Venice
June 1670

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

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201-216

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'Venice: June 1670', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 201-216. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90274 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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June 1670

1670.
June 4.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Spagna.
Venetian
Archives.
220. Tomaso Rudio, Venetian Secretary in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The flagship of Holland has come also for the hurt of the Algerines, with ten ships of war. He was waiting for six others to make a junction with the English admiral with the same end in view. Nevertheless I hear from Malaga that the barbarous effrontery and the pride of those corsairs has reached such a pitch that when the fleet of England was in Port Mahon with the intention of making some attempts and then to put in an appearance in sight of Algiers with the formula of the articles of the British king for an adjustment and when the Turks saw them there they gave them a curious answer. This was that they would sign the peace and a commercial agreement with that nation if they would change the articles of the English in their own favour and their own for their advantage (quando si commuteranno li capitoli degli Inglesi a proprio favore et li suoi a loro vantaggio).
Madrid, the 4th June, 1670. [Italian.]
June 6.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
221. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Repeated representations from the king of England to the Most Christian to agree to the passing of Madame of Orleans to the advantages of London have had no better result than the first, the reasons for the objection being already known to your Excellencies. That monarch has however yielded to some extent from the first arrangement for her return and the duchess is taking the liberty to postpone from day to day her departure from Dover. At Lamtico (?) the whole of the royal house here is lavishing upon her every mark of affection while she is protesting at every moment that she must be leaving to follow the train of the Most Christian Court which has already passed Cales and is approaching Boulogne. Up to the present it does not appear that this visit of Madame has any other object than the display of family affection, but even if this were so and there were not a thought of secret transactions the jealousy of princes and ministers would have given substance to various suspicions of which it is not permissible for me to report even one positively, in the absence of any foundation of confirmation.
Under present circumstances when in Holland they are disputing with the prince of Orange the right to enter the Council one cannot help thinking of the incitement that Madame might give her brother with the past pledges given by the king to support his nephew. But as a matter of fact his Majesty has not as yet communicated any such thing to the Council and he will perhaps put it off for a more favourable occasion. Meantime at the Hague there are various opinions. Some agree to the entry of the prince of Orange to the Council, merely to instruct him in the government. Others would grant him the consultative vote while the most favourable would give him the deliberative vote in order not to prejudice those just privileges which his father enjoyed in the United Provinces. Nothing has been settled as yet. They write daily from there that van Beuninghen has set foot on board ship but he is never seen to leave port, nor is it known upon what basis he can found his negotiations. Borel himself is quite in the dark about it, who left for Dover last week.
With respect to the alliance there is nothing new. I have no definite news that any decision has been taken at Dover or that any has been sent from there to France. It is quite true that the duke of Hiorch has chosen to come from Dover to London for the three recent feast days of the Holy Spirit, providing by a body of troops and the utmost diligence against all those disturbances which the liberty of the people, stimulated by the restless fanatics, might have caused on the solemn feast days. Against these and all other sectaries the king has ordered the punctual execution of the laws promulgated by the last parliament. Exemplary demonstrations will be made, search in the houses and imprisonment of delinquents, all tending to an increase of respect for the king and the rule which he is proceeding to introduce over his subjects (e del dominio che va introducendo sopra i sudditi). Amid all these searchings a fanatic who was distressed to see himself abandoned by his own devotees who were accustomed to gather at the house, let himself be carried by his fury to preach from a window. But he lost in a moment the consolation of seeing an audience of thousands of persons, partly curious and others devotees, because he was shut up in prison where the walls alone hear him. As he protests that he would rather suffer imprisonment that fail when at liberty to communicate to the people his inspirations which he receives from God, the poor fellow will live in darkness until he receives the true inspiration to promise silence and relinquish his scruple of defrauding the people of his imaginary devotions.
London, the 6th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 7.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
222. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
On Monday I went to call on the resident of England, as I intimated that I would. I congratulated him on his safe return, his good health and so forth, all to win his goodwill and to show him the state's esteem. He thanked me profusely and professed his peculiar devotion to the greatness of your Serenity as was proper for one who is to reside as ambassador for his king, and he is well pleased to have the honour of this ministry. The ambassador was to have reached this city on Wednesday, but he had been attacked by a violent fever which forced him to take to his bed and to have recourse to the doctors and now he did not know when he should get there. This attack had been entirely his own fault, because at Leghorn he had gone to see some very noble baths made after the Turkish fashion by Celibi, the Armenian. He made up his mind to enter them as he was and after he had come out he remained with his jerkin (giupone) unlaced and his breast bared. There happened to be a strong scirocco blowing and that had done the mischief. (fn. 1) He hoped that the ambassador would soon be well and he would then send and let me know the exact day of his coming here. The resident told me further that the new Grand Duke, foreseeing that his Excellency might be in doubt whether he should present himself with letters of credence addressed to his father, had contrived to let him know that he would be welcomed with the same and received with every circumstance of honour. Although the duke was greatly upset by the fatal accident that had occurred and the whole city had gone into mourning as an expression of grief for the ruler they had lost, yet at his entry they would perform everything decorously by the firing of guns and other suitable demonstrations. His Excellency appreciated this willingness but declared that he did not wish for the firing of guns or any other public ceremony. He would rest content with the offer made by his Highness as a token of esteem for his Britannic Majesty. It was accordingly arranged that his Excellency should enter by the Porta Romana, where the Boboli gardens are, and there he should meet Prince Francesco, brother of his Highness who would accompany him and attend him as far as the palace. There the Grand Duke would receive him and accompany him to the apartments which are habitually assigned to ambassadors extraordinary, where he would be lodged and defrayed in the customary manner.
His Excellency went on to speak to me about current events. He said that the Most Christian had been inconvenienced on his journey by the heavy rains that had fallen and by the bad roads he had to do with. He had been obliged to change his route and recross the frontier with a loss of horses and detriment to his baggage. He had gone to Arras and had left there for Lille and other conquered places, going on afterwards to Dunkirk and Cales.
The Dutch being jealous for the conservation of the triple alliance had decided to send Van Buninghen with all speed to England. The Baron dell' Isola is also going there to forestall and hinder any attempt that may be made by France to the prejudice of the same by means of the negotiations of Madame, the duchess, although her journey was not yet certain. Some feeling had been roused in England by the declaration made at the Court of Spain that in the mediation about the differences in the Low Countries the emperor and the Dutch should also be included as mediators. The latter, knowing this to be impossible, affect to be indifferent about it and have written to Madrid that they are very sorry about it and that they wish the matter of the arbitration to be left to the two who have been chosen. In the mean time the English ambassador has set off for the Court to treat with his Majesty about this affair. The French ambassador in England was getting ready to go and meet Madame and the king with the duke and duchess of Jorch would cross to Cales to receive her. His Majesty had already returned to London from the country, followed by the Court and the ambassadors to the hunt, to see the horse racing. They were also expecting that the prince of Orange might arrive from Holland.
In addition to the welcome given by the Genoese to this Ambassador Falcombrighe the Signory there had decided to make a present to his Majesty of the hull of a bastard galley, built in the Arsenal there and also give him some officers to manage it. The one here at Pisa is quite ready and it is believed that the Grand Duke will also make the same present. The United Provinces had decided to send the Sig. Van Boninghen to his Britannic Majesty in the capacity of envoy extraordinary with orders to stay at that Court for the whole of the time that Madame remains in the neighbourhood of England.
He went on to tell me that the ambassador to your Serenity would certainly not tarry at the Court more than two days as he was anxious to go on to his residence at Venice. He said that he would cross the Alps with the litters of the Court and at Bologna he would take coach on to Padua where he would be lodged and defrayed by an individual who is there by order of the king. He would stay there until such time as everything was ready for him to take up his post with your Serenity.
All these particulars were given me by the resident with the utmost courtesy and after thanking him, I took my leave. On Thursday he sent the secretary to inform me that the ambassador had not had any recurrence of the fever and he hoped he was on the way to recovery. I should be promptly notified of any move that he might make. To day, after dinner, the resident sent his secretary back to me to tell me that the ambassador will arrive in Court on Monday evening having entirely recovered and that his Highness was going to meet him at the Ambrogiana. (fn. 2) Florence, the 7th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
223. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
The English ambassador arrived here on Sunday at eleven at night because he did not wish to spend the night at the Ambrogiana. He had two long conferences with his Highness on Sunday and Monday; these were devoted to compliments and matters concerning the merchant ships at Leghorn. I sent at once to pay my respects and on Tuesday I called upon him, when we exchanged compliments. He spoke of the honours which he had received from the Grand Duke. He proposed to travel to Venice via Bologna and Ferrara. He would go incognito with a very small suite, leaving some here and some at Bologna. I wished him a good journey.
Florence, the 10th June, 1670.
[Italian.
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
224. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The duchess of Orleans left Lille for Dover. Her brother, the British king was awaiting her there with impatience. Passing through Spanish territory before embarking at Dunkirk the duchess received the honours due to her rank by order of the Constable of Castile. She responded graciously making known by rich gifts to the people and troops her gratification at the universal acclamation by which she was accompanied the whole of the way. Here also the king has received the English ambassador Montegu, and Baron Obdam, envoy extraordinary of the States of Holland, was admitted as well.
The king receives here by means of Lord Brocaz and other distinguished personages, sent as envoys extraordinary of the king and princes of England, the most abundant tokens of regard and correspondence from that monarch and his royal House. He has responded to these offices by the most affectionate demonstrations and the envoys will recross the sea each in possession of the king's portrait richly set in diamonds.
Paris, the 11th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
225. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The duchess of Orleans is still at Dover in good health. She has written from there assuring the king that she will leave to morrow, the 12th inst. and will travel to these parts without any interruption. The royal attention is concentrated with impatience upon the issue of her Highness's negotiations with the king, her brother, especially as the duchess tells him in a message she has sent, that she will impart to him orally what she has succeeded in arranging for the advantage of France.
Some additional ill feeling has been created between the duke of Orleans and his wife over this absence. It will be longer than was originally arranged before she left this country. In the secret conferences between the king and his sister in law his Majesty agreed to her making a longer stay in England, without taking his brother into his confidence. The duke has now found out about this arrangement and resents it strongly that such a thing should be settled without his knowledge. It seems to him that he counts for very little at this Court when he is constrained to agree to what is solely for the gratification of his wife.
The high favour and regard which the duchess enjoys in the royal eyes is a guarantee that his Majesty will take her part in anything that concerns her and this makes it certain that she will see the present differences calmed down on her arrival, by the king's authoritative interposition. If the affairs of this kingdom have in any respect improved from the suggestions made by her to his Britannic Majesty there can be no doubt about the continuation and increase of the royal affection and partiality for his sister in law.
Paris, the 11th June, 1670.
[Italian, the part in italics deciphered.]
June 13.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
226. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The duchess of Orleans delayed her departure from Dover so long that she decided to take part with all the Court in celebrating the 29th May, the anniversary of the king's birth and of his restoration to his kingdom. This noteworthy event is usually celebrated by bonfires and joyous demonstrations. The duchess has decided to leave on the expiry of the permission given by the Most Christian, and this may happen at any moment. Nothing fresh has occurred which is likely to postpone this move which has been arranged with the king and accepted by him although it pains him and wounds his tenderest affections.
What effect the conversation and proposals of the duchess may have produced on the king is buried in his bosom. This uncertainty only increases the variety of the opinions formed. The most plausible are the offices of the duchess in favour of the earl of Clarendon, sometime chancellor, who is now in France, exiled by the parliament. His daughter is here married to the duke of Hyorch and they are all exerting themselves in his favour.
The duchess may also have said something on the subject of her own dowry, which is constantly being raised, while some will have it that she has unburdened herself to her brother about the ill treatment she receives from the duke of Orleans, her husband.
The talk about the duchess urging the king to divorce his barren queen and offering him a French princess has certainly no better foundation than mere gossip. There is only this that the eagerness of the king in the last parliament to decide the dispute in favour of Roche, who wished to marry again after divorce, was noticed and led some to believe that his Majesty wishes to profit by the example and by the act.
The prince of Orange also continues to be in the picture for that share of protection which he looks for from the king here with respect to his interests in Holland. I mention this because it is my duty to keep on the watch and report what I hear. But I have not yet been able to delve into the truth of the matter; neither has the Dutch ambassador, who has been observing closely, been able to find out any more, nor is there any jealousy about the affairs of the alliance.
Signor Van Beuninghen has since arrived from Holland. He is still keeping incognito in the house of the Ambassador Borel. He left the Hague only after the States had agreed that the prince of Orange should have the entry into the Council to instruct him about the government, encouraging him to take part in all military exercises, with an intimation that they will provide him with the distinguished post of Captain General at sea and by land as soon as ever years and experience shall have fitted him for the position. On the king's return to London Van Beuninghen will come out in his proper character and with his commissions. At present he does not show himself or appear anywhere, being equally remote from communication and from business.
By duplicate letters from Copenhagen from the Ambassador, the earl of Esses, they have news of his public entry and first audience of the new king, with all the most distinguished ceremonies. He was entertained for three days at the royal expense in return for similar honours rendered to the Ambassador Guldenleem.
Esses writes in detail about an incident which happened in the Sound. When he was passing through with sails spread and flag flying, three discharges were fired from the fortress with shotted guns to warn him to lower his flag; but he merely lowered his sails to let slip the anchor and take ground. Arrived at Copenhagen he complained to the king of the lack of respect shown to his character and to the flag of England. The governor of the fortress being summoned declared that he had orders to fire the three shots, with due respect for the distinguished British minister, and for the rest they served to show the dominion of the Danish king in those waters. (fn. 3) Esses is satisfied at having sustained the dominion of his master by keeping his flag flying, and the difference has been settled to the satisfaction of both parties. The Dutch proceed in another fashion. In sending Vit as ambassador to compliment the new king they are arranging to write in advance that without paying attention to the pretensions of England they will command their ambassador to lower the flag and recognise the dominion of his Majesty.
The news of the death of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, sent to the king here by the Grand Prince, found his Majesty at Dover. When he returns to London with the foreign ambassadors and all the Court he will put on mourning, on account of their relationship in blood (fn. 4) and because of his regard for the deceased as well as for the correspondence which they desire to cultivate with the present Grand Duke.
London, the 13th June, 1670. [Italian, the part in italics deciphered.]
June 18.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
227. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The return of the duchess of Orleans is awaited with impatience. On receipt of the definite news the duke of Orleans has decided not to budge from this neighbourhood or to proceed to some distance to receive his wife when she arrived as he was used to do. This public demonstration shows more clearly than ever the resentment he feels about the incidents recorded.
Paris, the 18th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
228. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The departure of the duchess of Orleans took place last week in accordance with the arrangements reported and with the universal desire. Attended by Lords St. Albans and Sandwich she arrived in Cales in four hours after a most prosperous crossing entirely satisfied by the show of esteem and content at the affection which she found in her brothers. The generosity shown by her Highness in scattering presents about the Court was fully reciprocated, especially by the queen. She took away several pieces of jewellery to the value of 9000l. sterling and 6000l. in cash from the king to be laid out in France upon some property to please herself.
The separation from Madame having taken place, after a stay of seventeen days at Dover, the king travelled back to London by water while the queen took the land route, returning to quiet after the discomforts of the place and the emotions of the meeting. Besides the compliments and demonstrations of affection the duchess intervened in the affairs of the royal House obtaining for the son of the late chancellor, Lord Coromberi, his reinstatement as grand chamberlain to the queen. (fn. 5) She also interested herself more nearly in the internal affairs of the government and differences between ministers. With great prudence she contrived to suggest such inducements that she had the personal satisfaction of seeing them reconciled. (fn. 6) The permanence of this is left to the workings of time, to the turn of events and to their own self interest.
All these things are to do with the private concerns of the royal House. Passing to the interests of foreign princes we see so far that the question of trade with France has been brought to the front again through the efforts of the duchess and the Ambassador Colbert is already putting his proposals in writing. Lord Arlington told me that he had instructions from the king to hear him and to examine them.
Lord Arlington also spoke to me, although with some reserve, against the procedure of the States who show excessive caution in recognising the deserts of the House of Orange in the person of the present prince. From other quarters I gather that the king is not pleased about the deliberative vote only or the post of lieutenant general accorded to the prince. He also puts a sinister interpretation upon the other decision to confirm or actually to elect the captain general every year. Orange has been living in expectation of that post and he would receive it in due course with too many limitations, controls and reservations. The duchess may have added some slight incitement to the king, at the instigation of the Most Christian who is closely watching any innovations in the States. But the king here is sufficiently disposed to support his nephew and the Sig. Van Beuninghen will hear him speak about it with interest.
This minister, Van Beuninghen, did not have audience of his Majesty before Wednesday, after dinner. He was conducted without ceremony by the Secretary Trevers alone. They had known each other in France at the time of the negotiation of the peace of Aix la Chapelle. Van Beuninghen refused to be introduced by the Master of the Ceremonies, concealing any character as minister under the pretext that he has come to London merely to amuse himself, and the States gave him the letter of credence to present to the king for the sole reason of qualifying a member of their council, as in fact he is. Up to the present he has confined himself to compliments, but by way of confidence he lets it be said that the States have confided to him the affair of trade in the Indies, so long in dispute.
The French ambassador, taking a longer view, suspects a great deal but merely says that Holland is jealous of the union that England might make with France. But although it is probable that Van Beuninghen does not tell all that he has to treat of, most people conclude that Colbert in speaking of an alliance, however far off he may believe it to be, is using it in order to start a shadow of suspicion and to give his opponents something to think about.
The report that the Baron dell' Isola may be coming from the Hague to London derives from those of the party of the alliance who would like to see the emperor included; but it does not rest upon any basis of truth. Similarly Don Francesco di Melo, the Portuguese ambassador in Holland, has no business. He crossed to Dover to pay his respects to the queen and to Madame, and came on here to see his sister. He is about to return to the United Provinces.
Acknowledges receipt of the ducali of the 24th and 30th September.
With regard to the movements of Faulcombridge I have learned from Lord Arlington's own lips that the viscount will in due course have continued his journey to Florence and shown his credentials to the new Grand Duke as in Florence the representative never dies. With regard to offices, the king, the Court and all the ministers here had gone into mourning and Sig. Amilton had already been appointed by the king to go and offer condolences while the duke of Hiorch would send another gentleman to fulfil every proper demonstration. (fn. 7)
London, the 20th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
229. To the Ambassador Mocenigo in England.
Acknowledge receipt of his letters of the 6th. With regard to the conference between Madame of Orleans and her brother we approve of your intention to find out what may pass in the direction of some sort of negotiation such as appears to be imagined, from other information received.
The Ambassador Falcombrighe does not afford us the opportunity to say more to you about his arrival in this city since he has not as yet notified us of it with the usual formality. He is devoting himself solely to his preparations and leaves us on the watch and ready to show the esteem which is usual with ministers of his character.
Ayes, 99. Noes, 1. Neutral, 6.
[Italian.]
June 23.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
230. The English consul, George Ayles came with another person who he said was the secretary of the ambassador extraordinary of the king of Great Britain, (fn. 8) and asked to speak with me. I went to him by order of the Savii when he presented the secretary. The latter said that the ambassador had sent him to obtain information about the ceremonial at his reception. I asked him to allow me to seek permission from the Savii to speak with him. He then gave me a copy of the ambassador's credentials and said he would like a copy of what I had to say.
I informed their Excellencies of all and then returned and told him that I had obtained leave to oblige him but had not told their Excellencies anything, but we secretaries were not permitted to put anything in writing. He repeated his request saying that he only wished to confer with me privately. I told him that three days ago a certain Sig. Poggio, a lawyer, accustomed to frequent the Collegio, had made the same request in the ambassador's name and the instructions had been given to him. The secretary replied that he knew nothing about him. I told him that did not matter as the ambassador would receive precisely the same treatment as was used with the ambassadors extraordinary of France.
He seemed greatly pleased at this but said, I have two other difficulties. The ambassador will go to Padua and inform the Senate of his arrival from there. Tell me if he will be defrayed and if a master of the ceremonies will be sent to meet him. I said that certain refreshments and compliments were accorded to ambassadors extraordinary. I did not know about defraying them, but I could assure him that none of the usual practices would be omitted, and this satisfied him.
He asked if he would be met at neighbouring islands by a grandee of the Council and sixty senators. I said, No because such persons do not go to these functions when they are in office, but a cavalier would go who had been on embassies to crowned heads and had passed as savio of the Council. (fn. 9) I could not tell about the senators; even more might be invited, but all could not go and they cannot be compelled. I assured him they would all be senators of title.
He asked, Is a house prepared? I said that some apartments were made ready at the island, for the reception. He said, I mean a house in the city. Not because the ambassador intends to be a charge on the Senate, but that the full ceremonial may be fulfilled. I said there was no doubt but he would be defrayed for the customary number of days, but a house was not given to all. One was made ready for those who only stayed a few days, but for those who were staying some time and were known to have taken a house for themselves, they did not provide one as it would only encumber the ambassador and cause trouble to the state. I assured him that this did not affect the treatment, but only the condition of being defrayed for those few days, and he would have this just the same at his own house. The consul said he thought the number of days was eight. I said I did not remember, but there would be no difficulty about it. The secretary repeated that the ambassador did not wish to be troublesome to the Senate, and it would be enough for the ceremonial to be performed. He seemed to believe all that I told him, but he asked my permission to come whenever a difficulty arose. I told him that I was at his service. I afterwards communicated the whole to the Savii who directed me to make this entry.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
231. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The government here is aware of the strong resentment felt by the British king when he heard of the conditions upon which the States of Holland have admitted the prince of Orange to their Council of State. With the eager attention which they devote here to separate the United Provinces from England by taking advantage of any circumstance that arises, secret instructions have been drawn up for the Ambassador Colbert so that he may seize upon this opportunity that has presented itself to derive ever increasing advantages therefrom and sow discord between that kingdom and Holland. None the less it is permissible to believe that all his efforts will prove vain since it is definitely to the interest of the British king to continue without alteration in the triple alliance.
The profit brought back by the duchess of Orleans from her recent voyage to England is calculated at this Court to amount to a considerable sum in ready money. She received the most lavish tokens of the generosity of the British king and queen and before her departure she was honoured by his Majesty here with no ordinary profusion.
Paris, the 25th June, 1670.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 25.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
232. The English consul with the ambassador's secretary came to the door of the Collegio and asked for a word with me. As the doge was about to descend I could not see him. The consul said he would go down to the church. Half way through the mass the consul showed himself, and after a word with the Savio Contarini I went to hear him, and both came out of the church towards me. They said they had told his Excellency of what had passed between us the day before yesterday, and the only difficulty was over the prepared house. He had definite information that this was done for all ambassadors extraordinary, and as he was not to omit anything of the ceremonial he meant to ask for it. He certainly did not wish to involve the Senate in expense, after the heavy cost of the late war, and a day or two more or less of entertainment did not matter, provided it was not prejudicial, but he thought he ought to have the house. I said that if he wished I would report what he said; but I could only do so after dinner. For myself I could assure him that it was only the defraying that mattered, the house makes no difference. I could show precedents for the crowns of France, Spain and England. The doge would not consider expense in showing his respect for the king, especially as these affairs have their fixed forms. I said this must not be taken as a statement and asked when he would come for the reply. He said, Three will come this evening after nine. All that I am now going to tell you is from myself. In four days I shall come definitely in the name of his Excellency. I also leave you this paper because it shows the ambassador's character as plenipotentiary.
The secretary then drew me aside and said. The ambassador is obliged to you for the information given, but he would like to know also how he should conduct himself in his exposition, because he has orders to say something about the universal peace, and proposes to touch upon it in his exposition. But he is anxious not to give umbrage to the neighbours of the most serene republic, and does not wish to do anything disagreeable. He knew what the umbrage of neighbours meant. Indicating his hands he said they were considered as two, but it was not necessary to tie them together as they were actually one flesh joined by nature, and this was the case between neighbours. Universal peace was a great boon affecting every one, and the ambassador had something to say about it, but he wished to do so in a manner agreeable to the Senate at a time when there was no need to be careful who was listening, and that all should pass in secrecy and under the seal of secrecy. I promised to acquaint their Excellencies of everything and to give him the reply after dinner. With that he left.
[Italian.]
June 25.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
233. The secretary of the English ambassador came again to the doors of the Collegio after dinner, for his answer. As instructed by the Savii I assured him again that the house had nothing to do with the formality. Sir Fildinch, ambassador extraordinary of his king in 1634, was treated thus and more recently the archbishop of Ambrun, ambassador of the Most Christian, and the bishop of Bisiers, now archbishop of Toulouse, who succeeded him with a like title. The secretary said that the ambassador wished to have full satisfaction. He had a paper written by the hand of Lord Gaston, ambassador extraordinary at Venice in 1632. (fn. 10) He arrived on the 10th November and was defrayed until the 24th, which made fourteen days, and he had a house. As there were examples that was enough.
On the other point I told him that his first audience should be public and that anyone could enter to hear what he said. But after that he could have private audience when he wished, and he would always be welcome. The question of mingling affairs with the first formalities was left to his discretion, but they would always be glad to receive him.
He asked me afterwards for the paper which he gave me in the morning and I handed it back to him although there had not been time to take a copy. It gave the ambassador full powers to intervene in any treaty between the most serene republic and the Turk. He told me that the ambassador would introduce him, the secretary, in the College, every time that he had to speak English, to act as interpreter, and that he would leave a copy of his expositions in both idioms. With this he left.
[Italian.]
Attached,
filza.
234. Memorandum that on 16 December, 1634 Sir Fildinch came to Venice as ambassador, having taken his own house, and the usual treatments were performed in it.
On 14 August, 1659, the archbishop of Ambrun came to Venice as ambassador for the Most Christian, having also taken a house to live in, and the same course was adopted with him in respect of the house.
[Italian.]
June 27.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
235. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
One of the most important matters resumed in the Council of State since the return from Dover is that of the arbitration. The king has not yet taken occasion to impart to the Most Christian the Spanish reservations. It is feared here that he will take them in ill part; not only the claim of the Catholic to nominate other arbitrators but that the delay will upset the favourable progress of the business. Nevertheless upon the receipt of news that has reached the Secretary Arlington from Madrid they are holding back from taking any fresh steps with the Most Christian since it appears that the Catholic queen has at last made up her mind to accept the nomination of France and refers the decision about the boundaries to this crown and that of Sweden. They are waiting for the letters of the minister Godolfin to verify this point, after which they will set to work to get things under weigh, pressing for the minister of Sweden to come and some one for Spain.
Van Beuninghen is watching all these cogitations. With great dexterity he informs himself of the circumstances of the government and sounds the feelings of the ministers. It is certain that a man of his ability cannot fail to find out the opinions of others and win credit for himself, which will serve to facilitate the success of any business that he may introduce. There is already talk about the trade of the Indies and he confesses that he has instructions from his masters to conclude a treaty for sea affairs. He urges the king strongly to put down the Algerine corsairs, offering more freely than ever the cooperation of the Dutch forces with those of England.
The French ambassador, who communicated his suspicions to me, has not yet made up his mind about the subject for which the States have applied this jewel of theirs (he called Van Beuninghen a precious relic (fn. 11) of the Provinces), but he concludes that their object is to bring in other princes and to establish the alliance more firmly than ever.
Three evenings ago this same Van Beuninghen met me in the Park in the footwalk with the king. He took the opportunity to pay me a most elaborate compliment to show his respect for the minister of your Excellencies. I responded by assuring him of the esteem of the most serene republic for the Lords States. The ceremony of visits is dispensed with seeing that he does not wish it and indeed avoids it.
Van Beuninghen also compared with mine his advices from the Indies of a conquest made by the Dutch from the king of Macassar, occupying his country. But as we both have it from the reports of ships and from merchants' letters he will wait before making use of it or turning it to advantage in the treaty of commerce which he is about to conclude with England.
The French ambassador is also exerting himself for his treaty but he has not yet had the opportunity or the good fortune to entirely convince Lord Arlington, with whom there have been conferences, in order not to lose the benefit of the recommendation of Madame of Orleans while it is still warm.
On the other side the king, intent on the affairs affecting his own crown is firmly directing the observance of the act of parliament against the Nonconformists. Some he has detained in prison while others are allowed to be condemned in accordance with the severity of the Act. Three days ago, sitting in the Council, he ordered that eight large houses destined for the use of the sectaries should be converted to the use of the Protestant churches until those that were burned in the terrible fire a few years ago have been replaced, (fn. 12) By thus upsetting the nests of the conventicles of the fanatics the king in his prudence will contribute by his authority to the destruction of this mischief in the kingdom. As an adjunct to this decree there is another of rigorous banishment from London for six months of the officers and soldiers who served Cromwell. (fn. 13) At the expiry of that time they are to know the king's more recent pleasure. In the mean time as many have been restored to the king's favour and do not abuse his pardon, the king in his mercy is ready to grant them a safe conduct as he only aims at driving out the most unruly.
Since the force of arms sustains that of the sceptre and of command the recruits for the royal guards are being increased by more than 2000 men part foot and part horse and there is no shadow of doubt that his Majesty in establishing the crown together with his authority will cause the throne to be more resplendent than ever by a real dominion.
Among the events of the kingdom there is the change of governor at Jamaica. Lord Carleils, who returned six months ago from the embassy of Sweden is substituted for the present one by royal decree. (fn. 14) This appointment makes the Spaniards hope that all moderation will be shown and an abstention from reprisals which were becoming a commonplace upon their possessions in America.
As the Secretary Bridgeman has fallen sick at Dover the offices of the duke of Buckingham have taken effect and have prevented his journey for the time being. So all action against the secretary at Venice is suspended until the arrival of the reply from the Ambassador Faulcombridge.
London, the 27th June, 1670.
[Italian.]
June 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
236. Ottavian Valier, Venetian Secretary at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
News has come from Leghorn that an English ship of war, named Amisier has arrived in that port to take on board provisions and other munitions for their fleet. (fn. 15) This vessel left Malaga with ten ships of war of General Alen from which it parted company four days ago off Minorca, to go to Algiers without having effected anything against the Barbary corsairs. It also stated that the galleons of the Spanish fleet from the Indies had arrived safely in Spain.
Florence, the 28th June, 1670.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 He took a hot Turkish bath on Sunday night, the 25th May, and owing to his carelessness, had a sharp attack of fever the next day. “My lord ambassador hath had a very severe bout,” wrote Dodington, he “hath no very good constitution of body, which makes him very temperate. However he hath frequent indispositions, the least of which brings him ever to the verge of the grave.” Finch to Arlington on 3 June; Dodington to Williamson on 6 June. S.P. Tuscany, Vol. xi.
2 The villa Ambrogiana situated between Empoli and Montelupo, built by the Grand Duke Ferdinand I.
3 Essex's account is dated 7 May. The incident occurred on the 3rd o.s. The governor's name was Holck. S.P. Denmark, Vol. xviii.
4 Maria de' Medici, wife of Henry IV of France, grandmother of Charles, was first cousin of Cosimo II the father of the deceased Grand Duke Ferdinand II.
5 Henry Hyde, viscount Cornbury, Clarendon's eldest son.
6 This refers more particularly to Buckingham and Arlington. Clarke: Life of James II, Vol. ii, page 451.
7 The envoys were James Hamilton, a groom of the bedchamber, and Mr. Saville. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 391; Cal. Treasury Books, Vol. iii, page 600.
8 As Dodington was in disgrace owing to his alleged slander on the King of France, Falcombridge had dismissed him from his post, and the duties of Secretary were discharged by Dr. Yarbury. Falcombridge to Arlington on 27 June. S.P. Venice, Vol. xviii, fol. 20.
9 i.e. had served as one of the high executive officers of state.
10 Jerome Weston, eldest son of Richard Weston, then lord treasurer.
11 Reliques: ce mot pris dans le figuré pour dire une chose precieuse est bas. Richelet: Dict. de la Langue Françoise. Van Beuningen, born about 1622, was not a relic in any other sense.
12 By an order in Council of 10 June, Christopher Wren, surveyor general of H.M.'s works, was authorised to seize all houses in London, Westminster and Southwark which have been made use of for the meeting of persons disaffected to the government, under pretence of religious worship, and to shut them up. Privy Council Register, Vol. lxii, f. 190.
13 Proclamation of the 10th June, requiring all who served in the armies of the late usurped powers to depart from London before the 16th inst. and not to return before the 16th December. Steele: Tudor and Stuart Proclamations, Vol. i, page 427, no. 3533.
14 This was not carried into effect until some years later, and Carlisle was not actually appointed until March, 1674. Cal.S.P. America & West Indies, 1669–74, page 567.
15 The Hampshire, sent to Leghorn with the Pearl and Deptford ketch, for rice, oil and beer. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 250.


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