Venice
October 1669

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

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109-123

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'Venice: October 1669', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 109-123. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90266 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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October 1669

Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
119. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The negotiations of the triple alliance being at the point reported last week the ministers have had recourse to the judgment of the constable governor to get him to decide to satisfy the Swedes by the payment of the money before a declaration about succour. At this point the Chevalier Goi Melz, a Savoyard arrived at Brussels from Madrid, in haste, with secret despatches for the constable. Even after seven days the contents are not known to those most intimate with his Excellency. This news has reawakened the most profound meditations. There has been rather wild talk about the exchange of fortresses. I prefer to withhold my judgment until the difficulties of so great a transaction are seen to have been digested by more matured negotiation, calculated to deal with a matter of so much importance. The truth is that the Swedish ministers are becoming more & more importunate for the money. Supposing the governor to be furnished with new commissions they are pressing the mediator, the baron dell' Isola, so hard that he does not know what expedients to adopt in order to induce them to stay and hear the decisions of the constable. He is constantly suggesting fresh compromises to his Excellency in his efforts to make sure that the Spaniards will pay and to induce the Swedes to commit themselves. On this point the fate of the alliance depends. The generality of the people are left in suspense because of the impenetrable advices which have reached the constable. Not a ray of light comes from Madrid either, communication being still interrupted by the arrest of couriers. The same thing is happening between France and Flanders, disarranging everything.
The baron dell' Isola, being intent on bringing together the two principals, Spain and Sweden, no longer speaks of the inclusion of the emperor in the alliance, which was held up by the difficulty about titles. According to the advices which have reached your Serenity from Vienna, agreeing with what I noted on the 30th August, I continue to hear that the negotiations will be making some apparent progress but will reach no effective end.
The Council here has entered minutely into all the details and most important particulars. Reflecting on the insistence of the Spaniards to induce the allies to pledge themselves to succour them, they have suspended taking any fresh decision until they see more likelihood of a speedy issue. When that time comes there will be no lack of disputes and different opinions as to what the obligations of this crown may be for the maintenance of the peace of Aix la Chapelle. Already they have discussed in the Council with some liberty the results of committing themselves to this alliance, showing how wavering their opinions are, being attached always to intelligences with France and looking closely at the selfish ends of Holland, which cultivates the union for its own service and keeps them here in perpetual jealousy. They came finally to the real crux of the matter, that the king here, very scantily provided with money, without any compulsion for his own advantage, should oblige himself to a defence that might possibly hazard his reputation and was certain to bring him little or no credit. This and other matters will depend on the resolutions taken by parliament at their coming meeting. These will be fundamental in determining the payments of ready money, to defray past expenses and what is proper for the future. So far as one can see at present there seems to be no plausible pretext for persuading a body so averse from expenditure that they are pledged, for the honour of the crown, to grant aids in order to uphold the peace concluded between France and Spain. This object may serve to keep his Majesty protesting his firm intention to guarantee Spain if she is attacked by France and to this very day M. Colbert has not been able to get the smallest correction of the step taken by the Ambassador Temple at the Hague. The secretary of state always tells him that the allies will have heard both sides and that the English ambassador would never depart from a most correct impartiality.
London, the 4th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
120. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
With the royal palace of Witheal draped and the household all in mourning, the king & queen with the duke & duchess of Hiorch appeared in London after dinner on Saturday. They are beginning to receive the offices & condolences on the death of the queen mother. Sunday evening was assigned to the French ambassador, and in four separate audiences he thoroughly carried out his duties. On the following evening the minister of your serenity did his part, being received with the same formalities as France. I spoke of the sorrow with your Serenity would hear the sad news, and enlarged on the merits of the deceased who has given the world and these realms such distinguished, benign and glorious princes. They replied with great kindness & appreciation. The ambassador of Denmark, with his king so near, is momentarily expecting letters of condolence to present to his Majesty, and accordingly has put off the public function. He, together with Holland, who without entry or state audience does not enjoy the character of ambassador, went as private gentlemen to the queen's chamber to pay their due respects.
In connection with the news that the Most Christian, as a compliment to the king here, has ordered a general sequestration on all the goods of the late queen, four commissioners have been appointed here to view the debts and collect what is due. It is generously ordered that all those who were salaried by her Majesty shall receive their pay regularly until next January. The earl of St. Alban, who made an appearance here and then returned to Paris, is one of the deputies. The ambassador and the almoner Montagu are others and the fourth is the husband of the late duchess of Rismond, of the house of Ouward. These all will attend personally to the settlement of that business. (fn. 1)
As the king is appearing in public and accessible and ready to listen to the foreign ministers, I went to tell him the news of Candia. When enlarging upon the courage of the defenders I contrived to let fall something about the steadfastness of your Serenity and protested strongly and publicly that there was no thought of peace, so that there should be no one who was not convinced of it.
The Ambassador Colbert is satisfied of the Senate's appreciation of the merit and ability of his brother, the camp marshal. who has a large share in the defence of Candia.
The news arrived here from Alicante that Vice Admiral Alen has been sighted cruising in those waters keeps the Court extraordinarily eager to learn the result of his protests. The merchants are all thoroughly tired of the constant breaches of faith and of the interruption to their peaceful trading. The Council of State certainly has not mitigated the severity of the instructions and the result will show how well the Vice Admiral has carried them out, it being his duty to bridle the audacity of those corsairs by force.
London, the 4th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
121. To the Ambassador in England.
Commend his office of condolence for the queen mother. His private fortune shall not be charged with the mourning expenses, and 1000 ducats will be allowed him for this. Strong orders have been issued for the release of Galileo's son.
That 1000 ducats be granted to the agents of Pietro Mocenigo to pay for mourning for the queen mother.
Ayes, 102. Noes, 3. Neutral, 7.
On the same day in the Collegio:
Ayes, 19. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
122. To the Proveditore General of the Three Islands.
The Court and the merchants in England have been much gratified by the order of the Senate that the merchants who lade currants for those parts shall be relieved of the increased charge put upon every thousand of currants, which was imposed contrary to the intention of the state. The Senate is confident that he will see that this order is observed and they send this fresh incitement so that he may be on the watch to ensure that this is done.
Ayes, 102. Noes, 3. Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Oct. 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
123. To the Proveditore General da Mar.
The delivery of the son of Galileo has been recommended to him several times; but the demands of more important interests have prevented him from persisting in his efforts. A renewal of the requests for this made to the Senate afford a fresh motive for doing everything possible, and by concerted action as well with the Cavalier Molin he is to try and procure the result.
Ayes, 102. Noes, 3. Neutral, 7.
[Italian.]
Oct. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
124. Catterin Belegno, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge & Senate.
The commissions of the British envoy are for treating of most lengthy & complicated matters connected with the sea. They claim the introduction of trade for English craft beyond the line. The Count of Pegnoranda is the minister destined to hear him; but they have had him informed that to avoid all possibility of a misunderstanding they do not wish to treat either orally or in the Spanish language but in writing and in the universal Latin. In response to the mission of this envoy they will send from the Court one of these days, with the same character, Don Giovanni di Toledo, natural son of the late duke of Alva.
Madrid, the 9th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
125. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
When Viscount Faulcombridge returned from the country, his first steps, after he had paid his respects to the king, were directed to the house of your Serenity's minister. He protested that he would never lose any opportunity of making known to all the world his veneration for the honour done him by the king in making him serve the most serene republic as ambassador. His effusiveness gave me ample opportunity to reply in the same style in assuring him of the affection with which your Excellencies would receive him and I went on to speak of his speedy journey to Venice. He seemed equally inclined to make haste to enjoy that distinguished position, leaving me hopeful that he will hasten his start. He began by telling me that he hoped, on his way out through Turin, to present a letter of the king to the duke there, paying at the same time the debt of gratitude due from the king here. He went on to tell me of the nature of the burden which has been laid upon him, as he will have the superintendence of all the affairs of Italy. But the most important thing was what had been intimated to him at his first meeting with his Majesty, that he should offer to your Serenity the mediation of peace with the Turk.
The Secretary Arlington has spoken to me more clearly on this subject. Entering upon the despatch of Faulcombridge he said that besides the incentive of correspondence with your Serenity the king wished to convince you of his passionate concern for the affairs of Candia. Since he had not been able with arms and prompt succour to join with all the other princes for the defence of that place, he would like his ministers, acting as mediators of peace, to give the republic that quiet which is disputed by the obstinacy of the Turks. Arlington commended the king's idea and seemed persuaded that success would be easy.
With the commands of the Senate fresh in my mind, while applauding the generous spirit of his Majesty I enlarged merely upon the fierceness of the war which is at present being waged with the Turk and that it was by that road that your Excellencies were seeking quiet, in the belief that your steadfastness would always stimulate the princes to come and take part in the end of so glorious a resistance.
In spite of this modest reserve I did not forget anything that might stimulate the viscount to the expedition. Without mixing myself with the question of mediation I assured him that he was looked for and would be received with every mark of esteem.
Lord Arlington went on to communicate to me letters from Vice Admiral Alen written from the waters opposite Algiers. He had sent Sir [Edward] Sprack with twelve of his force of twenty frigates from there to meet the ships which were returning from serving the Grand Vizier. For the rest the letters leave one curious to know what he is going to decide about those corsairs, to make amends for their bad faith, against the sworn peace. Arlington assured me that the Vice Admiral, fully informed of the opinion of the king and furnished with instructions from the Council, would make it his business to prepare the way for obtaining all due satisfaction by the use of severity. With this opening Arlington said that he hoped this expedition might divert the force of the Turks. He told me that the king had given permission to five English officers to proceed by Toulon (fn. 2) to Candia. When the king himself repeated this with his own lips I bowed and told his Majesty that they would be kindly received by the captain general.
To day Borel is presenting publicly his credentials to the king. He sent me word by a gentleman that as he has come rather to continue than commence the embassy which he has already supported at this Court he absolved himself from the state entry. As the great hall is not quite ready his Majesty will receive him in another room. For the rest the function will conform to the usual ceremonial.
London, the 11th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
126. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
From my past despatches your Serenity will have gathered the feelings of the French ambassador about the forward step taken by the ministers of the triple alliance at the Hague and the intention intimated to him that the Ambassador Temple should be reproved in some form for his action, the king having held out some hopes and the duke of Hiorch spoken favourably. Upon this foundation Colbert wrote to the Most Christian from here against Temple. He now has instructions to thank his Majesty for this. On going to audience to execute these orders he found that the king had changed his mind, possibly being primed by the ministers or influenced by the supporters of Temple or by Spain. So he answered very firmly that he has seen with his own eyes that what Temple had done was on good grounds. Seeing from what had gone before that it was hopeless to look for a withdrawal, Colbert decided to provide for the future and asked that Temple's hands should be tied. He succeeded in obtaining a promise from the king, who undertook that he should be ordered to maintain complete reserve in such matters of joint action and implications of the alliance.
Colbert communicated this much to me and he also told me that the Most Christian had sent a paper to the Hague in response to that presented by the Spanish Ambassador Gamarra to the allies and by them to Pompona. In this he retorts upon the Spaniards all the complaints made by them against the French. He ends by saying that his minister Pompona was at the Hague to cultivate friendship with the States, but if there should be occasion to negotiate any matter pertaining to the alliance they were to direct themselves to him, Colbert, in London, as the ambassador to a king who is the principal part of that alliance. This confirms what I wrote in my Nos. 96 and 97 that the French look with an unfriendly eye on the game of Holland in her efforts to draw the negotiations to the Hague, and M. Colbert said as much to me.
With regard to the share which the crown of Sweden has in the alliance, its dealings with the Muscovite call for attention. That power would be pleased to hear of differences between them and the French and Danes, with the former for the break up of the alliance and with the latter because of their longstanding quarrels. There is also some talk of bad faith. It is whispered that when Sir Wich, the English mediator with the Grand Duke, in order to impress him with the authority and merit of the British king, told him that he had given peace to Holland, brought about and established that of the crowns, put an end to differences and procured good will between the princes of Christendom, the Grand Duke answered dryly, and said that with respect to his relations with the king of Sweden he would decide in accordance with the interests of his own government.
A better turn has been taken in the negotiations between Portugal and Holland over the long standing dispute about the 8,000,000 francs. This was claimed by the Dutch by virtue of the agreement made at the time when Portugal had separated from Spain, and Brazil had rebelled against the dominion which Holland had acquired there, to throw itself into the arms of Portugal. Braganza then declared himself a debtor to the Dutch for the eight millions for their improvements, provided they should leave him in free possession. This agreement has not been violated in any respect except in the default of payment. This will now be performed by treaty concluded at the Hague by the Ambassador Don Francesco di Melo upon improved conditions for his master, as instead of eight Portugal will only pay four millions, and this in instalments, and not cash down, but in salt. (fn. 3) This is a very bitter morsel for Holland, which accepts the arrangement rather than allow the debt to slip out of their hands or to risk the union which Portugal protests with the king of France, particularly in the East Indies.
Conflicting news comes from Africa about the successes and losses of Taffilet. The earl of Arondel has arrived at Tanger and sent to have hostages for his own security. Before assuming his character he will observe the proceedings of Taffilet and the solidity of his dominion which seems to be contested by many rivals, over whom his fortune is at present in the ascendent.
London, the 11th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
127. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge & Senate.
Several commissioners have arrived in Paris who in the name of the British king are to participate in the inventories which are to be made for the inheritance of the queen mother of England. (fn. 4) The count of St. Agnan has returned here from that country, who was sent as an envoy with condolences.
Blois, the 16th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 18.
Senato,
Secreta
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
128. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
While I was getting ready to go to the king to thank him for perfecting the correspondence promised to your Serenity by the appointment three days ago of Viscount Faulcombridge as ambassador, the ducali of the 26 & 27 September reached me with instructions to seek an opportunity for thanking him. Accordingly in the evening I spoke with the king in the queen's chamber. After telling him how much the Senate appreciated his action and how warmly it would receive the ambassador, I said that your Excellencies desired me, without loss of time, to thank him for the decision of the Council last Wednesday about the more speedy departure of Faulcombridge, as they would rejoice to see the minister with them as a fresh pledge of the ancient correspondence with this crown. The king received my office most graciously and said he knew he could count on the affection of the most serene republic. He added several more remarks to show his interest in the glories of your Serenity and his wish that Faulcombridge should go soon. Your Serenity must know that the king has not come to this decision suddenly. Faulcombridge, being urged by me and attracted by the prospect I held out to him of his reception at Venice, has been led to importune the Secretary Arlington. Owing to this and to my representations of the merit he would acquire with your Excellencies, Arlington was induced to propose the question and he also induced Faulcombridge to urge the duke of Hiorch to use his influence in the Council to overcome all difficulties. So it fell out that Arlington proposed in the Council the despatch to Venice on the ground that the time was seasonable as it had not yet become very cold nor was there the summer danger in proceeding to a warm climate. The duke of Hiorch supported him on more political grounds urging that as England had not followed the example of the princes, great & small in hastening to the war, she should enter for the peace of the republic. This is the ground for hastening his despatch, so that your Serenity may be able to avail yourself of him the sooner, and to this end the commissioners have been ordered to make an immediate provision of money. (fn. 5)
Since this decision I have seen the Secretary Arlington who obliged me to assure your Excellencies of Faulcombridge's speedy departure. He spoke to me in the same sense as the Council about the mediation saying that Faulcombridge at Venice and Harvis at Constantinople will have instructions to be guided by the wishes of the republic. When I met the duke of Hiorch and thanked him for supporting the despatch he began to speak about the important reasons for mediating peace. I went no further than I had with the king, confining myself to expressions of appreciation, in accordance with my instructions. In the mean time I have done my best to encourage despatch and I hope that the cold weather will not arrive to upset the arrangements. The viscount told me that he hopes to be ready to start or nearly in four weeks. He hoped to have the money ready and to learn if he is to take complimentary letters to the duke of Savoy, which will serve to increase the importance of the minister.
In the further execution of my instructions I saw and thanked the Ambassador Colbert for his efforts over the levy of 2000 Irish. As I discovered that he has no commissions to press for this I went on to to speak of events at Candia. The ambassador was rejoiced to hear from several quarters that since the departure of the auxiliaries the place was offering a brave resistance to the Turks.
I refer to your Excellencies the offer of Thomas Ewan, an English engineer. He has patents of Duke Mazarini, general of the artillery in France and attested by the duke of Hiorch, showing the services rendered, and with his son he promises to do the same in Candia.
London, the 18th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
129. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
The mediation of the baron dell'Isola at the Hague has been made public. The most plausible proposal, reduced to its elements, is the one sent some weeks ago to the governor of Flanders for discussion and which, as reported, balances the satisfaction of the Swedes against that of the Spaniards. According to this project the latter are to pay the Swedes the 200,000 crowns and the latter are at the same time to enter with the allies into a declaration of the succour for making good the guarantee. The point about the uncertainty of fixing a time for the subsequent payments now falls to the ground because the Spaniards promise to pay the remainder of the amount in three months in instalments of 60,000 crowns, giving England & Holland to Sweden as their pledges. These last two are to contribute as their share forty ships and 10,000 men each, and Sweden 10,000 men only, all being ready to defend Spain whenever she is attacked by France. When such transactions come to the ears of the French Ambassador Pompona at the Hague he reports them punctually to M. Colbert here, who is always watching closely the proceedings of this Court.
His Excellency has told me that he considers the business of the alliance to be entirely concluded; but from the hints that I receive from the Secretary Arlington I find that the information of the French is founded upon fear, since the business is in its customary stale of suggestion. He told me with perfect frankness that England ought not to pledge herself more than she had done, in order to hold the balance, and should not throw herself on to one of the sides, except in case of necessity or for reputation.
The truth is, however, that the gentleman who came express from Spain to Brussels with secret despatches for the governor, was sent back by his Excellency to Spain six days ago. Just as his first commissions were impenetrable so there is no key to the advices which he is transmitting to that Court. Possibly all this secrecy only covers a simple series of correspondence which was interrupted by the seizure of the letters in France. Admitting that all are giving their imagination free play about the proposals reported above, then the more they are advanced without anything being done, the more they seem to be inventions of the Spaniards in order to alarm the others about their secret correspondence with France. As the correspondence of Flanders with Spain by land is still interrupted and the governor foresees infinite difficulties in arranging a passage this way and the crossing from Plimut to Bilbao, he is attempting it from Ostend to Spain by sea, in spite of the danger of traversing the whole of the English Channel which always becomes greater with the advance of the winter.
As the differences between Spain and Portugal remain unresolved and as Don Pietro continues to press earnestly for the interposition of the king here with authoritative mediation, they have at length directed the Resident Godolfin at Madrid to collect information and keep his eye on the matter without producing his commissions to mediate except when he sees the likelihood of a successful issue or the need to prevent greater evils, as they are not disposed here to depart from such reserves so as to oblige Don Pietro to make some more favourable declaration such as is claimed by this Court.
The ambassador of Holland is trying to get an important declaration. Since his first audience he has arranged to visit the royal ambassadors. He asked and obtained it first from Denmark. When this was known by France, to prevent any trouble about returning visits, he went unexpectedly in the morning to the house of the Dutch ambassador, while Denmark paid his call after dinner. Now Colbert is claiming precedence in the visit and that Borel shall come first to his house, more because of the preeminence of his crown. Denmark claims the same, maintaining that the visit was appointed for him before Colbert, and that he had gone as arranged. In addition to the punctilio about ceremonial there is also the personal question, as Denmark is the son of the king there and has the character of extraordinary. So the Dutch ambassador has suspended all action and has written to the States in order to have liberty of movement and direction. Until that time I also, with the others, shall await the return of the visit.
London, the 18th August, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
130. To the Ambassador in England.
Information has been received from the Captain General, dated the 18th inst. of the blessing of peace concluded with the Grand Vizier. The terms are enclosed and they have been immediately approved by the Senate. (fn. 6) He is to go to a special audience of his Majesty and acquaint him with this news, in the assurance that the King will be pleased to learn that the republic is to enjoy tranquillity and a breathing space after so many years of cruel war. He is also to inform the Dutch ambassador.
With regard to the trade with that country and that in currants he is to assure the merchants that the orders issued will be observed and recommendations will be sent for them to receive the best possible treatment at the islands themselves.
A decision will be taken with respect to salt fish, with the utmost desire to satisfy that nation in every possible way. It is delayed for lack of the necessary information, which is expected from the magistracies.
On the basis of such measures taken by the Senate in favour of that nation which is so very welcome (molto accetto) he will be able to destroy any other sort of report about a monopoly of lead, which has no foundation since the Senate has no knowledge of any thing of the sort. If any one was scheming to attempt such a thing he can assure them that the Senate desires liberty of trade and to give access to traders to make their profit where it suits them without the fear of any sort of burden for such causes, so that they may be able joyfully to dispose of what they send, whatever its nature at their good pleasure and every possible facility will be afforded them.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
131. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge & Senate.
In the practical conclusion of the negotiation of a commercial treaty between this country and England the government here rejoices at having overcome the opposition and the obstacles placed in the way by the partisans of Spain. By granting liberty to English traders to dispose of all their merchandise in this country they have made it easier to obtain from his Britannic Majesty the same permission for those of this nation. This deprives the Dutch of the hope of getting England to join in their policy (di unir alle massime loro l'Inghilterra), obliging her on this side also to provide herself elsewhere with that which she requires. Moreover in respect of the triple alliance it inspires a notable lack of confidence between these powers.
Paris, the 23rd October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
132. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge & Senate.
There are no letters from any quarter this week, as contrary winds have prevented the packet boats from crossing. So there is not a morsel of news about the important affair of the triple alliance, which is left in the ambiguous position reported last week. The matter is debated more than ever in their consultations so that the decisions at the Hague may not take the government by surprise. But as yet they have not taken any formal decision and to-day they are to discuss what will suit the crown. An important minister told me in confidence that the Spaniards care little about their interests: a year had gone without any payment to quiet Sweden; correspondence with this Court was given up, and it was left without an ambassador; they even neglected civilities, as the constable governor had not yet written a letter to the king, or made any friendly sign. He ended by saying that the protests which the constable is now making about severely punishing those who encourage reports of arrangements with France are worth nothing.
The States of Holland, on the other hand, are confounded by the bad beginning of the mediation of the English minister in Muscovy. They are urging their own minister who is in Sweden, to leave Stocolm and to go to the Grand Duke to resume the thread of adjustment, which is of such consequence, (fn. 7) so that their ally Sweden may not be diverted by war. The Dutch take consolation from hearing that Portugal has approved the treaties recently concluded at the Hague. Definite news has arrived by ship from Lisbon that Don Pietro accepts the reduction of the debt of that crown to four millions and the arrangement for the payment, renouncing all claims to Cochin & Cananor in the Indies, now held by Holland. The Dutch will be permitted to send ships to Brazil, with the obligation to join with the Portuguese fleet on the voyages out and home, but not to demand any general or particular permission. The advantage of Holland will not end here because, as intimated in my No. 103, the refusal of that prince to admit the French to the trade of the Indies will be received as of good augury of the reluctance of Portugal to join herself with France. That prince has only given the French letters of recommendation for the Viceroy of Goa to permit them to take foodstuffs and not to exchange merchandise within the dominions of the crown.
The same ship from Lisbon has brought letters from Tanger. The Ambassador writes from there that he has sent his secretary to Sale, who was received and dealt with on behalf of Taffilet, and he had sent some one else to arrange for a decorous & safe reception. (fn. 8) Up to the present there is no further confirmation beyond the report of another ship which claims to have touched at Tanger and to know that 4000 Moorish cavalry were advancing on it to receive the English ambassador. By letters from Sale of the 1st September we hear that Taffilet, successfully pursuing his conquests, has advanced into the mountains towards Morocco, subduing the country and putting to the sword those who refuse him obedience, his brother having been mortally wounded in storming a town.
It would seem that these Moors have withdrawn from the siege of Uram on the coasts of Africa on the report of succour brought by the duke of Alva, general of the coasts of Andalusia, but if the assistance is not kept up the peril will be manifest. Here, with the same purpose, they do not fail to keep the place of Tanger as well supplied as possible.
From these external affairs the king's prudence is called to internal ones by the meeting of parliament which takes place on Tuesday next, the sitting for business being postponed until the Tuesday following.
Two English books came out six days ago at an important moment and scandalous in their substance, dealing with the authority of the Upper and Lower Chamber respectively. (fn. 9) Although they have been suppressed by order of the king yet the poison of many copies has already spread throughout the kingdom. Other reports, at present believed to have a malicious origin, have been circulating for some days that the Secretary Arlington, to escape the attentions of parliament, is covering himself with the character of ambassador extraordinary and will go to Spain for the king. But all these reports are spread with design. Every one watches to see the stone thrown and others are easily led to join in against any one who is raised to a pinnacle for universal observation. I will give your Excellencies more information from time to time.
Viscount Faulcombridge is busy over his preparations for departure. He assures me he is untiring over it. He has already received the notes for the consignment of 2,500l. sterling of the royal plate, which it is usual to give to the ambassadors. He also has in his hands those for the money. I observe that nothing diverts him from his sole idea, which is to be soon at the service of your Serenity.
The Dutch ambassador, seizing the opportunity of Denmark being away amusing himself in the country, has been to return the visits of M. Colbert and myself, without waiting to hear further from the Hague, pretending that his having sent a gentleman to the house of Denmark to make an appointment absolved him from the punctilio about precedence. Borel sent his other gentleman on Denmark's return to London. The latter received a request for a new appointment as a visit of compliment and accepts it in place of the official visit paid by the first gentleman. So the matter is still pending, but placed in the hands of friends it will soon be adjusted.
London, the 25th October, 1669.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
133. To the Ambassador in England.
Approval of his office of condolence with the king on the death of the queen mother. A letter is enclosed, to be presented at a special audience. He is also to inform his Majesty of the peace concluded with the Turks. He is further to tell the king and ministers that the Ambassador Molin is to stay at the Porte and that he will have instructions to be on friendly terms with the English ambassador.
Ayes, 77. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
134. To the King of Great Britain.
Deep regret at the news of the death of the Queen Mother, whose merits rendered her worthy of a long course of years for having given to the world a prince of such rare character. Offer their condolences. Compliments.
Ayes, 77. Noes, 0. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
135. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge & Senate.
At a special secret audience the English ambassador has conveyed to the king in the name of the triple alliance vigorous remonstrances about the failure to observe the peace of Aix la Chapelle. It is claimed by the league that it has been broken by the frequent passage of armed forces through the states of the Catholic and by the reprisals made by order of the king here upon the property of Spanish subjects who do not go to live in the newly conquered territories where the property in question is situated. The ambassador performed this office in a very forcible manner. The king told him in reply that after the matter had been duly considered in the Council he would explain his sentiments more thoroughly to the ambassador, always with the object of maintaining inviolable what had been established and of not deviating one jot from the obligations which his Majesty had incurred by his own promises.
St. Germain, the 30th October, 1669.
[Italian.]
Oct. 30.
Inquisitori
di Stato
Busta 419.
Venetian
Archives.
136. Tomaso Gobbato, to the Inquisitors of State.
The English ambassador, when I went to wish him a good journey, asked me to write for the release of Captain Tomaso Giles, (fn. 10) an Englishman captured in the service of the state. I replied that I would do as he asked and hoped that the state would grant his request.
Galata, of Constantinople, 30 October, 1669.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 On the same day that the queen died the duke of Orleans came to the house to seal up the goods. St. Albans to Arlington on 10th Sept. S.P. France, Vol. cxxvii. On 27 Sept. the king appointed commissioners to go to Paris to arrange for the queen's burial, to wind up her affairs and to take an inventory of her goods. Those appointed were Sir Ralph Montague, the ambassador, the late queen's master of the horse; Henry Jermyn, earl of St. Albans, her steward: Abbot Walter Montague, her almoner; Henry, lord Arundel of Wardour and Dr. Leoline Jenkins. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1668–9, pp. 503–4. There is also a copy of the commission in S.P. France. The duchess of Richmond's third husband was Col. Thomas Howard, younger brother of the earl of Carlisle. Mocenigo has apparently confounded him with Lord Arundel.
2 Where the force under Marshal Bellefonds was assembled for the relief of Candia.
3 Signed on 30 July. The text printed in Dumont: Corps Diplomatique, Vol. vii, pt. i, page 114.
4 The earl of St. Albans, Lord Arundel of Wardour, Abbot Walter Montague and Dr. Leoline Jenkins. See note at page 111, above.
5 There was order on 18 Oct., o.s., for payment to Falcombridge of 1500l. for his equipment as ambassador extraordinary to Venice, and of 10l. a day as ordinary. Cal. of Treasury Books, Vol. iii, page 287.
6 The peace was concluded on 5 September. The terms are in Dumont Corps Diplomatique, Vol. vii, pt. i, page 119.
7 Nicolaus Heinsius, who started for Moscow on 30 Aug. Niew Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek, Vol. ii, 558.
8 Howard, sent his secretary, a London merchant named Thomas Warren, to Salee on 13 August. His other emissary was F. Burghill. Howard to Arlington 13/23 August. S.P. Barbary States, Vol. xiii. Routh: Tangier, page 100.
9 The one on the side of the Upper House was called the “Great Question”; the king was very angry with Lord Holles, who was believed to be responsible for it. Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. ix, page 100. Colbert to Lionne, the 17th October. P.R.O. Paris Transcripts.
10 It should be Galilee.