Venice
June 1666, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1935

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1-12

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'Venice: June 1666, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 35: 1666-1668 (1935), pp. 1-12. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90201 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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June 1666, 1–15

1666.
June 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
1. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Duke Mazzarini writes from Brittany that the English fleet has been sighted off the coasts of that province with a very large number of ships. In letters from private individuals we read that their numbers exceeded a hundred and forty; much firing was heard and several fires were seen. So the Court is filled with apprehension that a fight may have occurred with Boffort, unless it was the junction of another squadron with the fleet. Boffort runs great risks. He ought to have about seventy ships since the fifty with which he left Toulon should be joined by sixteen more which were at la Rochelle and by some others besides, scattered in different ports, which were waiting for him. It is estimated that there will be from 11,000 to 12,000 good soldiers in the fleet; but the ships are not all of the same condition. There may be 32 warships of the greatest size, well provided with guns. The others are of inferior condition, which have served for convoying merchantmen; but all are fitted and provided in the best manner.
They have caused this force to advance to the Ocean for the purpose of uniting it with the Dutch, and upon the word of these, orders were given to Boffort to hasten his move. But the Dutch still remain in port. Some weeks ago they made an announcement and even caused some ships of Ruiter to leave port, but subsequently they withdrew again to the Texel. They made this show to act as a spur for Boffort. Here they complain strongly about the procedure of the Dutch. Van Boninghen is looked at askance and if any disaster should happen to his Majesty's forces the Dutch would experience the royal indignation.
In the ducali of the 15th ult. I note the renewed instances of the merchants interested in the ship Salvator del Mondo et Anima del Purgatorio seized by English ships. Before I had passed any office by order of your Serenity the ship was condemned by sentence of the Admiralty at Oxford on 22nd January last. After the ambassador of England had been prayed to obtain its release he exerted himself to such purpose that the sentence of the Admiralty was annulled by his Majesty and his Excellency informed me of this by one of his gentlemen, as I wrote on the 16th March. I added that there would be some difficulties to which the king's secretary could not attend and so it was necessary to advise the interested parties. I advised the parties at Venice of everything and did the same to their correspondents at Amsterdam. They entrusted the affair to the Signori Geremia and Natanel Rovelli in London from whom I heard in letters of 26th April last that the plunderers of the ship in question claimed to be heard before the ship was released. His Britannic Majesty was pleased to choose certain commissioners to hear the parties and among them Arlington, first secretary of state, was appointed. I gave the English ambassador a full account of the whole affair, adding a fresh office to get him to renew his representation to his Majesty. He professed his readiness to write and added that as he would be arriving in London within a few days he would take steps personalty for the prompt and certain release of the ship. He said that the obstacles encountered were the usual formalities about all prize ships and that justice and every reason required that the ship should be released. I reported this to the Bonelli in England, intimating that it would be the safest course to protract the business until the arrival of Lord Hollis. I am still waiting for their reply.
Paris, the 1st June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
2. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
I paid a visit to the Swedish ambassador, Count Chinismarch. He told me in the strictest confidence that he had come to offer the king his mediation with England; that the Most Christian had promptly embraced the offer and that another ambassador had been sent by Sweden to England. Yet another was to proceed to Holland. There had been some difficulty about the place of meeting, but they had finally settled on Calais for the deputies of France, Holland, and Denmark, and on Dover for those of England, the Swedish mediators crossing to and fro. They are waiting for the arrival of the Swedish mediators (fn. 1) in England and Holland, and if the offer is accepted, as is hoped, negotiations will be opened. He did not know what Denmark would do about Swedish mediation, because they had declared war. I commended these efforts of Sweden in the interests of Christendom. The ambassador went on to speak of the military preparations of the hostile powers. He spoke of the forces of the English with great respect. He said that they had 112 great ships at sea up to the present time. They were thoroughly equipped and furnished with soldiers and provisions beyond what was necessary. General Monch and Prince Roberto had inspected them and finding four with some defect, the captains were dealt with severely. (fn. 2) He seemed to think poorly of the Dutch and spoke of them rather with contempt, referring to their inferiority to the English both in their forces and in their spirit. The latter were spirited, generous and military, the former mercantile and base, better fitted for fishing than for fighting, and this year France could not promise herself much from them. His feelings show the predominance of some prejudice and he seems to favour advantage for the English rather than for Holland.
Paris, the 1st June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
3. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The chief attention of the government is directed to the affairs of France and England. The fact that Munster has not been vigorously supported by England is an argument that they also are beginning to incline towards pacific resolutions… (fn. 3) observed the opening of the negotiations with England, although not easy to arrange, they fear and resent passion (si teme et resente passione). Once the agreement is made they foresee that the great forces assembled will not be allowed to disperse uselessly but will be employed to advantage. Upon such efforts some ministers wax warm, urging that peace is necessary with Portugal and an alliance with England herself, not allowing time for the transactions to be prejudiced, but to take it by the forelock and embrace the opportunity.
They affect to attach no importance to the ordinary ambassador of England. He exalts the power of his king as sufficient to fight alone against all and to carry off the victory. He has not tried to get any one to join forces with him or to prevent any from leaving him. In short, he speaks with pride and hauteur, affecting contempt where there is necessity.
Madrid, the 2nd June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
4. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The earl of Sandwich, ambassador extraordinary of England, entered this city late on Thursday. With three [coaches] (fn. 4) of the king the introducer of ambassadors accompanied by other gentlemen, met him three leagues out. He paid his respects on behalf of his Majesty and then caused the ambassador to enter one of the places and brought him to the house, gorgeously decorated with costly furnishings. That same evening they began to entertain him at a sumptuous banquet, those of the royal household serving. A hundred doubles a day have been set apart to provide everything with magnificence and splendour. He keeps seventeen companions at his table, persons of quality and of distinguished name. The rest of his people will amount to seventy persons. He is now arranging the liveries for his public audience and seems desirous of entering upon his embassy soon and beginning his functions.
He did not send the ordinary compliment to any ambassador when he arrived and no one wished to be the first with him. It seems very strange to the ambassador of Germany that he does not observe the usual style and ceremonies. I will watch to see what happens, to be guided by it later, in accordance with the decorum and service of the state. That same evening Medina sent one of his secretaries to congratulate him on his safe arrival, with expressions of regard for his person and character. I do not know whether any other minister has passed a similar office, but as it was rather affected than decorous I imagine that they will not follow the example.
The ordinary ambassador went two leagues out from Madrid to welcome him. It was noticed that at their first meeting few words were exchanged and they looked ill-pleased, an indication of very strained relations and an unfriendly disposition. The reason for this is that the one tried to prevent the other from coming, while the other did his utmost to come. The moment he arrived he began not only to speak openly about the departure of his predecessor but to make sure that a start was made. He has already begun to pack a lot of his goods, taken from the cart, and in his house may be seen all the indications of an approaching journey. Those of the household of the earl of Sandvich confirm it, adding that he has to leave, to his great disgust. In effect, his distress is apparent, his face being overshadowed with great sadness and in a few days he has lost his colour and become very pale.
I have been told that for the negotiation with Portugal he has received a severe reprimand, as it has by no means pleased his king and pleased this Court even less. They say that having exceeded his commissions he is blamed for this also in addition to the deep mortification.
The envoy is staying on, but at the longest it will only be until he sees the new minister in possession of his ministry. In the mean time he frequents his house greatly and they pass the greater part of the day together.
At Cadiz the greatest precautions were taken because of the approach of the French fleet. Some who landed to see that town engaged in wordy altercations with some of the people. The disturbance grew, arms were seized, blood was shed and some were killed. The French, finding themselves at a disadvantage, withdrew honourably to their ships. Bofort likewise went to see the flagship of this crown. Although he did not wish to be recognised he was entertained with some refreshments.
Madrid, the 2nd June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
5. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The overtures for peace introduced by the Ambassador Chinismarch with some energy have not yet got as far as transactions because of the delay of the Swedish ambassadors destined to offer mediation to both England and Holland. We have no news of their arrival and the winds or some other accident is blamed for it, since there has been plenty of time for them to arrive. Meanwhile Chinismarch personally is watched. His actions are carefully observed to see which way his sympathies lie and to which side he leans. At bottom he is better disposed towards England than to France, has little love for the Dutch, and is altogether hostile to Denmark. This gives rise to much discussion and renders the mediation suspect.
The intentions of Sweden are not disclosed; its ends are not clearly known. That a nation entirely devoted to arms should wish for peace sincerely is hardly credible. That one who loves turmoil should desire tranquillity is unlikely. From what one gathers on good authority the Swedes would like to detach France and Holland from Denmark and that the money of both of them should be the means for beating the Danes.
On the other side they are applying themselves here to win over Sweden and separate it from England. France wishes to make this gain, but with the money of the Dutch. When the Ambassador dell' Estrades informed the Lords States of the office of Chinismarch in which he offered the mediation of Sweden to his Majesty and the reply of the latter, they replied that for their part, while they had tried in every way to stir up the war they would be ready to embrace the peace and if the mediation of Sweden was offered to them they would accept it promptly, provided the Swedes confined themselves within the bounds of indifference and neutrality and did not molest their allies in any respect and Denmark in particular, for in such case they could not consider Sweden as a mediator but as a declared enemy.
They have passed this office to Van Bouninghen and added that if they are able to draw Sweden over to the side of the allies, Holland will be content for this to cost them what is reasonable and even something more. This would be a great step both towards bringing the English to any terms and to render the party of the allies invincible against no matter whom. In an audience which Chinismarch had of his Majesty he tried to divert France from helping Denmark, while his Majesty on his side did not let slip the opportunity of insinuating to Chinismarch the desirability of joining the allies of this crown, reviving the ancient alliances and the great conquests which Sweden had made in Germany with the support of France. After an exchange of answers and remarks, the king, discovering some hardness in Chinismarch, said to him with some amount of emphasis that he wished to stand by his friends. He valued the alliance of Sweden, but he did not want it to cost him anything in advance. France had no need of any one; she could manage in everything by herself, and she found that all others rather had need of her. With this sentiment he let him go and the other made no answer.
Paris, the 8th June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
6. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The thunder of cannon and the continued flashes of fire which were heard and seen last week in the seas of Brittany, with some apprehension of a great fight between the fleets, was nothing more than an obstinate combat of six ships, three English and as many French, who engaged fiercely for a great many hours with equal fortune and were only separated by the force of the weather when strong gusts of wind parted them.
The English fleet after having cruised about the English Channel for some days has withdrawn to Plimut; it is not known whether it is for lack of water or to fill up their crews, among whom the plague is taking toll of a good number, even on board the ships.
The Dutch have sent to sea forty one of their powerful ships, possibly in order to tone down by this show the remarks which were being freely made in criticism of their proceedings. Those who favour the Provinces, stung by the contempt expressed, excuse the delay, whether truthfully or feignedly, as due to the hidden intentions and secret wishes of France, with which they also are conforming. To decide the question with the English in one engagement does not suit either France or Holland. They hope to vanquish the enemy by time, not by arms. They have the notion that the English, being short of many things required and chiefly of money, which is very scarce, will only be able to hold out for a few months, and some great disturbance may easily break out inside the country. The same persons also affirm that although they make a fuss and threaten over the slowness of the Dutch, it does not, nevertheless, displease them. They have caused the princess d'Omala (fn. 5) to take her voyage from La Rochelle, and they wish her to sail from the port with a few ships, so that Boffort, on the plea of assuring her safety against 18 Spanish ships which are waiting, to prevent her passage, may remain in the seas of Portugal and not advance farther.
All these ideas are very natural and conform with the present temper of the government, which is directed towards cautious and safe ways. They satisfy the fiery character of the nation and the prompt resolutions which it has always practised by causing it to be stated that they wish for battle, to make attacks and to take up with spirit all manner of enterprises, mentioning Tanger in particular. But so far as I can see their commissions are being changed and regulated with the most careful circumspection. If chance does not bring about clashes, prudence wishes to avoid them.
The English have decided to make two bodies of their fleet, one destined to fight the Dutch fleet and prevent them from advancing to unite with that of France, if the latter should attempt this; the other bound to the waters of Brittany, each of them, according to report, having more than seventy powerful ships. (fn. 6)
The Prince of Galian, who molested the English in the neighbourhood of Tanger, obliging them to maintain a large force of troops there, has come to an accommodation with them (fn. 7) ; so they think of sending a good number of ships to those parts to take those troops on board, to be made use of. At the last assembly of the States three deputies were chosen to hold a council of war every day before the Admiralty about the fleet and avoid those irregularities which have occurred in past years. A new body of troops is being prepared to march in the direction of Holsatia, as Denmark is making very pressing requests to the Dutch for vigorous assistance, from fear of being fiercely attacked in his states by England and the Swedes. Orders have been issued to the colonels in command to examine the way, and owing to some difficulty with the dukes of Luneburgh it is believed that tbey will be sent to descend the River Elbe, taking the way by sea afterwards.
Paris, the 8th June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
7. Marin Zorzi, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The earl of Sandwich expressed a wish to see Medina. To avoid fuss and escape any sort of show the duke chose the Retiro, in a remote part and away from observation. Whether they proceeded beyond compliments to negotiation I have not yet ascertained with the requisite certainty, but it seems likely that after the formalities they proceeded to matters of greater importance. These are wrapped in the most complete silence, discussion proving jealous and prejudicial. However as in other negotiations I have succeeded in hitting the bullseye, so in these I will try to make no mistake in my advices. The ordinary ambassador was present at the meeting and the envoy also took part. Outwardly they are united and in harmony.
The earl of Sandwich also expressed a wish for an audience, nominally private although it is believed that it will have to serve for the public one. Her Majesty decided to gratify him. Accordingly on Sunday evening very late, he proceeded to the palace with a quantity of lackeys but not more than five coaches, three of the king, two of his own and one of the envoy. The ordinary ambassador had two others. He was present all the time and introduced the earl. The compliment was brief; he presented his credentials. He expressed his indebtedness for the honours received with such great generosity and left it to another occasion to set forth the points of his commissions. The queen answered with the usual formalities and briefly and the function ended. He did not see the king, the hour being inconvenient.
This form of audience, if it is to serve instead of the public one, is an innovation. It reflects scant honour on the embassy and affords the Court no satisfaction. The grandees did not take part, assisting her Majesty, as is the style. The royal household did not accompany it. The solemn procession attended with all splendour was omitted; all circumstances as essential as they are conspicuous. The reason for arrangements so different from the ordinary is believed to be an unwillingness to invite the foreign ministers. Though these English ministers do not send to favour any one they nevertheless claim to be favoured themselves. For this reason they may have thought it better to proceed in a manner avoiding any sort of show than to be without the following of the foreign ministers. This may be the explanation, yet they sent the usual announcement of their arrival to show that in formalities their own satisfaction is their guide and not precedent. In the meantime the ambassadors do not visit the earl, and if this continues he will lose correspondence with all. His entertainment at the royal expense ceased on the second day after the audience. He is staying on at the house which is left for him with its furnishings, as he intimated that he would be glad of the favour for a month. To render him content at the outset the government will grant him more than he asks.
Madrid, the 9th June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
8. In the Pregadi, the 12th June.
Upon the instances transmitted by the king of Great Britain in his own letters in favour of John Ravesgraf, sworn depositions have been heard of the Savio Cassiere and three deputies upon the provision of money, who state with exactitude the nature of the deeds indicated and who further intimate what it would be desirable to prescribe in respect of the requests of that king no less than in respect of the requirements of the public service. It being necessary, in satisfaction of the aforesaid requests to take the most careful deliberations:
That with respect to the compensation which the said Ravesgraf claims from the Banco del Giro for money fraudulently taken from him by the officials of that bank, the affair be referred to the Inquisitori del Banco to the end that justice may be rendered to him within the shortest time.
That with regard to the other money which he has been compelled to deposit as debtor of Dorat, the said Ravesgraf be heard in our Collegio as well as the fiscals of his Serenity representing the state, and that the Collegio itself shall subsequently decide according to justice, and their decision shall be as stable and valid as if it had been made by this Council.
Ayes, 94. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni.
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
9. To the King of Great Britain.
The republic has always desired sincere correspondence with the British crown, and has, also for some time, desired that its subjects should be well treated and every assistance afforded to them. As a sign of regard for his Majesty's offices on behalf of John Ravesgraf, they have made an express commission of magistrates for the settlement of his affairs in the briefest period, in the certainty that clear justice will be given him. Compliments.
Ayes, 94. Noes, 0. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
10. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
It is believed that his imperial Majesty intends to despatch to England the Baron Gois, to recommend ideas of peace to the king there, for which he will have cause to repent later if the issue is the same as what happened to him about Munster.
A new arrest of two gentlemen of high rank has occurred in England, on suspicion of intelligence with the enemies of that crown. (fn. 8) The Signors Hamillorte and Clochester both accompanied the king on his journey to Nordsbury. (fn. 9)
The Dutch have come out with 85 great ships; the wind or something else prevents them from going far from those shores.
Paris, the 15th June, 1666.
[Italian.]
June 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
11. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The effects of this war show themselves more fierce and cruel at a greater distance from its source than in the proximity of its centre. It would seem as if this monster of the earth wished to usurp the prerogative of the heavenly bodies which in their remoteness alone cause their beneficent or malignant influence to be felt. Up to this moment one may say with truth that these two countries, so near if not contiguous, strongly armed with horse and foot, by land and by sea, with numbers of ships, have rather studied to frighten each other by a fearful aspect and stern looks than by fighting, more by vauntings than by trial of arms, by noise rather than by attack. But in the islands of North America and in particular in that of San Cristofolo, which is possessed half by the English and half by the French, a tragic scene of inhuman barbarity has been disclosed.
The Seigneur di Rainsy, governor in that island (fn. 10) for his Most Christian Majesty, found out that the king of England had informed his representatives of the declaration of war issued against him by France, with resolute orders that they should immediately and unexpectedly attack the French and slay them, sparing neither sex nor age, burning their houses and churches without any reservation. Greatly perturbed and much perplexed by such an unexpected resolution, greatly inferior in force and without the necessary equipment, Rainsy held a consultation with other French leaders. These all decided to make a supreme effort of desperation, that all should take their arms and forestall the enemy by attacking him and at least end their lives gloriously. Accordingly they at once embarked on some ships all their women and little children, their most valuable possessions and what they could get together to support them on the voyage. They then entered the enemy country ravaging and burning all that they met with, killing as many as they could. The women on board the ships, being ill favoured by the wind, when a short distance out heard the frequent salvoes of the muskets, confused sounds of shouting and lamentation. Being subsequently taken farther away from the island by a favourable wind which sprang up, but keeping it in view as long as they could, they declare that they saw great flames and great clouds of smoke rise to heaven for many days, and heard a continuous noise of firing, so that they believe that all has gone to perdition and ruin with fire and sword, without knowing which side remained the victim of the fury of the other.
When these arrived on the shores of La Rochelle, consumed by hunger, wasted by their sufferings, stunned by their travail, dry, lean, extenuated, rather living skeletons than human beings, they made a dreadful report of the event, arousing a timid curiosity to know the final issue of that wretched calamity. Many persons of note have set out from the Court to see them. They found persons and ladies of rank among them. Provisions were immediately sent to them for their relief and restoration. The incident is disliked as much as it could be and the more so because they are uncertain about the issue and they are afraid that any succours which might be sent out would prove a prey for the enemy rather than a reinforcement for their fellow subjects.
This fatal slaughter may well move their feelings of compassion, but it does not serve to inflame them to more venturesome decisions. It becomes ever more apparent that on this side they wish to avoid a clash of the naval forces. Boffort moves but with lagging steps. He will advance to the estuary of Lisbon waiting for the niece of Omala, (fn. 11) under the pretext, as already reported, of protecting her against Spanish attempts. The Dutch, who have now come out of port, will act as a bridle on the English, following after them and preventing them from advancing against the French, and unless the English in desperation commit themselves to some precipitous action, they flatter themselves here that they will conquer without fighting.
There are some, however, who experience many pricks and who suffer grave injury in the frequent losses of ships, one by one, which the English keep capturing by some of their squadrons. The ship Vittoria, which was returning from the Indies richly laden with goods as the fruit of the new commerce, has fallen into their hands (fn. 12) to the sorrow and deep regret of the government, because at the very beginning of that enterprise they suffer this loss and witness the disappearance of the imaginary wealth which some of the ministers were anticipating from this venture about which the wrath of England was seriously provoked against this country. It is said that two other ships on the same errand have suffered a like fate, but as this happened in distant seas there is no certainty about it as yet. By this piratical nourishment the forces of England are being maintained, and the French complain not a little at such losses, for having become merchants in inclination and by profession they count them as the most serious injury.
Flimen, the Swedish ambassador designate for England, has already arrived in that country. It is not known when he means to start on his undertaking and to set forth his commissions, or whether he will be found on that side or on this, if Sweden intends to extinguish the fire or to fan the flames.
Paris, the 15th June, 1666.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Juriaen Flemmingh and Peter Julius Coyet.
2 According to Salvetti, Monk, “habbia dopo il suo arrivo alla flotta privato alcuni delli capitani che non si comportano con valore o fedelta nelli ultimi incontri delle loro cariche.” Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 R. fol. 391 d.
3 Obliterated.
4 Obliterated. The coaches are mentioned in a letter of John Taylor, the earl's secretary, of the 3rd June. S.P. Spain, Vol. li. According to Fanshawe he arrived on the Friday. Fanshawe to Arlington 2nd June. Ibid.
5 Marie, daughter of Charles Amadeus, duke of Nemours and Aumale, who was going to marry Alfonso, king of Portugal.
6 At the end of May, Monk in the Downs had only 56 ships. Rupert, who was to sail down the Channel, had 20 ships and 5 fireships. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1665–6, page 418.
7 The treaty arranged by Lord Bellasis with Cidi Hamet Hader Gaylan was made on 2nd April, 1666, o.s. S.P. Spain, Vol. 1. The terms are given there and are set out by Rugge in his diary for May. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 10117, ff. 163–4.
8 Possibly a confused report of the arraignment of Lord Morley and Mounteagle for the death of Mr. Henry Hastings. See Rugge's Diary. Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 10117, f. 159 d.
9 The King went to Deal at the end of May, accompanied by the Duke of York. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1665–6, page 415.
10 The French governor was named de Sales. Higham: Development of the Leeward Islands under the Restoration, page 45. Perhaps by confusion with Col. Charles Reymes, who betrayed the English to the French.
11 Henry who succeeded his brother Charles as duke of Nemours and Aumale in 1652, but died in 1659.
12 See Cal. S.P. Dom. 1665–6, pp. 416, 425. She was a ship of 26 guns and 207 men, sighted by the Resolution on 30th April, o.s. and taken after a three days' chase. London Gazette, May 17–21, 1666.


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