords for having sent the packet of the Earl of Bristol, and that same day the House of Commons was still occupied with the reading of several bills for the regulation and promotion of trade On Thursday the 24th the Countess of Bristol herself brought a communication from her husband to the House of Lords, but none of the members would charge himself with it. Following on this the earl has written a letter to the king full of submission, which, so far as one can judge, has not so far made much impression.
His Majesty has had issued a prohibition against transporting saltpetre out of England during the three months next following. (fn. 8) At the session of the judges on circuit at Appleby Robert Waller and four others were convicted of being of the number of our last conspirators and as such were condemned to death.
We have news from Spain that our Ambassador Fanshaw had arrived there and had been received with every possible honour. A command has been issued in the king's name to all military officers, without exception, to leave London by the last of this month and not to return thither without the permission of three members of the Council. (fn. 9) The Countess Dowager of Derby being dead, the two queens have been this day to visit Lady Dorchester to offer their condolences on the loss of her mother-in-law. (fn. 10)
[French.]
April 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
11. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador pursues his journey amid the most conspicuous demonstrations of honour. At Seville, at Cordova and other places of these realms they have shown their satisfaction at his appearance by festivities and entertainment. They say that he is to stop for some days at Caramanchel or Mandes, less than a league from Madrid. They have not yet found a house for him, although the junta of the aposentadori has been at work about it for so long, owing to the resistance of the owners. It is thought that the higher the hopes are the greater will be the difficulties in negotiating. It seems to me that as the ambassador cannot meet with a ready response to his claims, they will go on here detaining him with words, he will enjoy the benefit of time and by obtaining a truce for his Portuguese friends will divert hostilities during the present campaign so far as is possible by negotiation.
A ship from the Indies which has arrived at Sant' Andrea in Biscaya, brings word of the capture by the English of a very rich ship of the Spaniards, and English frigates at Alicante have refused to salute the fortress according to the custom. After staying some days in the port they left without this mark of respect.
Medina himself told me that England and Holland are all ready to break, by reason of the trade of the Indies. The Dutch have recalled Admiral Tromp from these waters, and England has done the same with Lauson, to concentrate their forces. The rupture is at hand.
Madrid, the 16th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
12. To the King of England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 10th March expressing a desire for the release of a certain quantity of steel and lead on the ship Bacilier. Orders were sent at once to the fleet for the whole to be handed over, although the material is of such consequence. It is denied that it was destined for the enemy and the cases which contain it are stamped with the seal of St. Mark. This has been done as a mark of esteem for his Majesty, but the Senate is persuaded that he will consider the damage that will be inflicted on Christendom by the communication of such commodities to the enemy, and that he will not consent to the ships of so generous a nation being employed to transport from Italy to the states of the barbarians material which will tend to the injury of all the world.
Ayes, 164. Noes, 0. Neutral, 4.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
13. To the Grand Chancellor Ballarino.
We regret that the English ambassador, with his unquiet spirit, is able to upset you and your transactions. That his feelings may be rendered more friendly is greatly desired by us, and accordingly you should use all your skill to win him over and by the suavest methods to clear his mind of the suspicions and jealousies which he may entertain. Formerly intimate confidential relations existed on both sides, which have since been interrupted by unfounded suspicions or by malevolent reports which have been earned to him. An effort to renew the earlier relations will cause the truth to come to light and consolidate more firmly the sincerity of a mutual regard, to the common advantage.
At this point we have to say that on learning by letters of the Captain General of the removal by order of the Admiral of the Ships Giustinian from an English ship named Bacilier, in the waters of Zante, of a great quantity of steel, lead and tin in cases marked with the device of St. Mark, directed to Smyrna for the service of the enemy, and since guarded in deposit to await our orders, and having also received letters from the king requesting their release, we immediately sent instructions to the Captain General to have this done punctually, without any charge (aggravio). You can use this information, in the event of any complaint being made, to show the readiness of the republic to satisfy his Majesty.
Ayes, 142. Noes, 2. Neutral, 25.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
14. Francesco Bianchi and Domenico Vico, Venetian Residents at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
A ship arrived from Algiers reports that in less than two months those barbarians have plundered and carried off to that place and to Tunis twenty-seven vessels, English, Flemish and Genoese. This ought to serve as an additional incentive to the powers to provide the necessary remedy.
Florence, the 19th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
April 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
15. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador had audience yesterday and spoke of the affair of Orange, the articles promised in the adjustment with the Count of Dona having been largely, not to say entirely, ignored. King Charles is interested as guardian of the prince during his minority, besides being his uncle.
The last letters from London state that the act for triennial parliaments has already been annulled; but I can hardly believe this since it is merely a bill.
An incident has occurred in London, very slight but always dangerous because of the pertinacious courage of the race and of the occasion which it may give the malcontents to stir it up. Two youths or shop boys, called apprentices, were imprisoned for having beaten their master, and were condemned to the pillory by the magistrate. Generous youth being unable to endure such an indignity the apprentices of the city, to the number of over 4000 assembled together and with stones and sticks roughly handled the officers of justice and released their two companions. The lord mayor, whose duty it is to watch over and to command the burghers, immediately caused a regiment of the militia to be armed, composed for the most part of the masters of these apprentices, and persuaded them more by argument than by arms to withdraw to their homes, as they did. Disorder having had its way, justice was determined to be obeyed, and the aforesaid two delinquents were not only brought back to the pillory but severely beaten right through the city. This action aroused greater ire among their fellows, and on the following day these rose up in greater numbers and threatened to pull down the houses of the alderman and another judge who signed this indecorous sentence. General Monck, when the noise reached Whitehall, caused a number of soldiers to mount their horses who were sufficient to scatter this gathering and make them withdraw, but nevertheless they all protested with one voice that if these judges were not punished they would be revenged on them.
There is no doubt that the affair is accidental and has arisen solely from the ardour of youth, but the pertinacity I have spoken of, which is characteristic of this race, coupled with the existence of so many malcontents makes it necessary for the government to stand well on its guard not only over this but for other apparently slight incidents.
Parliament has resolved that no letter or instance in the name of the Earl of Bristol may be accepted without the express approval of the king, so he will have to look for his safety elsewhere, being destitute of hope and of pardon alike in London, since it is supposed that after such a resolution no private gentleman of any kind will undertake to protect him.
It is believed that parliament will grant the king not only the means to facilitate the collecting of the taxes previously granted for the maintenance of the troops and for the expenses necessary to ensure the safety of the realm and the tranquillity of the people, but that they will also give the king further satisfaction by consenting to some other tax.
Certain deputies or commissioners have been appointed to consider and facilitate means for promoting some trade advantageous to the country, as this is the essential means for bringing out its strength.
Some decision was about to be taken against the officers of Cromwell, for as they are without employment and discontented, nothing can be expected of them except to stir up trouble and disorder in the good government which is so industriously sought by King Charles.
Another exemplary sentence has been carried out at York against three persons concerned in the last conspiracy, a fourth, who was arrested with them being granted his life. (fn. 11) But the most important news of that island reduces itself to reasonable grounds for believing or fearing that parliament wishes to have some discussion about the injuries which it claims to have received from the Dutch. The reaction of the latter is the more considerable because it is known that besides the fleets which the Dutch have sent to the Mediterranean, under the pretext of hunting down the corsairs to the extreme limit, they are at present arming seventy ships of war, to stand ready and armed for all eventualities.
In such case, later, they will also employ other arms consisting in the distribution of a quantity of money among those sectaries, who with encouragement will never fail to disquiet and trouble the kingdom.
Besides this the royal company of merchants for Guinea have brought complaints to the king and parliament against the Dutch, for having impeded the trade of the English on the coasts of Guinea, and for having ill-treated them. Accordingly the king and parliament have appointed commissioners to examine this matter and subsequently to make report, upon which they will base their demands for satisfaction from the Dutch. They believe that they can obtain this by reprisals, which is a kind of war and the seed of it. The Dutch, rather than come to an agreement or to consent to this are fully determined to face rather a definite rupture and to declare war, from their remembrance and the recent example in the time of Cromwell, when they lost more ships and goods during the time spent in treating for an adjustment, by reason of these reprisals, than they would have done if they had ventured to declare war. The annexed sheet of London will tell the rest.
The King of England has issued a prohibition that goods of Zealand shall not be unladed in any of his ports unless they either belong to English merchants or are directed to native Englishmen. (fn. 12) On their side the Dutch have declared that such an intimation against one province is understood to be directed against the others as well. And because the States are extremely suspicious of the negotiations conducted by the Danish ambassador Zeester in England and France, their consultations tend to the consideration of more serious matters than one could wish.
It is a remarkable report from Madrid that the English ambassador Fanschau claims a fresh declaration of his status from the Catholic, which in plain language means a claim for parity with that crown, and a demand for precedence over all the others. They tell me this is what the Ambassador d'Ambrun writes.
Paris, the 29th April, 1664.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.16. Intelligence from London.
London, 21/11 April. The king has thanked parliament for having passed the act which provides that parliaments shall no longer be triennial.
Count Coningsech has had audience of the king and of the queens as well as of the Duke of York, who received him with all the honours due to his quality.
It has been resolved by parliament that Sir Henry Bennet, principal secretary of state, shall go to the king to beg his Majesty to nominate commissioners of the two kingdoms of England and Scotland to give their advice touching the impositions which it is desirable to continue upon goods which are transported from one country to the other, and touching the expedients which may be adopted in order to establish trade with Ireland on an increasingly favourable basis. (fn. 13)
On Thursday his Majesty washed the feet of the poor according to the custom. On Saturday the 9/19 orders were sent to the various ports of England to forbid the landing or reception of any more effects or goods belonging to the Zeelanders. This proceeds from a just resentment of his Majesty against the insolence of that people, which a short while ago committed some enterprise and affront derogatory to his royal dignity. (fn. 14)
Some ships which have newly arrived assert that the vessels of the royal company are returning from Guinea, laden with gold, and that one of them, when about two degrees from the line was attacked by a monstrous fish which passed underneath it and gave it a rude shock, and then presented itself at the side and after spouting a quantity of water disappeared into space. Its horn was caught and broken off, and they have kept the fragment. Without this the ship would have run a great risk of being dragged along by such a guide.
The Spaniards are sending here in a ship more than 50,000l. sterling of gold and silver in bullion.
The Earl of Teveot and the garrison of Tanger have had divers skirmishes with the men of Prince Gayland, who have had the worst of it and have not been able to prevent the works being constructed outside that place. Among these is a new fort which had reached the height of eight feet when they wrote the news.
Since the order to all the officers who served the party of the usurpers to take themselves away from London, they have been very exact in making them go and in finding out if any are staying without permission in order to prevent them from intriguing against the king's service.
[French.]

Footnotes

1 Maurice was supposed to have perished in May, 1652, in a storm which overtook the squadron commanded by Rupert and himself off the Virgin Islands in the West Indies. It was now reported that he was a prisoner on an island inhabited by savages near Porto Rico. A ship was sent from St. Christopher to this place to answer signals agreed upon. Comenge to the King 31st, March, 1664. P.R.O. Paris Transcripts. See also Green: Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia, page, 378.
2 Sir Richard Fanshawe. He sailed with a squadron of twelve frigates under Sir John Lawson, which went on to Algiers. The Intelligencer, April 27th. He arrived at Cadiz on 24th February, old style. Original Letters of Sir R. Fanshaw, ed. 1702, page 30.
3 Fanshawe had been made a member of the Privy Council of Ireland in 1662 on his return from Lisbon, and of that of England on the 1st October.
4 Paul Rycaut.
5 The ship was the Batchelor, belonging to the Levant Company. At a Court held on 8th March, o.s., it was resolved to make representations to the king on the subject. Levant Co. Court Book, S.P. For. Archives, Vol. chi., fol. 200.
6 The king's speech, delivered on 11–21 March, is printed in Journals of the House of Lords, Vol. xi., page 582.
7 A bill to prevent the yielding up of English ships to Turkish ships; bill for the better observance of the Lord's Day; bill to prevent unnecessary delays expenses, vexation and grievances in the Courts of Law and Equity and supplying some defects in Law and Legal proceedings; all read for the first time. The Triennial Act was debated and its repeal moved. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. viii., page 535.
8 Proclamation of the 17th March, o.s., forbidding the exportation of saltpetre for six months. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1663–4, page 517.
9 Proclamation of March 25th, o.s. Ibid., page 530.
10 Charlotte, daughter of Claude de la Tremouille, duke of Thouars, who married James Stanley, seventh Earl of Derby, died at Chester on 21st March. G.E.C.: Complete Peerage, revised od., Vol. iv., pp. 214–5. Her daughter Catherine married Henry Pierrepoint, Marquis of Dorchester.
11 Captain Robert Waller, Stephen Wetherhead and Henry Petty were executed at Appleby on 24th March, o.s.; Fothergill was reprieved at the last minute. The Intelligencer, March 31st.
12 Warrant of 7th April, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1663–4, page 548.
13 On April 6th, o.s., it was resolved that the king be moved to appoint commissioners of England and Scotland to consider the impositions on the goods of both kingdoms, and also to appoint some persons to consider expedients for the redress of grievances by the impositions upon the trade of England with Ireland. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. viii. page 544.
14 This apparently refers to the warrant of 7th April, mentioned above. Four persons of Zeeland had published a paper entitled “Obligation, Action or Protence of 696l. sterling against the Duke of York.” The king considered himself personally affronted and ordered Downing to make complaint, after which the publication was proclaimed by public authority to be false and scandalous. The Intelligencer, May 18th. See Cal. S.P. Dom., 1064–5, page 435.


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Venice:
May 1664