Venice
March 1665

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1933

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81-93

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'Venice: March 1665', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 34: 1664-1666 (1933), pp. 81-93. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90163 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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March 1665

March 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
133. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
His Majesty would wish his ambassador to be present in London before the English ambassador leaves Madrid. With the introduction of correspondence the object is to try and keep it mutual, and to see that the embassy here is not terminated too quickly. In circumstances like the present both for the interests of Portugal and for all other emergencies, they would like the ministers of that king to be always at hand. Everything accordingly is being done that the one may go and the other stay.
Madrid, the 4th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
March 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
134. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
I rejoiced, when taking leave of M. di Liona, at the choice of an ambassador extraordinary to England. Liona said that efforts had been made to obtain peace and they might feel hopeful about it since King Charles had made such ample declarations that he would welcome all the ministers who might be sent to London by the Most Christian and he would always be willing to hear the reminders and listen to the counsels of his Majesty; but so far definite mediation had not been accepted by that crown, so it might be that we should first hear of some hostile encounter between the two parties. I expressed my feelings about this quarrel over a trifle between Christian powers, who might have united against the common enemy and had for their reward the accumulations of the customs duty of the tenth at Algiers and of the booty for the last sixty years. Liona answered, That is true, but it is necessary for all to be agreed.
Paris, the 6th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
March 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
135. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The embassy extraordinary for England proceeds very slowly. M. de Courtin said the day before yesterday that he personally is ready but two essential things are lacking, namely money and the instructions. Meanwhile the two parties continue to arm vigorously, and if parliament duly eggs on King Charles to war and urges the Duke of York to proceed to sea, the Provinces are truly united and of one mind in this grave emergency to do everything that is requisite for the most stubborn resistance. Already a fleet of thirteen vessels has left Zeeland for the English Channel without the Earl of Sandwich, the English Admiral, being able to catch it up. It is believed to be going to the Strait to take vengeance on Allen. Another Dutch fleet for the north is said to be well on its way and to be going to Barbade to make itself master of what the English hold there and to fight all their merchant ships.
In London, on the other hand, Captain Holmes being released, (fn. 1) everyone is being urged, as in duty bound, to exert himself for the defence of trade and the honour of the country, for the supremacy in navigation which they claim. Thus with both sides strong in the great number of their ships, well provided with troops and with officials on the fleet itself to distinguish the actions of the captains in the very heat of action with reward and punishment, spurring the others on to valour and unparalleled determination, the scene cannot fail to be a very tragic one for both sides, the issue being left to the arbitrament of fortune.
M. de l'Estrades has promised that the king will not fail to keep the treaty of alliance with the States; but in view of the knowledge of the proposal made to van Beuninghen about the introduction of an article into the treaty, about Flanders, in the event of the death of the Catholic, they do not know how much they can build upon this; since it is certain that the Dutch will never have any other aim than to separate the ten provinces subject to Spain, and at all costs to keep them away from an accommodation and much more from the imminent perils from France, and when they are reduced to the form of a republic, always to defend them.
Meanwhile it is known that King Charles, to arrive at an offensive and defensive alliance with the Most Christian, has sent and offered any sort of convention, and it is also known that in Britanny they are waiting for four English frigates with an envoy of Braganza, under the pretext of treating for the marriage of the princess of Nemours, but really to slip in some great matter (per fiancheggiar qualche gran negotiato), after the English ambassador has shaken himself free of the Court of Madrid, without having been able to achieve anything. The enclosed sheets will give particulars.
Paris, the 6th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.136. From the Hague, the 26th February.
The French offer of mediation. Estrades has been told that all his offices are useless unless his Majesty supplies the succour promised in the treaty of alliance. It cannot be denied that these delays have greatly estranged the affections of the people here and the enemies of France are given to understand that the great confidence which existed between that crown and these states no longer exists. So if our Court does not make up its mind in a few days, they will try to come to terms with England, to which one observes a strong leaning.
The fleet will not be ready for two or three weeks.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.137. From London, the 26th February, 1664. [M.V.]
The Dutch and others interested in their cause have spread many false rumours about this city during the week, for instance that Everson had passed the Channel with a considerable fleet and that Captain Banchert had taken the island of Orcheni, near Scotland. But now we hear by letters from Holland that Everson has not left port and that Bankert, being followed by the English fleet, would not engage and to avoid it retired with all speed in the direction of Zeeland, where we have word that he has now arrived.
Last Saturday the king gave his assent to the Act for the grant of ten million crowns, to be levied, as previously reported, in the space of three years beginning from 28th December last. The bill was as usual presented to his Majesty by the Speaker of the Lower House in the name of the Commons of England, who accompanied the grant with a very fine speech in which he assured his Majesty of the forwardness of his parliament to assist him with their contributions, both in the present rupture with Holland and in all other matters affecting his honour and the interests of his people. (fn. 2) His Majesty returned a thousand thanks for this assurance and the grant and promised them that all the money should be spent for the advantage and satisfaction of his people.
Lord Sain Johns, son of the Marquis of Winchester and M. di Seimers, both members of parliament, having had the quarrel reported, in the precincts of parliament, forthwith left for the country to fight a duel. But some other members of the parliament, having noted their remarks and departure, disclosed the facts and informed the Speaker who, at the instigation of other members, sent officers to secure their persons. These officers arrived just as they were taking their places for the duel, preventing the unhappy issue which might otherwise have occurred by taking them both prisoners to the Speaker's house. (fn. 3)
Parliament has already made good progress in the reform of the laws and they have abolished some obligation for expense which prolonged trials, but it is thought that much time and labour will be required for making all the alterations and regulations which they intended to make.
We hear from Chester that Sir Oven, Vice Admiral of Wales, (fn. 4) has arrived at that city with a great number of sailors levied from his jurisdiction, who are only waiting for a ship to take them to Portsmouth.
The English have recently taken eight Dutch ships, laden with wines of France, wool and brandy and have sent them as prizes to Portsmouth. On the other hand it is said that the Dutch have taken three of ours laden with coal, but this news is not yet quite certain. The Admiralty here has recently condemned twenty-three Dutch ships and consequently confiscated them with their cargoes for the use and profit of his Britannic Majesty.
[Italian from the French.]
March 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
138. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The affair between England and Holland has become embittered to such a point that whereas last year the issue might have been predicted, it is now impossible to do so, owing to the heat on both sides. With the preparations for war there vanishes correspondingly the hope of a settlement by an amicable composition, which every one had always believed in, up to a certain point. It is therefore generally believed that King Charles will raise his pretensions in proportion to his expenditure and that the justice of his claims will be extended to a demand for reparations for all that the Dutch have done beyond the line. On the other hand it is recognised that the United Provinces, at this present time, if they give way, will be submitting to a too disadvantageous loss, with respect to what the others wish to exact, while if they resist they place themselves in the obvious necessity of moderating if not abandoning a large measure of that sustenance which in every account depends on liberty of trade, with navigation, so one or more combats will have to decide who will have the worse or the better of it. It is true however and known to everybody that the Spaniards, weak in proportion at sea, although enemies of the Dutch, build entirely upon their good fortune. But the English, strong and vindictive above all others, without the smallest imaginable fear of being invaded in their own country, abounding in everything that serves for the use and delight of man, are pertinaciously resolved to settle this point. Moreover King Charles, who has always shown himself reluctant to break with a power so friendly and of the same religion, is not sorry to see that parliament has spontaneously put such power into his hands, with which he arrives at establishing himself upon the throne and with its pristine authority (con chi si viene a stabilir nel throno et nell' auttorita primiera).
It is believed that Denmark will have to unite itself with the States; while on the other hand they say that Sweden, whose interest it is to sow trouble by the hands of others, particularly in a neighbouring kingdom, will place itself beside England.
Now the King of France, who imagines that he will be the sole mediator of these differences, is thinking of increasing his naval armament and of setting new forces on foot to be ready for everything that may occur and the ambassadors extraordinary will not be able to set out for London until after Easter, under the pretext that the royal assignments may be deferred. But in the mean time van Bouninghem has frequent sittings with Mons. di Turena and tries to impress him with the obligations of France. So they say that Mons. di Turena, who for the affairs of Portugal seems to have strong leanings towards England, must now stop in his present policy from the consideration that the Most Christian cannot abandon the Dutch, while to do this it behoves the king to arm himself, and without some great happening Turena cannot enjoy again the authority he desires although he always enjoys the reputation of being the greatest captain of the day, who is able to act in this kingdom (chi possi hoggidi agir in questo Regno).
It is further stated that a Swede who lately arrived in London has reported the cruelty of the Dutch against the English in the last affair at Cormantino, asserting that Ruiter had them bound together in pairs and thrown into the sea. But on examination it was found that he had said this in order to stir up a universal passion against the United Provinces, (fn. 5) and there are others who try to do the same. In spite of all this the lower classes in London, who have always looked unfavourably on the Ambassador Van Goch, have begun to make demonstrations and to clamour about his house, to such an extent that the king was compelled to send some troops thither at once to prevent any outrage that might have occurred. Nevertheless there are some who hope that as the two ministers Van Goch and Douning continue in residence at London and the Hague respectively, there may be some unexpected facility for a project of peace between the two without having recourse to others.
Encloses the usual sheets with particulars.
Paris, the 13th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.139. From the Hague, the 5th March, 1665.
Surprise at hearing that the Duke of Vornuil is not leaving Paris before April. Mons. de l'Estrade has said that the Most Christian is labouring for a suspension of arms; but that is contrary to the interests of this state, which will never consent thereto. There is no doubt that everyone will be on our side if we are in a condition to exact our rights from the English. The state has great resources in money and can send to sea 114 ships, the least of which carries forty guns. The deputies of Zeeland said on Monday that they had ships enough to force the English to detach some ships from their fleet to defend their own coasts. Ruiter is expected back in April, and twenty-four new ships will be ready in May. Although the English say that they will have the better of us in everything they know full well that they will have to share fear with us.
Commander Banckert, who has been at sea with twelve ships, on hearing that seven English ships were off the coast of Scotland, returned, but found nothing.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.140. From London, the 5th March, 1665.
The king having intimated his intention to parliament, which is not to dismiss it for some days, they are now showing exceptional activity in perfecting the bills which they have under consideration at the moment. On Monday last a bill was read in parliament to obviate the delays that usually occurred in suits, to put off the sentence for a long time and to avoid the execution of the same. On the following day they passed another bill to prevent petty actions and malicious suits. For judicial reform twelve persons have been chosen and sworn, to examine the question of fact and to report thereon to the judges, in accordance with which they will subsequently pass sentence. But because these jurors have frequently been corrupted by bribes, parliament is trying by this bill to remedy this disorder by imposing heavy penalties and imprisonment during the king's pleasure on those jurors who accept money from the litigants. (fn. 6)
The superb embassy which the Most Christian king has decided to send to this Court in order to mediate a reconciliation between his Britannic Majesty and the United Provinces, provides material for much discussion and speculation here about the issue of this embassy. Some believe that it is to contrive a happy end and that the king has prolonged parliament on purpose to render himself more absolute in treating, and possibly to conclude the adjustment with the United Provinces. But others, with no less understanding of public affairs, are of opinion that the king, having several times promised parliament not to conclude this peace except with honour and advantage to the nation, will never consent to make it in the absence of parliament, except upon terms that the Dutch are unlikely to grant. On the other hand, if one considers the interposition of the Most Christian together with the friends whom the Dutch have in the royal Council here, and among others the chancellor and treasurer, both with strong leanings towards such a composition and very desirous of it, one may reasonably hope for it, in the event of the Dutch giving such satisfaction as may clear his Majesty of the imputation laid upon him by some who are anxious to have a rupture with Holland, that his purpose was to obtain from his parliament the grant of a tax of 10 millions of crowns and once he has got that, that he intends to make the adjustment without any advantage for the English nation.
The last letters from Tanger report the garrison to be in excellent condition and that considerable succours have recently reached them both of men and of provisions.
Here they continue steadily beating up for volunteer soldiers to serve in the fleet, and it is said that in this way they have finally raised two companies for that service.
The Earl of Sandwich continues with his fleet off the coast of Holland but we do not hear that he has done anything more except cause apprehension to the people there and take two ships of little value. The Admiralty here continues to sit three times a week, and in the present week they have newly confiscated twelve Dutch craft with their cargoes for his Majesty's benefit.
[Italian, from the French.]
March 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
141. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Most Christian king is making no effort to bestir himself with respect to what the consequences may be of an open rupture between England and Holland in the coming campaign, both parties being extraordinarily busy with their preparations. King Charles has already written that it is not necessary for the Sieur de Vernuil to bring furnishings with him as the palace of Whitehall will be capable of receiving him. But now his Majesty declares that on the point of mediation it will be useless to make haste and because the Dutch understand that the crown is sensible of the wrongs received without any reparation being made. The Swede who came from Guinea has been convicted of having been bribed with money to publish falsely the reports about the barbarities committed by Ruiter, and King Charles hay ordered that the rascal shall be punished as an example. Nevertheless last week M. Vernuil had orders to prepare his equipage for London and M. de Courtin also. But they will not leave until after Easter. It is noteworthy that they have not even passed a complimentary office with Lord Holles. The enclosed sheets will give particulars.
A leading English nobleman and Catholic, Lord Carinthon, who was living here at Pontoise, to pass the rest of his days peacefully in the true faith, has been barbarously murdered in his bed these last days by an old servant of his, a Liegois. The villain acted out of revenge, because he had been beaten by his master, no less than to rob him of a large amount of money. He was immediately pursued and fell into the hands of justice when crossing the frontier. The day before yesterday, on the self-same spot, he was broken alive on the wheel and then burned, still alive, in order that a crime of which no one remembers the like, may be punished in a manner for which there is no example. (fn. 7)
Paris, the 20th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.142. From the Hague, the 12th March, 1665.
It is seen that no help is to be expected. It is of no use for the extraordinary ambassadors to come here, because both of them are in the confidence of the British king and this state would not trust its interests to them. For the same reason no ambassador will be sent to England to inform them. The Court of France understands its own interests. This is a conjuncture which might change the interests of all the princes of Europe. It has been decided to order Van Bouninghen not to insist so much in France about the succour any longer, but this does not prevent the belief that France will have to do something more than she is actually doing.
In England it is certain that they are greatly incensed against Douning who is the stoker (battifoco) of the war and who has committed his king, making him believe that this state will not take up the interests of the company of the Indies, that Friesland and Groningen would not consent to the war and that Zeeland would be embarrassed because of the interests of the prince of Orange; but he has been deceived in this as well as in the affair of Ruiter. Last Friday he said to a member of the States that it was lamentable to see these two nations about to cut each other's throats about the explanation of the phrase poursuivre le proces entamé, (fn. 8) while their neighbours would get all the profit out of it and would laugh at their folly. As a matter of fact there is a disposition in England towards an accommodation and I believe further that they will accept the mediation of France.
The King of Sweden has answered the letter in which this state asked succour of him by virtue of the treaty of alliance. He says that though Sweden has been most punctual in the execution of its treaties, he does not know if so much can he said of this state. He concludes that he does not say this by way of reproach, but that he will not fail to execute the treaty after right has been done to him.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.143. From London, the 12th March, 1665.
The king has recently published his declaration against the Dutch. (fn. 9) In this he sets forth that they were the first aggressors, and that being unable to obtain any satisfaction for the depredations and injuries done to his subjects, he simply issued orders for the seizure of ships belonging to the states of the United Provinces without any commission or letters of reprisal, until he received certain information that Ruiter had carried out his commission at Guinea by stopping English ships and goods. Judging from these fresh injuries and from their great preparations for war that they were resolved to maintain by force what they had done against all right, his Majesty has accordingly declared, with the advice of his Council that all the fleets and ships of his Britannic Majesty and all other ships which are commissioned by the Duke of York, may lawfully engage, conquer and take all ships, vessels and goods belonging to the said States or to their subjects.
The publication of such a declaration at this conjuncture when they are expecting a sumptuous embassy from France to mediate an adjustment, gives rise to various comments and speculations at this Court. Some predict an evil issue to the embassy in question, presuming that his Majesty is too irritated by the manifold injuries done to him by the Dutch, to allow of an adjustment upon easy terms. But others whose disposition, possibly, is rather malicious than political, contend that this declaration has only been published to keep the people in hope and delude them, when they were beginning, upon the reports of an embassy from France to mediate this adjustment, to give credence to the lies of the fanatics, to wit, that his Majesty was causing himself to be invited by the Most Christian to an adjustment, so that he might be able with the better grace to put in his pocket the ten million crowns granted him by parliament for the purpose of this war. But in spite of all this persons of more modesty and considerable intelligence conclude with good cause that his Majesty is so jealous of his own honour and so sensible of the interests of his people that he will never consent to a reconciliation with the Dutch except upon terms very advantageous to himself and to the English nation.
In parliament they are still actively engaged in perfecting the bills touching the laws which they have under consideration, so that the king may give his assent to them before the prorogation.
A certain Dutchman for having falsely affirmed and sworn before the king and his Council of State, that he had recently come from Guinea and had there seen the total destruction of the English, (fn. 10) Ruiter having had as many as 1500 of them thrown into the sea, has been publicly whipped through the streets and is to have his ears cropped. This falsehood made such an impression upon the people at first that they were planning to avenge their countrymen by assassinating the Dutch in this city, to such a point that his Majesty was obliged to afford a guard to the Dutch ambassador for his personal defence. But this rascal, after being closely questioned, with threats, in case his assertion proved false, confessed the truth that he had invented the lie in order to receive a reward from this court, and by this confession all the rage of the people was turned against this malicious and miserable liar.
The king and Council have heard and they say with scant satisfaction, from the Earl of Carlisle of his treatment in Muscovy, where, besides many insults and affronts put upon him he was in danger of his life from having refused a present sent to him by the duke there. It is said that a vote was taken if he deserved death or no for this refusal, and that only three votes were against it. What will be the end of this affair cannot yet be discovered. This much is certain that the envoy of Muscovy here has not yet obtained any reception or ceremonial audience, and so far as he has been heard as a private individual he is looked on with great disfavour by his Majesty. (fn. 11)
[Italian, from the French.]
March 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
144. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
War against Holland was proclaimed in London last week. This much has stimulated his Majesty to cause the two ambassadors extraordinary to start at once, not merely to obviate the threatening evils but to avoid prejudice to himself in his declaration about appointing them, since if the two parties had been inclined to treat and to agree by themselves, the Dutch cannot refuse on their side to accept the mediation of France when the royal ministers are actually engaged, and it is supposed that a like honour cannot be denied by that crown to this one. Meanwhile, that is on Saturday, the king sent an express to England with a request for the release of a French ship which left Rooan for Dunkirk, and was taken by the English who inflicted unheard of torture on the sailors to force them to confess that the goods were of Holland. (fn. 12) So this first example which seems an effect of the sovereignty of the sea, intimated and claimed in some words of the sheet, is by no means well received at this Court and might make them change the style they have hitherto adopted.
The parliament there is irritated not less by seeing the requests for reparation for so many injuries constantly put aside than by the procedure of the Dutch, as well in denying the facts as by the words used, so wounding for the dignity of the crown and the reputation of its representatives, especially in the last paper, which has been printed, in which they, contend that the list which sets these forth is trifling. (fn. 13) Hence it happens that with the idea widespread and believed in Great Britain that the States are making every preparation but that they will never dare to come out with their fleets and because of the opinion judiciously promulgated that henceforward the United Provinces will begin to tire and to turn away from so hurtful un object as a naval war, because the elements there without the trade are not vital for them, it is to be feared that the English will hold on more pertinaciously than ever. And all this prejudices enormously the approaching conclusion of this very perilous affair, which was hoped for. It is also opposed to the interests of Christendom, since all these great forces united and turned against the common enemy might produce all the benefits that the imagination of man could conceive, as apart from the memory of the last war of Philip II with Queen Elizabeth no such armament has been seen upon the Ocean.
King Charles frequently amuses himself at Portsmouth in viewing his ships and especially the Royal Sovereign, recently built, which is claimed to be the finest and handiest craft that ever went to sea.
An unfortunate mishap has occurred on the Thames to a royal ship, as by negligence or fatality the powder magazine caught fire and the ship blew up with 300 men on board who all perished. (fn. 14)
Paris, the 27th March, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.145. From the Hague, the 19th March, 1665.
It is hoped that Ruiter will very soon make himself talked about. They have no idea here of having military leaders brought from France or from anywhere else. The fleets will not begin to act before April. A truce cannot be negotiated now because it is worse to languish than to heal a disease by the letting of blood. It is necessary for the English to learn what the Dutch are able to do. England has published a decree that all ships carrying goods of this country will be confiscated with the goods found therein. This shows that they mean to search all ships and to remain the sole arbiters of trade. It is not known if France will understand it this way or if Spain, Sweden and Denmark will consent to it, but if they do they ought not to object to the Dutch doing the same thing.
It is reported that all the ships of Amsterdam are ready; also that Tromp has gone to anchor at the Texel on hearing that the English proposed to enter the port to prevent the junction of our fleets. The Council of State has asked for an extraordinary fund of 800,000 crowns to build twenty-four more ships.
M. Courtin (sic), the French ambassador in Denmark, has been to see the resident of this state, (fn. 15) and told him that he had orders from his king to declare to the King of Denmark his intention to carry out the treaty between France and this state, and that he will declare himself so soon as the result of the embassy, which is just leaving, is known. His minister in Denmark is further to ask the king there to carry out his alliance with this state. This has caused great satisfaction here, but they would wish for something more.
Douning will be leaving very soon. He has offered his house to a person of rank and a member of parliament has asked one of his friends to send something bought in this city by Douning.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.146. From London, the 19th March, 1665.
On Friday last the king gave his assent to two acts of parliament for the reform of certain laws and to another to give powers to the governor and aldermen of London to establish and reduce the price of coal in this city, (fn. 16) which, at the first rumour of war with Holland at first doubled and then tripled, to the great distress of the poor people here, many of whom died for lack of fuel in this severe season. The king then prorogued parliament until the 21st June next.
They are displaying more activity than ever not only in filling up the ships already built with sailors, soldiers, munitions and other provisions, but also in augmenting the numbers of the fleet by changing many merchant vessels into ships of war and in building some new frigates. They continue to press the watermen of the river here. Of troops they have a sufficiency with the volunteers and other levies from the established regiments. To give his support and to encourage the fleet his Majesty went on Tuesday in person to Portsmouth to give the final orders necessary for this great enterprise against the Dutch. His Majesty is most determined to press them with the utmost vigour and will no longer consider any negotiations for an adjustment unless they previously consent to give the English a town as a pledge for the fulfilment of the terms contained in the treaty.
On Wednesday last nine other Dutch ships were condemned by the commissioners of the Admiralty as lawful prizes and these ships with their cargoes were ordered to be sold at Portsmouth.
Letters from Holland report that the States have at length decided to dismiss and let go the English and Scottish regiments, and this is to be carried out on the 21st March. The officers alone may be readmitted, on condition that they take an oath to be faithful to the States General and to the States of the respective provinces under which they serve, and to recognise the States as their sovereign lords, to the exclusion of all others. They must also declare if they have ever given an oath of fealty to the King of Great Britain and those who are free will be adjudged capable of serving their lordships. The letters further state that it has been decided to build twenty-four new ships of war, and they are making every possible effort to be at sea before the English with a considerable fleet.
We have this morning received the sad news of the loss of a frigate named the London at Chattam, through the magazine taking fire, which caused it to blow up with all the sailors. They say that there were from two to three hundred men on board and the loss is the more considerable because it was one of the largest ships of the fleet. (fn. 17) However, they hope to recover the guns.
[Italian, from the French.]
Enclosure.147. The Court at Whitehall, the 22nd February, 1664. (fn. 18)
Declaration of the king touching his proceedings for reparation and satisfaction for several injuries inflicted by the East and West India Companies.
Signed: Richard Brown.
[English.]

Footnotes

1 He had been committed to the Tower on the 9th January because of the Dutch complaints. Pepys: Diary, Vol. iv., page 327. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5. pp. 170, 235.
2 Sir Edward Turner. His speech is printed in Journals of the House of Lords, Vol. xi., page 654.
3 On Feb. 10th it was resolved that a summons be sent to the Lord St. John and Mr. Henry Seymour to require them at their peril to attend the service of the House the next morning. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. viii., page 599.
4 Sir John Owen. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5, pp. 236, 295.
5 He was whipped round the Exchange on 25th February, old style. He confessed that he was not a Swede but a Hollander. The Intelligencer, Feb. 27th. In Van Gogh's despatch of the 9th March his name is given as John Petersen. S.P. Holland, Vol. clxxv.
6 A bill for regulating some proceedings in Courts of Equity was read a first time on 20th February, o.s. The bill for regulating juries was re-committed on the following day. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. viii., pp. 606, 607.
7 Charles Smith, baron Carrington of Wotton, murdered on 3rd March, n.s. According to the Newes of 16th March, o.s., the murderer was executed on Tuesday, 17th March. See G.E.C. Complete Peerage, rev. ed., Vol. ii., pp. 65–6. Herald and Genealogist, Vol. iii., pp. 62–3.
8 Litem inceptam prosequi in the treaty, touching the ships Bona Esperanza and Bonaventura.
9 On 22nd February, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5, page 214.
10 The Dutchman who pretended to be a Swede and who was whipped on 25th February, old style, See page 85 above.
11 Writing on the 16th March van Gogh says “The ambassador of Muscovy, at present at this Court, who for some time hath been discontented because his charges were not defrayed, seems now to be better satisfied, his Majesty having appointed him a sum of money after he had made some nearer presentation to his Majesty concerning the free trade for the English Muscovite Company.” S.P. Holland, Vol. clxxiv.
12 A reply by commissioners to the Ambassador Comenge of 24th March refers to charges of torturing and plunder against the commander of the Jersey frigate. S.P. France, Vol. cxx.
13 Probably an allusion to the Dutch answer to Downing's memorial of 30th December. It is printed at length in Aitzema, dated 9th February: Saken van Staet en Oorlogh, Vol. v., pp. 356–68.
14 The London which blew up near the Nore on 7th March, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5, pp. 245, 249. Pepys: Diary, Vol. iv., page 368.
15 Jacob le Maire. Niew Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek, Vol. viii., 1097. The French ambassador was Terlon.
16 An act for regulating the assize and measure of wood and coal.
17 The London was of 1050 tons and 64 guns, built in 1656. Oppenheim: Administration of the Royal Navy, pp. 336–7. The accident occurred near the Nore.
18 Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5, page 214.