Venice
May 1670

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

Pages

183-200

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Venice: May 1670', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 183-200. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90273 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

May 1670

May 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
196. Francesco Michieli, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
The British Ambassador had audience of the duke last Friday and he saw the duchess the same evening. The French ambassador called on him that same day and I followed without delay. After an exchange of compliments he said that he had come here for pure compliment. The object of his king had been to send him definitely to your Excellencies. After a short stay at Florence, and more doubtfully going to Genoa incognito, he hoped to arrive at Venice at the end of next month, to receive the public favours. Every report proclaims him to be an affable and discreet person and certainly it is not I who would venture to assert the contrary for I found him overflowing in his kindness to the minister of your Excellencies.
The first object of his discourse was to let me know that it was eight years ago when the king selected him as the minister for your Excellencies. The war of Candia had proved the obstacle to acting on this resolution, to avoid giving umbrage to the Porte where they have the most substantial part of their trade. It was fitting, as a consequence, that a close correspondence should exist between his king and your Excellencies now that the differences with the Grand Signor had disappeared, to be of one mind in maintaining a reciprocal advantage and the trade in those dominions. For the British king it was the more important, he said, to show his flag in the Ocean, while the republic was most concerned about the Mediterranean. The stream of navigation had been interrupted a little by the long and tiresome war, but the exercise of it would be resumed very quickly with the great advantages that would result from peace, and it was of this that his king no less than your Excellencies should think in particular.
He came subsequently to speak of the triple alliance. He said it was a bridle to the increase of the power of the Most Christian, who found it convenient to abandon his thoughts of military glory and to give himself up to his pleasures. He showed this very clearly by plunging more and more deeply into them. As a consequence there was no need to take account of that power, considerable as it was, since against such opposition it was unable to decide anything. The chief consideration which the republic should have upon the deliberations of that king was the close alliance and union which he is possibly premeditating with the Porte, and the great activity of his shipbuilding should cause misgiving to all who have ports on the Mediterranean. I replied in a manner befitting the friendly correspondence between his king and your Excellencies.
Turin, the 1st May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
197. Francesco Michieli, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
The British ambassador came to this house and gave me some particulars of the northern alliance. He said that the allies had not chosen to listen to the instances of the emperor to enter this alliance, although they had been very strong. It was not to the advantage of the vigorous to receive the weak into their company. The emperor was a feeble prince, often obliged to apply remedies to his own misadventures and disturbances, without attending to those of others. Alliances were easily broken up when they included a prince who lacked the power to keep his promises. The Most Christian had nothing on his mind that pricks him more than this confederation and he had decided to send his sister in law to Havre in order to persuade the king, her brother, to take new resolutions. To ambassadors of the republic he felt at liberty to say in confidence that the king would be neither able nor willing to decide. He loved his sister dearly, but he ought to esteem and prize the affection of his people much more. By this alliance he had won their sincere attachment. The affection of their subjects was one of the most important points that all kings ought to observe, but particularly those of England.
On the following day the ambassador's secretary, (fn. 1) a man of some capacity, came to ask me about the use of the republic in receiving ambassadors. I found that this was in order to guide his dealings with Genoa. I explained that the ambassador must recognise the republic as being on a par with royal princes, and I gave him a short account of the ceremonial used by the republic with royal ministers. Yesterday he visited the French ambassador (fn. 2) who was somewhat huffed because he had not come before, but who received him with perfect friendliness. After he left the ambassadress was very angry because he only came with a two horse coach.
Turin, the 1st May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
198. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The question of the conventicles having been brought to its last stage at the parliamentary sittings and thanks to the stimuting presence of the king, the difficult point of permitting the perquisition to be made by means of two minor judges of the House of Lords being digested in the Upper House, the Lower House is setting aside many other severities proposed against the nonconformists. So this with more than twenty other bills was all ready on Monday the 21st April last to receive the royal assent. After dinner on that day his Majesty appeared in parliament in the royal robes and went through the ceremonial to give effect to these enactments. He also delivered a most gracious speech, praising the Lords for having by their application contributed to the glory of the realm and expressing appreciation of the Commons in being so disposed towards the general good and for the quiet of the people.
In order to give the deputies the clearest proof of his satisfaction, he afforded them the final and most palpable pledge, by proroguing the session until October next, whereas, if he had considered himself ill served he might have dissolved the parliament altogether and have proceeded to the nomination of other persons at another opportunity. This is one of the principal bridles on the deputies of the Lower House, who are ambitious of the place, the privileges, the authority and all the other appurtenances of that House.
This body, which casts no small shadow on the royal authority, is thus disbanded and his Majesty is provided with money, which is the sole motive for calling parliament together. So to shake off the weight of the continued strain experienced, the king has gone to his country diversions at Niumarchet and he is pleased for the ambassadors to follow him in the general diversion. Seizing a favourable opportunity I expressed the sentiments which I read in the ducali of the 29th March and his Majesty was gratified to hear of the regard of the Senate and its interest in the felicity of his rule.
When the king afterwards, because of some change in the weather, decided to return to London, the French ambassador and I, according to custom, for greater convenience, forestalled him. On arriving here I found the ducali of the 8th April and have just time enough to send the missing No. 129 by this ordinary.
If the weather does not improve his Majesty will return to this city within two days and I shall then be able to devote greater attention to the affairs of the alliance. The more timorous souls are somewhat disturbed over the delay in the ratification by Sweden. The resident here holds his tongue and the Dutch minister keeps on the watch, while the ministers of the allied princes remain idle with the complete settlement of all the differences reported. From Spain also they are waiting with impatience for the acceptation of the arbitration of this crown upon the boundaries. They place entire reliance upon the promise given by the Most Christian, which is gradually entering into the spirit of the Spaniards and gives relief from constant agitation.
The Dutch are also taking breath after the suspicions reported. They claim, by their foresight, to have provided against those covert designs for making new conquests which they suspected the Most Christian to have had in his recent journey into the Low Countries.
Vice Admiral Ghent has at last sailed from the ports of Holland in command of twelve ships of war, with other armed ships and merchantmen, to join in with the English in operations against the Algerian corsairs, who are more troublesome than ever at sea. The king is relieved to see the result of his glorious incitements to the States.
London, the 2nd May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
199. To the Ambassador in England.
The Senate learns from France of the journey of the duchess of Orleans to Dover to see the king, her brother. The Senate will look for his attention to the objects of the conference and for his continuance in the same to gather the most certain intelligence; all of which will be useful and appreciated.
Ayes, 112. Noes, 0. Neutral, 5.
[Italian.]
May 5.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
200. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The States of Holland have selected an individual who in the capacity of envoy extraordinary is to come in their name to pay his respects to the king here. (fn. 3) At this Court they are taking particular notice of the resolution taken by the United Provinces to send the Sig. van Bonighen to his Britannic Majesty in the capacity of envoy extraordinary with instructions to stay in London for the whole of the time that the duchess of Orleans remains in England. The States are paying close attention to what may be the subject of negotiation at the forthcoming conference between that king and his sister, when she has pressed so very strongly to go and confer with him and after she has overcome all the obstacles in the way by winning the consent of the Most Christian king.
Landresi, the 5th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 8.
Senato
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Savoia.
Venetian
Archives.
201. FrancescO Michieli, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
The offices of the English ambassador with the duke amounted to the most ample declarations of the desire of his king to see the interests of this house increased through the trade of Villa Franca. In the mean time he promises that a consul of his nation shall go to that port with the concourse of ships which will be going there to pick up goods. Thus, with the desire of reaping that advantage, the minister is courteously welcomed here and well treated, and the duke does not neglect to let him participate in greater recreations. To this end a ballet was given in the park of Valentino, attended by a great swarm of ladies. Yesterday they went to a distance from this town. (fn. 4) It is settled that he will travel by Genoa. His secretary has come back from there and brings word that the Signory there will arrange to meet the ambassador at Savona and offer him a galley to take him to the city.
One day that I happened to be with the ambassador at a place of recreation he opened out to me with some freedom about the suspicion that the Spaniards had conceived about the conference that the British king had agreed to with his sister at Dover, though the sole reason was fraternal affection and a particularly loving sympathy in their relations. On account of this the Spaniards are making some difficulty about referring unreservedly the differences which they have with France, to the two kings, to wit of Britain and Sweden, and for the same reason they let it be known that they would like to have the emperor as a third judge. Such an innovation would always be prejudicial to themselves as it would mean waste of time without any resolution or decree. The Most Christian might make up his mind to unsheathe the sword, although he would then find the allied powers opposed to him; but if, in the event of some disaster, the alliance were dissolved, the Spaniards would be the first to feel his strength and to suffer losses.
During the ambassador's stay here the French ambassadress has not returned his visit, but the minister does not seem to attach the slightest importance to this.
Yesterday the relics of the holy shroud were displayed. On that occasion was observed the impulsive action of a youth, nephew of the ambassador, himself a stranger to the Roman Catholic faith, who approached with signs of adoration, took it eagerly and kissed it although no one else had given him the lead.
Turin, the 8th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
202. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Although the rainy weather has given over, this has not sufficed to keep his Majesty away any longer in the relaxations of the country. Being called upon to take part in their counsels here he returned to London accompanied by the duke of Hiorch, the ministers and all the Court. Mourning is extended, with pomp, and the ambassadors have to follow the lead in everything. First of all the king saw the latest advices from Spain about the queen there and how she is still undecided about referring the difference about the boundaries to the two allied crowns. He also heard the comments of some minister upon this indecision, directed to removing all the seeds of mistrust to which an evil interpretation of the reserve of Spain might have given birth in England. Being readily satisfied in this way of the sincerity of Spain's behaviour they proceeded to remark how very ill timed it was for that government to let itself be led into longeurs. They were reduced to offering a feeble excuse for it on the score of an empty punctilio, about not leaving the nomination of the arbiters to the Most Christian. As the choice has fallen on the crowns of England and Sweden, Spain should consider them the most suitable, as being allies, and she ought not to be so eager to introduce any other arbiters, which would only embarrass the conclusion further.
Such are the opinions of the Council here; but the statements of the French ambassador are very clear. He says that the Most Christian is constantly making the world better acquainted with his upright intentions, which are being thwarted more than ever by the reserves of the Catholic. He also lets out that Holland greatly resents its exclusion by the king his master. While time is passing amid these meditations, news comes from Stokolm of the nomination of the Baron Spar as ambassador to this Court for this same affair of the arbitration, (fn. 5) but the Swedish resident here, who went to inform his Majesty about it, did not say a word about the ratification of the alliance.
A report comes from Holland that Sig. van Beuninghen may arrive here by order of the States, about the affairs or the East India trade. The French ambassador says that in paying his respects to the king on behalf of the States he may perhaps be wanting to be present at his Majesty's meeting with his sister, the duchess, at Dover. If time permits this encounter, the few days in which the journey to Dover will be decided will make it plain, and in a short time we shall find out if the States have the purpose to inquire into alterations in the alliance at which the Ambassador Colbert hints.
The Prince of Orange also expresses the intention of proceeding to this Court, and it may be he wishes to take part at the function of the knights of the Garter in the church of St. George at Windsor, 25 miles from London, to which the king and almost all the Court will go. The interests of this prince in Holland are not yet adjusted as there is opposition to the renewal in some sense of the very ample powers which his father enjoyed in the States. So it is by no means unlikely that van Beuninghen, in coming here, should have some commission to keep a close watch on all the proposals made for the just satisfaction of Orange at this Court, which is so much interested on the score of relationship.
The earl of Esses has started at last on his embassy to Denmark. He embarked on a royal frigate (fn. 6) with orders to fly the royal standard all through the Baltic until the port of landing, in order to keep up the claim to dominion. For the rest his commissions are the same as reported.
The embassy of Lord Arondel to Taffilet was unable to achieve a successful issue. The malcontents of that prince's nephews are increasing daily and troubling that state. This has induced the earl to send back a good part of his household to London by sea, and he himself will be taking the same direction by land very soon. There is also bad news, which is confirmed, of the capture of three English ships returning from Zante. (fn. 7) They do not like the losses of the nation to increase with the courage of the corsairs. But although the drawbacks are manifest and the advantage may diminish yet they will always be cultivating the profitable trade of the Levant.
Among the important events of these realms is the despatch these last days of Lord Barkle to the viceroyalty of Ireland, where he is impatiently awaited by the people of the country, being assured of an admirable ruler from the infinite prudence for which he is known.
Acknowledges receipt of the ducali of the 12th April.
London, the 9th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
203. To the Resident at Florence.
Viscount Falcomberghe has left Turin and will soon be with the Grand Duke. We desire that on his arrival you will be forward to render him every possible civility and to be on the most friendly terms with him because he is coming to reside with us and we wish to receive him with the most ample demonstrations of respect and honour and we desire you to assure him of the esteem with which we shall welcome him and with which we shall favour him during the whole time of his residence. You will also endeavour to find out, but with all possible tact and reserve, when and by what route he proposes to travel to this part.
Ayes, 116. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
May 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
204. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The secretary of the English resident has been to tell me that the Ambassador Falcombrighe is not going to Genoa as they are not agreed about the ceremonial. He said that his Excellency had got away from the Court of Savoy having conferred with the first secretary of state at Turin on the questions of trade. He will soon be arriving here to pay the respects of his king to the Grand Duke and will then go on to Venice with all speed.
Florence, the 10th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genova.
Venetian
Archives.
205. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador has sent his secretary here, before he leaves Turin, to settle about ceremonial. It was agreed that the republic shall send a galley with the master of the ceremonies, to fetch him and bring him to the palace appointed. The ambassador is expected to-morrow, weather permitting.
With the English convoy of three powerful ships of war, which set sail yesterday for the Ocean, there went in company twenty two merchantmen of divers nations for various parts.
Genoa, the 10th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
206. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The approaching crossing of the duchess of Orleans to England and the misgiving about secret agreements between those here and the British king are a cause of constant apprehension to the United Provinces. Although so far, the true inwardness of this move has not transpired, I have it from one, who would not willingly deceive, that the plan is to suggest to the British king the desirability of protecting the prince of Orange, offering the good offices of France to secure his restoration to the authority anciently enjoyed by his predecessors. With the universal mistrust felt by the Provinces towards the prince it will be a matter of great difficulty to induce them to concede advantages of consequence. Thus the government here hopes that with the British king pledged to the support of his nephew incidents may occur calculated to interrupt the excellent intelligence that exists at present between England and the States and then matters may take a turn towards bitterness and it will be possible to believe that the thread of the present triple alliance has at last been cut. In such case it is to be hoped that the omnipotent hand of the Almighty will be opposed to human designs since the consequence of these plans would appear in the upsetting of the quiet of Europe.
Arras, the 12th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 16.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
207. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The delay in the arrival of the ratification of the alliance from Stokolm caused some to believe that a transaction so long discussed and combated by so many opposing forces must have suffered shipwreck on entering port. It was supposed that the crown of Sweden was struggling with contrary winds and no less agitated by French proposals than discomposed by Spanish longeurs. An express that arrived at the Hague at the end of last week put all these fears at rest with the exchange of the ratifications between the ministers of the allies. This has made the Spaniards easy and they have released to the Swede the orders for the drawing of the money. They hope from these forces, not only reputation for their party but security for their dominions.
On the other hand, when it seemed that the Spaniards would be more justified in relying upon the skill of the treaties for the determination of the boundaries than on the force of arms for the defence of their territories and their rights, the Resident Godolphin writes from Spain to the secretary of state that the queen certainly approves of the nomination of the two crowns of England and Sweden made by the Most Christian, but that she wishes to add two other arbiters so that the Catholic king may have as large a share in the transaction as France has taken. That the Council was inclined to choose the emperor and the Dutch in spite of the fact that the former would incur the objection of the relationship while the latter are the object of the practically declared mistrust of France, and that for the moment there was no sign of ameliorating the business. This information being confirmed in the Council of State has called for the closest attention of the ministers. Considering the king as pledged to the Most Christian and with such a cold response from Spain, they have suggested several courses, but so far no decision has been taken for setting the business on its feet again. It is very true that Spanish dilatoriness incurs universal censure as it furnishes the Most Christian with strong arguments in the face of the world with which he can always show the desire he had to compose the differences over the frontiers. It seems a strange thing that the punctilio about not allowing the Most Christian to nominate the arbiters can postpone a question of such consequence, and men are exerting their brains to find out whether this delay may not be due to other and more recondite ends.
While these affairs are maturing the States of Holland and the constable governor, in order not to be found wanting in those acts of civility and respect demanded by the passage of the Most Christian to the Low Countries, have chosen two individuals to compliment his Majesty. Baron Opdan for the States and Don Francesco Velasco on behalf of the governor will proceed to Lille with a noble cortege of gentlemen to fulfil all the formalities that are likely to give pleasure to the Most Christian.
From England also Lords St. Albans and Sandwich are picked out. They are to cross the sea in a few days, as they are to attend upon the duchess of Orleans from Cales to Dover. The infantry who are to serve as a guard are already beginning to file off in that direction, with the cavalry who will proceed thither, following his Majesty. The day of the move is not yet settled. The king is anxious to arrive at Dover only a few moments before the duchess, his sister, so that he may suffer less from the inconvenience due to the limitations of the place. It has already been decided that the queen and the duchess shall stop in London; but it is still uncertain whether the ambassadors will follow the Court.
Not short of expectation was the pomp with which, last Saturday the body of General Monch was taken from Somerset House to the church of Westminster. His Majesty would allow nothing to be spared in making the most magnificent demonstrations on behalf of a subject whom he believes to be well deserving of the country, of the crown and of himself, restored as he was to the throne. The guards on foot and mounted, the militia of the city and the neighbouring country with the most distinguished chiefs all took part with the symbols and tokens of mourning. The leading men of the Court followed the funeral car on foot with the son of the dead duke of Albemarle and with all the rest of the sad cortege which numbered some of the most rare in England.
On the following day the king appointed the duke of Monmouth to the vacant seat in the Council, whom he loves not only as his son but for all those qualities of mind, character and capacity which cause him to be respected by all the Court and which well befit the character of his birth.
The ducali of the 19th April have just reached me. I have nothing to add except a certain report which has come to my ears of displeasure of the Most Christian, announced by the Ambassador Colbert here against the secretary of the Ambassador Falcombridge who at Turin expressed himself with some freedom about the government of France, calling it tyrannical. (fn. 8) I have not had time to check the truth of this, but I know that it was the king who gave the secretary to the viscount, so his Excellency can always justify himself and the secretary alone would ran any danger.
London, the 16th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
208. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
On Thursday morning his Highness sent several individuals and other sorts of persons to Leghorn with the remittances necessary for the worthy reception of the English ambassador Falcombrige. It is said that he may possibly arrive in this state on Saturday or Sunday. He has already left Genoa. It was decided by the government there to lodge him in the palace of the Durazzi at the public cost and to receive him with all pomp. It has not transpired what his negotiations may have been about, but it is supposed that they would turn upon the differences which frequently occur with the ships of war on their entry into that port.
Here the ambassador will be lodged in the palace. The time of his appearance is not known for certain.
Florence, the 17th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genova.
Venetian
Archives.
209. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador arrived here on Sunday evening and was received with all the honours. On the following day he was visited by the procuratori in the name of the government. On Tuesday he was fetched from his house by Count Fiesco and taken to the palace where he had audience of the doge and senators and presented his letters of credence. The audience was public and consisted of an exchange of compliments. I called upon him on Wednesday and he responded with every courtesy.
Genoa, the 17th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
210. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The appearance of Madame of Orleans in England is nothing more than a meeting desired by the king here and equally solicited by the duchess from those unique springs of affection which have never been dissociated from this royal comradeship and which at present obliges the king to arrange everything which can render it more conspicuous and noteworthy. A quantity of baggage waggons are already on the road to Dover and numbers of foot soldiers have filed off in that direction. But as it becomes ever more apparent that the place is too confined and unequal for such a reception, the king has sent Mons. di Godolfin with all speed to Lille with letters to the Most Christian asking for permission for Madame, his sister, to come as far as London, and in another letter he expresses his hope to the duke of Orleans that he will agree to this short trip of only one day, by relays from Dover to here seeing that he has consented to the sea passage.
While awaiting the answers Lords St. Albans and Sandwich have set out on their destined journeys. As the former is to pay his respects to the duchess at Cales, and the latter will serve her at sea with a small fleet of pleasure craft, the king has decided to send another lord on purpose to pay his respects to the Most Christian, as a more apparent token of respect for that monarch as well as for the duke and Madame of Orleans. Your Serenity will have learned of the differences between them from the proper quarter.
There is some talk, but nothing for certain of the intention of the prince of Orange being present in England in time to pay his respects to his aunt, the duchess, but as the days and weeks go by without any sign of a move, one cannot feel sure of this. The fact of the matter is that the reports of a passage to this country to see princes so nearly allied in blood may have proved very serviceable to Orange for his claims in Holland. Confused reports come from there that the States have granted him some of the prerogatives that his father enjoyed.
By order of these same States the Ambassador Borel here is to speak publicly of the behaviour of the Spaniards in the matter of the arbitration, expressing astonishment at delay over a matter of such importance. A decision about the frontiers affected the States very nearly as measured by the importance of the peace of Aix la Chapelle. But the more he tries to give the impression of the sincere cooperation of Holland in this transaction the more they are convinced here that he is labouring to defend them against the accusation that is made against them of having instigated Spain about punctilio in order to be called in to share in the arbitration. This is no more than a suspicion of Dutch proceedings, but consultations are constantly being held about the punctilio or circumspection of Spain, as they are unable to conceive the true reason for the delays, and all expedients are suspended as they do not wish to make proposals without feeling sure of success.
The new king of Denmark (fn. 9) having sent letters of credence to the Sig. di Lindenovu as his envoy in ordinary at this Court, he went last week to present them to the king. After paying his respects to the royal house he is visiting the ministers. On calling at the house of your Serenity he expressed the greatest esteem for the most serene republic. His instructions are in general terms, and directed to the cultivation of good correspondence on the footing arranged by the Ambassador Guldenleem. But he finds himself confronted with the instructions given to the Ambassador Esses, not to dip his flag even under the fortress of the Sound; and he is afraid that if a salute happens to be fired with shotted guns they may give rise to some incident. This much is certain that if the Ambassador Esses receives an affront in any place he will proceed by land to Copenhagen, and if he does not receive suitable satisfaction he will come straight back to London, leaving his embassy unfulfilled and the correspondence with that crown interrupted, which otherwise will be continued from this side.
[Acknowledges receipt of the ducali of the 26th April.]
On meeting the French ambassador our conversation turned on the indiscretion of Faulcomberg's secretary. He told me in brief that he had accused the French government of tyranny. Colbert had spoken about it to the king who promptly gave him his promise to write to the ambassador for information and when this arrived he had no doubt that the secretary would receive exemplary punishment; but as this individual enjoys the protection of the duke of Buckingham and of Arlington he may find means and excuses for evading it.
London, the 23rd May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
211. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The day after the king's arrival in this city the duchess of Orleans set out at once for Dunkirk, in order to cross from there to Dover where the king, her brother, is impatiently awaiting her. In order to speed the journey of her Highness coaches and barques are disposed at several places along the route, at short distances apart so that by frequent changes and with good fortune she reached the coast in a single day. Arrived there she embarked with her numerous suite on three ships sent on purpose by the king, her brother. (fn. 10)
To shorten the length of the journey the duchess was obliged to traverse for some space of time the territories of the Catholic king. At the town of Ipre she was received by order of the constable of Castile by the firing of all the guns and the utmost possible distinction and amid universal acclamation from the people to which her Highness responded by a generous distribution of largess. Thus, within a short space of time the duchess set foot in the dominions of three of the greatest kings of Europe. It is known that she arrived safely at Dover on the day immediately following her departure from this Court.
The king has sent Count Grammont in the capacity of envoy extraordinary to his Britannic Majesty to assure him of his confidence and regard and to give him this fresh testimony now they are so near. The first gentleman of the bedchamber of the king of England is to respond to this function at Dunkirk. (fn. 11)
I must add the hope conceived by this government of taking away the commerce with England from the Dutch by this vigorous interposition and of uniting that kingdom more closely with this side in the anticipation of considerable advantages for both parties, and here they are carefully seeking every possible means for injuring the United Provinces. A few days will suffice to bring to light the success of the present project. One is inclined to think that this present scheme is likely to encounter divers and most serious obstacles from the mutual interest of the two maritime nations to continue in their ancient correspondence, as well as from considerations of trade.
Lille, the 23rd May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
212. Ottaviano Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The coaches of the Court which were sent to Leghorn to receive the ambassador of England have returned as they have no information about his arrival. They do not know either what he will decide to do, as the Grand Duke to whom he was accredited being dead, (fn. 12) his credentials will no longer serve.
Florence, the 24th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genova.
Venetian
Archives.
213. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador was received with all possible pomp. He asked that some gentlemen might be deputed to confer with him about certain interests that had been imparted to him by the king. Two procuratori were appointed who proceeded with a secretary of state to his residence. According to the reports circulated the business consisted of nothing but matters concerning the English merchants living here upon some questions of security in dispute with some Genoese. Some of these have been compounded with the parties. Others have been obliged to deposit the amount of the damages in dispute while the judges received orders for the speedy despatch of the cause.
His Excellency has been taken to see the most notable things, not only of the city but of the suburbs as well and has received every sort of joyous entertainment. Two galleys are all ready to take him as soon as the state of the sea will permit it.
Genoa, the 24th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
214. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
When the despatch of the Sig. di Godolfin to Lille gave rise to hopes of the appearance of the duchess of Orleans in London an extraordinary courier arrived from that side with the news that her Highness had started for Dunkirk where she had decided to take ship and would cross rapidly to Dover. The news came on Saturday a few hours before sunset. A short time afterwards the king with some leading personages of the Court went down on the stream as far as Gravesend whence they travelled by the posts, arriving at Dover on Sunday evening. On Monday morning he was present to receive his sister at her landing after a passage of 24 hours across a calm sea. The duke of Hiorch, after having disposed of various matters for the government, hastened on the way to Dover. But the duchess was so far from coming to seek the ease of London that she was inclined to stay the rest of the present and some days of next week. Accordingly the queen was warned not to lose a moment before proceeding to that port to join his Majesty there with the duchess of Hiorch and a numerous train of ladies. By yesterday evening they will all have arrived safely at Dover.
The ministers of the Court only allowed themselves a short time for getting their baggage on the road, following it themselves in order to be with their Majesties at the proper time. The French ambassador took the posts that same Saturday evening, the ambassadress following with a conspicuous suite. The Dutch ambassador, by instruction from the States, also set out the day before yesterday to pay his respects to the duchess. In the expectation of receiving the public orders to morrow by the next ordinary I do not despair of being in time to convey the compliments of the most serene republic.
In the mean time I am unable to penetrate deeper into the motives for the visit of Madame of Orleans to England, because of all the numbers who are going to Dover not one has returned to London or any one from whom it would be possible to gather the grounds for such a step.
Before the king set out for Dover Sig. Ognate, the Spanish envoy had his public audience. He presented the credentials which reached him from Madrid and with them the reply of the queen on the subject of the arbitration, which your Excellencies may read in the enclosed copy, translated from the Spanish. From it your Excellencies will take note of the resolution taken by Spain to have a part in this transaction equal to that which has been taken by the Most Christian. I have already communicated to the Senate the light on this subject which has issued from the Council of State here and as no fresh decision has been taken so far I will wait until there is one before informing your Serenity.
With regard to a good understanding with Ognate personally, I cultivate it by the most suitable means. He has already been at this house twice to express his esteem for the most serene republic and I am not without hope that I may be able to use this to smoothe the difficulties with Count Molina when he comes in accordance with the instructions in the ducali of the 25th April.
Those of the 3rd May were delivered to me by the ordinary of last week and I promise them my best attention. With regard to what has been written about Falcombridge's secretary Darinton I may add that Bridgeman, nephew of the Lord Keeper here and an official of the secretariat of state under the secretary Arlington, is destined by the king to serve as secretary to the embassy at Venice. This decision was taken by his Majesty in order to deprive Darington of the prospect. He puts off taking any further proceedings until the arrival of the reply from Falcombridge. In the mean time Bridgeman has set out for Dover where he will receive the final decision and hasten to Italy by the posts. He is a person of good ability and is equally well trusted; and it is additionally helpful that the king has such confidence in his uncle, the Lord Keeper Weston. (fn. 13)
The information intimated to me by your Serenity upon the copy of Turin, which has not yet arrived, causes me to open my ears to a vague report circulated to day about some clash over ceremonial between the Ambassador Michiel and Viscount Faulcombridge. I have been unable to verify this or even to ascertain the particulars but I have so far heard nothing but praise of the minister of your Excellencies, and the affair makes so little stir that it can scarcely be heard even by those who are most intent on what happens. (fn. 14)
Three days ago the consul of Genoa arrived in London. (fn. 15) He is waiting for his Majesty the king in order to explain his character.
London, the 30th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.215. Memorial drawn up by Sir William Godolphin upon the appointment of the mediators.
[Italian, from the Spanish.]
May 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
216. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Court has arrived safely at this town. As is usual with the king he has given his personal attention to an inspection of the fortifications, the garrison, the port and whatever else calls for his royal attention. In the absence of the introducer of foreign ministers an ordinary gentleman of his Majesty presented to the king Lord Boras, first gentleman of the British king's bedchamber, who in the name of that sovereign has paid his respects to the king, queen and princes here upon the occasion of their coming so close together. Other persons who have come on behalf of the queen there, and of the duke and duchess of Hiorch have also performed their commissions with the king and royal house. They were all welcomed and treated with every distinction. To morrow, after they have taken leave of the Court they will set out for London. Each of them will carry away the royal portrait enriched with diamonds of considerable value.
By letters from England the Court has learned of the decision taken by the duchess at the instance of her brother to proceed from Dover to Canterbury. The British queen and the duke and duchess of Hiorch will also go there to enjoy the sight of their sister for a few days. This unexpected move leads some at the Court here to feel sure that the duchess will go on to London and consequently that her return to this Court will be postponed. That would be deeply felt by the duke, her husband for several reasons. A few days will make everything clear by the progress of the king to Boulogne, as it was agreed between his Majesty and his sister in law that she should arrive in that town so that they might proceed together with the royal household to the usual residence at St. Germain.
Dunkirk, the 30th May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
217. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The resident of England returned to this city to day from Leghorn. I gathered from him that the Ambassador Falcombrighe will come here incognito. He will be lodged and defrayed at the palace with the usual formalities, but without pomp because of the Court being in mourning. He will arrive on Wednesday. He proposes to leave Leghorn on Monday and to spend Tuesday at Pisa. The secretary said that his Excellency was well pleased with his reception at Genoa. His negotiations had turned upon questions touching the English merchants upon interests of security with that mart. They caused him to be accompanied and transported by two galleys to Leghorn to his place of debarcation, in the name of the state. The ambassador will be received here with the credentials addressed to Ferdinand II.
Florence, the 31st May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
218. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
Letters from France state that the journey to be taken by Madame to England has provided occasion for fresh altercations between her and the duke, her husband. It appears that the latter did not wish his wife to take with her the most precious jewels from fear lest she should leave a part of them over there. They also say that the British king is determined to repudiate his wife and that Madame intends to propose the eldest daughter of the Princess Palatine for him, (fn. 16) although there seems little likelihood that she will prove successful, since the aversion of the parliament there for France is well known.
Florence, the 31st May, 1670.
[Italian.]
May 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Genova.
Venetian
Archives.
219. Paris Tasca, Venetian Consul at Genoa, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador left last Sunday after a stay of fifteen days. He was provided with a galley to take him to Leghorn.
The British king wished to have the hull of a bastard galley to be employed round about his kingdoms. The Signory here decided to make him the present of one and also to grant him officers to manage it. (fn. 17)
Genoa, the last of May, 1670.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 John Dodington, son and heir of Sir Francis Dodington of Dodington in Somerset. Cat. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 272. Collinson, Hist. of Somerset, Vol. iii, page 519.
2 The President Ennemond Servien. He was brother in law of the French foreign minister Lionne. His wife was also offended because Falcombridge paid his visit unaccompanied by the Master of the Ceremonies. Falcombridge to Arlington and Russel to Williamson on 3 May, n.s. S.P. Savoy, Vol. xxiv.
3 The baron of Opdam, going to Lille to compliment the French king on his arrival at his new conquests. London Gazette, May 2–5.
4 The ballet at Valentino, near Turin, was given on May day. The further expedition was to la Venerie, a hunting place of the duke near Pinarolo. Russel to Williamson. S.P. Savoy, Vol. xxiv, f. 232.
5 Peter Spaar, governor of Gothenburg.
6 He sailed on 22 April old style, in the king's yacht Henrietta. See his narration of 7 May. S.P. Denmark, Vol. xviii.
7 Five merchantmen from Zante which ventured without convoy were attacked on 19th March by 4 Algerine warships between Alicante and Girgenti. The Merchant's Delight, Concord and Submission were captured. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, pp. 160, 316. London Gazette, April 4–7. Godolphin to Arlington, April 20/30. S.P. Spain, Vol. lvi. All the commanders of the captured ships were killed and the prizes were taken into Tripoli and sold, as Allen was before Algiers and the French before Tunis. Godolphin to Arlington, June 15/25. S.P. Spain, Vol. lvi.
8 When on the way out to Turin, Dodington was in company of some Frenchmen. One of these, apparently a M. Rion, began to speak slightingly of the English and England. To this Dodington made a spirited and patriotic reply. He was quite unrepentant. He wrote to Williamson on 10 June “Can any man think it reasonable for an Englishman to be silent when a Frenchman shall abuse the conduct of our prince, laugh at our government and upbraid our nation … if his Majesty will give up all such as speak with freedom on such occasions, he must part with most of his subjects…. I am so little moved at this accusation that I do not think it worth while to interest any of my friends to solicit his Majesty on my behalf.” S.P. Venice, Vol. xlvii, ff. 3, 10. Yet his position was precarious. Falcombridge had accepted him very unwillingly as secretary, and only out of pure obedience to the king. Id., f. 1. The king only gave him the appointment to get him out of the way. He was a creature of Buckingham, but that was enough to make Arlington his enemy. Nevertheless Arlington told Colbert that to punish him as he deserved would cause a great stir and it would be enough to give him a stiff reprimand. Colbert to the King, 8 May, 1670. P.R.O. Paris Transcripts. When Falcombridge was informed of the occurrence he dismissed Dodington from his post, though he kept him about him to make use of his services.
9 Christian V, who succeeded his father Frederick III on 9 Feb. The envoy was Christofle Lindenow, who had his first audience on Friday, 6/16 May. London Gazette, May 5–9.
10 The Advice and Guernsey were sent to Dunkirk for her, with two of the king's yachts. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 213. London Gazette, May 12–16.
11 The first gentleman of the bedchamber was John Grenville, earl of Bath; but it was Charles Sackville, lord Buckhurst, who went to Dunkirk. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 258.
12 Ferdinand II, who died on 24 May.
13 It should be Sir Orlando Bridgeman.
14 The incident occurred on 3 May. Falcombridge was going to the duke's country house at la Venerie. Michiel invited himself to accompany him. Getting into the coach first he occupied the right hand seat which he refused to give up to Falcombridge. The latter insisted on having the chief place, and ultimately he made the Venetian get down, who promptly went home. His behaviour was universally condemned. A few days later, when Falcombridge was leaving Turin, Michiel sent to ask him to call. The Englishman refused to comply unless the Venetian first admitted that he had been in the wrong on the previous occasion. This was conceded and the visit was duly paid on the 6th May. Russel to Williamson, and Dodington to Williamson. S.P. Savoy, Vol. xxiv. ff. 232, 260.
15 His name was Agostino Ottone, selected at the beginning of the year to be agent or consul in England, having been formerly employed in the same capacity at Rome, London Gazette, Jan. 17–20, 1669.
16 Louise Maria, eldest daughter of Edward, fifth son of James's daughter Elizabeth Princess Palatine and Queen of Bohemia. Her mother was Anne daughter of Charles, duke of Nevers and Mantua. The lady was not quite 23 years of age at this date.
17 A bastard galley was of a heavy type more adapted for the sail than the oar. The Signory's intention does not seem to have materialised. A galley was already building at Genoa for Charles. On May 7/17 Falcombridge reported that it was only half ribbed and nothing had been done to her for two months. On Sept. 27 Giles Ball, acting for the consul Legat, states that the galley would be ready in two months, but only the bare hull, as it was not usual to provide more than that at Genoa. S.P. Genoa, Vol. ii.


<--Previous:
Venice:
April 1670