Venice
July 1673

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1947

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70-81

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'Venice: July 1673', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 38: 1673-1675 (1947), pp. 70-81. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90360 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Contents

July 1673

July 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
102. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Account of the siege operations at Maastricht. Attack made on the part towards the Brussels road. Two assaults delivered, one of them led by the duke of Momut as lieutenant general, on the night of the 24th; the other by Montal, maitre du camp. The attack proved successful but the losses of the assailants were considerable. The enemy counterattacked, but the duke of Momut, who was vigilant for the defence, was ready. The musketeers of the king marched towards the angle of the demi lune, and the duke of la Fogliada hurrying up to take over from the duke of Momut, the enemy was repulsed. Thus on the 26th the duke of la Fogliada took over the function of lieutenant general from the duke of Momut.
Tournay, the 1st July, 1073.
[Italian.]
July 1.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Germania.
Venetian
Archives.
103. Zuane Moresini, Venetian Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
The negotiations of Colonel Guasconi, the envoy of England, being rendered fruitless by that unforeseen fatal accident, (fn. 1) the emperor has accorded him permission to return to his country. In addition his Majesty has also given the envoy courteous letters in his own hand for the British king and has also favoured the minister personally with tokens of his generous favour. The letter contains the sentiments which were concocted here a while ago. Nevertheless the emperor does not declare his own intentions about his future nuptials and he leaves it to the bearer to give a full and particular account in the present circumstances. With the near approach of his departure Guasconi is performing the usual offices with the foreign ministers and the Court and the minister of your Serenity was among the first whom he favoured with a visit.
Vienna, the 1st July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 7.
Senate,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
104. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The news from Cologne of the first proposals made there by the Dutch reached this Court promptly. Having asked the French what satisfaction the Most Christian demanded, they were told “that of which he had been deprived,” but that for the sake of an accommodation he would consent to an exchange of fortresses, though the most difficult point to settle would be that which concerned his Britannic Majesty who insisted on the consignment to him of cautionary fortresses. When the Dutch rejoined that they did not see how he could have such pretensions, the French made answer that the Most Christian would accept no agreement save in concert with the king of England. Such is the account given by Colbert here and he told me the same, as the ministers here are acting in concert.
Prince Rupert went back to the fleet and Count d'Estrées joined him after they had been a few days in London. Spragh had already put to sea with 25 ships, to keep possession. In the mean time the fleet is fitting out and the troops are mustering for embarcation. The king has visited the camp twice and the duke went there several times. Ten regiments are now ready there and the Count of Schomberg, who has come from France and also inspected them, pronounced them all fine troops and well officered.
A rumour has started this very day that the duke of York will no longer command this force. Some say it is because he cannot exercise any command without taking the oath, rendering those who obey him liable to the penalties. Others declare that his Highness, after sacrificing himself in the first instance for the good of the Catholics by resigning his places, when as next heir to the crown he might have claimed that he was not subject to parliament, does not intend, by assuming this post and evading the act, to provoke the malignants to render it more severe. Like many others I cannot tell where the truth lies but it is a fact that many colonels mutter that they will obey no one but the duke of York, while Schomberg refuses to be under the command of the duke of Buckingham, the lieutenant general.
Lord St. Albans, the chamberlain, talks of retiring and Arlington aims at seeking refuge in that post, to get out of the secretaryship of state, which is burdensome to him and at present too perilous.
The worst sign of all is that the king daily rewards those who least deserve it, a circumstance which always precedes the downfall of a government.
A courier sent by Lord Peterborough arrived to-day from Cologne and is the bearer of something about the marriage treaty with the Neuburg; but as yet nothing has transpired about it.

London, the 7th July, 1673.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
July 10.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Proveditore
General
da Mar.
Venetian
Archives.
105. Andrea Valier, Proveditore General da Mar, to the Doge and Senate.
Having decided to leave Zante I have taken the Santa Giustina with me. The English ships are still there, awaiting the arrival of the others from Alexandretta. I have been much upset by the incident, which has obliged me to write every day.
Cephalonia, from the galley, 10 July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
106. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
All England was flattering herself that when Maastricht was taken and the Most Christian was at liberty he would lend a helping hand to the English troops destined for the landing, when Colbert announced that his king thought it necessary to meet the imperialists, as once they were either stopped or attacked all these fortresses would remain bare walls and the United Provinces would be at the mercy of the two crowns. Colbert did not say, though he hinted, that the Most Christian would perhaps go to Paris, in order, through the advantage and applause of his victories to extract fresh subsidies and prepare them for whatever may be needed in the next campaign. I have also ascertained that on discovering a certain coldness about the promised assistance of French cavalry, it is suspected that the Most Christian, to avoid causing too much stir by his successes, means by a trip to Paris to leave more room for negotiations and calm the violence of the neighbouring powers who are so jealous of him.
On Sunday, at the same cabinet council where these points were discussed, it was decided that the prince should put to sea. 2000 men drafted from the camp were put on board the fleet and the king and the duke having gone down to Gravesend, held a conference there with Prince Rupert and gave him his final instructions.
In the mean time it is admitted that York's opinion as to the impossibility of compelling the Dutch to give battle is too true, and that a victory, unless it destroys the enemy, cannot open the way for a landing. With this scant hope with respect to the future, the prince may possibly set sail today in pursuit of Ruiter, who is understood already to be off his own coast.
7000 men therefore remain in camp, buried in sloth and a superfluity of food. All are raw recruits and more could not be raised for the present campaign. So unless the fleet has spare hands after fresh engagements, which is impossible, there is not a sufficient force to undertake any expedition and it seems to me that the project has been completely dropped.
Thus do the resolves of England fluctuate and confusion reigns supreme there. Most glaring is the feebleness generated by the king's inattention and excessive good nature and by the perilous division among the ministers.
This combination of circumstances has the effect of dissipating the king's exchequer, although it is rich, and of reducing him to great straits, so that he is compelled to submit to dictation, not only by parliament but by his enemies. As he is unable to conquer ports in Holland and the Swedes refuse to obtain them for him as mediators in the treaty of peace, the English begin to waive that claim and parley about receiving acts of submission and money in compensation for their expenses. Such will always be the weak point of England, as the king from want of money and the ministers out of greed for it, will equally allow themselves to be ruled thereby.
A confidential friend of mine writes from Flanders that the baron dell' Isola has been ordered by the emperor to exert himself in favour of peace, but on no account to accept the office of mediator between his Majesty and the French as suggested to him by the latter. He says that Monterey, believing Flanders to be in danger, is anxious to resign its government, which is expected to be assumed by Balbaces from Vienna. That the Flemings are incensed at the idea of having the Portuguese Conde d'Assentar as maitre du Camp General, (fn. 2) owing to the hatred they cherish for the memory of Castel Rodrigo and that Monterey has betaken himself secretly to Contich, between Malines and Antwerp, to encourage it to resist; but the Dutch are unlikely to listen any more to instructions to destroy themselves on the faith of fair words and for the interests of others.
London, the 14th July, 1673.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 14.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
107. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
It is most necessary that your Excellencies should be acquainted with the private interests of the ministers here, as they are inseparable from political complications. Being unable to spare your Serenity the tedious relation I will make it as brief as possible at this most confused crisis.
At the restoration the king's mildness generated factions in the ministry. These were encouraged by many great persons and men were prompted to seek advancement by such means. Thus in the last parliament Arlington linked himself with the chancellor at the very moment when the latter deserted the king and joined the parliamentarians and the two together raised the outcry against the Catholics, in order to oust the lord treasurer Clifford from his post, of which Arlington was immoderately ambitious. The duke of York, stung to the quick by the act of parliament which concerned him so deeply, both for himself and for his creature Clifford, gave way to his old hatred of Arlington. He took into his confidence Buckingham, the irreconcileable enemy of Arlington. Together they charge him with treason, accusing him of being in the pay of France. Indeed scarcely had Clifford resigned the treasurer's staff than the king gave it to Hisbord, the dependent of this party, in spite of Arlington's entreaties and the solicitations of the ladies, Cleveland and Karuel, who hoped that the favour they enjoy would obtain it for their friend. Not satisfied with the support of the French party, Arlington has called an ancient functionary, the duke of Ormonde, to share his pensions, for it is a rooted opinion that the Most Christian distributes many here, and he expects thus to guard against the coming storms.
In the mean time the duke of York, who with so much zeal threw up his offices (a step into which some think he was betrayed by Buckingham, always false in counsel and fickle in his principles) is in the secret, though he does not take his seat at the council board, and the junta and the cabinet are open to him. The Admiralty has not been disposed of and his Highness directs it, but borrows the king's name. Prince Rupert has been unable to obtain that honourable post, which shows that the duke's public resignation had some secondary end. Yet so great is the number of the agitators that he cannot feel safe against strange accidents. In the mean time nothing more is said about his marriage.
Some persons whisper that the Spaniards have gained the Ambassador Peterborough to break off the treaty with Neuburg; but the report is not credited at the Court, from whence a rumour got abroad that they will think of looking out for some Italian lady.
The English consul at Cadiz has been imprisoned owing to something that occurred about a ship. (fn. 3) The Spanish consul here has been arrested but as he is a turbulent restless and indiscreet character, he has drawn this misfortune on himself, and the Spanish ambassador cannot help him.
I have received the ducali of the 17th June.
London, the 14th July, 1673.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Enclosure.107a. Speech of the Lord Chancellor upon the Lord Treasurer's taking his oath in the Exchequer, 26 June, 1673. (fn. 4)
Printed paper. London, 2 pp.
July 15.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
108. To the ambassador in Germany.
We note in your despatches that the British envoy, in view of his approaching departure from that Court, has performed the customary civilities with the foreign ministers resident there, and that he visited you among the first. You did well in responding in a friendly and courteous manner with the usual formalities. Ayes, 135. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
109. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
By England also the Dutch are promised peace if they will render them the honour of lowering their flag to every sort of vessel, and all freedom for fishing in the sea or the Channel, if they will compensate them with the sum of six millions for that king, in addition to the expenses of the present war. They further require that Flushing shall be granted as a hostage to be held until the full completion of the agreements.
The negotiations conducted by the plenipotentiaries encounter a thousand difficulties. The wisest are of opinion that so many obstacles connot be removed without further convulsions. The English are delaying their arrival at Cologne and the Ambassador Subderland, the first plenipotentiary, stays on here still. The baron dell'Isola had arrived at Brussels, where he had a long conference with the governor of the province.
Paris, the 19th July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 19.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
110. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The naval forces are still persisting in the idea of hazarding their glory one against the other. All are of opinion that it can only be a matter of moments before a conflict is engaged. Nevertheless many days have passed since this news was put about, but no result has appeared as yet. Possibly the English are holding back their decision, the delay being stimulated by other plans; and perhaps the French ships do not wish to risk their power any further. Ruiter, on the other hand, seemed more courageous since he has persisted with all his forces at the mouth of the Thames.
Paris, the 19th July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
111. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate,
On Saturday last a courier from the duke of Monmouth arrived at the Court and on Sunday night the king went with the duke to the fleet. There he ordered the embarcation of the rest of the infantry remaining at the camp. Fom this it is to be inferred that the Most Christian gives fresh encouragement to the attempts by sea, though I cannot discover that he promises to back them. His Majesty told me that Prince Rupert would have the means to compel the Dutch to quit the shoals and fight in the open; but as yet no one is acquainted with this secret.
The object is to obtain territory from Holland by force of arms, as the Swedish mediators refuse to support this claim by negotiation. From what I hear practically every one condemns the design to hold strong places overseas, which commit the country, involve great expense, yield no profit and scant honour and are incapable of bridling the Dutch, as is boastfully pretended. So I fancy that the English will finally renounce this idea when bought by a considerable sum of money and counselled by their own necessities. The Spanish ambassador counts upon this. When he heard of the bias here towards peace, he remarked to me that it was time to think of it, as for the next campaign they would not have the means to make war; that the Most Christian also was exhausted, it being too much to keep eight armaments on foot at one and the same time, his own, that of Condé, the third of Turenne, the two fleets English and French, the Swedish corps, besides one in Catalonia and another on the borders of Italy. Your Excellencies will be able to judge from your advices from France whether the Most Christian will be able to carry on the war, but I know that here they are thinking of landing at Dunkirk and crossing Spanish territory to attack the Dutch in that direction. I do not know what Fresno would say to me if this were verified.
Yesterday evening there arrived here Don Bernardo Salines, as the successor of de Lira as the Spanish envoy at the Hague, who left Holland last Thursday. He conferred with Monterey at Brussels and is come to London with projects of peace, all digested by Van Beuninghen with Monterey after the interview mentioned previously with Orange between Contich and Malines. It is not yet known what they were, but the embarcation of the troops proceeds all the same, an indication that an accommodation is not very near.
I have this week received the ducali of the 24th and 30th June. Publicity has just been given to the meeting between the French and Spanish ambassadors, but no one has paid any attention to it. Colbert in one of his most ordinary coaches with only two footmen was on his way to the Court at night when he met the Spanish ambassador who, with his whole retinue claimed to occupy the palace gateway. When Fresno recognised Colbert he withdrew and not another word was said. This week's advices report the complaint made by the French minister at Madrid. I understand that Fresno complains that Colbert, after so great a lapse of time, should make a fuss about an incident of no consequence. He says that he will never again enter Colbert's house, for the avoidance of contests and he abstains from the Italian comedy which he frequented, the performances being given in the court yard and house of the French ambassador.
London, the 21st July, 1673.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 21.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
Venetian
Archives.
112. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Parliament will now have a fresh grievance, provided by the general complaint that at this conjuncture, which is so highly important for the glory of the kingdom, his Majesty should employ two foreigners, a German and a Frenchman, Prince Rupert and the count of Schomberg, as if the nation could not supply natives for these posts. Yet, to avoid discussion with parliament the king consents that his brother shall not receive even the command of the landing. York has spontaneously renounced the claim, in order not to dispute with the two Houses as to whether he could or could not assume it. The king has therefore appointed Prince Rupert admiral at sea and general on land for this expedition with the count of Schomberg as his lieutenant, a post which had been destined for the duke of Buckingham. So with York remaining idle the debate with parliament is at an end as well as the objection of all the colonels, dukes and earls, who refused to obey Schomberg, since Prince Rupert is commander in chief. From this innovation many suspect that the duke of York and his party are falling while others maintain tenaciously that necessity compelled the king to take this course. But with the more moderate I am waiting to see the post of admiral conferred definitely on others and some stronger attack made on the duke by parliament. I shall then believe that he has incurred violent persecution owing to his excessive zeal. Buckingham has spoken loudly and resentfully to the king, but his adversary Ormonde with his friends the deputies (con gli amici deputati) press his Majesty too closely; and so, with his usual impartiality the king fancies that he can balance and rule his ministers at his pleasure. But as no one can rely on him, since his maxim is inconstancy, it is very difficult for him to succeed in commanding quietly and securely.
London, the 21st July, 1673.
[Italian; deciphered.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
113. To the Secretary Alberti in England.
The Senate acknowledges his letters Nos. 189,190. (fn. 5) The No. 188 is missing and has probably gone astray. They commend his diligence as well as his reply to Arlington about the request for a memorial upon the question of the consulage. He is to confine himself to that line every time that the subject is raised again, until other and more definite instructions reach him from them.
That the magistracy of the Five Savii alla Mercanzia be charged to enter in their papers all the fresh representations made by the Consul Hayles on the matter of the new consulage together with whatever they in their prudence may consider fit to add upon the subject, for enlightenment and so that it may be possible to arrive at such a decision as may be considered convenient.
Ayes, 148. Noes, 0. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 22.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
Venetian
Archives.
114. Giovanni Giacomo Corniani, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
I enclose a copy of an edict published by the king of England against all foreign goods. (fn. 6) This throws the whole of this city into confusion as it professes to have the principal market for all its manufactures in that country, particularly in silk. So much is this the case that with the cessation of commissions from thence every trading house has cancelled its orders for fabrics. The prince here, greatly perturbed by such a bombshell, is holding continual conferences to find some compensating means to stave off poverty. But before all they flatter themselves with the hope that in practice this decree will not be carried out so punctually as to have such pernicious effects in these parts; and they hope that after the lapse of a couple of seasons, at least, they will be at liberty to ignore it and to restore matters to their pristine state, little by little. It is proposed to open trade with Portugal, but there are many difficulties in the way. It is stated, however, that his Highness may decide to issue various capitals and to open his own houses of trade in several parts and chiefly in the Levant, for this sole purpose of enabling them to work (lavorare) in various sorts and in this fashion to provide them with a market.
I place all this under the eyes of your Serenity in order to acquaint you how this edict brings to these parts a tacit and unexpected war.
Florence, the 22nd July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 23.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
115. Francesco Michiel, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ambassador Subderland, who is staying on here, always with the object of proceeding to the congress of Cologne, is at present making a change in his plans. He announces that he has asked leave of his king to return to the Court. Accordingly it is stated that some other qualified person will be substituted in his place. Some find the reason for this unexpected move of his in the dilapidation of his fortune, which has suffered exceedingly from the heavy expenditure he has incurred on this embassy which he has sustained with pomp for a few months. Others allege that he has taken offence at the nomination of two persons who are to be his colleagues in the function, (fn. 7) as being of a lower rank than his own.
Chalons in Champagne, the 23rd July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 26.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Francia.
Venetian
Archives.
116. Ascanio Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
Some days ago the duke of Momut passed near these parts. Owing to the distinction he gained in the last affair of Mastrich and from the fact of his being such as a favourite with our ally, the king his father, he has been met with the greatest civilities and with every possible sign of esteem. He embarked at Cales upon one of five frigates which have been waiting for him for some days. He was saluted by the fortress with the firing of five guns. He announced with affectation that he was going to levy troops and then return to the royal service, but those who penetrate into the very depths assert that he has been pressed to return in order to take up a greater post and some do not consider him undeserving of the command of the fleet where Prince Roberto is not popular. Substituted in place of the duke of York he held the command in the last battle and did not behave as he should.
The fleet remains stationed at the mouth of the Thames. It consists of eighty ships and thirty other pataches and they have postponed its sailing for some days yet. They say that the 10,000 infantry who were encamped with their tents a league from London (fn. 8) have been held back under various pretexts. Some assert that it is for the purpose of profiting for the royal party at the coming meeting of parliament which should take place at the end of September or the beginning of October. In support of this alleged intention is the efforts they are making to provide officers of another nation to command them as they do not trust their own very much owing to the disgust occasioned by the changing of the duke of Yorch and because of the successes which the French have gained over the Dutch through union with this crown.
Paris, the 26th July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
117. To the Secretary Alberti in England.
From the enclosed copy of the letter of our Proveditore General da Mar you will receive information of the grave insult committed by the captain of the English ship of war in the face of the port of Zante to the ship Santa Giustina which was coming to this city under the Venetian flag, with a Venetian patent and laded with goods chartered by merchants who are Venetian subjects. You will observe that this ship was laded at Scanderoon by the consul of England stationed there himself, in the name of the interested parties and that it made the voyage in company as far as those waters with another squadron of English ships which have received the best possible treatment. We are sure that such proceedings are contrary to the admirable intentions of his Majesty, especially seeing that the ships and subjects of that crown are treated with favourable distinction both in this city and in those islands. Six ships of that country with goods were present in the port of Zante at the time of the incident. We therefore wish you, with full information upon all the facts, to bring this affair to the notice of the king, in such manner as may seem proper to you and with all due tactfulness, even at a special audience, if you think fit. After you have made suitable representations to his Majesty we desire you to try and get orders issued, both to the said captain and to all others of the nation, as well in saluting fortresses as in encounters with the ships of our subjects, to practice that due correspondence of friendship which is always observed by us. The matter is commended to your ability and tact, as it is important and urgent.
Ayes, 162. Noes, 1. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Inghilterra.
venetian
Archives.
118. Girolamo Alberti, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
I have just returned from accompanying his Majesty, where he remained three days, holding perpetual consultations, inspecting the ships and troops, which amounted in all to 10,000 infantry. Some colonels are remaining here because of their objection to being commanded by Schomberg. It is impossible to discover where or how it is intended to effect the landing on which great hopes are placed, as the Dutch show themselves more than ever averse from yielding any of their ports or a single inch of land. Don Bernardo Salines, who brought the last proposals on peace on behalf of them and of Spain, declares that such is the feeling of the States, though they are quite ready to grant whatever can satisfy England with respect to the flag. With regard to the fishing, as the Dutch resist paying tribute, it is suggested that they may consent to make a payment once and for all.
The Spanish ambassador here is jealous of the presence of Salines, and in England they do not relish his hints that if his Britannic Majesty does not choose to make peace in London, the others will make it at Brussels or the Hague.
Salines has also tried to render France an object of suspicion by saying that she is pledged to Holland by secret treaties. But Colbert, to prevent such a notion taking root, went to audience and assured that king that the Most Christian had never opened ears or mouth and that he would do nothing save in concert with England.
From Flanders they advise me of the conference between the Prince of Orange and Monterey at Malines. After this four regiments, two of Walloons, one German and the fourth of Vaudemont, marched into Holland on account of the very great apprehension caused there by Condé. From other quarters your Serenity will know if it is true that over 8000 Burgundians and 8000 Lorrainers will join the corps of the 30,000 from England. Such I am told is the strength of the auxiliary force. Don Pietro Ronchiglio the intendant general in Flanders is gone, by order of Spain, from Brussels to Vienna to hasten their movements. This is all that I can gather in this brief space.
London, the 28th July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Cinque Savii
alla
Mercanzia
Risposte.
Venetian
Archives.
119. With regard to the claims of the English consul Hailes, so frequently repeated, about which the Secretary Alberti has only received inconclusive answers, our magistracy has thought fit to take information from the merchants of this mart trading with England, and the results have been communicated to your Serenity. A decision would seem to be called for, owing to the frequent instances of the said consul.
From the office, the 28th July, 1673.
Giovanni Giustinian,
Almoro Grimani,
Bernardo Memmo,
Piero Foscarini,
Ferigo Marcello. Savii
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Deliberazioni,
Corti.
Venetian
Archives.
120. To the Resident at Florence.
Your continuance in acquainting us with the progress made with the plans contemplated by the Grand Duke with respect to the manufacture of silk will be very proper and acceptable to us, as is the copy of the English edict which you forwarded. We are sending this to the magistracy of the Five Savii alla Mercanzia for their information.
Ayes, 131. Noes, 2. Neutral, 2.
[Italian.]
July 29.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Firenze.
venetian
Archives.
121. Giovanni Giacomo Corniani, Venetian Resident at Florence, to the Doge and Senate.
Fresh letters from England bring with them some hope that although the prohibition in the edict reported is universal yet it may not be generally observed with rigour. It would seem that the smooth silk cloths of these parts, that is to say those not in use, may be allowed to circulate. This hope is based upon definite news that is said to be common, for some provision of this material, although those who have correspondences in that kingdom are not all agreed about making arrangements for continuing their works as they wish to wait for better founded and more precise information.
Florence, the 29th July, 1673.
[Italian.]
July 30.
Senato,
Secreta.
Dispacci,
Zante.
Venetian
Archives.
122. Alvise Barbaro, Venetian Proveditore of Zante, to the Doge and Senate.
These last days five more English ships of war have cast anchor in these waters. They have come from Syria and have brought with them their consul who has hitherto resided at Aleppo. (fn. 9) It was he who caused special official letters from his Excellency Marco Bembo, consul for you Serenity in that place, to be handed to me, giving him an introduction. Among these ships was a ship of war which saluted the fortress here with eleven guns, to which answer was made with an equal number, according to the rule. I have also thought it proper to accede to the request made to me by this consul of theirs that this ship of war and another like it which came before, shall be allowed to lade two miglia of currants here, that is one miglia each, without paying duty, in conformity with what I see has always been done with such ships.
Zante, the 30th July, 1673. S.N.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The death of the Empress Margaret Theresa on 22 March.
2 He arrived in Brussels on 25 July from Barcelona, to take the place of the Comte du Marsin. Brussels: Relations Veritables, 1673, No. 31.
3 The case is thus related by Godolphin: “I have received a great complaint from Sir Martin Wescomb of his being imprisoned by the governor. The case thus: on the 8th Capt. Le Neve having several merchants aboard him at dinner, a ship appeared coming in from sea which was fancied to have the complexion of a Hollander; whereupon Le Neve commanded Capt. Russel to weigh and go out to examine it; which was done against the advice of the merchants present. Capt. Russel seizing the ship on this side Rhota, which is always comprised within that port, she proves a Hamburger … of about 60 tons. The consul of that city complained to the governor of Cadiz, whom the governor sent off with an ayudante to Capt. Le Neve. But it seems the ayudante, going only on board the Hamburger offered with rudeness to turn the English out; but the English, being more powerful, did the same to him, somewhat ruggedly, which highly incensed Don Diego Cavallero, the governor, though Le Neve makes this the ayudante's fault in offering violence to his men, without coming to him as commander-in-chief, in which case he would have withdrawn his men without any disturbance, as he did so soon as the skipper came on board him, surrendering the vessel to its owner, without doing him the least damage. The governor, expressing great indignation at this affront to his master's port, demands satisfaction and would have had Le Neve come in person to give it him, which this refusing, he hath imprisoned Sir Martin Wescomb.” Godolphin to Arlington on 11/21 June. S.P. Spain, Vol. LXI. Godolphin suggested that Fonseca should be put in Newgate as a reprisal. Actually he was committed to the Gatehouse on 29 June, ostensibly for practices tending to the disturbance of the government. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1673, page 408. Le Neve's ship was the Plymouth.
4 A copy is preserved among the Domestic State Papers. Car. II, 336, No. 48 i. See Calendar, 1673, page 396.
5 i.e. of June 30. No. 188 is of 23 June.
6 Presumably referring to a proclamation of the 6th June, o.s., forbidding the wearing of foreign silks at Court, and ordering all imported manufactures to be seized at the customs. Steele: Tudor and Stuart Proclamations, Vol. I, page 433, No. 3581. This seems to have been issued in response to a petition of the Weavers' Company of London, received on 28 May. Cal. S.P. Dom., 1673, page 304.
7 Sir Leoline Jenkins and Sir Joseph Williamson.
8 At Blackheath.
9 Lannoy by name. He was dismissed by order of the Court held on 10 October, 1672, by reason of complaints made against him and he is mentioned as present at the Court held on 28 Nov., 1673, having lately returned ready to answer his accusers. Levant Co. Court Book. S.P. Foreign Archives, Vol. CLIII, ff. 189, 287.


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June 1673