Venice
October 1665

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1933

Pages

206-218

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: October 1665', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 34: 1664-1666 (1933), pp. 206-218. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90170 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

October 1665

Oct. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
269. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Very serious news was published the day before yesterday of another battle between the English and Dutch fleets with a greater victory for the English than in the last one. I enclose notes received from the English ambassador and Borel. It is established that after long and weighty consultations they have decided to assist the Dutch against the Bishop of Munster, and this decision was taken immediately after they knew for certain about this fight.
Paris, the 2nd October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.270. Lord Holles to the Ambassador Sagredo.
This Thursday at midday. I have had no news since I had the honour of seeing your Excellency yesterday, only the rumours which are circulating in the city, which are, at the moment, all to our advantage. The queen came here yesterday after you had gone and merely told me that they were assured at Court that we had had great advantages over the Dutch, but the particulars were not known. The Earl of St. Albans who called at the embassy later told me the same, and I have just seen a gentleman who showed me a letter from Holland of the 24th which confirms that there is great consternation there from having lost thirty-seven ships. This was before the battle. The same gentleman also told me that M. di Turena had told him this morning that a great battle had taken place and that the Dutch had suffered a great reverse. That is what I hear, but I do not count upon anything except what comes to me. As soon as I know something I shall not fail to impart it to your Excellency since you do me the honour to believe me.
[Italian; copy.]
Enclosure.271. From the Hague, the 1st October, 1665.
It is quite certain that the manner of the convoy of Ruiter is magnificent, but he cannot do the impossible with the winds and the sea, which have been against him. The opinion formed in France that the English will be compelled to make peace on reasonable terms has no basis up to the present because the intentions of this State do not incline to consent to an adjustment unless it is made upon the proposals which the ambassadors extraordinary of France have made, because they will not be received in any other way. With regard to the guarantee the king cannot give a more essential one than that which he granted in the treaty of 1662 and so that consideration will not make us change our course. Here they cannot persuade themselves that France can preserve the friendship of the King of England and that of the States by declaring or not declaring himself, since it is difficult for the king to preserve the friendship of England by declaring and by succouring this republic against the Bishop of Munster, who is an ally of the English king, because they have promised not to treat the one without the other. And although it seems there is no sign of their enlisting troops in France in this present season, yet his Majesty has assured Sig. Bouninghen, who has sent an express here on the subject, that he will send a considerable succour to the States against the bishop, which would be useless if it did not arrive before the spring, and those who have the administration of the finances in France are too good economists to make a useless levy which would no longer be in time.
The opinion of those who believe that in secret there is some arrangement with the English to make peace with the mediation of France only in appearance, when parliament has assembled at Oxford, and that a certain personage on behalf of the English has conferred with M. de Wit is a chimera. Those who know the constitution of these States are aware that it does not permit any one to enter upon such negotiations without being accompanied by two other deputies of the States General and this cannot be done without express order from the superiors. With regard to the consequences that would ensue if peace were made, that England and these States would be relieved of a great expense and this will cause great terror to the corsairs and would contribute much to the adjustment between Spain and Portugal, they are unquestionable results.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
272. Giovanni Cornaro, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
Letters from Brussels bear out the report of the arrival of a gentleman sent by the King of England to this Court, (fn. 1) the forms of honour and esteem with which the Marquis of Castel Rodrigo has received him, the curiosity about the business which he is bringing, which is not discovered. With the Court and ministers far away we hear no more and must await his arrival.
Vienna, the 4th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
273. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The English have captured twenty-five Dutch ships since the 1st inst. by the admission of Van Beuninghen himself. The fleet remains exposed and the rest of the mercantile craft are not yet in safety. The general situation increases the difficulties of the weaker party, for it is foreseen that the pretensions of the British crown will rise in proportion with its successes. The enclosed sheets give particulars.
Paris, the 6th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
274. Francesco Bianchi, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The English resident came to complain to me about the gazettes, printed so he said, at Venice, full of lies and amounting to an infamous libel against his king who had read it and directed him to make a remonstrance. He was greatly astonished that from a quarter with which he has such good relations such unsupported things, prejudicial to his crown should be tolerated. To prove his king's consideration for the most serene republic he confided to me that when parliament pointed out to his Majesty that there was no corresponding benefit derived from sending yearly more than 800,000 reals to the state of your Serenity for the purchase of currants, without a single one being employed in England for the export of merchandise he had replied that they ought not to consider this because being in friendship with the Turk and not being able in consequence to supply succour openly to your Excellencies, by permitting the purchase of currants he fulfilled the obligations of his friendship and entered in part for the support of the war while promoting the benefit of trade.
I told him that the gazettes had the Venetian imprint but they were undoubtedly written and printed in this city. Nothing offensive would be allowed at Venice, least of all against a king so much esteemed by the republic. With regard to the exportation of goods I said it ought not to be imputed to the prince if his subjects preferred to get what they needed from other states, but on the character of the states themselves, more or less provided with the things needed, and that in Venice many things were sold which come from no other place than England. He said the gazette was headed Venice and he personally was ready to believe that this was the act of the printer to get credit, but his king could not be persuaded that it was not printed there. He gave me two copies of those issued these last weeks, also full of lies, which I forward with the parts marked of which complaint is made.
After he had gone I sent for the printer who told me that the news of France, England and Holland was supplied by two French merchants; that for the printing he answers up to 400 crowns a year and that by order of the Grand Duke they are reviewed by the Senator Fabrici so that there may be nothing against France before they are issued. He could not say why they were headed “Venice” except that it was the custom of the printer who had received permission to print twenty years before his time. I gave all this information to the English resident who promised to write to England to explain the matter.
Florence, the 10th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.275. Gazettes headed Venice, with the objectionable passages marked, to wit:
12th September, 1665. Spread of the plague in London. Over 3000 dead and at Salisbury it has begun to attack the persons of the Court, the Duke of Buckingham, the Duchess of Richmond, Lord Castelmen and others having died; so the Court is withdrawing to Oxford. The Duke of York has left the fleet and gone to Edinburgh to put down a rising.
Venice, 12th September. Arrest of Lord Morfil, who has been sent to the Tower on the suspicion of intelligence with the Dutch ambassador Gog and a share in the conspiracy in Scotland. The lieutenant there is also imprisoned and they are on the track of other conspirators. Fortune is beginning to turn to the side of the Dutch who, rejoiced by two defeats of the enemy, have arranged a fast day to render thanks. An account follows of the repulse of the English fleet at Berg under the Earl of Sandwich and Thomas Tiddelmans, two ships being sunk and over 600 killed; the Dutch only losing twenty killed and eighty wounded; also of a fight between General Ruiter and the largest fleet of England of which they sunk fifteen and chased the rest to a port of Sweden, subsequently capturing two English ships from the Indies, richly laden.
[Italian.]
Oct. 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
276. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The situation between the northern powers, in spite of the action at sea and the ravages of the plague in England seems to be steadily becoming more and more difficult and consequently more perilous to Christendom. His Majesty has decided to help the Dutch against the Bishop of Munster, because otherwise they could not hope for the help expected against the British crown. I fancy that the action of France depends on what the Swedes may do. On Thursday the king sent the courier Airon to Germany, it is supposed in order to make proposals for the purpose of detaching the Swedes from the Bishop of Munster, which means separating them from England, to be effected by the outlay of a considerable sum of money, which is all ready at Amsterdam, Hamburg and other places. Airon is to go on to Vienna to complain of the help given from there to Munster.
A warship of the Duke of Beaufort has been driven by a storm or some other accident and has arrived in Plymouth where it has been detained as a prize. On Saturday the king sent an express to the British Court on some very important mission. It is not known whether this is because of the meeting of parliament at Oxford, for instructions to the ambassadors about mediation, or because of suspicion of the British ambassador at Vienna. The point is that all deliberations weigh upon them and until the issue of the campaign, which cannot be considered as terminated before both the fleets have returned to their ports, they are in a state of great apprehension as to the expedients which will have to be taken on this side.
Encloses the sheets giving particulars.
Paris, the 13th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.277. From the Hague, the 8th October, 1665.
Of the East India ships three only have arrived at Flie; one in the Elbe before Glukstat, where it is unlading and the four others with some merchant ships are still scattered in various ports of Norway and elsewhere. Since Sunday the Vice-Admiral of North Holland, Hutuin, has brought in ten warships which were in Norway and the Vice-Admiral of Friesland is still in the Sound with six other ships; and the day before yesterday our fleet was reinforced with seven great ships which came out of Texel the day before. That fleet left Gorea on Monday morning the 5th inst. and towards evening it was sighted along these coasts, where it appeared on the next day also. It is not known yet whether it has gone to seek the English, who on Saturday were near Margate, at the mouth of the river of London. Our fleet will go there to look for them and to convoy the other ships of the Indies and meet the Smyrna fleet which left Cadiz on the 28th August with a convoy of four ships of war and has in its company some ships which laded in Spain for more than eight millions in silver bars.
We still hope to do something with Sweden where they continue to profess that they desire to renew the ancient friendship and good understanding with these states, which creates the impression that that crown has made nothing more than a simple commercial treaty with England. Their troops are marching from Pomerania to the Duchy of Bremen and here it is believed that they will take up their quarters in East Friesland, so that the bishop may not enter it and perhaps with the design to capture the town of Embdem and to fortify Grietzel, under the pretext of forestalling the imperialists who might have the same design. Here it is said that the widowed empress will come into the Low Countries to take possession of them in the name of the emperor and the infanta and that the Count of Serino will accompany her with 15,000 men. However this may be there is every appearance of the beginning of a great war in which all the princes of Europe will have their part, unless there is some one to keep the English busy or to create an internal diversion for them.
The King of Denmark had caused it to be written here that he would send two ambassadors to England and to these states, and he had already nominated them; but he seems to have changed his mind since the arrival at Copenhagen of a fresh envoy from England, (fn. 2) and he will follow the movements and opinions with which France will inspire him, as he is bound to consider the Swedes, his neighbours, and so we do not put ourselves about much here. Some believe here that France is so far the mistress of the affairs and counsels of Portugal that the Portuguese will not venture to treat with Spain except with their consent; but the ministers of the House of Austria think the contrary and believe that peace will be made within a very short time, if it is not made already.
Our fleet consists at present of ninety-five good ships of war, among which there are some which carry eighty-four, eighty-two, seventy-six, and sixty-eight pieces of bronze ordnance, and they are going straight to seek the English.
Paris, the 13th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
278. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Two items of news are published here, but I believe them false.
The truth is, however, that after the return to the point of Norway of both fleets and the convoys, or the departure of so many powerful ships of war and rich merchantmen, the royal ships, up to this day, have taken thirty-five ships from Holland with the burning, by misfortune, of a single English one. That King Charles with the Duke of York, united in their wishes and determination at Oxford, finding a corresponding spirit and vigour in the parliament, are thinking of anything rather than of giving anything away by conditions of peace, which they propose to have arranged in accordance with their great aims. They thus incline with more determination than ever that these shall include the re-establishment of the Prince of Orange, in regulating commerce beyond the line, in recognising the sovereignty of Britain over the fishing which infers an absolute dominion at sea, and they end by demanding reparation and prompt satisfaction for the injuries suffered by the king's subjects, for which they insist on the costs of the war.
The English are absolutely opposed to seeing France interested in the adjustment. To keep Denmark loyal, that is to say at least neutral, a person has been sent thither again from England, furnished with what is required. They have no doubts or mistrust about the crown of Sweden following their designs, and detaching itself absolutely from France. With the plague beginning to diminish in London this week, with 1800 deaths, and considering the necessity for the Dutch to have the sea route free, the parliamentarians become more and more determined to see the attainment of their designs by supporting the Bishop of Munster and doing the worst that they know. It has been noticed here that the gentleman sent as envoy by that prince had several conferences with Lord Holles, and particular communication with the Spanish ambassador as well, as distinguished from the other ministers, whom he did not visit.
The relations between the two Courts are also becoming a little strained, the English being determined to aim at nothing less than the reduction of Holland. Your Serenity knows that the Most Christian has never given satisfaction to the English ambassador for the wrong done by the men of the Princess of Carignano to the coaches, horses and lackeys of his wife when she was going to the Louvre in the company of Madame, when the gentleman sent by Carignano with some excuse, three days after the accident, was refused a hearing by the ambassadress, who was then in bed in great pain from a fall. When asked if he wished to speak to the ambassador, he said No. Accordingly Lord Holles, who had no part at first in the affair, is now beginning to take offence, for the reason that when his wife has been insulted, his servants in the livery of King Charles beaten, his own horses struck in the face, a gentleman sent to offer apologies refuses to speak with him, when he protests that the lackeys of the Most Christian king himself could not attack those of a minister of King Charles in Paris; and Holles maintains that if he was here merely as a private gentleman he would claim satisfaction for such an affront from the Princess of Carignano herself.
When Giro came to the ambassador's house the day before yesterday to justify the action he did even worse, because he wished to be given the attributes of a princess of the blood, and Lord Holles said haughtily that no prince of the blood should set foot before him, and so, instead of this difference being appeased the dispute between the parties is inflamed.
Further, a Norman gentleman named Baglieul, a French subject, (fn. 3) armed a privateer for the King of England, and finding a Dutch vessel on the coasts of the kingdom, he landed to find a way of surprising it, possibly from private reasons. This may perhaps have been his intention, but things did not turn out as he had intended. Baglieul himself with six young gentlemen volunteers, his comrades, also French, were taken prisoner on land and brought to Havre de Grace, to stand their trial. The ambassador spoke to Liona, representing that if so many Frenchmen served the Dutch as volunteers the British crown did not make a grievance of it when it had at its disposition a royal ship of France. His king was always allied with them and with the best relations. He protested that if anything happened to Baglieul, who is said to have been already condemned to death, he would not undertake to answer for the consequences that might ensue, because of 6000 prisoners whom they have in England there may possibly be 2000 Frenchmen. Liona answered that the trial or the sentence, which is the same thing, reported that Baglieul had taken three commissions. Lord Holles was able to show that the commission from King Charles was one also for the fulfilment of which Baglieul had given pledges here to the ambassador of 1000 Jacobus, and he might well excuse himself that to balance the numbers who serve the States for pay and as volunteers, one alone, who sought employment had been occupied for the British crown. Liona admitted the fact but found that he had three sorts of flags. The ambassador claims that everyone who privateers at sea does this.
What will be decided at Court here has not yet been announced, but the issue of these two apparently trifling affairs, at their beginning, may produce much, as the ambassador affects to scoff when they speak to him about the present movement of the forces and of the best regiments of France, who are being marched off on the pretext that they are directed against the Bishop of Munster alone. According to his instructions from London his Excellency pretends that they will not give way on any account notwithstanding all the resolutions which may be taken here.
Paris, the 16th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
279. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
I have learned from a confidant at Cadiz that they proceed with scant circumspection at that port in admitting merchant ships from London, which come full of goods of all kinds. I impart this information to your Excellencies not because of any sickness at Cadiz, but from the great danger that it may be introduced there.Tanger is experiencing the penalty of the same neglect for they say that the infection has spread to that place through communication and is working great havoc.
Madrid, the 16th October, 1665.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
280. To the Resident at Florence.
Acknowledge his letters of the 10th inst. containing his conversation with the English resident touching the matter printed against his king. Commend his reply. He is to express the Senate's strong feeling about the circumstance and their displeasure that the name of Venice is being used on these prints. Without committing the state he should speak with some one whom he considers suitable so that this manner of printing with the heading of Venice may be given up, and send a report of what he does in the matter.
Ayes, 93. Noes, 8. Neutral, 6.
[Italian.]
Oct. 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
281. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
Some lackeys of the English ambassador have been arrested for going with the scabbards of their swords open, contrary to the recent edict. The ambassador complained of the affront to Medina, but his men have not been released. An alcalde passing the embassy with a staff in his hand, as a sign of authority, was attacked by the household and the staff was taken away. The alcalde complained to the ambassador, who ordered that the staff should be detained. The ambassador then decided to send it to Medina, attributing the event to the ardour of his servants. The royal Council has discussed the matter and a process is being drawn up which may be sent to London. But here with circumstances as they are, they will not proceed to take severe steps, as would have been done in other days. There is a lack of resentment against the powerful when one is destitute of the strength to assert oneself.
Madrid, the 21st October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
282. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
I went to see the English ambassador and told him of the design of the common enemy to use Christian ships to transport Turkish troops to Candia and asked him to inform his king so that this might be prevented. He promised to report it at once to the secretary of state. He asked me if I was making similar representations to others and more particularly to France. I answered Yes and that M. di Liona would doubtless issue instructions to refuse such aid to the barbarians. I also saw the Dutch ambassador, who promised to write at once to the Hague.
Paris, the 23rd October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
283. Francesco Bianchi, Venetian Resident in Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
I have had occasion to assure the English resident again about the false news in the gazettes. In return for this satisfaction he told me in confidence, as if coming from himself, that his king considered himself offended with the most serene republic from the manner in which it deals with him, so different from what was practised in times past with his predecessors. It had been the custom to keep an ambassador in ordinary in London. Now there was no one, though the republic had observed the ancient style with a rebel.
I thanked him for the confidence and showed him that there was no reason for offence; assuring him of the state's desire for the best correspondence with that crown. I could not give him the reasons for the sending of an embassy extraordinary to London before his Majesty occupied the throne, as I was absent from the city at the time in the service of the state. I could only say that the Signory followed the example of other crowns, and no news ever gave greater satisfaction at Venice than that of his Majesty's restoration. It has not tarried in showing this as was shown by the embassy extraordinary and the choice of an ambassador in ordinary. He said that the non-arrival of the ambassador chosen and his release from his charge was the principal cause of his Majesty's annoyance, who, to correspond, had appointed a nobleman to go as ambassador to your Serenity and had even caused him to cross the sea, to continue his journey when Sig. Mocenigo moved. The same course had been followed with other crowns to whom he had not sent his minister before receiving an ordinary accredited to the king. In reply I said that there was nothing unusual in the republic releasing an ambassador, as it happened every day and should not cause offence.
Florence, the 24th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
284. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
We are in expectation of a second engagement between the two naval forces. The Dutch fleet has gone out with every determination to attack the royal one, even in its own ports, and advanced to within sight of Haruich but being driven back by bad weather it had steered for the open sea, but stopped at anchor off the coasts of England to await a fight with the English or to blockade the royal force in the Thames, after the model of what the Duke of York first taught them could be done before Texel. Since it is quite certain that the English will never refuse the invitation it is clear that we only have to await the issue with the other decisive consequences of a new battle.
Mons. di Wight, the pensionary of Holland, who has concerned himself so deeply in all the negotiations, to such a point that he might have come to an agreement under four eyes, as the saying goes, with the Councillor Doueningh, and omitted to do so for a small sum of ready money which the royal minister claimed in addition, as I intimated and as has been again confirmed to me on good authority, is now said, by his ardour or excessive presumption to have brought the affairs of the Provinces to such extremity that at present great discords will be excited in that democratic government, so different in interests and passions, unless some favourable event makes amends. As he presides over the fleet, by order of the States General and knows that everything depends upon another experiment, it is believed or feared that he will hazard everything rather than return to Texel with loss of credit and reputation. In the mean time King Charles, supported by parliament, in the first session held at Oxford, instead of lowering his pretensions, told the ambassadors of the Most Christian that the States General had not chosen to make peace, since not content with having injured so many merchants, subjects of the crown, they never cease outraging the nation and offending his Majesty himself by promoting sedition in Scotland, for which, by the royal order, a leading gentleman had been arrested at Edinbourgh, in reward for services rendered. (fn. 4)
That is the first point. The second consists in this, that Baglieul, a French gentleman who armed for the king of England, has been ignominiously hanged at Caen in Normandy. (fn. 5) His comrade has been sentenced to arm, at his own expense, for five years, a ship of war in the service of his natural lord; the officers are condemned to the galleys. When the Ambassador Holles heard the news he said that this was one of the provisions against England. And indeed I have seen three letters written by the ambassador on the subject to M. di Liona, expressing the wishes of King Charles, which point to untoward consequences.
Paris, the 27th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
285. Alvise Sagredo, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
It is uncertain what declaration Sweden will make to the pressing instances of the King of France, after having received satisfaction for her ancient credits with this crown, because King Charles, in the alliance lately established, persuades them that they are constant and unchangeable, in spite of any offers from this quarter.
The Dutch who believed, with a prudent and courageous deliberation to come nearer to peace and to gain an advantage by pushing their own fleet forward and planting their anchors audaciously in several places in sight of England, as I reported, and as is shown more particularly by the sheets which I could not send last week, have so stirred up the king and parliament, offended, to express their idea, by such a bravado, that though the large war ships had already been withdrawn to the Thames, as being dangerous to plough the sea during the autumn gales, and the usual winter fleet of about thirty light craft being left outside, the king, with unimagined ardour has ordered the re-arming of the ships and that they shall all go out to seek and fight the enemy. The latter is believed to have made this attempt in order to secure the fleets of Norway and Cadiz. Thus the Ambassador Vangoch, whom his Majesty had summoned to Oxford, with the intention of promoting with him some particular negotiation, seeing that the season besides every convenience agreed with this, is now in despair of any sort of good issue by way of negotiation.
The most extraordinary circumstance is that in spite of the havoc wrought by the plague still raging in London, with the absolute destruction of trade internally by the epidemic and externally by the war, the people are stirred to inveigh per- tinaciously against the ardour of the Provinces. Here I know that at the Louvre a parallel was drawn by some of the king's gentlemen, with regard to the long and glorious struggle main- tained by your Serenity against the common enemy. They said that the obstinacy of the States against the English only serves to irritate and to produce worse results. But constancy alone, not to speak of the attacks launched and continued by the generous hearts of your Excellencies against the Ottomans reduces those barbarians, but most cowardly spirits, to consternation, subdues their empty threats and false reports, for it is observed that the Turks are only insolent and bold when fortune smiles on them or the weakness of others yields to an arrogance foolishly feared.
It is stated that the Lord Chancellor Hyde has intercepted a letter of the Ambassador Courtin in which he informs his king that he has bribed some members of the Lower House for not contributing to this war, so he has complained bitterly about it to all the foreign ministers at that Court. If a statement is confirmed, made at the Louvre yesterday, by the Duke of Mercurio, now Duke of Vendosme, by succeeding to his father's title, namely that the Duke of Beaufort, his brother, now Duke of Mercurio for the same reason, met with three English ships in the Mediterranean, and as they would not dip their flags at sight of him he fired on them, sinking one and taking the other two, there will be no lack of graver quarrels between these two countries. On this emergency, however, the Most Christian has to-day sent off an express for London. The Ambassador Holles, under the plea of indisposition, keeps postponing his audience of the king to offer condolences on the death of the Catholic. (fn. 6)
Paris, the 30th October, 1665.
[Italian.]
Oct. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
286. To the Ambassador in France.
We enclose a copy of what the English resident with the Grand Duke said to our minister about our not sending an ambassador to that crown. Although we suppose that if such is the feeling at that Court they would have caused it to reach us in another way, yet we have sent this in case any one refers to the subject, for your illumination. You will also follow the instructions previously given which show our disposition to cultivate the best relations with that crown.
Confirmation of the order to express the confidence of the Senate that the King of England and the States will not allow the Turks to use the ships of their countrymen.
Ayes, 93. Noes, 8. Neutral, 6.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Theobald Taafe, Earl of Carlingford. He wrote from Brussels on 22nd September. S.P. Germany, States, Vol. lvi., and from Vienna on 6th January, 1600. S.P. Germany, Empire, Vol. xi. See also Cal. S.P. Dom, 1664–5, page 542.
2 Sir Thomas Clifford. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1604–3, page 535.
3 Jacques Morin, called Bailleul, a native of Honfleur. He had applied to Holles for a privateering commission under the English flag, and obtained it in April. He was captured in September, tried at Caen and condemned to be hanged on 12th October. Holles to Arlington on 18th Feb., 22nd April, 6th Sept., o.s. S.P. France, Vol. cxxi., where there is also an account of the trial.
4 Possibly Major General Monroe is intended. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1664–5, page 534. Lieut. Gen. Hepburn and Maj. Gen. Montgomery had also been arrested. Id., pp. 512, 514.
5 On the 12th October. See page 213 above.
6 Philip IV., who died on 17th September.