Venice
July 1668

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1935

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223-237

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'Venice: July 1668', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 35: 1666-1668 (1935), pp. 223-237. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90227 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Contents

July 1668

July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
304. Pietro Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador to England, to the Doge and Senate.
Has made good progress towards Frankfort in spite of continuous rain. Nothing worthy of report when passing through the Tyrol and Bavaria. The death of the Cardinal di Thum has not stayed the opposition to the prince of Bressenon for the bishopric of Trent. (fn. 1) The prince counts on the support of the pope. The minister of the posts at Trent came to him about the frequent murder of couriers in the states of the bishop and prince of Trent. They hope for a remedy with the help of your Serenity. The archduke of Innsbruck is patron of the posts and the count of Trent is not allowed to cause troops to enter his states. Only the emperor can intervene. Has found great interest everywhere over the glorious defence of Candia.
Augsburg, the 6th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
305. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I left the Hague on the 15th inst. and arrived in five days, but hardly had I reached England when I was attacked by a fluxion of the eyes which threatened me with the loss of my sight. I have begun to recover and am making preparations to appear with the necessary decorum at this great Court where expenses are endless and what is modest is not recognised (il poco non vien riconosciuto). On hearing of my arrival the earls Henry and Howard of Arundel at once called and offered their services. (fn. 2)
I notified the Master of the Ceremonies of my arrival the day before yesterday. The secretary of Lord Arlington promised to notify me of his arrival on the return of his Majesty from the sea, whither he had gone solely in order to see the fleet. He was expected back and I should be received on the day after. Yesterday he informed me that he had seen Lord Arlington, who would wait upon me this morning about eight o'clock because at nine he had to be with the king. When I was about to get into my coach that of Lord Arlington came to fetch me and took me to his house. I learned afterwards that I owed this honour to the earls of Arundel. When I reached the house the Secretary received me with every courtesy. After I was seated I enlarged to him upon the perils of the situation and the republic's hopes of assistance from his Majesty.
He responded with high praise of the services of the republic in guarding and preserving that bulwark for Christendom. I should have found the king in the most favourable disposition towards the Senate if the internal affairs of the country had allowed him to do anything. In the last few years England had suffered great losses through the plague, the fire and war. It had scarcely emerged from these and from the immense expenses which it had been necessary to incur.
I told him that the power and greatness of this crown might well contribute some assistance for the relief of Christendom and of a friendly prince without feeling any inconvenience and this would redound to the greater glory of the crown and of the nation. They had no equal at sea and the mere report of a resolution would strike fear into the Turk. He took me up, saying, We are in good friendship with the Turk and at peace and our trade in the Levant would suffer severe injury. I replied that they would be able to find some device to prevent it appearing that the succour came directly from this crown. This would not upset the peace or cause any disturbance to trade. I did not suppose that the Turks were such exact observers of the peace, since they were infidels. If fate so willed it that the most serene republic should not receive succour from the Christian princes, that boon of universal peace, from which it hoped to find relief, would have caused it the greatest harm, because at the report of concord among the Christian princes the Turks, out of fear of substantial help from these, would have made the most strenuous efforts so as not to suffer the disgrace of being repulsed and chased away, and if they found only a feeble resistance for lack of such aid, they would in a short time render themselves masters of the fortress. It behoved every Christian prince to consider this.
He said that my argument was a good one. The Turks would always know what assistance his Majesty afforded. They had been faithful observers of the peace. When I smiled at this he added that he could assure me of the fact, indeed he might go further and tell me that towards the Strait the Turks had been roughly handled by the English and the government was afraid of some trouble; but in spite of this they have not made a move. This country was situated in the North, far away from the Ottoman Empire. An ambassador of his Majesty having been a long time at the Porte the king had decided to change him and had sent M. d'Harvy in his place a short while ago.
I retorted that such dissimulation on the part of the Turks clearly showed the respect which they bore for this crown and the fear with which they regard it, and even if they knew of some assistance afforded to your Excellencies they would not take any notice, especially if they were beaten, as past experience had sufficiently shown. I referred to the opposition met with and once this was overcome we should certainly see the friendly disposition of the king towards the most serene republic. I would inform him of my arrival and do all that I possibly could for the service and advantage of the state. I begged his Excellency to use his advice and credit with his Majesty in a cause so just, assuring him that your Excellencies would be peculiarly gratified by his so doing.
With this I took leave when his Excellency with excessive kindness and extraordinary courtesy insisted on descending the stairs and accompanying me half way through the hall on the way to the courtyard, whence I was taken back by his coach.
Such has been the first move in my employment at this Court and I regret most deeply that the appearances of assistance are not at all comparable with the excess of courtesy shown. It would seem as if they wished by the latter to gild their excuses over the other. Nevertheless I will not desist from bringing the greatest pressure to bear upon the king, representing to him the interest he ought to take in it as a Christian prince and the immortal applause which will be given to his glorious name.
London, the 6th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
306. To the Ambassador in France.
The Senate is glad to learn of the arrival of Marchesini in London and regrets the indisposition which is troubling him. It feels confident that his arrival and that of the Ambassador Mocenigo which will follow will finally dissipate the criticisms that were current over there about the scant application of the republic to cultivate correspondence with that crown.
Ayes, 117. Noes, 8. Neutral, 15.
[Italian.]
July 10.
Inquisitori
Di Stato.
Busta 418.
Venetian
Archives.
307. Tomaso Gobato to the Inquisitors of State.
These last days his Excellency of France stirred up certain Jews against me, to get them to accuse me to the Caimecan, but I have arranged everything. He makes a show of friendliness to me, but in reality I know that he looks on Venetians with an unfriendly eye. He now cultivates most friendly relations with his Excellency of England, which is something new. I have very confidential relations with that minister, and I have so contrived that he goes to visit the Most Illustrious Dolfino, at the Towers, to introduce some jealousy between them, which has since served to give some umbrage to the Turks also.
Pera of Constantinople, 10th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
308. To the Ambassador Mocenigo at London.
The Senate is glad to hear of his progress on his journey and supposes that he is now arrived. It notes the accident to the post of Augsburg. That sort of thing happens too often. Orders have been issued to prevent disorders in the future.
Ayes, 101. Noes, 1. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
309. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Monday after dinner was appointed me for audience of his Majesty. The deputy introducer came to tell me that as their Majesties were to proceed on Tuesday to a certain house in the country of the Lord Chamberlain where he had prepared a sumptuous banquet for their Majesties and the royal household, (fn. 3) he had not wished to delay my reception any longer. I was fetched on Monday by Cotteral, the master of the Ceremonies, with a coach and six, and taken to Whitehall. There I was admitted to an apartment of the lord chamberlain until I was sent for by the king. His Majesty received me standing, surrounded by many of the leading gentlemen. I told him of the siege of Candia; that I had been sent to represent the imminent peril of the place and the need for prompt assistance, which the most serene republic felt confident he would afford.
His Majesty replied that, as was well known to every one, he had just emerged from a most costly war in which he had spent much treasure. He admired the constancy of the republic and felt sympathy for its afflictions. If the other princes had supplied assistance he certainly would contribute so much as was permitted to him by the scant means he had at present. I told him thereupon of the generous help given by the king of France.
I went afterwards to audience of the queen, who received me graciously and promised to speak to the king for the republic. I was then conducted to the palace of the duke of York and set forth my commissions to him. The duke said that it was shameful for the Christian princes to leave your Serenity in the lurch. You were making such a bold, prolonged and steadfast resistance that assuredly aroused the admiration and astonishment of the world. He would use his influence with the king, his brother, with the utmost good will. He then asked about the state of the siege. I told him that the attack had slackened but that it was likely to be renewed with greater energy. I went afterwards to pay my respects to the duchess.
London, the 13th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
310. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have been trying to see the leading ministers of the Council of State. The Lord Keeper could not receive me because of the gout. I called later on the duke of Albemarle. He said that the most serene republic had won for itself distinguished honour in the face of all Christendom. The brave resistance brought out most clearly the prudent conduct of the Senate. He asked me about the help given by France, Spain and the Dutch. He told me that for his part he would always do what he could for so glorious a work. He then asked me many particulars about the siege of Candia and whether the Marquis of St. Andrea Montbrun (fn. 4) had yet arrived there.
I propose to see the Secretary Arlinton again to ask that English ships shall not be permitted to serve the Turks, and I will try to have orders about this given to the new ambassador who is going to Constantinople. I have also paid visits of ceremony to the ambassadors of Spain and Holland.
London, the 13th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
311. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The affair of Saramane in the West Indies is completely adjusted. Villogbi, the English commander, has restored the place to the Dutch by the royal command. The place together with the country dependent upon it is considered more valuable than New Belgium.
Paris, the 17th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
312. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Having received at the public audience the replies reported to your Serenity in my last, I considered that I ought to report them to the Secretary of State, Arlinton, in order not to miss the opportunity which seemed favourable to the cause of your Excellencies. For this purpose I went expressly to his house, where his Excellency received me with the usual marks of courtesy. I said that I felt sure he was acquainted with the benignant answer given me by his Majesty to the requests made by me by commission of the most serene republic, to wit that he lamented the perilous state of Candia, that the long defence offered by your Serenity in that kingdom aroused the admiration of all and that for his part he would supply help in conformity with his scanty powers whenever other princes also made their contributions. This royal offer afforded me no slight consolation seeing that France was already committed to a succour of 100,000 crowns. The emperor was going to permit levies of troops and was also covertly allowing some bands of soldiers to be conducted to the frontier. The duke of Lorraine was sending 2500 men under the command of the chevalier d'Harcurt. From the duke of Bavaria we hoped for 2000 more soldiers. The elector of Mayence was giving 400 men and hopes were entertained from other princes of the empire. I ventured to believe that the king would not wait for other and greater examples or allow other princes to forestall him in a cause so just which concerns the general welfare of Christendom.
The secretary answered me: I will not deceive you. The king has given you such an answer following his own natural instinct, and has opened his heart to you about what he would desire to do for the most serene republic. But in wishing to give effect to this desire he will encounter a very great deal of opposition and will find himself obliged to withdraw the promise given, since he proffered it without considering the peace which he has with the Turk and the great trade which this country has in the Levant, or that the crown is weakened by the late war with the Dutch.
I replied that his Majesty would be able to contribute succour in a cautious and reserved manner so that it would not reach the ears of the Turks and so that it would not cause the slightest possible disturbance to trade. Your Excellencies did not aspire to a royal fleet. Some squadron of ships under another flag would help greatly for the preservation of Candia, since it would prevent the Turks from introducing reliefs into the kingdom. There was also another consideration which would cause your Excellencies to appreciate very highly even a little which his Majesty might be able to grant. The obligation would be double, because if the king would come to an express declaration, the Lords States of Holland had expressed their intention and held out the hope to me that they also would help the republic; but if nothing was obtained from this crown, then your Excellencies would obtain nothing from the Provinces either and that would mean a grave and considerable prejudice.
Arlinton replied that the Dutch would not do anything. This was nothing but a trick to induce this government to commit itself to some declaration in order to get into their own hands all the trade of the Levant. He knew those fellows very well. The king had no influence over them and the past examples had demonstrated as much. The information would assuredly be passed on to the Turks and it was quite certain that the king could not keep the promise he had given me. He told me that candidly.
Seeing that I could not achieve anything on this visit about assistance I changed my requests to ask that his Majesty would be pleased to forbid English ships from being employed by the Turks to the hurt of your Excellencies. As a new ambassador of his Majesty was proceeding to Constantinople and as the king with the United Provinces had made himself arbiter of the differences of Christendom by the peace arranged between the two crowns of France and Spain I was inclined to believe that the most serene republic would have no objection to placing its own interests in the hands of ministers of his Majesty in the assurance that as it is a question of the welfare of all Christendom and on behalf of a friendly prince he would preserve and win every possible advantage for the public cause. I said all this in obedience to the commands of the 9th June and the other of the 25th May which directed me to encourage the project here also.
On the first point his Excellency replied that he would speak about it to the king and it was certainly his Majesty's intention that his ships should not carry succour against your Excellencies. With regard to the second, about mediation, he believed that the king would not only consent readily to act but that he would take a peculiar pleasure in it, and instructions might be given to the ambassador on the subject, saving the king's honour, to act in such fashion as should be desired by your Excellencies, receiving such illumination and commissions as you might be pleased to send him. I did not go any further into this matter so as not to commit myself, considering reserve necessary for a project requiring the approval of your Excellencies. So I made no further reply on the subject but I will see the ambassador to find out his personal disposition also.
Subsequently I happened to be in the apartment of the queen on the morning of the very day on which I had seen the secretary of state. The king came in and seeing me there he came forward. I made a reverence and he asked me what news I had of Candia and if the Turks were still pressing the place. I told him that the fierceness of the siege had slackened for a brief space; that the Turks had accordingly duplicated a battery towards the port to prevent succour from entering the place, and that they were busily getting ready troops and munitions from every quarter in order to invade that kingdom with the greatest forces. The goodness of his Majesty was therefore called upon to provide speedy and vigorous assistance. This would not only serve as an example to other princes, but would bring an advantage of consequence to your Excellencies because the United Provinces would also contribute assistance not to be despised, and thereby the obligation of your Serenity to his Majesty's generosity would be augmented. Very good, said he, if the Dutch will succour the republic I will do so also. At this I bowed to express my thanks and said that this would serve to increase the applause for his name and to render immortal his generous and heroic actions.
I asked him besides for another favour, which was to forbid ships of the nation from serving the Turks as transports against Candia. The king replied I myself am not master of this. They take them by force and with violence. So much so that, my new ambassador having to proceed to the Porte in a ship of war, I have directed that it shall stop at Smyrna or elsewhere, so that it may not be detained. I represented to his Majesty that if he made a prohibition it would make the captains more reluctant to obey and possibly they might endeavour in some manner or by some pretext to avoid exposing themselves to such service. The king replied, it might be done and I concur gladly, and leaving me he went away to dine.
I must confess to your Excellencies that this repeated asseveration by the king of his willingness to aid the pious cause of your Serenity if the Dutch give any help and the remarks of the Secretary of State, Arlinton, in the opposite sense have puzzled me not a little and caused me to wonder fearfully if the expressions of the latter are sincere or due to some private considerations of his own. I do not feel competent to decide but I will take care to set down every circumstance so that the infinite prudence of the Senate may be able to form an opinion, whether good or bad.
I feel it my duty to remind your Excellencies that the first visit which I paid to this gentleman afforded me scant material for feeling hopeful, and this in spite of the reply reported which the king had the goodness to make me, and has now repeated with the remark “if the Dutch will do it.” So I do not know if the king is seeking a pretext to cover himself over the promise given or whether the protests of the secretary of state that they can do nothing proceed from his own disinclination to assist the most serene republic, or from his desire to relieve the king of my importunity in this way.
I have made inquiries to find out if his views may have their origin in some remote cause and I have succeeded in discovering that the earl of Harviz, the new ambassador destined for Constantinople, is his intimate friend, proposed by him to his Majesty for the embassy and that he supports and upholds him in the Council over any manner of business of his. Besides this, there might be some particular business for that part, or he might fear that some mischance would overtake his friend at the Porte either personally or the trade, if this crown supplies help to your Excellencies. All this may make him try to get me to believe that it is impossible to obtain help and superfluous to ask for it. As I must conceal nothing from your Excellencies I must add that he has asked the duke of Arundel, who is extremely anxious to do everything possible for the service and advantage of the most serene republic, how long I shall be staying here. The duke replied that he did not know but he supposed it would be until his Majesty had had the goodness to give me some succour.
It may also be that he speaks frankly and with sincerity and that this is or was my blind and ardent unwillingness to see succour refused to such an exceedingly just cause. I also misdoubt my feebleness, as being unable to discern the truth; but the extreme prudence of your Excellencies will be able to dive to the bottom of the matter. What causes me most regret is that with the great credit and power which he has in the Council, and holding such views he will not prove helpful to the cause of your Excellencies since it is always easier to persuade people to do nothing than to point out the duty of embracing some glorious and generous enterprise. Heaven grant that this be only the offspring of my great insufficiency.
London, the 20th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
313. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the Doge and Senate.
In accordance with my instructions I called upon Prince Rupert and performed the office enjoined. The Prince replied that he wished he had been able to serve the most serene republic, that aroused the admiration of the whole world by the valorous defence it had offered up to the present time. The king here had suffered heavy expenditure in the late war with the Dutch of which he was still feeling all the inconveniences. For his own part he would be glad to contribute everything in his power in order that succour might reach your Excellencies; but if his Majesty sent ships thither secretly they would be recognised and that would completely upset the affairs of the merchants at Constantinople. He professed himself peculiarly bound to the most serene republic.
I also saw the duke of Buckingham, a man of more than ordinary understanding (che possiede pure spirito non ordinario) and who has no small credit in the Council. He expressed his obligations to your Excellencies and said he would have been pleased to act with all his heart because it was a war of utter justice. He asked me if I had had any conversation about it with Lord Arlinton. I told him Yes and he asked what he said. I replied that he raised some difficulties about trade. The duke said he had not yet heard him speak about it. Affairs in England are not usually despatched promptly; he would have the matter discussed and would let me have some answer later. I thanked him warmly and will see him again in a few days. I also spoke to Moris, the other secretary, who promised to serve your Serenity.
His Majesty has postponed the meeting of parliament from the 11th of the month until the 11th November, in order to afford an opportunity to each of the members to attend to his private interests in the country, which is so necessary at this season. However, those members who are present in the city will meet on the day originally appointed in order to authenticate this prorogation.
London, the 20th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
314. Catterin Belegno, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The progress of the alliance with the British crown is meeting with difficulties of great consequence. The English are claiming 400,000 crowns a year and a guaranteed pension in return for uncertainties, subject to alterations and to the bad faith of the nation, which looks no further than its own interest.
The earl of Sandovich has gone on to Cadice to take ship there.
Madrid, the 25th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
315. To the Secretary Marchesini in London.
Acknowledge his letters of the 6th inst. Note the honours received from the earls of Arundel and the courtesy of the Secretary of State, which he did well not to refuse. To express the public esteem for the earls and appreciation of their courtesy to him. Approval of his office with the secretary and his effort to remove objections. Confident that when his Majesty comes he will make his exposition with energy, in the hope that by the offices of the earls of Arundel and the good insinuations of the secretary they may be successful in bringing home the numerous arguments for giving help, following the example of practically all the princes, who are giving their aid quite openly against the Turks, the common enemies. The Ambassador Mocenigo will soon be there to take up his charge and to perfect what Marchesini has begun.
Ayes, 113. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
316. Pietro Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador to England, to the Doge and Senate.
It is three weeks since I left Augsburg; the time being mostly spent on the journey to Antwerp, which I reached a week ago. At Augsburg I received no distinction from the Board of Health, but I was well received at Frankfurt. The Landgrave of Hesse expressed his esteem for your Excellencies. I was received by his first councillor and entertained. Further honourable demonstrations were made at Cologne. At Antwerp the magistrates came at once to my house. The bishop, of the House of Capello, (fn. 5) also came to call. I made only a very brief stay at the cities of the ecclesiastical electors on the Rhine. At Brussels I noticed the lack of precautions against the plague which has broken out at several houses there. I am nearly ready to make the sea passage.
Antwerp, the 27th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
317. Pietro Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador to England, to the Doge and Senate.
Avoided meeting the prince electors in order to get forward on his journey. Succeeded in gathering some information. Work is proceeding on the fortifications of Mainz. Peace in Flanders is insecure; a general fear of what is in store. Castel Rodrigo is blamed for the losses incurred last year. There is a universal desire for Don Juan, shared even by Castel Rodrigo himself. Differences over the peace treaty. The French claim Condé and Linch, even Nieuport. Lille is ready to expel the French garrison if the Spaniards can support the citizens. The aversion of the people from the French is so great that it is universally stated at Antwerp that if the place had been attacked last year by the French and weakly defended by the Spaniards, they would have gladly opened their gates to a Dutch garrison. It would seem that they are unable to conceal their first intention to do this very thing if such a position should occur in the future. The only thing that holds them back is the manifest danger of losing their religion.
Antwerp, the 27th July, 1668.
[Italian.]
July 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Haia.
Venetian
Archives.
318. Giovanni Francesco Marchesini, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
While waiting for some news from Holland upon the replies given me by the king here about assisting your Serenity and with the approaching departure of the ambassador of this crown for Constantinople I considered that I ought not to omit to repeat my offices so that orders might be given him, before his departure, to mediate a peace for your Excellencies with the Turks. Accordingly I saw the Secretary of State Harliniton for this purpose before he set out for some baths which he has gone to take, over which he is likely to spend some three weeks, including the journey and his stay there. (fn. 6) I told him, therefore, that the goodwill he had shown to the request I made that the interests of the most serene republic might be strongly recommended to the Ambassador Harviz, destined for the Porte, had caused me to be importunate, but the confidence I entertained of the esteem and respect felt by the Turks for this crown excused my audacity. I therefore besought him that the necessary instructions upon this subject might be given to the ambassador before his departure and also that English ships should not serve the Turks to the prejudice of your Excellencies. As his Majesty had achieved the glory of establishing the peace between Spain and Portugal and between France and Spain I might hope that he would enjoy equal good fortune in that of your Excellencies with the Turk. By so doing he would make himself known as a monarch of the most illustrious and generous resolutions and conspicuous as the first sovereign in the world, especially if in the mean time he had, in accordance with his repeated assurances, supplied substantial succour to your Serenity to help you to face the enemy and defend the town of Candia against the formidable preparations of the Ottoman, making it possible to defend that bulwark of Christendom.
The secretary replied that his Majesty would interpose most willingly for peace, in order to oblige the most serene republic. The ambassador should have precise instructions to exert himself about this with as much warmth and affection as if he were dealing with the interests of the crown itself, and, saving the royal honour, he would be directed to follow such orders as your Serenity might choose to send him. He imagined that the Ambassador Mocenigo would bring with him fuller instructions upon this matter, so that they might be transmitted from time to time to the ambassador aforesaid. The prohibition about ships would also be granted, but your Excellencies might rest assured that these ships only served the Turks against the wishes of the king and the owners, as they were taken with force and by violence. For the rest, in the matter of succour his Majesty spoke in accordance with what he wished he was able to do, but that when he himself touched upon the subject he found that it caused a great commotion and that it would in consequence lead to a great stir among the merchants because of their trade in the Levant.
I begged him to assure the king that your Serenity would not fail to show appreciation of his mediation, and that as I had acquainted the Senate with what I had said to him I imagined that the Ambassador Mocenigo would be supplied with all the illumination considered necessary upon the subject. On the question of assistance I would not press him just then since I was expecting to get some news from Holland and I firmly believed that his Majesty would not wish to be inferior to other princes in upholding a cause where religion and the faith were at stake, since there would be no difficulty in finding cautious and covert ways of effecting it.
He replied to this that his Majesty's goodwill was extreme, but it was combated by so many difficulties and encountered such opposition that they appeared to him insuperable. I did not think it advisable to insist any further on the point, both for the reasons which I gave in my last and because I thought it would be more opportune to wait for the replies which are to be given to me by the Dutch ambassadors. If these are favourable I will renew my appeal to the king with energy. His disposition is favourable but his authority and power are not absolute from what I gather (tiene buona la dispositione ma non intiera l'auttorita et il potere, per quanto ricavo).
I paid a visit to the Ambassador d'Harviz giving him an account of everything and begging him to act with vigour in an affair that could bring him nothing but advantage, winning for him great credit and glory in the world and making it ring with his name in an affair so outstanding and so beneficial to Christendom.
He told me that he saw there might be much glory in it, but the opposition was great and serious and there were many obstacles. The Turks were not relaxing their hold. The Sultan was resolved not to betake himself to Constantinople for a very long time. The journey to Adrianople involved an insufferable expense, especially for an ambassador. As the embassy was supported by the money of the merchants these would never concur in an expense which was none of their business. The Turk only looked for opportunities of profit. The best of reasons did not move them, only abundance of gold. The example of the French ambassador (fn. 7) obliged every one to move with caution, because that barbarous people did not care for any one whoever he might be.
I replied that the Grand Turk would not be staying away from Constantinople for very long because his presence there was so eagerly desired by the inhabitants. As his Excellency must go to his first audience he would be able at the same time to make an opening for affairs. As he would be obliged, for this purpose, to make some present, the generosity of the most serene republic would not allow him to do it out of his own purse. It was in difficult transactions that a lively intelligence made itself known and that greater merit was acquired. The accident of Mons. Vantellet was a pure misfortune and I did not think that it would happen to an English minister because the Grand Turk prized this nation more highly and consequently would have more regard for it. Once the Porte accepted the mediation of this crown there would be no further occasion for fear as of necessity they would be anxious for correspondence.
He repeated that this was true but that the Turks did not enter into so many considerations as they had no other object than self-interest. I agreed that the Turks were interested but I hoped that his prudence and ability would be equal to everything and being on the spot he could adapt himself to the conditions. He said that he would carry out the commissions of the king, but the Turks were greedy for gain and the merchants would not contribute to the expense of the journeys that he would be obliged to make to Adrianople on behalf of your Excellencies.
I have been surprised at so much reserve on his part, which has no other end in view than self-interest, putting aside the glory that he might be able to win in such a business. But I would not let the matter rest in such an unsatisfactory state. Accordingly I had recourse to the duke of Arundel, the ambassador being a friend of his, in order that he might stir him up to serve your Excellencies and by his goodwill smoothe away those difficulties which the ambassador thought would not be easy to overcome. The duke undertook this task with great promptitude and with exemplary zeal. He pointed out to him by convincing arguments that such a transaction was to be desired and instead of being requested it was he who should have asked for it as he could not win so much glory in any other negotiation. So the ambassador himself came to see me and showed himself very ready to undertake the business in which he said he would conduct himself in exactly the same manner as if it was the king's. He would be leaving in a few days and your Excellencies might cause the instructions on the subject to be sent to Leghorn or Florence with suitable guidance for his direction.
I said that your Excellencies kept a resident with the Grand Duke who would be exhorted to pay his respects to him on his passage to those parts and who would convey to him the public intentions. He added that there was also a resident there for his Britannic Majesty, Mr. Finz. On his arrival at Leghorn he would confer with this gentleman; he did not know if he should go on to Florence. He asked me in addition, that if your Serenity was keeping some one at Constantinople, he should be charged to undertake the expenses of the journeys and of the gratuities that might have to be made at the Porte on behalf of your Excellencies. I replied that I imagined the Senate would take this into consideration and would supply him with the advices which were considered proper to the business. He added that until the moment when his mediation was received by the Grand Turk your Serenity would be able to cause the public deliberations to reach the hands of this Mr. Finz who would pass them on to him wherever he was. This gentleman is to start on his voyage one day next week. I will not forget to visit him again so that I may not fail to instil on his mind the greatest propensity for the public advantage.
Eight ships from the East Indies have arrived in the port of Leghorn, and four others from the same parts are expected very soon. They are bringing a quantity of saltpetre and it is intimated to me that this will be sold in the month of September. It is to be hoped, as there is no war in these parts, that it may be had for less than 30 florins the hundred, refined with the customary test practised by the Lords States. If your Excellencies are in need of this and would like to have it you need only cause a letter of credit to be sent there for such provision as you may require. I report this matter for the public information.
The king here has admitted the elector of Saxony to the order of the Garter and some one has been appointed to take it to him. (fn. 8) Some one else has been selected to go to the elector of Brandenburg to offer congratulations in the name of his Majesty here on the marriage which he has recently completed. (fn. 9)
London, the 27th July, 1668.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Guidobald von Thurn, archbishop of Salzburg and cardinal, who died on the 1st June, 1668.
2 He probably means Thomas and Henry Howard, the eldest sons of the earl of Arundel.
3 The king and queen, the duke and duchess and the nobility were entertained at the earl of Manchester's house at Waltham Abbey, in celebration of his recent marriage to the countess of Carlisle. Salvetti on 13th July, Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S. fol. 267. Rugge's Diary, fol. 223, Add. MSS. 10117.
4 Alexander du Puy, marquis de St. André, son of Jean du Puy, marquis de Montbrun; appointed to direct the defence in the place of the Marquis Villa who had been recalled by the duke of Savoy. Daru: Hist. de Venise, Vol. v, p. 72.
5 Mario Ambrosio Capello.
6 He went to Bath, arriving there on the 18th July, o.s. Cal. S.P. Dom, 1667–8, p. 493.
7 Denis de la Haye, Sieur de Ventelet. At audience of the Vizier on the 8th January, after an altercation he was struck several times and beaten, and then imprisoned for four days. He was only saved from a worse fate by Winchelsea's intervention. Hist. MSS. Comm. Finch Papers, Vol. i, p. 406; von Hammer Purgstall: Geschichte des Osmanischen Reiches, Vol. iii, pp. 583, 599.
8 John George II, elector of Saxony, was elected at the chapter held on 19th June, o.s. Sir Thomas Higgons was appointed to take the insignia to him. Nicolas: Hist. of the Order of the Garter, Vol. i, p. 254. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1667–8, p. 564.
9 Frederick William, elector of Brandenburg, married his second wife, Dorothea, daughter of Philip, duke of Holstein Glucksburg on 13th June, 1668. The envoy was Sir Gabriel Sylvius. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1668–9, p. 84.