Venice
June 1664

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1933

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20-26

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'Venice: June 1664', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 34: 1664-1666 (1933), pp. 20-26. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90154 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Contents

June 1664

June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
28. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador, who called upon me the day before yesterday, confirmed my doubts about the health of Viscount Falcombrige, telling me that he had recently passed through Paris and proceeded to the waters of Borbon, for the sake of his health. So King Charles has not disposed of him for any special employment to the Prince of Tuscany, or by renewing his appointment as ambassador to your Serenity. It is true that two English gentlemen, in the capacity of envoys, recently proceeded to the court of Savoy, on a complimentary mission in the name of the king and queen; but the viscount, as soon as he has recovered, will return to England in the character of a private gentleman.
In respect of the intelligence from England, the ambassador confirmed to me the complete abrogation of the triennial act, so that parliament, which was to separate on the 28th of this month, will have followed the king's wishes in every particular, his Majesty watching with inestimable goodness over the general comfort and the establishment of what is best calculated to ensure the quiet and advantage of his dominions.
The affair with the Dutch is quieting down with great rapidity. The chief reason for this in the king and government of England is attributed to the present state of affairs in the north, as it would suit the Most Christian, above everything, to be the spectator of such a set to, which must of necessity end in tragedy for one of the parties and possibly for both. Thus in addition to the assurances given me by the ambassador himself that he hoped the disputes would be amicably settled, I noticed that the ambassadress with the daughter of the Ambassador Borel and the envoy of Holland went out in the coach together that day, and the ambassador himself desired that they should all together honour me with a visit.
I must tell your Serenity that the ministers here are full of jealousy at seeing such close passages of friendship between England, Spain and Portugal. And at Fontainebleau it is noted that the king has never been so persistent in calling the Council of State to such long and frequent sittings as at this present time. From this there arises another observation, namely that in response to the representations made here by the ambassador about the affair of Orange, in the name of King Charles, Mons. di Liona, after taking a long time to make up his mind, has replied that the Most Christian will do nothing about it, since for the safety of his kingdom he will never consent that the governor of that fortress shall be other than a Catholic. He promises indeed that for the rest the articles shall be carried out, always provided that by a meeting of the parties they decide hinc inde the disputes over the claims advanced, offering in the mean time, if it be true of the disorders reported that the people there cannot feel safe for their lives, to provide a remedy. This is precisely what King Charles will not have and to which the Prince of Orange can never consent, seeing that it would amount to signing to the diminution and loss of his own authority in his hereditary sovereign state. Mons. di Lione concludes that the same reasons have been stated to the elector of Brandenburg, who is equally interested in the guardianship of his nephew, and had agreed to the force of the representation. The ambassador replied that such was not the intention of the king, his master. That the prince would never allow it of his own free will. That Brandenburg does not speak to him in that way, and that he can do no more than report, having fulfilled his duty by speaking on the subject and presenting the paper, obtaining orally the intention of the Most Christian, without settling what would be proper. So it would seem to me that even on some other private request of his Lord Holles has not had the smallest satisfaction from here. Thus one day follows another with little content, and it looks as if they were carefully making an accumulation of many things which time and circumstance will cause to become more apparent.
Essone, the 2nd June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
29. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador continues to remain outside Madrid. No house is yet provided for him. The Court murmurs about it. The various comments, the attention attracted and the intention to give him this house of the republic after my departure meet with general disapproval. The Duke of Medina has committed himself to the Englishman, and the latter claims that the promise to him shall be kept. I have seen the king, the Council of State and Medina himself. The duke is covered with confusion; he hoped that his stroke would be secret. It is the custom for the king to assign houses to the foreign ministers.
Meanwhile England does not provide for himself and he does not deal with me. It is impossible to say what the end will be. If I did not know the present government of Spain I should conclude that there was some hidden object. But in this I see no more than a personal committal of Medina to the Englishman, the difficulty of finding a house and the certitude of my steadfastness in upholding the rights of my successor.
Madrid, the 4th June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
30. To the Ambassador in Spain.
We await with the most intense expectation to hear of the negotiations of the English ambassador over there, and as we are ready to believe that they will be to open the way for some adjustment with Portugal, they will be the more interesting. From Paris moreover we understand that this same ambassador has commissions to treat for a close alliance between the Catholic and his king, the latter promising the former the defence of Flanders against all comers. This will serve as a guide to you to discover any confirmation from that side.
Ayes, 109. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
31. To the Captain General at Sea.
By an order of the 8th October, 1662, the abolition of improper charges on the lading of currants was directed. Now letters from the King of England bring fresh complaints on the subject. He is to make inquiry into the matter, remedy abuses and punish delinquents. The Senate further desires that English ships shall have the best possible treatment, and that they shall pursue their voyages without impediment.
Ayes, 109. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
32. To the King of Great Britain.
The Senate has been most gratified by his Majesty's letters, imparting his courteous regard and his appreciation of the orders given promptly about the ship Bacilier and its cargo. The instructions given to their representatives have presumably been carried out, and have been repeated as a further proof of their goodwill. They also agree to the requests made to them, and the ships of the nation shall have every consideration and respect from the republic's vessels and ministers. They feel confident that the goodness and religious zeal of his Majesty will have regard to their interests so menaced by the Turks, and attacked by fierce invasion. Orders have been repeatedly sent to the Proveditori of Zante and Cephalonia that the lading of currants shall not be taxed beyond the usual gabelles. If, though it is unlikely, their orders are neglected, they will write to the Capitan General de Mar to make inquiry and punish whoever has disobeyed and to see that the state's decrees are fully carried out. From this his Majesty will perceive their desire to give him satisfaction and to see his royal person and house loaded with every prosperity for a long period.
Ayes, 109. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
June 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
33. Francesco Bianchi, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
From Tripoli we learn by intelligence brought by a French barque that the pirate ships there are all gathered within the port and guarded, from fear of the fleets of France and England.
Florence, the 14th June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
34. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador remained at Valieras until Monday in last week and then proceeded to Madrid to the house appointed for him by the king. He persists in the propriety of the design to give him this house. I am awaiting the arrival of Sig. Zorzi with impatience. All the other ambassadors strongly resent this attempt. They are very outspoken about it, and with good reason.
Following the example of the other ministers I sent the usual compliments to the English ambassador on his arrival. At present he is not receiving visits. They say he is to make his entry on Wednesday.
Madrid, the 15th June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
35. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
We hear from London of the continued mutual satisfaction over the proceedings in parliament which give an impression of the most steadfast and particular devotion of those realms to the king. Nevertheless the complaints against the Dutch continue, with much passion on the part of those interested, over the injuries received on so many occasions in their past voyages; so by large offers they are trying to induce the king to take the proper and necessary steps, the more so as from close observation they had reason to believe that his Majesty's sentiments were wavering and indeed inclined to a peace and a prompt adjustment.
There is no doubt that such was the royal feeling in the matter, but considering on the one hand the provocation received and the inevitable satisfaction to be obtained for his subjects, and on the other observing the method of the Dutch in conducting negotiations fully armed, since it is well known that under the pretext of the Barbary corsairs they have assembled a number of ships of war with extreme solicitude, King Charles has ordered and personally solicited the arming of forty-five more powerful ships of war. So we see that the affair is taking another turn, although there is every reason why it should be finished and settled by simple negotiation.
The Resident Douning has left the Hague with a long narrative given him in writing by the States upon every incident, which confutes all the pretensions aforesaid. Whereas at first he showed himself more ardent than any other of his countrymen, he has now become much milder and undertook to make the journey to London. So there are signs of an approaching adjustment, but with due regard for the honour and safety of both sides. At the same time it is very noteworthy that Denmark at this very moment has unsheathed against the Dutch her pretensions to Cabo Corso and the interrupted voyage to Guinea, treating them sharply.
Paris, the 17th June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
36. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
This morning M. de Batteville has been to my house to tell me that the English ambassador is greatly annoyed by the impression and the talk that he tried to get this house. It was true that it had been offered and promised to him. He knew nothing subsequently of the obstacles in the way and he wished him to inform the Venetian Ambassador of this at some opportunity. Batteville said later that he had brought the ambassador round to the opinion not to move from the house where he is, praising the conveniences, the pleasant garden and the advantage of the position.
Madrid, the 22nd June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
37. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador had his first audience of the king on Wednesday in last week. The coaches of the foreign ministers did not attend owing to an intimation received from the king.
Madrid, the 22nd June, 1664.
[Italian.]
June 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
38. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The latest from London report the expected arrival of Douning from the Hague, with the resolution of the States upon the complaints of the English merchants. They continue to be busy over the arming of ships of war but King Charles and the chancellor are inclined to a composition, in spite of the lamentations of the persons aggrieved.
The Court greatly regrets the death of Rudelsdorf, the earl of Teviot, governor of Tangier with sixteen officers and men in a sortie. They were ambushed and cut to pieces by the Moorish cavalry of Prince Gayland.
I have just received the sheet from England, which I enclose. I have not had time to translate it.
Paris, the 24th June, 1664.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.39. Intelligence from England.
London, 6/16 June. On the 30th ult. the king caused a proclamation to be issued that all sailors, his subjects, employed by foreign princes should return home and that none should go back again to serve outside his own country. An express from Tangier has brought us the sad news of the disaster which has befallen the garrison on 13/3 May. They state that the governor had gone out of the place to visit a fort near a wood from which the enemy was accustomed to come out to attack the garrison, after having sent twelve horsemen to reconnoitre the place, who brought back word that there was no one there. Nevertheless he had fallen into an ambuscade in which he and thirty officers who accompanied him were killed and 200 or 300 horse who followed them were driven back as far as the place, which had also been attacked on the following day by the Moors of Prince Gayland, who delivered a general assault on the whole circuit, but had suffered a severe repulse. Forthwith the king appointed Colonel Fitzgerald, an Irishman of great experience, to go and command the garrison as deputy governor and to take 500 men there with money to console our troops after so great a misfortune.
We hear from Barbadoes that Sir Thomas Muddifort is preparing to leave at the end of the month for Jamaica. He found 300 heads of households who were willing to accept the conditions granted by his Majesty, and go with him; some with thirty or forty negroes to work and others with considerable effects so that to all appearance that plantation was about to receive a considerable increment. Other letters from Barbadoes report the arrival of Captain Stoakes from Guinea with a quantity of good merchandise despite the hindrances placed by the Dutch in the way of the merchants of the royal company. It included a quantity of ivory and gold to the value of more than 20,000l. sterling, and they say that more than sixty merchantmen are at Barbadoes ready to sail on their way back to England.
Sir Douning, who has returned from the Hague, had a very long interview with the king upon the relations with the Dutch States, after which his Majesty held an extraordinary council. News from Dublin of the 30th and 31st states that the Duke of Ormond, the Viceroy, is leaving for England. The Earl of Glencairn, chancellor of Scotland, is dead. (fn. 1)
[French.]

Footnotes

1 William Cunningham, Earl of Glencairn, died at Belton, co. Haddington, on 30th May, o.s. The Intelligencer, June 9. G.E.C. Complete Peerage.


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