Venice
February 1669

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1937

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9-23

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'Venice: February 1669', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 9-23. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90258 Date accessed: 31 August 2014.


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February 1669

Feb. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
7. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
My zeal to carry out my instructions induced me to approach the Secretary Arlinton, to obtain an audience of the king for me without fail. The ducali of the 4th January reached me three days ago with pressing instructions to see the king about the position of Dalmatia and to urge him to detach himself from the Dutch and to publish his own resolutions and carry them out in time to render them fruitful. Accordingly I went to see Arlinton, who is the only minister able to support me with juicy speech (con sucose parole). I told him that these fresh and urgent emergencies made necessary renewed representations to the powers to obtain help with speed to meet the need, upon which your Excellencies counted to save a place of such importance to Christendom and to stem the flood of the threatened invasion. I desired a speedy audience to move the king to let poor Candia enjoy speedily the effects of his piety, to which he is already pledged; only waiting for the Dutch to set the example. I would also give him a memorial upon the reasons for this extraordinary urgency.
Arlinton thanked me for the confidence and promised to speak to the king. He said that I might suggest that the king should detach himself from the Dutch, but he doubted that the interests of this country would prevent the king from gratifying the republic about this.
The audience was appointed for the next day. I enlarged to the king upon the affairs of Candia and Dalmatia and presented the enclosed memorial. I tried to persuade him to contribute now that which, arriving late, would not relieve Candia, and so he would not even achieve his intent.
The king said that he was glad to have the memorial, although it was superfluous, since he had the interests of your Serenity greatly at heart. He sympathised with the Signory for being plunged into this war for so many years with such an outpouring of blood and money. He would consider the matter again, and putting aside the considerations of the quiet of his own kingdom he would put the advantage of your Serenity before everything, leaving me with some hope of progress in the matter, although his Majesty repeated his considerations about being closely watched by the Dutch and not doing harm to trade (fn. 1) I do not report to your Serenity any determined objection to acting without the States of Holland, but for all this I do not flatter myself that they are about to accede to my requests, which if they do not oppose they do not concur. But I promise to press for a reply to the memorial for the purpose of hastening the succour, and if this cannot consist of a good body of troops and ships I will confine myself to munitions.
While pressing for resolutions in London I will try also for those of Holland. I have the promise of the Ambassador Borel to write to the States. It remains with the opening of the Assembly for the Pensionary Vit to propose the question in conformity with the motion of the Ambassador Temple.
From a long conversation with Borel I have not been able to find that he has any commission from the States to assist me here with his offices. The Ambassador Colbert, upon whose influence I shall rely greatly for his support with this crown in obtaining help, no longer (fn. 2) the usual civilities, but in spite of this (fn. 2)
London, the 1st February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
8. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
When the body is sick attention is called chiefly to the part which seems to suffer most, and sometimes the physician discovers the cause of the mischief at the bottom of the wound. The triple alliance is agitated by the jealousies reported, and while England, with some coolness does not support the warmth of Holland, yet the proceedings of Sweden, not so constant to the alliance, are rendered more noticeable to both of them. This has moved them to probe more deeply into the aims of that Court. The infected part has been found, as it appears that the chancellor (fn. 3) has been bought by French gold. To prevent the corruption of the whole body the Ambassador Carlise will leave here promptly and they have directed (fn. 2) in Flanders so that jointly with the Dutch minister he may urge the governor so that the troops of Bresse with 100,000 (fn. 2)
Your Excellencies know how the warlike movements of the Most Christian against Lorraine have stirred the neighbouring princes and how they have persuaded the partners in the alliance to draw more closely together. The Spaniards considering the strength of the union of several forces and having multiplied their efforts (fn. 2) and propose negotiations to be included and at least to guarantee the states of Flanders. The baron dell' Isola proceeded from Malines to the Hague, and though he was incognito, he treated with the ministers. If anything definite and more secret comes to light I will report it to your Serenity.
Definite news has come from America of the surprise of Porto Vello by the English. The Spanish ambassador has repeated his remonstrances here although with scant hope of recovering from the hands of those who have taken it the plate to the value of 1,800,000 crowns. There is talk, however, of removing the cause of the mischief, if the Spaniards relinquish their policy of not admitting other nations to trade in those parts, since there are no other powers which refuse their ports to ships for refuge and to provide themselves with what they need. With the removal of the cause of the mischief and of hostilities there would no longer be the motive for plunder and a real peace might be established in those parts. But the affair will involve delays and the decision is uncertain.
The affair of my first visit from the Spanish ambassador will remain unsettled. Every effort has been made to induce Colbert to give way on the question of punctilio, but in vain, and it has been suggested to the Spanish ambassador that he should not object to receive for once the treatment accorded to France. Many compromises have been suggested, and I have always contrived to have the best relations with both parties. Finally, the Ambassador Molina told the Secretary Alberti frankly that the question was a trifling one for Spain, which suffered no indignity. As he was certain of my goodwill he hoped that I would employ him in the service of your Serenity, and we could meet in a third place. Unbosoming himself he then said that there were ways out but as everything would have to be discussed for the benefit of Colbert he thought it best to let the matter drop.
After much consideration I have decided to conform to the suggestion of the Spanish ambassador. It will always be difficult to arrange a settlement with the disagreement existing between Colbert and Molina. If the matter is dropped your Serenity will have the advantage as Molina came to my house and returned home without receiving any correspondence from me or compensation for having gone so far.
If Molina goes they do not expect more than a resident here in his place, and so with time the punctilio about ceremonial may possibly be dropped.
London, the 1st February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.9. The Memorial.
Persistence of the Turkish attacks on Candia, in spite of the season of the year. The Turks are also moving forces against Dalmatia in the direction of Cattaro. At sea the Turks are strengthened by the accession of ships from Barbary, so the forces of the republic will be divided, and they will be forced to give way unless they receive generous assistance. The pope, the emperor, the kings of France and Spain and the princes of the empire and of Italy are preparing to help. Feels confident that this crown will also assist and that it will not delay to make a declaration. If rendered speedily the help will be additionally valuable.
[Italian.]
Feb. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
10. Antonio Grimani, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the Doge and Senate.
The pope has consented with alacrity to write the hortatory brief to the queen of England, and I am told that it will be despatched to her this evening; God grant that it be with some fruit.
Rome, the 2nd February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
11. To the Ambassador in England.
We hear from our ambassador at Rome that in spite of certain difficulties he has succeeded in getting the supreme pontiff to agree to write the hortatory brief desired by the queen over there, so that with such an incitement she may be able to exert herself with the king on behalf of our interests with the more warmth. Accordingly it may be of advantage to make known this good disposition and to make an effort that the desired benefit may result therefrom.
Ayes, 133. Noes, 3. Neutral, 1.
[Italian.]
Feb. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
12. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Even small accidents conspire to delay the resolutions for which I am pressing. The exceptionally cold weather has so aggravated the usual catarrh of the Lord Keeper, one of the most important ministers and a member of the Council of State, that since he has passed from chronic convalescence to a painful illness, the king has only once been able to go and hold a consultation at his house after I had presented the memorial enclosed last week. To forward the matter by private means I have sent the Secretary Alberti to the Lord Keeper in my stead, as he does not admit visits, while I have spoken to the duke of Buchingen and others of the Council, obtaining assurances and promises from them all.
The Lord Keeper, who is a man of infinite goodness, opened his heart to the secretary and showed how this crown is committed to the Porte, both by the peace and by its subjects and the enormous capital which is in the hands of those barbarians.
Alberti, being well informed of my intentions, replied that there was no lack of ways by which this crown could lend its vigorous arm to the support of tottering Italy, without the Turks finding it out. There were divers kinds of succour and easy ways to cover it under the cloak of (fn. 4) others and different names. The Lord Keeper said that the only way was to help covertly. The secretary replied that the republic did not wish to limit the generosity of this crown. While he assured the Keeper that the Senate did not wish for declarations with manifest prejudice to his Majesty, he carried out my instructions by leaving him impressed by the urgency of the need of Candia.
In my wish to get them to consider the question here and to detach themselves from Holland I give up cultivating for the declarations which are expected from the Dutch. As the meeting of the States General seems to be fixed for the 15th of this present month, I am trying to have Temple moved to induce the Pensionary Vit to introduce the question of succour there, and I shall also move the Ambassador Borel, keeping my eye on both parties for the better service of your Serenity.
I greatly regret that this matter has to be dealt with at a time when there is fear of an approaching rupture of the peace between the crowns and when the greatest attention is absorbed by the affairs of the triple alliance. The negotiations of the commissioners at Lille are now near a breach or are already abandoned. The Spaniards say that this is due to the extravagance of the demands of the French, and not admitting (fn. 5) their pretensions (fn. 5) and Linch, they talk (more for the sake of appearances than from any disposition to agree to what is just) of the claims, which they assert they have, over seven or eight other places, lands and territories, in short introducing a demand absolutely removed from the motive for which the commissioners were gathered at Lille, and that in Flanders they ought not to cause tolls to be paid on the goods which pass from France to Holland. Such are the contentions of the Spaniards. Your Excellencies will have received more particulars from the Court of Paris.
The Spanish ambassador, however, has told me that the constable, governor in Flanders, had recalled the commissioners from Lille seeing that the French had no intention of concluding, their only object being to leave a way open for quarrels, so as to avail themselves of opportunities by force for their advantage. For this cause he was not yet relieved of his anxiety about Franche Comté, and he felt certain of the rupture of the peace. In spite of this he did not know if the alliance would guarantee Flanders according to the treaty of peace. On the other hand he did not believe that the queen, his mistress, would consent to the excessive payments claimed by the alliance itself for guarding all the dominions of her Majesty. Holland required nothing of Spain of the things that had passed (delle cose passate nulla ricercava alla Spagna) and now wanted to control all the negotiations. Sweden insisted on the 100,000l. sterling for the soldiers of Brem, without the slightest reason, but the gentleman was bought by France, more than the English one was, who was already sold, because the English, whose pride was unparalleled, in the event of any upset would have no spur of reputation for upholding what the alliance had established. These are the additions of the Spaniards and the real objects of (fn. 5) that when they have (fn. 5) peace they will obtain their intent therein, because they make the Spaniards bear the expense, the charges and the perturbations of war itself.
The ducali of the 18th January have reached me, and those which went astray, of the 24th November and 1st December have arrived. I will use the papers enclosed in conversation with the ambassador of Holland to show the good will of the republic towards the States. I enclose copies of Arlinton's note, of an extract from the letter to Harvis and of the treaty of peace with the Algerines, which were all sent with the despatch of the 31st December, but I note with astonishment that the following one was opened (fn. 6) only one courier was robbed.
London, the 8th February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Enclosure.13. From a letter of Lord Arlington to Daniel Harvey, H.M.'s ambassador to the Sultan, of 26 Nov. 1668.
Explaining that nothing can do more prejudice to the republic of Venice, than the belief that the Signory is negotiating peace with the Sultan while pressing Christendom for assistance in the war. He will receive in good part the reserve of the resident of Venice in the matter and not desist from serving the Senate when occasion arises; but it is not necessary to be beforehand in any matter of any kind soever, unless it be in conformity with the measures of the ministers of the most serene republic or what he is certain will be fully authorised by them. If he does otherwise he will do them more harm than good.
[Italian from the English.]
Enclosure.14. Lord Arlington to the Venetian Ambassador.
Encloses copy of the king's letter to his ambassador at the Porte, to remove misunderstanding.
Whitehall, the 6th December, old style.
[Italian from the French.]
Enclosure.15. Copy of the peace established by Sir Thomas Allen with the republic of Algiers. (fn. 7)
[Italian.]
Feb. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
16. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The news of the state of affairs at Candia serves to arouse universal sympathy, but whereas it should stir men to hasten to help it has exactly the opposite effect, and here they look idly on as if time would defend the place against the might of the Ottoman.
(fn. 6) the Ambassador Colbert about Candia up to the 2nd December last, with a detailed account of the position of the siege, describing the walls opened by great breaches and the outer fortifications utterly destroyed, the ground being converted into batteries for the Turks, lodged within a few paces of the walls. It seems that they place their only hope in a sortie. If this fails it seems evident that (fn. 8) of the walls and that the place must fall after all these efforts. Supplied with the ducali and with new intelligence, while not denying the fact of the ruin of the bastion of Sant' Andrea, which is only too true, have maintained at Court (fn. 8) was hoped from the sortie, and that with any advantage gained over the Turks, joined with the help obtained from the powers, there was good hope of a courageous resistance. I do my best to instil the necessity of succour and to encourage the belief, which has almost vanished, of a brave resistance. This is all talk and so is what up to to-day I have been able to represent to the Lord Keeper, with whom I have not been able to speak, as he is confined to bed with a catarrh. To him my memorial has been referred, according to custom and to the confidence which his Majesty has in the ability and zeal of so sincere a minister. As I have the matter much at heart I am trying to keep up a good disposition, which has cooled and to get them to write again to the Hague for the next meeting of the Assembly General, that they may decide definitely on the succour for your Serenity.
I have expressed a wish to the Dutch ambassador to know the decision of the States about the withdrawal of the sequestration made by Sautino. He was expecting letters from that part and said that on their arrival he would inform me of what had taken place (fn. 8) to write so that the question of succour should be brought before the assembly, although their High Mightinesses had no need of any prompting to declare in favour of your Excellencies. In this same assembly they will deal with important matters, the opinion being established that the peace between the crowns is ephemeral. The Spaniards, dejected by the fear of the rupture with France, infected by the great reserve of the allies about guaranteeing them and constrained by the excessive expense, offer at the Hague to enter as a third with the English and Dutch for the payment of the soldiers of Brem, and they claim that as they did not sign a treaty or give their approval to the offer made by these two nations to Sweden, the alliance should recognise this payment as evidence of the regard which Spain has for it. Moreover the Spaniards make another proposal, and show that they are equally anxious for the friendship and assistance of the alliance, as they offer to pay the whole sum to Sweden provided it will guarantee Flanders. But on the other hand the demands are raised so much that it seems (fn. 8) but until the result of the first proposals is seen, it is impossible to know definitely how far either will go, as all of them keep secret the chief basis of their punctilios.
The French ambassador continues to protest that the Most Christian is most strongly in favour of maintaining the peace, and at the same time he renews his negotiations for the introduction of trade between these two countries, reducing them to definite proposals, that the French shall enjoy in England the privileges of English nationals, and that the latter shall have the same rights in France; but as (fn. 9) in ways and means, tends to the same end because it will not be advisable to treat as foreign nations in either kingdom where another foreigner communicates with less disadvantage, so that by their reciprocal trading they will shut out every nation, and there will always remain the original objection which induced them not to consent to the French project.
A (fn. 9) has arrived from Portugal bringing to his Majesty on behalf of the princes there the news of the birth of a princess, (fn. 10) He was publicly introduced to audience of the king, queen, the duke and duchess of Hiorch, and received with all the honours, constantly attended by Sir Cotterel, Master of the Ceremonies. In accordance with the usual custom, last Saturday the king and Court and all the people put on mourning, in commemoration of the anniversary of the king who was beheaded twenty years ago, (fn. 11) and to-day this monarch is venerated as a martyr by the same persons who, when he was alive, did not respect him as their prince and lord.
London, the 15th February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
17. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I lay at your Serenity's feet the petition of Sir Philip Ovvardi and of Francis Watson, the former a gentleman of a great house, the same as that of the dukes of Norfolk and earls of Arundel, the latter a soldier and student who under the protection of the other has progressed and succeeded with his experiments and trials, one for the preservation of ships by careening, the other for gilding, having obtained from the king here the privilege of which I enclose a copy. They both petition the authority of your Excellencies for a patent that no one except themselves may engage in work of this sort in your dominions, so that this privilege may encourage its introduction there, more especially because of the facility with which your Serenity may use it owing to the ingredients which grow there or are easily found. There are examples of similar privileges granted by favour by your Serenity to men of this nation, and I have complied with the request, which does not extend to one for money, referring everything to the high prudence of the Senate.
London, the 15th February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Enclosure.18. Francis Watson to Pietro Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England.
Setting forth how he has discovered the art of careening ships and vessels and of painting houses, coaches and similar material equal to the best gilding and at a much lower price than has hitherto been done, and asking him to report this invention to the most serene republic of Venice to the end that the petitioner may obtain letters patent similar to those enclosed, granted to him by the king of England, that he may practise that art under the auspices of St. Mark.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.19. The true and proper use of the secret newly discovered for the careening of ships and vessels.
This secret by irrefragable experience is recognised as much more suitable for careening ships than pitch, sulphur, resin etc. since it protects and preserves the decking and sides of ships against the inroads of worms for a much longer time than anything else hitherto discovered, while it also maintains itself upon the wood more than grease, bisonto or bitumen can and further by its lightness and smoothness it greatly helps the course of the ship in sailing, dries very quickly, has no offensive smell but rather a very pleasing one; and for the greater advantage of the most serene republic, seven of the ten ingredients which constitute the preparation are either known or found in its territories. On this account nothing more suitable has ever been found for careening gondolas or piotte. (fn. 12) His Brittanic Majesty will ratify all and has already done so as one who has seen and approved by experience in many of his ships, which have been furnished within and without and careened with this stuff, and for the greater encouragement of the invention he has of his favour been pleased to grant them letters patent for the sole use thereof as also for its exceptional use for painting and decorating shops, houses, coaches and the like, its lustre and brightness making it hardly distinguishable from true gilding, although the ingredients may be obtained for half the price.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.20. Copy of patent granted to Sir Philip Howard and Francis Watson, for an invention. (fn. 13)
[Italian from the English.]
Feb. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
21. Marc Antonio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
They are only waiting at the Hague for the powers to come from Sweden in order to put the final touches to the affair of the guarantee. The Baron Isola the imperial minister, the ambassador of England and the Pensionary Vit at the Hague have held frequent conferences, which have taken place without the knowledge or assistance of the Catholic ambassador. This causes much umbrage to that minister. When recently he surprised them all together in the house of this same de Vit he gained no further advantage than that of interrupting the conference.
Paris, the 19th February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Feb. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
22. To the Ambassador in England.
With regard to the memorial presented to the king and his reply thereto although it is hedged about with appropriate considerations, we are willing to believe that some good will result the more so because there seems to be some sign of their abandoning their original reluctance of taking any step without Holland. But while we had it at heart to solicit a positive answer to the memorial and to have expeditious and swift succour in any case, we also consider it prudent to aim at obtaining munitions if they do not agree to give troops and ships. With your prudence it is superfluous to repeat the necessity for reserve and the caution required to avoid accidents; at the same time you will recognise that time is passing without any results and with nothing but good intentions and hopes. We are sure that you are perfectly aware how to conduct yourself and will know how to avoid replies which might prove harmful and useless.
Ayes, 120. Noes, 4. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
Feb. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
23. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
My representations of the need of assisting the republic and the importance of doing so speedily induced an influential minister to have the matter brought before his Majesty's privy Council; but there was no one with sufficient Christian zeal to concur in the merit and justice of the succour, and political considerations were introduced to make them cautious in their declarations, and they measured their feelings narrowly with due consideration for the circumstances of the time. Arising from this and sitting down to discuss in detail the manner and to weigh carefully the quantity of the aid, one of the first proposals to be rejected was that of changing the flag of the squadron of ships in the Mediterranean and letting them go under that of St. Mark. Almost all of them maintained that this would be found out and that when the Turks perceived the deceit their vengeance would inevitably fall upon this crown.
The same considerations of the peace with the Porte and the number of persons and the trade which this country has in those parts, in a conspicuous manner, has persuaded them not to embrace another proposal, less obtrusive than the first, to wit, under the name (fn. 14) and under the appearance (fn. 14) a body of troops, when all the other princes supply them in abundance. But this was held to be a false step and particularly in his Majesty, who not only had his greatest interests with the Porte, but was committed to it more than any other prince, since he must have a tender consideration for the preservation of the capital of his subjects. My persuasion led to these easy and covert methods of succour being submitted, but when they came to be discussed my words did not suffice to remove the fears which are deeply rooted in the minds of every one. It was also proposed to make a liberal gift of powder and munitions which they could pretend had been bought by the minister of your Serenity, and this led them to discuss supplying a sum of money, and if this could be done secretly. Fearful of their own shadows they proceeded to discuss the ways which would be most hidden from the observation of the Turks.
In the Council the matter is under consideration and before they decide it will certainly return to the hands of the Lord Keeper.
The hopes of great succours have vanished and there is not the slightest assurance even of a little.
The truth is that the question of the Levant trade is of the greatest importance, which forces them to meditate upon the nature of the succour and the king is very hard up and this forces him to measure the quantity. By the authority of parliament very slender revenues are assigned to him, with the obligation to meet unlimited expenditure, and to make good the losses suffered with scant hope of receiving fresh assistance from parliament itself, which has already supplied an extraordinary subvention of eleven millions, so that those being consumed he is now in precisely the condition which his subjects desire, who are impatient of bearing a yoke and jealous of the king's forces, to whose strength they contribute with caution, always suspecting that they may be providing him with arms to their own hurt.
London, the 22nd February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
24. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The storms which interrupt the quiet in this season have an evil appearance, and scarcely has the lightning in Lorraine vanished without thunder than there comes the failure of the negotiations at Lille and a beginning of resolute operations, to disturb men's minds if it does not disturb the peace. By a resolute edict the Most Christian has published (fn. 15) within a period of fifty days, upon pain of confiscation, at a time when many of the nobility, particularly of Brussels, feel the blow and judge it a severity such as has never been practised in the tranquillity of good correspondence, and more in the nature of war than of peace. (fn. 16) The Constable governor is uniting a part of the troops of the duke (fn. 15) for the safety of Luxemburg (fn. 15) .
France complains, but much more, that the Spaniards are exerting themselves with all their might to oblige the alliance to uphold their side. To this the Spaniards answer frankly that the Most Christian also is at liberty to redouble his efforts, but that the alliance is under an obligation to uphold whichever of the two crowns will be constant in the peace and to oppose any other … (fn. 15) the said alliance.
Five days ago the Ambassador Carlisse left at last for Sweden. After he has handed over the garter to that monarch he will press for the continuation of the alliance, and in order that that crown may not be diverted by war with Muscovy, England and Holland will mediate for a composition (fn. 15) Sweden from the Spaniards, but it already appears that his Catholic Majesty no longer objects, provided his dominions enjoy the guarantee and are strongly defended in case of need.
The Spanish ambassador told me that he had this point for certain, and that England and Holland having remitted their pretensions with the Catholic crown recognised that they had sufficient interest to pledge themselves to the maintenance of the peace. His Excellency is not alarmed by the reports spread about of intelligence of this crown with France, and he feels sure of the inclusion in the alliance of the emperor, the princes of Luneburg and possibly the Swiss as well.
The Spanish ambassador also told me that (fn. 17) of the plate of Porto Vello had arrived here (fn. 17) had actually set out from the said island towards Cartagena to surprise it. He also had it for certain that the ports of the Indies would never be opened by the Spaniards to any nation, because that would be to open the mines. This point might be disputed and backed up by reprisals, but in his opinion they would never (fn. 17) particularly of a quantity of drugs, has caused some apprehension to the merchants of this city, who in their belief in the failure of that commerce hoped to supply their own to the French, with so much profit and advantage to the mart.
The growth of popularity and the multiplication of expenses (fn. 17) the Ambassador Colbert (fn. 17) gentlemen of the Court. The most sumptuous banquet was succeeded by a dance, (fn. 18) honoured by their Majesties, in accordance with what they did two months ago in the house of the Spanish ambassador, that his Majesty should favour the foreign ministers with tokens of greater friendliness.
London, the 22nd February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Feb. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Roma.
Venetian
Archives.
25. Antonio Grimani, Venetian Ambassador at Rome, to the Doge and Senate.
The brief for the queen of England has been drawn up and has been consigned to me in order that it may reach her Majesty with more security. Accordingly I attach it to the present despatch so that it may be forwarded to the Ambassador Mocenigo with such comments as may be considered most advantageous for the public service.
Rome, the 23rd February, 1668. [M.V.]
[Italian.]
Enclosure.26. The pope's brief.
Carissima in Christo filia nostra Catharina Magnae Britanniae Regina, Clemens Papa IX.
Carissima in Christo filia nostra Salutem: Ingens ac sollicita cura mentem nostram anxiam indesinenter habet ne Candiae civitas quae magnopere periclitatum in manus hostis tali detrimento ac periculo cadat. Itaque omni penitus opera qua propriis viribus qua officiis apud principes Catholicos omnes enixe contendimus ei suppetias et auxilium quod maxime querimus afferre. Hinc ab eximia pietate Majestatis tuae etiam atque etiam petimus ut si quid opis ab ea in hanc tarn piam causam istic parari potuerit, id omne Reipublicae Venetae conferre benigne velit. Hoc autem etsi pro certo habemus Majestatem tuam alacriter ac prompte publicae causae daturam esse, tamen veluti nobis ipsis et ditionis ecclesiasticae rationibus ac securitati singulariter et unice praestitum, praecipuis etiam animi grati sensibus accipiemus. Interim piis hujusmodi conatibus adjutorem ac retributionem Deum accurate precamur, Apostolicam benedictionem Majestati tuae Paterne prorsus impertimur.
Datum Romae apud S. Mariam Majorem sub annulo piscatoris, die xix Feb. MDCLXIX, pontificatus nostri anno secundo.

Footnotes

1 Obliterated.
2 Obliterated.
3 The chancellor of Sweden, Magnus Gabriel de la Gardie.
4 Obliterated.
5 Obliterated.
6 Obliterated.
7 The London Gazette of Nov. 30–Dec. 3, 1668, contains a report from Algiers dated 9 Oct., with particulars of the renewal of the former peace with the Algerians, with three additional articles.
8 The last two lines of each page of this despatch are obliterated.
9 Obliterated.
10 Mons. Verjus, secretary to the princess of Portugal, who arrived on Saturday, 23 Jan., o.s. His errand was to engage the queen to be godmother to the little princess, born on the 6th Jan. and christened Isabella Maria. Williamson's Journal, S.P. Dom. Chas. II, Vol. cclxxi, on 25 Jan. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9, p. 190. London Gazette, 1668/9, Jan. 21–5.
11 Saturday the 9th February, by the old style 30th January, the day of the execution of Charles I.
12 Peota, espèce de barque legère qui servait quelque fois d'aviso dans les escadres. Jal. Glossaire Nautique.
13 A warrant was issued to Howard and Watson on Feb. 10 for a patent for their invention of a new mode of graving, garnishing and painting ships, and for their invention of a method of gilding. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1668–9, p. 190.
14 Obliterated.
15 The last 3 or 4 lines of each page are missing, the paper having rotted.
16 A reference to a proclamation of 20th October, 1668, by which all persons having lands within the jurisdiction of the French in any of the places depending on their late conquests, were commanded, within the space of two months, to repair to their respective habitations, to acknowledge their obedience to his Most Christian Majesty and to quit whatsoever employments they held under any other prince or governor. On Saturday, 9th Feb., N.S., they published in Lille the confiscation of the estates of all who had not, by their appearance, given obedience to the proclamation, London Gazette, Feb. 8–11, 1669/1670.
17 The last 3 or 4 lines of each page are missing, the paper having rotted.
18 On Wednesday the 10th Feb., n.s. The duke of York and Prince Rupert were also present. Salvetti on 23 Feb., Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 27962 S, fol. 341d. See also Pepys: Diary, Vol. viii, pp. 223–4.