Venice
October 1670

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1937

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281-294

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'Venice: October 1670', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 36: 1669-1670 (1937), pp. 281-294. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90279 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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October 1670

Oct. 2.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
328. To the Ambassador in England.
Acknowledge his letters of the 12th September. The Senate is glad to learn that the passage of couriers and letters is no longer in danger. In recognition of his merit and of the heavy expenses he has incurred in the public service he has been decorated with the title of Savio del Consiglio.
Ayes, 175. Noes, 2. Neutral, 8.
[Italian.
Oct. 3.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
329. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Faulcombridge writes to Arlington that he has taken leave of your Excellencies and is leaving extremely well pleased with the honours and treatment accorded to his office. On a visit to the secretary I repeated to him the abundant satisfaction of the Senate with his mission and that the republic would respond in the fullest manner to this demonstration of his Majesty. I told him that the viscount personally had given satisfaction to every one by the worthy manner in which he had conducted himself and had won the especial regard of your Excellencies. Arlington replied that the king would be pleased but immediately asked me if I had written on the subject of the English cloth in the Levant. I assured him of the greatness of the principles of the government of the republic. I told him moreover that I was instructed to express the public obligation for the readiness shown by the Ambassador Harvis in carrying out his Majesty's orders by a good understanding with the Bailo Molino, and that his Excellency would be acting in accordance with the sentiments of the republic on all occasions of common interests at the Porte.
Arlington confirmed the interest of this crown in a good correspondence with the republic in every quarter and the decision of the king to provide for ordinary eventualities at Venice by means of a secretary resident, only sending an ambassador for extraordinary circumstances. The king does not entirely trust to the loyalty of the Secretary Darinton, or look for the best service from him. His credentials are being held up until a decision is taken which is under consideration; but his Majesty has not yet made up his mind.
The duke of Bouchingan makes a great stir personally and so do his transactions at Paris. Many suspect that they tend to the ruin of the alliance, but there is no sign of this as yet. The king is far from wishing to change the present constitution of the public quiet or to hazard that of the others. On the other hand, when they were expecting the Prince of Orange in London and the earl of Osseri was leaving to meet him, the Ambassador Temple has arrived from the Hague and reports that the prince has put off his journey for private reasons as he does not wish to lose the opening of the next Assembly, in order to have the pension which is being obtained from the States.
In this state of affairs at the Court here, where all the affairs of the North are represented, the Count of Molina has arrived here. Being still incognito he rests content with having seen the king and the royal family in secret and with enjoying the visits and favours of his friends in the house of the Spanish resident until all is ready for a stately train. I shall keep a look out then for resuming visits and for forgetting past events. From a confidant of Molina I learn that his Excellency is inclined to doubt whether France was so lavish with Bouchingan and made so much of him in the hope of capturing him or with the object of rendering him suspect to the Spanish party, seeing that the duke has always been opposed to the French in London. Molina also suspects that the return of Temple involves some mystery, especially because of the well known grievances of the Prince of Orange, his Majesty's nephew. But there is not the slightest ground for supposing that there are transactions of Bouchingan at Paris.
Molina is not of the opinion that the king refuses the succour of the alliance to Lorraine because of a pact made by Bouquingan at Paris. He says that the heart of his Majesty will either be wholly contaminated or not at all, seeing clearly that the desire of the glory of the peace will be greater than that of being involved in war.
Count Morosse, the envoy of the duke of Savoy, had his audience of the king and the royal House. He was taken to Court in the coach of the Grand Chamberlain. He was unable to have the king's, in imitation of the Marshal Belefont, a person of distinguished rank personally and in addition worthy of the highest regard, because of the occasion and of the character which he bore.
The king being disposed to go into the country on Monday to enjoy the rest of the season, wished to get together the commissioners of England and Scotland for the union of the kingdoms. The sittings will be held in the queen's palace of Somerset. It will be confined to preliminaries only and the material will barely be digested for the next meeting of parliament on the 24th of the present month.
London, the 3rd October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 8.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
330. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The States have sent orders to Van Boninghen that he is not to leave London unless he receives previously the unanimous consent of the Provinces. He is also directed to make strong representations to his Britannic Majesty to direct Temple, who is in London on his private affairs, to confer with the baron dell' Isola, the imperial minister who has returned to the States, and to join with him in putting the final touches to some roughly draughted articles which are an incitement to the emperor to join himself to the triple alliance so that by receiving that notable reinforcement that combination may provide a more solid basis for the peace of Europe and greater security for the peculiar affairs of the Provinces themselves. It would seem that it depends solely upon the British king to provide the motive power for so weighty a resolution and the most strenuous efforts will be applied from this side in London to deprive the triple alliance of this considerable reinforcement.
The following of the Prince of Orange having greatly increased he was thinking of starting in a few days for the British Court, having the additional inducement of a pressing invitation from the king there. The Count of Molina will by this time have arrived at that Court in the capacity of Catholic ambassador.
Paris, the 8th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 9.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
331. To the Ambassador in England.
Enclose the decision of the Senate upon the duty on salt fish. This shows the goodwill of the republic, as there were not a few difficulties in the way. He is to draw attention to this when he has occasion to speak to his Majesty.
The Senate has decided to grant him permission to take leave of their Majesties and return home. At his audience he is to say that he has been permitted to return owing to the serious pressure of his private affairs. He is to express the cordial regard of the republic for that crown and their desire that English merchants shall receive the best possible treatment and to promote trade between the two countries.
He will leave the Secretary Alberti in charge of the residency. He will charge him to devote himself to promoting good correspondence on both sides and to possessing the merchants with the assurance that they will be allowed to enjoy every possible facility in trade and encouraging them to send an abundance of goods to the republic's ports. He will also be expected to keep the Senate informed of the important events that occur in those parts.
That to the Secretary Alberti, who is to remain in London after the departure of the Ambassador Mocenigo, 430 ducats of good value be given for his equipment. For his salary 160 ducats of 7 lire each a month and 680 crowns a month as is customary by the regulations of the 19th August 1619. Also 40 crowns a month for all extraordinary expenses, except couriers and the carriage of letters, for which he need not render account. 150 ducats for couriers and letters for which he will render account. Allowance will be made to him for a chaplain and interpreter in his accounts, for the time that he remains at that Court; for the chaplain at the rate of 186 ducats a year and for the interpreter at the rate of 100 ducats, in accordance with the decision of 26 November, 1610.
Ayes, 104. Noes, 4. Neutral, 3.
[Italian.]
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
filza.
Venetian
Archives.
332. In the Pregadi, the 9th October.
The Revisers and Regulators of the Customs having carefully considered the representations of the English ambassador and English consul about the heavy burden on salt fish, and delivered their opinion: it is ordained by the authority of this Council that the report presented by them concerning the import and export of herrings, salmon and pilchards, be approved by this and referred to that magistracy to command the execution thereof; further directing them to determine the time when it shall begin; and what the said magistracy shall herein do shall be as valid as if this Council itself had done it; and calling the English consul before them they shall communicate their decisions to him.
[Italian.]
Oct. 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
333. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The proper limits of the alliance have been extended upon the basis of its principles of maintaining the peace and England is consulted impartially in all contingencies that are likely to disturb the quiet. This crown takes the foremost place in the triple union as distinguished from Sweden, which takes little interest and from Holland, which has taken the part of acting and which, besides the conspicuous end of glory, has that of self interest. The further the arms of the Most Christian penetrate into Lorraine the more the king here is urged by the States, who are near the conflagration, to undertake mediation in favour of the duke jointly with the alliance. But the Ambassador Colbert went to a special audience of the king and told him the just reasons for indignation against Lorraine who, contrary to the treaties maintains forces in his pay, has infringed frontiers and torn up agreements. More openly he tells ministers that the duke offered 14,000 men to Spain and afterwards to Holland, to invade France right up to Paris. In this way Colbert hopes that he has done enough to divert England from pledging herself in favour of Lorraine. It cannot be very long before the arrival in London of an envoy from the duke of Lorraine. We shall then know more precisely what his Majesty will decide.
Some thought that the English Ambassador Temple, recalled from the Hague, had come to bring word of the more profound ideas of Holland in favour of Lorraine. But it is more reasonable to wait and see whether his return has any connection with the postponement of the visit of the Prince of Orange here and of the interests of that prince with the States. On good authority I can assure your Excellencies that Temple brings word of the persistence of the report that the emperor is disposed to enter the alliance and to write a letter to the king here. But this affair is in the hands of the baron dell' Isola, who does not inspire complete confidence in this business, as at the very beginning of the formation of the alliance he promised the inclusion of the emperor without having commissions for it. This is the reason for the diffidence about this subject, which I have already intimated to your Excellencies.
The reply about the arbitration has arrived from Spain. While withdrawing the nomination of Holland the queen includes the differences over the guns, bells and materials which the French carried away from Franche Comté. But the French ambassador says that he does not see how the Most Christian can agree to this. He also has other claims, but he does not mix them up with the decision about the boundaries, to avoid confusion and to prevent the affair dragging on for ever.
In spite of all this the king is determined to go to the country, so the Ambassador Molina has made haste to present his credentials. He did this without the formalities of a state reception and has begun to treat with the ministers to get the business under way. The first step is by pressing letters to Paris to remove this last difficulty.
In order that this theatre of London may not fail to make a great show, the king and his Council have decided on the arming of fifty ships of war for the coming summer. They let Holland believe it to be for the maintenance of the peace; Spain to hope that it is to defend their quiet and France to conclude that it is merely an alarm. The real truth is that his Majesty's wishes will be communicated to the country in the next parliament, in October, in the assurance of approval on every occasion when it is a question of maintaining the dignity and splendour of the nation.
The armament of the twenty ships against the Algerians had not hitherto aroused much enthusiasm owing to the scanty results. Now news has come of the burning of six ships of those corsairs, including the Admiral, Vice Admiral and Rear Admiral, with 250 guns, and 2,200 men and the rejoicing is universal. The news will have reached your Excellencies already by way of Madrid. I will only say that they give the Dutchman Van Ghent the credit of the chance of having met the corsairs with his four ships, while the English captain Beach has the glory of the victory. (fn. 1)
Five days ago the king left London for Nicomarchet followed by all the Court. Following his example the queen proceeded to the other royal pleasure resort in the same neighbourhood. (fn. 2) She is expecting a sacred present of the divine body, Agnus and similar objects of devotion, which the pope is sending to her by Mons. Amilton, who went to Rome out of curiosity after he had discharged his functions with the Grand Duke. (fn. 3) Another rich gift has been made to her Majesty by the Spanish ambassador in the name of the countess of Molina, his wife, of some rare things from Madrid.
As the ambassadors of France and Holland have paid secret visits to the Ambassador Molina, I decided to pay my respects to him by the Secretary Alberti. As he found that his Excellency is ready to receive me in the same form that the Ambassador Colbert will meet with on his public visits and will not claim more from me, I paid him a special call and he came subsequently to my house without formalities. I am waiting for the French ambassador to see him in public, when I will follow his example, so as not to prejudice the decorum of your Excellencies in any way, and blotting out entirely the late incident.
Count Moross, the envoy of the duke of Savoy, has taken leave of the king. He departs without having visited any ministers except the French ambassador and that only as a private gentleman.
The ducali of the 13th September have reached me this week and I will make use of them to make known the distinctions and welcome accorded to the minister of this crown.
The king, in contemplation of an individual of influence in parliament, brother in law of Dorington, granted the position at Venice to the latter. The member of parliament has now found out about the alteration intimated in my last and has so worked matters that the king is allowing the credentials which have been sent, to proceed. (fn. 4)
London, the 10th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 12.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
334. Ottavian Pisani, Venetian Proveditore of Zante, to the Doge and Senate.
In reply to the ducali of the 31st August with respect to the memorial of the English ambassador, those guilty of the death of the Consul Arbis, the person of Clement Arbis, etc. I have to report:
(1) Before the instructions arrived I had endeavoured by orders to the officers and the despatch of troops to secure the arrest of the murderers, at the request of Sig. Clement, a worthy gentleman of honourable rank. After a most diligent search I caused the arrest of one of the accomplices, although the principal assassin has not been found. The one arrested has been condemned to the galleys for ten years. If the others are found they will undergo their sentences. I have afforded every satisfaction to Sig. Clement.
(2) The other matters concerning trade have been referred to the Avvocato Fiscale for his opinion. To grant exemption for 150 pieces of cloth to the nation in question would not only prove very detrimental to the public interests, but would involve serious loss to the duty of the new impost, at a time when it is called upon to meet so many essential public expenses.
(3) The claim for 4 soldi per migliare seems to me inadmissible not so much because these are destined for so pious a cause as because the vendor is the one who is obliged to make the payment by way of duty although the fact that the purchaser is obliged to make a deposit causes the vendor to establish the price of the currants without such a charge, although the obligation is his.
(4) With regard to the casks this is a very trifling matter seeing that they are to be used solely for the lading of currants and the request seems to me to be not unreasonable.
Zante, the 12th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 17.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
335. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
On the arrival at this Court of the English Ambassador Temple back from the Hague his first expressions were about the impatience with which he had longed for some moments free from his extraordinary obligations in order to bear witness to his regard for your Excellencies in the person of your minister. He also said how grieved he had been at his failure to obtain a declaration of succour from the States of Holland when he had such precise orders from his Majesty here. In reply I commended his zeal which led him always to interest himself in the common cause. He said that the loss of Candia was the loss of Christendom. The most serene republic had compensation for it in the acquisitions in Dalmatia. (fn. 5) He rejoiced at the peace. I assured him that it was established. He said he had envied the employment of the Ambassador Faulcombridge with your Serenity. I ended with remarks calculated to continue his regard for the Senate.
Temple went on to speak of the triple alliance. He gave me confirmation of the promise made by L'Isola that the emperor would write to England to be included and that other princes of the empire would follow his example, sending envoys to the Hague. This transaction would fall into confusion at any time that Caesar might take it upon himself to come in person alone, as chief, to treat with the alliance and consideration of this possibility made the king of England still undecided. In order to convince me of the rightful bias of his Majesty in this affair Temple dwelt upon the multiplicity of opinions and interests among the princes of Germany, as a body difficult to direct and move. The consequences of this were seen in the circumstances of Lorraine. No one went to the rescue there and they would be much less inclined to move in order to guarantee the peace of Aix la Chapelle.
An envoy of the duke of Lorraine is in England at this moment. (fn. 6) He went to the Court at Niumarchet to solicit favours for his master. The French ambassador followed him so he has not taken a step which has not been thwarted and up to the present he has little hope of obtaining declarations for the relief of the duke.
The Dutch ambassadors Borel and Van Beuninghen do not fail to keep an eye on this question corresponding to the jealousy of the States. According to Temple's account they are in such a state of apprehension over the proceedings of the Most Christian that in a panic of perpetual fear they have lost control of their reason. Incapable of making distinctions they believe that everything is tending to their hurt. In consequence of this and because of the esteem for this crown, which is constantly on the increase, the United Provinces have decided that the Prince of Orange shall pay his visit here with all his expenses paid out of the public exchequer. Declarations which express their affectionate regard for that well deserving House come as something new here, after some reluctance in the past, and this may be considered as one of the causes and results of Temple's departure from the Hague, as I intimated last week in passing. The earl of Osseri has already embarked. With three of the king's ships he will bring the prince across to England. (fn. 7)
The Spanish ambassador who is watching all this, while he rejoices to see this harmonious agreement between the two parties, would prefer that England should pay greater attention to the states of Lorraine, but without saying anything about the duke. He says that this government, so happily directed, had tasted glory too easily without being troubled to commit itself, a course which it would not readily bring itself to take.
The ambassador himself said that much to me. The ceremony of the first public visit has been settled. He has decided to take his own course and perform it with the French ambassador, meeting me at the door of the house. I shall do the same when he comes to return the visit and so all past differences will be settled.
[Acknowledges the ducali of the 20th September.]
The earl of Arondel is back from his embassy to Africa. He set out immediately to see the king at Niumarchet, but he first saw the minister of your Excellencies. He expressed his wish to serve and his regret that he had not spent his time more fruitfully with your Serenity, which was always his particular object.
London, the 17th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
336. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Dutch people are watching with bitter feelings the journey of the Prince of Orange towards the British Court. They are afraid that with the accident of some quarrel over formalities between the duke of Jorch and Orange himself the prince may follow the example of his grandmother and mother in days gone by. Both of these, on their return to the Hague from London, arrived in a short space at the end of their days, not without the suspicion that their death was due to poison. (fn. 8)
Paris, the 22nd October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 22.
Collegio,
Secreta.
Esposizioni,
Principi.
Venetian
Archives.
337. The English consul came to the doors of the Collegio and asked to speak to a secretary. I went to him by order of the Savii and he said, that the secretary of the Ambassador Falcombridge, on arriving at Vienna and Augsburg, found a letter of his king there directing him to return to Venice to remain as resident. He considered it his duty to impart this through the consul. The consul added that the secretary told him he had heard something of the Senate about his conduct. He was ready, if there was any misunderstanding, to vindicate himself, as he knew that he had always acted in conformity with his duties. He was providing himself with a house and getting everything in order to make himself ready to take up his charge and have audience. On reporting this I was directed by the Savii to thank the consul for the information and to tell him that when the secretary presented himself in the Collegio with his character and his king's letters he would be welcomed and received.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Collegio,
Ceremoniale.
Venetian
Archives.
338. Viscount Falcombridge came to take leave of the Collegio, in respect of having received orders from the king to leave. On the 20th of this month orders were sent to Padua, by which way he was going, to the Rectors, to visit him with the demonstrations customary on such occasions, supplying him with refreshments to the value of 200 ducats, which the magistracy of the Rason Vecchie had orders to transmit, which they reported having done on the 19th inst. The ambassador afterwards wrote from Bassano with thanks befitting the honours and courtesies received, and the Senate answered on the 24th October, sending the ducale to the Ambassador Mocenigo in London, to give it to him.
Zon, Secretary.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
339. To Viscount Falcombrighe.
The Senate is pleased to learn from his letter of the 22nd inst. that he is having a prosperous journey. Compliments.
Ayes, 87. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
340. To the Ambassador Mocenigo in England.
Enclose the Senate's reply to a letter from Viscount Falcombrighe. He is to present this when the Viscount arrives at Court, speaking in the same sense of the republic's regard for the minister. If the Viscount has not arrived before his own departure, the office is to be performed by Alberti.
Ayes, 87. Noes, 1. Neutral, 0.
[Italian.]
Oct. 24.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
341. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The king will return to London to morrow and the negotiations will be resumed which flow at this Court through the bed of the alliance and with respect to the reputation which England has won for herself with the Northern powers and her allies. While waiting for the Prince of Orange they wonder more than ever at the facility with which the States of Holland have concurred in his coming to London after the departure of Temple from the Hague and after the scant inclination that way they had shown in the past. I have already referred to the jealousy and fear with which the United Provinces watch every step taken by the Most Christian and your Excellencies will deduce as a consequence how necessary it is for Holland to attach herself to the friendship of this crown. If amid the compliments Orange lets slip any complaint of lack of civility on the part of the States towards his House, he will certainly obtain favourable declarations at the expense of the alliance.
Such is the position to which Holland has allowed herself to be reduced; to be compelled to depend upon England after having led to strained relations with France through their strenuous efforts out of public zeal. So far as the Ambassadors Borel and Van Beuninghen are concerned it is clear that they are already on their guard and carefully watching all the movements of the Prince of Orange. They have intimated that as an act of respect it will be their duty to follow the steps of the prince. But as neither France nor Spain will be so eager to find out about the prince's doings I shall copy the normal civility shown by them, to render my offices more acceptable, while preserving the decorum of your Excellencies.
The minister of Lorraine has been reinforcing his instances by representing the glory that the alliance will win by supporting the duke and pointed out that the most lively appeals were made to the king here, as head of the triple alliance. But all these suggestions fall flat because the king is not fond of committing himself. The last reply received by the envoy was that he ought first to see the resolutions of the emperor and the empire which are so much interested for the duke and for the territories, and after that the other princes would be able to follow the lead.
The Spanish ambassador remarked to me that he had never looked for a better issue to the offices of Lorraine. On the other hand his confidence was strengthened that the alliance would subsist for a long time to the glory of the allied powers for the common good and that of the neighbouring countries. He added that the money of the second instalment for the Swedes had arrived with letters to the governor of Flanders and with Spain thus performing her part of the treaty, the guarantee established would continue in vigour.
The Ambassador Molino told me this when he came publicly to return my visit. He let himself be received at the door, as arranged and as he had received me. For the rest he expressed immense respect for the most serene republic. He said that, to his sorrow, owing to his engagements in these parts, he had lost the honour of serving your Serenity for which he had been selected, and that the Count della Rocca was going in his place.
The ducali of the 28th September and the 2nd October have reached me this week with duplicates of the lost copies. I will carry out the instructions when the Secretary Arlington arrives in Court and when Viscount Faulcombridge returns to London.
London, the 24th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
342. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The manifold variety of opinions and considerations at the Court surpasses everything that can be expressed or even imagined. In my humble opinion the resolutions and the movements of this side will depend upon what happens at the forthcoming meeting of the parliament of England and upon the negotiations and connections which are entered into in the approaching winter.
Paris, the 29th October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 31.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
343. Piero Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Late Saturday the king and all the Court returned to London in accordance with the arrangement reported. In the short time which is left to him he is preparing by frequent consultations the matters which he is to lay before parliament next Monday, discussing the question of the restless sectaries and of arrangements for the public peace.
The ministers of Spain and Holland, who are so deeply interested in the general quiet, are considering by divers ways, how to maintain it. At a private meeting held at Molina's house I have succeeded in finding out that the following proposals were made. The Dutchmen Van Beuninghen and Borel, impelled by the anxiety of the States over the arms of the Most Christian in Lorraine, pointed out to the Spaniard that a fire in a neighbour's house was always dangerous. To extinguish it at the outset he, Molina, should unite with them to make a joint protest to the king of England on the necessity of attending to it and to oblige him, once and for all, to declare himself the enemy of French encroachments, in order to remove the jealousy which weakens if it does not isolate the allies. Molina did not openly object to the proposal, but he declared that he had no power to take it up without fresh commissions from Spain. He added that in the mean time they might well devote themselves to a more moderate course. This was to overcome the difficulties still remaining about the inclusion of Caesar and the princes of the empire in the alliance, making known the good intentions received from his Majesty's own lips. The Dutch promised their offices, but I know from another quarter that the Dutch are annoyed at such coldness. They say that the Spaniards, clinging to the mere pomp of the alliance, which is indeed a fundamental principle of the peace, are unwilling to adopt some more resolute line of action adapted to present circumstances and put a stop to irregularities at their beginning, on the vain pretext of rooting them out afterwards by force, a reference to the progress of the arms of the Most Christian, which have already possessed themselves of the whole of Lorraine.
While these ministers are disputing among themselves about such expedients, the representative of Lorraine is labouring, though without success, to obtain declarations for his master more advantageous than those reported. The king shows that he is only inclined to follow the example of the emperor and the princes of Germany. In the matter of the arbitration this government has taken no further steps than those reported and they are awaiting the reply from Paris about the consent of the Most Christian to discuss, with the boundaries, the question of the materials of Franche Comté claimed by the Spaniards.
The chief excitement of the Court is the expectation of the Prince of Orange who is held up in the ports of Holland by contrary winds. He is awaited with impatience by the king, the duke and the whole Court, quarters having been prepared for him in the royal palace of Weithal. The ambassadors of the crowns have not yet decided about sending to congratulate him on his arrival, in conformity with what was done recently with the prince of Tuscany. Each of them is waiting to learn what precisely the Court would like. It remains to be seen if France will follow the example of Spain. So far it would seem that Molina has made up his mind to conform to the practise adopted at the Hague where the French and Spanish ambassadors visit the prince. I will keep my eyes open and make it my aim to please the king here, who is very partial to his nephew, while conforming to the example of the ambassadors which is most in accord with the dignity of your Excellencies.
When the Secretary Arlington returned to London I saw him and carried out my instructions, informing him, point by point, of what had taken place with the Ambassador Faulcombridge at Venice and of the steps taken by your Serenity for the benefit of trade with a special regard for the advantage of the subjects of this crown. Arlington assured me of the best correspondence and promised that he would give the king a detailed account of everything.
I took the conversation in hand and began to speak of the person of the Secretary Darington and of the displeasure occasioned to Faulcombridge at his repeated offices in the Collegio without the ambassador's knowledge. Seeing that Arlington was listening intently and inclined to disapprove of the excessive liberty of the secretary, I told him what had happened. Arlington said that he was amazed at what he heard and he saw that the incident at Turin had not yet corrected Darinton, whose proceedings were always imprudent. When I chanced to meet the secretary again I found that he was still incensed against this Darinton, indeed he told me that the king would not approve and that he would no longer surfer such lapses and that I should write as much to your Serenity. From this I gather that the favour of Darinton rather than a desire to leave him at Venice has preserved him for fresh experiences, especially as there is no lack of persons who offer themselves. By intimating that, while correspondence is nourished by princes it is cultivated by ministers, I have no doubt about making them see well enough the difficulty of achieving anything in a turmoil.
London, the last of October, 1670.
[Italian.]
Oct. 31.
Inquisitori
di Stato
Busta 442.
Venetian
Archives.
344. Pietro Mocenigo, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Inquisitors of State.
I cannot fulfil my duty as a minister or confine myself simultaneously within the proper reserve unless I inform your Excellencies of what is happening at this Court, because in not communicating it where you think proper the secret is hazarded. By my letters of 20 September and 1 November 1669 your Excellencies know of the mission of Agretti from Flanders to London and the resulting choice of a bishop in England. By these I add that the internuncio of Brussels himself (fn. 9) has come here by order from Rome and with the assurance of having the ear of the Court. He has put up at my house. He has seen the king and queen, the Duke of Hyorch; Arlington, the secretary, introduced him. The Grand Almoner was present as well as myself, having been summoned to the confidence and support. My interposition here being so acceptable, I was made acquainted with the good intentions of the king for the relief of the Catholics, being present at all the audiences. The near approach of parliament persuaded Airoldi, the internuncio, to leave London yesterday, and the position of affairs persuades him to move the pope to the appointment of a bishop. It is believed that this will follow after the end of the present session of parliament in the person of Lord Filippo, the queen's grand almoner, member of a very distinguished house, of the dukes of Morfold and earls of Arondel. (fn. 10) The Court of Rome cultivates this vineyard, up to the present without other advantage than the glory of God, and among so many difficulties they are getting together a good number of Catholics, dispersed and at variance.
London, the last of October, 1670.
[Italian; deciphered.]

Footnotes

1 The victory off Cape Spartel on the 18th August. See note at page 279 above. The four Dutch ships seem to have taken no part in the fight. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, p. 394.
2 She went to Audley End. Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 455.
3 In a letter to Pope Clement X of 10 March, 1670, the queen wrote “Jai reçu avec toute la joie … possible le bref le chapelet et la medaille qu'il a plu a Votre Saintete de m'envoyer … J'ai aussi a rendre mille graces à V.S. du corps sacré du bien hereux martyr St. Clement qu'elle avait donné ordre de me faire tenir.” P.R.O. Roman Transcripts, Vol. xcix from Arch. Vat. Epistolae Principum, Vol. xcv, p. 3. Hamilton left Florence for Rome on 18 August. See note at page 245 above.
4 Dodington's letters of credence are dated the 16th September and were presented to the doge on the 12th November. See below. The brother in law, active on his behalf, was Sir Richard Temple, who sat for Buckingham town in the Restoration parliament. There is a letter of Hester, Dodington's wife, of 30th September, thanking Joseph Williamson, Arlington's secretary, for his kindness to her husband, and asking him to get Arlington to complete the honour by getting Dodington “fixed and past all danger.” Cal. S.P. Dom. 1670, page 462.
5 By article vii of the treaty of peace concluded between Venice and the Porte on Sept. 19, 1669, “omnia quae Veneti eripuerunt Turcis in Dalmatia et in Albania absolutae summaeque potestati ser. rep. subdita relinquentur.” Dumont: Corps Diplomatique, Vol. vii, pt. i, page 119.
6 The sieur de Rambouillet, councillor of state of the duke of Lorraine. The duke's letter to Charles recommending his envoy is dated 13 September. S.P. France. Vol. cxxx.
7 Thomas Butler, earl of Ossory, Ormonde's son. He arrived at Helvoetsluys with two of the king's yachts on Wednesday, October 22, n.s. London Gazette, Oct. 17–20.
8 His mother, Mary, daughter of Charles I, died in London, of a malignant fever, on 3 Jan., 1661, n.s. His grandmother, Henrietta Maria, died in France in 1669; his other grandmother, Amelia of Solms, survived until 1675.
9 He was Francesco Airoldi, abbot of Monte Cassino. There is a letter of his on the question of making Lord Philip Howard chief of the English Catholic clergy as early as 18 May, 1669, addressed to one M. Baldeschi at Rome. P.R.O. Roman Transcripts, Vol. 99.
10 Lord Philip Howard, third son of Henry Howard, earl of Arundel.