Henry VIII
March 1516, 1-10

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

J. S. Brewer (editor)

Year published

1864

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Henry VIII: March 1516, 1-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2: 1515-1518 (1864), pp. 447-460. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90900 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

March 1516

1 March.
Vesp. C. I. 53.
B. M.
Death and testament
of Ferdinand
of Arragon.
1610. STILE to HENRY VIII. (fn. 1) (In cipher.)
Yn the town of Madryl, on the furst day of Marche. Soverayn Lord, as by my other letters by fore thys I have certefyed un to yowr hyzghnys that the late Kyng yowr fader of Aragon departeyd from thys present lyf on the thre and twenty day of Jenyver yn hys goyng towardys the cety of Sevyl, ayzghte legys from Our Lady of Gwadalope, in the vyllage of Madrygalegeo, and few asstateys or men of honwere were present at the deces of the Kyng yowr sayd fader. The Qwyn hys wyf was there, and was the day byfore come from the partys of Aragon. The Kyng yowr sayd fader wylfully schorteyd the days of hys lyfe, always in fayre wether or fowle laboryng in hawkeyng and hwnteyng, foloyng more the cownsayl of hys fawkoners than of hys fesecyans. The sayd Kyng yowr late fader made hys testament in thys maner foloyng:—Hys body for to be beryed yn Granada wyth the late Qwyn yowr gode moder hys wyfe, and ten thowsand masses for to be sayde, and one hundard pore men to be clothed, and that no man schuld were for hym nother sacke clothe nor long berde; and commandyd that al hys dettys schuld be payde, and for the same that they schuld sel al hys plate, jwellys, clotheyng, tapesary and al other thyngys to hym belongyng, wyth owte wythdrawyng of any parte of the same; and lefte and constytwtyd the Qwyn Donya Johanna of Castyl hys douzghter for to be hys herytur and successor of hys realmys of Aragon, Cecelya, Napolys, and of al other that he had, and of Navar. And consydoryng the sayd Qwynys defecte of wysdom he lefte the Prynce for govornore of al hyr realmys; and also consydoryng the Pryncys tender ayje, for the whyche he commanded that the Cardynal soly alone schwld have the govornacyon unto the comeyng of the Prynce in to Castyl, and of the realme of Aragon the Archebysschop of Saragossa, and of the real of Napolys the Vyso rey Don Remon de Cardona, also lefte Prynce for master of the thre Orders, whych ys of Sant Jamys, of Calatrava, and of Alcantara, whych ys a grete rent in valwe; and nameyd for to be hys exsecwtors the Prynce of Castyl and the Qwyn of Aragon, Donya Jermana hys wyfe, and the Duke of Alva and hys confessore, and the secretary Clement whych wrote the testament, and the Duches of Cardona, and the Archebysschop of Sarragosa, and the Vyso rey of Napolys; and conmandyd that the Qwyn hys wyfe schalhave threty thowsand florynys dureyng hyr lyfe yn the cety of Saragosa in Cecelya, and yn certayn placys in Catalonya, and more ten thowsand ducatys of gold for terme of lyfe yn the realme of Napulys, in case that sche do not marry; and yef sche do marry, for [to] have onli the threty thowsand florynys, &c.
Bequests.To the Infante Don Fernando, brother to the Prynce of Castyl, he assyneyd landys in the realme of Napolys to the yerely valwe of threty thowsand ducatys, and more other fyvety thowsand ducatys to be payd yn money carlynys of serteyn ordonary rentys, acordeyng to the maner of the sayd realme. Also he conmandeyd a certeyn sum of ducatys for to be payed to the Duke of Gandya for a town that he toke from the said Duke in the realme of Napolys, and also for to restore unto the Almyrante of Castyl a town that he had taken from the sayd Almyrante yn the cownty of Modyca; also conmandyd that the old Qwyn of Napolys his syster schuld have al that was to hyr assynyd byfor in the realme of Napolys, and desyred that the Prynce of Castyl schwl have the Ynfante Don Enryke, and the Duke of Segorbya hys son, and the Archebysschop of Sarragosa in hys favor; also to be payed a hundard thowsand ducatys to the yowng Qwyn of Napolys that he had of hyr marriage money, and gretely desyreyng the Prynce that he schwld love and favor the naturallys of Aragon, gretely reqwyreyng the Prynce that he schwld not alter nor change hys offycers, and conmandyd that when the Prynce schalbe cum yn to Castyl that the alcayde of the castyl of Schatyva, whych hathe the Duke of Calabrya in kepeyng, that he schal bryng the said Duke to the Pryncys presence, desyreyng the Prynce for to geve to the sayd Duke suche fe as that he was asynyd in tymys passyd for hys lyveyng yearly. Also conmandyd that the Cownsayl of Aragon breyfly schwld determyne the maters layd ayenyst the vyce chanceler of Aragon, and conmandyd fyve thowsand dukatys for to be gevyn amongys hys servantys, and other fyve thowsand for the redemcyon of Crystyn prysoners from the Morys and for orfans maryagys; and gretely reqweryd the Qwyn hys wyf that sche schwld make hyr abode yn some cety or town of Aragon. And wher he had lymyttyd upon the thre Maysyerasgos ten cwentos everry yere, for the space of fyve yerys, for the fwlfyllyng of hys testament, he desyryd the Prynce for to be contentyd wythe the same. And yt plese yowr grace, thys is the afecte of the testament, &c.
He died poor
and unlamented.
Disturbances in
Andalusia.
Yt ys to be mervelyd, and it plese yowr grace, that the late Kyng yowr fader of Aragon had no maner of tresore. And after that he was decessyd ther wold never a nobyl man, sprytual nor temporal, go wyth the corpus to Granada, excepte the markes of Denya; nor here hath byn no grete obsqwyys don for the sayd Kyng, nor murneyng made, never less seyn for any prynce. For thoys that he most loveyd and trwstyd furst repayryd to the Pryncys ambassatur wyth flatoryngys. And the Qwyn of Aragon returneyd to Our Lady of Gwadalope, and it plese yowr grace, on the last day of Jenyver. The Cardynal of Toledo and the Markes de Vyllena cam to Gwadalope, and on the fowreyth day of February the sayd Cardynal and the Qwyn of Aragon, and the Ynfante and al other the astatys and cownsayl of thys land, and the hole corte, departeyd from Gwadalope, and cam to this town of Madryl on the syxtyn day of the sayd monyth of February, where as yet holy thys corte resydeth; and the Cardynal, joyntly wyth the dean of Loven, the Pryncys ambassatur, have and do determyne and conmand al thyngys concerneyng the governacyon of thys realmys; and the Presydent, wyth the lerneyd Cownsayl, yn lyke maner thay do use and obbay the Cardynallys conmandamentys as that thay dyd the late Kyng yowr fader of Aragon, and al other astatys and comunys in lyke wyse wyth oon voyse be hoole for the Prynce of Castyl, and be gretely desyrws of hys cumyng hether, and no maner of person spekeyth to the contrary. Not wythstandyng, and yt plese yowr grace, that there ys lytyl love or stedfastnys amongys the statys of thys partys oon wyth another, yet thay tharnot move yn word nor dede ayenst thayr prince or hys deputys of the Andolosya. There was lyke for to have byn a grete trobyl yn Sevyl and yn al the Andolosya, and much pepyl were asemblyd by twyxt the Duke of Medyna Sedonya or of Sevyl and Don Pedro Jeron, son to the Conde Deurenja, the whych Don Pedro Jeorn pretendith for to have just tytwle to the dukedom of Medyna Sedonya, whyche now he had enteryd for to have recoverd by myzght, whych he cowld not do in the lyfe of the Kyng of Arragon, for the Duke that now ys hath marryed the dowzghter of the Archebysschop of Saragosa, &c.
Communication
with the Prince
through France
is intercepted.
Dyverse other whych fownd theym self agreveyd by the late Kyng yowr sayd fader, they have made some alterracyons and moveyngys oon a yenyst a nother, and that not wyth standyng they have donno thyng to any effecte, for the Cardynal and the Cownsel here by thay rconmandament derecteyd to the partyys and to the cetyys and townys belongeyng to the Crown, and govornorys of the same, for to subdew al thoys that wyl or do make any trobyl, in suche wyse that the sayd Don Pedro Jeron ys fayne for to dyssyste of thayr entendyd enterprysys. And it plese yowr grace, where that the Cardynal and the ambassatwr had sent dyvers messengers to the Prynce wyth thayr letters, and yn the returneyng of the sayd messengers hetherwardys ayen the sayd messengers be takyn prysoners in Bayon and other placys in France, and thayr letters oponyd; howbe that, and yt plese yowr grace, oon of the messengers, by the mean of a frynd, saveyd parte of hys letters and the conmyssyon of atoryte that the Prynce hath gevyn to the Cardynal onely with fwl power for to be govornore of thys realme unto the comeyng of the Prynce, and al offycers for to enjoye there offycys unto the sayd comeyng, acordeyng to the testament of the Kyng yowr fader of Aragon; the whych letters and conmandment cam hether on the sevyn and twenty day of February. And for a tranthe, Soverayn Lord, non other man schwl or myzghte govorne here in the Pryncys absence so wel and in dyfferently as the Cardynal, for amongys the other lordys ther wold be envy and dyferrencys. The Cardynal and the Markes de Vyllena and the Cund de Yllorys, Cundestabyl of Navar, have desyred me for to certefye un to your hyzghnys that yn thayr hartys and myndys thay do offer thayr servyse to yowr hyzghnys. And yt plese yowr grace, here they do fere that the late Kyng of Navar wyl atempte war in that partys, for the whyche here thay have be gun for to send forthe cappytayns for to wayge men for the defence of Navar; how be that, and yt plese yowr grace, here be ryzghte fewe gode cappytayns for the warrys now lefte, and lytyl redynys for the same as by land, &c.
The Queen of
Castile's insanity.
Also, and yt plese yowr grace, the Qwyn of Castyl ys as yet as that sche was yn the lyfe of the late Kyng hyr fader, and as reson ys hyr subjectys wold be glad that sche were amendyd of hyr dyseas, for the honore, conforte, and weal of al hyr landys; and for that entente upon a thre or fowr days passyd, hether ys come serten persons to the Cardynal and to the lordys and Cownsayl from the town of Tordeselyas, where the said Qwyn ys; and these sayd persons have browzghte testymonyalys and wryteyngys that there be serten persons, prystys, fesecyons, and other, amongys the whych one ys the Doctwr Sotto, the sayd Qwynys fesecyan, the whyche he and the other prystys, wyth clergy and fesyke, apon payne of thayr lyvys, haveyng lycence, wyl undertake for to remedy the Qwyn of hyr dyseas wythyn the space of thre monythys, sayeyng that sche ys cumberyd wyth spretys by wycchecrafte. And yt plese yowr grace, thys men as yet have not had thayr awnswer of the Cardynal and lordys whych that now be here wyth the Cardynal, that is for to saye, the Archebysschop of Sant Jamys, the Archebysschop of Granada presydent of the Cownsayl, the Byss-schop of Burgos, the Bysschop of Avylla, the Bysschop of Almarya, the Bysschop of Cedad Rodrigo, the Bysscop of Storga, the Infante of Castyl, the Duke of Alva, the Almyrante of Castyl, the Markes de Vyllena, the Markes de Denya, the Conmendador Mayor of Castyl, the Conmendador Mayor of Calatrava, and the contadorys mayorys, and dayly thay do loke here for many moe of the astatys. The Qwyn of Aragon ful hartely desyreyd me for to wryte hyr fwl harty reconmendacyons un to yowr hyzghnys, and yn lyke wyse the Qwynys grace. And here after y schal certefy un to yowr hyzghnys the farther nwys that schalbe here acurrant, and in the most humyl wyse besecheyng yowr hyzghnys that y, your poreyst and faythful servant, may have bryfly the knowlyche of the plesure of yowr grace how that y schal do and use myself most to the plesure and servyse of yowr hyzghnys, and somewhat to my conforte, of the whyche I have grete nede, as Almyzghty God yt knowythe. And glad y wold be that yt myzght plese yowr grace for to conmand me for to repayre bryfly un to yowr royal presence, in as muche as that nwe here ys no prynce wyth whom for to have anny entelygence or conmunycacyon, &c.
Cost of living.And, for a suerty, Soverrayn Lord, everry thyng ys so dere here, for the whyche my costys and chargys be so grete that yet ys and schalbe to my utterly empovyrysschement, on les that y be other wyse remedyed and conforteyd by the conmandament of yowr hyzghnys; for, a trauthe, a man schal better lyve in yowr realme of Yngland wythe ten schelyngys by the day then here wyth syxtyn or sevyntyn schelyngys, as it knowythe Almyzghty God, who perserve yowr royalyst asstate long for to endure. Wretyn ut supra, in the sevynyth yere of yowr most nobyl reygne, by the most humyl servant to yowr grace, John Style.
Stile's monogram.
Hol., cipher.
1 March.
S. B.
1611. For THOMAS MILLE, JOHN JAMES, WM. DENYS, and TH. STRETTON, chaplains.
Licence, at the request of John Heron, treasurer of the Chamber, and clerk of the Hanaper, to found a fraternity to pray for the said John and Margaret his wife; four wardens to be annually elected; to be called the guild of St. Michael, Crokyd Lane, London. Del. Westm., 1 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 15.
1 March.
S. B.
1612. For EDW. SHERMAN, of ... lowe.
Lease, for 21 years, of the demesne lands called Barnes, in Cleobury Mortymer, parcel of the earldom of March, at the annual rent of 12l. 10s., late held by John Hanley, deceased. Del. Westm., 1 March 7 Hen. VIII.
2 March.
R. O.
1613. The CARDINAL OF SION to [WOLSEY].
Wolsey has heard by others of the revolutions in these parts; of the defeat of the French, their explusion from Italy; and the happy invasion. All terms between the French and Swiss are at an end. Their expenditure of 200,000 crowns publicly, and 1,000 privately, has proved fruitless. In his last two or three letters stated that 17,000 Swiss were in the King's pay,—a larger number than is needful, but advisable under the circumstances. They will be at Trent in three days, and will obtain an easy victory over their enemy, from their greater experience, their union with the imperial forces, their terrible artillery, and the presence of the Emperor. The greatest unanimity prevails. The Emperor exerts himself. 16,000 foot have been sent forward to Italy. The Emperor will advance against Verona and the French. Half the month is over, and the pay of the Swiss not sent. Milan and the neighbourhood are completely exhausted; the imperial treasury drained. If the Emperor finds the whole burden of the war devolve upon himself, and that he is not well supported, he will be compelled to make terms with the enemy; these are offered, and he is strongly urged to accept them. This will necessarily embrace a confederacy of the Emperor, France, the Prince and King of Castile and their dependencies, the Swiss, who cannot carry on the war without the Emperor, the Scots and the Danes. Money must not be sent by bankers, but sewn up in the doublets of some trusty horsemen, and so carried to Basle, Constance, or Piedmont. Cannot descend to flattery as other persons do, that they may reap where others have sown. St. Michael's, Trent, 2 March 1516. Signed.
Lat., pp. 4.
Vit, B. XIX. 23.
B. M.
Abstract of the above. Much mutilated. Lat.
March.1614. MAXIMILIAN to HENRY VIII.
A few days since passed into Milan; crossed three rivers, defended by the French and Venetians, who did not dare dispute his passage. In consequence of their deelining a general engagement, his troops were obliged to separate for want of provisions, and retire on Lake di Garda. On this the enemy laid siege to Brescia. Whilst on his road to relieve the town, heard that it had consented to surrender in three days, as it did. Intends to follow up the expedition.
Lat., copy, pp. 2.
2 March.1615. For WM. HONE, clk.
Presentation to the church of Shepton Malet, Bath and Wells dioc. Westm., 2 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 15.
3 March.1616. For GEO. LAWSON.
To be customer in the port of Berwick on Tweed. Westm., 3 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 9.
4 March.
Vit. B. XIX. 26.
B. M.
1617. [MAXIMILIAN] to [HENRY VIII.]
"Mon bon frere ... avons, ensuant ce que ... et anssi le Cardinal de Syo[n] ... vous prie tresaffectuosement ... [vou]loir assister et subvenir comme mon ... presens grans affaeres et besuing d[une somme] dargent, pour povir parfaere mon ... avec mon armee et le vostre des Suisses ... Diu plaest a vostre grand bien honneor ... et le mien. Car sy jay bonne fortune ... par cy appres a grand avantage de vous ... ream. Et cumbien que jensse pen anoir app[oincte] auec less Franczoes apres ce qil failly re ... presse la ville, neantmoins pour le bon ... que jay congnew vous anoir enuers mo[n bien,] honnour et provit, lesquel comme dyt est ce ... apres le vostre, et lespoer que je tenoie en ... ne me veuldries a ma necessite, je nay [voullu] entendere audit apponetement sy vo[us prie de] rechieff, que ayans a ce regart et pour lef[fect de] tell bien que desus, me vouloir ceste [fois] montrer la fraye fiance et esperanc[e] ... de ma presente requeste en vous, et ... ne metray en obly enuers vous et le ... service que me faerez, pur le recongn ... samblable et plus grand chose on en ... quant me requerres. Ce scet nostre Seigneur a[uquel je] prie, mon bon frere, vous anoer e[n sa saincte] guerde. Escript de la main, le iii[j. jour de Mars], de vostre bon et leal frere." Signature burnt off.
Hol., Fr. Add. (f. 34*): A mon bonn frere le Roy dAngleterre et de France, en sa main.
Endd.: "A letter of themperours owne hande, iiijto Marcij."
4 March.
R. O.
St. P. VI. 48.
1618. PACE to [WOLSEY].
Has received Wolsey's letters, dated 18th of February, stating his fears lest the death of Ferdinand should prevent the enterprise of the Emperor and Swiss upon Italy. The Emperor remains stedfast; the Swiss loved not Ferdinand tanquam perfidum, so his death is no hindrance. "Where your grace feareth that my letters should have been intercepted by reason that in the space of twenty-five days you had no word from me, I think no letter of mine hath been intercepted except one containing this in few words, viz. that all my business here succeeded well, and that your grace should look for no mo letters from me unto the time that Thomas Cotton should come with some conclusion." Conveyances out of Swiss-land are expensive. Has sent two besides Cotton, of whom the one went to Brussels in six days, as Spinelly informs him. Will not be negligent in writing. Wingfield and he are to have an audience with the Emperor tomorrow. His aid will be great surety for the King and his realm, and by the loss of him great inconveniences might fall. He is now within 50 mile English of Italy, to the great comfort of the Swiss, and the great fear of the French. Galliace, this day, departeth to Verona; Pace will follow. Has already written of the need of money for the second month's pay. Have been obliged to lay out money to counteract French practices. "Talis et illorum barbaries ut pecuniam petitam neganti mortem minentur." Is glad to meet Wingfield at this time, not that he should share this intolerable trouble, "for I would not wish it to a dog," but that he may witness the necessity of the case. Has now in the field their best captains. Will write after communicating with the Emperor. Trent, 4 March.
Hol., partly in cipher, pp. 4.
Vit. B. XIX. 27.
B. M.
2. Mutilated decipher of the preceding.
4 March.
R. O.
1619. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Wrote last on the last day of Feb. Things here are beginning to be in good train, as Wolsey will see by his letters to the King. Obtained the news concerning the Scots at some cost. The French are much displeased with England in reference to the Swiss. Brussels, 4 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cardinal of England. Endd.
4 March.
S. B.
1620. For SIR WM. COMPTON, TH. BEVERLEY, GEO. EVERS, notary, and TH. HALL, clk.
To have the next advowson of the rectory of Rowley, York. Del. Westm., 4 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 15.
5 March.
Calig. E. II. (70.)
B. M.
1621. MOUNTJOY to [HENRY VIII.]
Has executed the King's King's commands, that Christ. Knevet, James, and Anthony should have the possessions of the late rebels John de Tables and John de Malynes. "Furthermore to advertise your grace among your sad and weighty matrers [of your] good fortune since my coming; it is a custom here that as the year goeth about the 2nd day of March, there is a great shooting at the popyngay without [the] gates; which popyngay is shot at by a brotherhood of St. George. And first tway (?) shooteth one for your grace, and afterward all other[s of the] fellowship, and he again as [his] course cometh about. The last year I appointed the prov[ost] of the town to shoot for your grace, which shot not in a crossbow 20 year afore; nevertheless he strake the popyngay; and this year I appointed Sir John Tremayle, porter of this your town, to shoot for your grace in likewise; which the s[aid day] before approved himself a [good] shooter in the crossbow and (?) came at the butts. Notwithstand[ing] he strake it down in likewise; and so is your grace king of [the] popyngay for this year. And if so be it be stricken by any man for your grace the next year your grace shall [be] Emperor, whereunto here belongeth many great royalties." The French King never had such fortune when they shot for him. "I would have [shot] thereat myself for your grace saving it was on Sunday [during] mass, and that also if I had gone forth out of the gates many would have desired to have gone with me." Will write again as to the citadel making. "And thus Jesu preserve your most noble gr[ace]. Beseeching our Lord to send you as much rejoicing of my la[dy] princess, and make you as glad a father as ever was king, and after this good beginning to send you many fair [children] to your grace's comfort and all your true subjects." Tournay, 5 March. Signed.
Pp. 2, mutilated.
5 March.
R. O.
1622. MOUNTJOY to WOLSEY.
Have given thanks for the Queen's good speed with procession and bonfires. Understands the King has sent them more money. Has received no answer to his letters by Richmond touching the citadel. Thinks it good that as Ponynges is coming over, he should have in charge to communicate with Lignay for Mortayne. Begs he will move the King for the restoration of his amunity in the Exchequer, and remember the matter of his father Kebyll. Tournay, 5 March.
P. 1. Add.: Card. Abp. of York and Chancellor of England. Endd.
5 March.
S. B.
1623. For SIR WISTAN BROUNE and WM. SYDNEY.
Licence to export 2,000 sacks of wool. Del. Westm, 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 19.
5 March.
S. B.
1624. For WM. BOWMAN, page of the Chamber.
To be the King's fisherman of the Thames. Del. Westm., 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 15.
5 March.
S. B.
1625. For MEREDETH AP RYCE
Annuity of 50s. out of the issues of Coydesoyth, in Milleneth, Marches of Wales, on surrender of patent 25 Feb. 5 Hen. VIII., granting him the issues of the said town, not exceeding the annual value of 50s. Del. Westm., 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 18.
5 March.
S. B.
1626. For JAS. AP RYCE.
Annuity of 40s. out of the issues of Pillith Forest, in Milleneth, Marches of Wales; on surrender of patent 25 Feb. 5 Hen. VIII., granting him the herbage and pannage, not exceeding the annual value of 40s. Del. Westm., 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 18.
5 March.
S. B.
1627. For DAVID AP HOWELL.
To have the customs, &c. of Radnour, Marches of Wales; on surrender of patent 1 Feb. 6 Hen. VIII., granting him the toll of the said town, which Sir Stephen Bulle late held. Del. Westm., 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 18.
5 March.
S. B.
1628. For GRIFFIN AP MEREDETH VAGHAN.
Annuity of 5 marks out of the issues of Radnour Park, Marches of Wales; on surrender of patent 25 Feb. 5 Hen. VIII., granting him the herbage and pannage, with a meadow called "Castell Meadow," not exceeding the annual value of 5 marks. Del. Westm., 5 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 18.
5 March.1629. For SIR WM. FITZWILLIAM and JOHN BIGGE.
To be bailiff, in survivorship, of Surrey alias Bagshote Baylys, in Windsor Forest, with 6d. a day out of the issues of Oxon and Berks, on surrender by John Bygge of patent 18 June 19 Hen. VII. Westm., 5 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 24.
6 March.1630. For TH. EDWARDES, clk.
Annuity of 100s. which the convent of Wenlock pays the King from the house of charity of Cluny. Westm., 6 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 24.
7 March.
Vit. B. XIX. 29.
B. M.
1631. MAXIMILIAN to WOLSEY.
Credential for John de Hesdin, master of the court of the Archduchess Margaret, whom he sends on a special embassy. He has a joint commission with Barth. Titionus Count Decian, the resident ambassador. Trent, 7 March 1516, 31 Max. Signed: Per Regem.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Thomæ Card. Ebor.
7 March.
Lett. Max. and
Marg. II. 318.
1632. MAXIMILIAN to MARGARET.
Sends instructions and credentials for Hesdin, her maitre d'hotel, to carry immediately into England. He must start instantly. Chasteau de Persen, 7 March 1515, avant Pasques.
7 March.
Vit. B. XIX. 33.
B. M.
1633. [SIR ROB. WINGFIELD] to [HENRY VIII.]
"[On the ... of] the last month I wroot my last [letter from] the village of Crawne." Received on the ... daye of this month Henry's letter [dated] Westminster the 17th of last month, [with] a letter from him to the Emperor ... in a packet directed to Pace, whom the writer found on the same day ... Yesterday in the afternoon the Emperor came h[ither], and within an hour after sent for Wingfield who, in the presence of Pace, made the King's recomme[ndations] to the Emperor, and delivered [the King's] letters, and declared his credence. The King will see by his former letters that the Emperor had already made him privy to things much consonant to the matters touched upon in the King's letter to himself. The Emperor has commissioned his ambassador resident in England to communicate to the King certain things of which Wingfield has no perfect knowledge. After Wingfield had declared his credence, with which the Emperor seemed well pleased, Pace made such communications as he had received. This day at 4 p.m. the Emperor sent for [the Cardin]al of Sion and "us" (Pace and Wingfield), and after mentioning many things bearing on the "[hu]rry and quikke expedition" of the desired enterprise ("which ... alle to as good pourpos as we cowde devyse oure sylvis ... [con]ciderynge that the chieff partis of the same did procede from the pryncypall partis of man, that is to saye from witt and good wyll,") he said that he trusted, as to the "overture" of their "credence" on the day before, that they had proceeded well in such matters as he had communicated to them; begging them to communicate to the King and Wolsey all things of which they had been advised, and that he would write to Henry VIII. to give credence to their relation. Everything is in far better train than could have been expected "by course of worldly power"... "God and youre highnesse hath don myrakyls" this year ... Marche.
Hol., pp. 3, mutilated. Add. Dated in modern hand: "Trente, 7° Mart. 1516."
7 March.
Vit. B. XIX. 30.
1634. [PACE to WOLSEY.]
"As I was yesterday departing ... with the King's letters unto Sir Robert [Wingfield] ... in ciphers unto me with all other as th ... of the said letters, Sir Robert Wingfield and I ... according to the King's pleasure and your [instructions], did read unto him the ciphers every word," and consulted what was best for the advancement of the enterprise into Italy. Sent their opinion to Cardinal Sion, who concurred. The same night had an andience with the Emperor, the Cardinal being there. Wolsey's letters were so [agreeable] to the Emperor "that he said he would not only say but [prove] that your grace was his faithful friend." Thinks Sir Rob. Wingfield will satisfy Wolsey in his desire for some delay to be made in the enterprise against France after the rec[overy of Milan]. Though they cannot have the money Wolsey provided for the Swiss as soon as they require it, hopes the tidings of it will satisfy them for a while. The Emperor has promised [to find] money for them unto such time that "ours" [arrive] ... the sparing of the King's money "non minus parce ... s inutiliter expendendæ." What has been spent already was unavoidable, unless the Swiss were to have been allowed to agree with the French, and so the Emperor would have lost all his cities in Italy.
The Emperor has just sent for him secretly to express his cordial thanks for Wolsey's services, and that whatever Wolsey promises in his name he will perform. He takes his leave for the army this day, "for [to be pr]esent in the conflict which he thinketh shalbe [in one or] two days." ... Sion has written to Wolsey for the third month's pay. He thinks it was wisely done to send "us" an ample commission for a league. "For if we by the g[race] of God obtain in Italy, the said commission is like to be put in execution." All things are likely to succeed in reference to the Swiss. Begs him to consider how great would be the danger to Christendom if the French obtained a footing in Italy. Wolsey himself has often written that now is the time to oppress Francis, "when he is poor, exhausted of men and [money]." Hopes the great occasion will not be lost ... "affairs do not proceed of himself but ... os who be loth to depart out of their stuffs from ... aking tanquam fruges consumere nati. Insomuch that the Emperor undertakes this expedition into Italy against the mind of all his Council. They care little either for his honor or their country's. All the good is done by himself. "It is pity to hear how they do peal and ploke hym of his money, whereby his good intents be oftentymes gretlie lett. Surely of his own person no man can honestly make other relation but that he is a noble, wise, kind, and manly prince."—This day he and Sir Rob. Wingfield had audience with the Emperor, Sion being present. Cannot express how much he was pleased with the overtures made by Wingfield in the King's name, and by Pace in Wolsey's. They will understand the Emperor's intention from his own letters, some of them written by his own hand. He leaves on the 9th for Italy, to join the Swiss in two or three days. He earnestly desires the interests of England. Pace departs tomorrow [toward] the field. The Emperor has appointed him to go in the company of the Marquis of Brandenburgh for his security. The Emperor will help the Swiss with money till they have word from England. Are informed by the Emperor "that[the Prince] of Castille, now King Charles, hath licencyde out of ... the French King's ambassadors. The letter of credence ... "whiche youre grace shall receve with this s ... sentt unto the same the xxvj. day of the mont[h of]" ... Ex. Tridenti, v[ij. Mart.]
Pp. 5. Endd.: Mr. Pace, vij. Marcij.
7 March.
S. B.
1635. To the SHERIFF OF KENT.
Writ to elect a coroner in the room of Richard Herenden. Westm., 7 March 7 Hen. VIII.
7 March.
S. B.
1636. For WM. PAWNE and JOHN LE FELLIER.
Licence to carry over workmen and materials for building a fortress at Tournay. Westm., 7 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 29.
7 March.
S. B.
1637. For MAWRO DE MASSAGROSA, merchant of Lucca.
Licence to export 300 sacks of wool. Del. Westm., 7 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 17.
8 March.
Giust. Desp. I. 184.
1638. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Has talked of the affairs of Candia with the Cardinal. He protested that no money had been sent to the Emperor or the Swiss; "nevertheless your excellency is aware of the truth through the result." He said matters might be arranged if France would withdraw Albany. Has received letters of the affairs of Brescia, with the agreement of ten cantons with France. The Cardinal heard the news willingly, but not in the fashion the successes of one's friends are listened to. In reply to Wolsey's question, said that Francis was in Provence, and was expected at Lyons. He muttered some report that Francis was dead, or it might be diseased. Sebastian said that was not likely. Inquired of Wolsey about the fifty ships that were said to be fitting out. Wolsey replied there were only some ten or twelve undergoing repairs, and made a long speech of what he had done to secure peace with France. Then proceeded to the Bp. of Durham, who asked him, where are the Swiss and the Emperor. "Told him, he supposed at home." He replied, "Rely on it, they are in Italy, in number 36,000. I marvel you have linked yourself to France. If she lose, you lose; if victorious she will deceive you." Sebastian answered, that the alliance was offered them by Louis XII., when their confederates deceived them. Remonstrated about the money sent to Inspruck. Ruthal affirmed it was not for the Emperor; Giustinian could not understand how the Emperor, "who was not worth a ducat," could have brought 36,000 men into Italy. London, 8 March 1516.
8 March.
R. O.
1639. SIR JOHN WILSHER to HENRY VIII.
A gentleman of the Duke of Ferrara is coming with presents to Henry, a dark grey courser of Naples, and a "lebard," a marvellous dangerous beast to keep. "The keeper saith a will kill a buck or doe or roe and an hare, which is a marvellous thing if it be so." Calais, 8 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
8 March.1640. For SIR MILES BUSSY.
Exemption from serving on juries, &c. Westm., 8 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 15.
8 March.1641. For SIR GODDARD OXONBRIGE.
Licence to export 3,000,000 billets and "talwood," from Sussex, Westm., 8 March.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 18.
9 March.
R. O.
1642. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
On Thursday last received a letter from the King concerning Kebyll's wools remaining in Wingfield's keeping, as by copy enclosed. Thinks the grant has passed the King by an unture surmise, on which consideration he has forbone to follow the contents of the King's letters till he hears further from Wolsey. Begs he will remember his opinion that part of the goods might have been employed in advancing the conduit there, and that Wingfield "might have had some pleasure at the least to have hanged one little chamber." The spy that Wolsey sent has been at Abbeville. No preparation made for shipping in Normandy. It is not known where the French King is. Calais, 9 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Cardinal of York [Chan]cellor of England.
Enclosing
R. O.ii. HENRY VIII. to SIR RIC. WINGFIELD.
Ordering him to deliver to Hen. Kebyll, alderman of London, executor of Wm. Browne, late alderman there, such wools as have remained under arrest in the town' of Calais, on giving security of 3,000l. to answer such demands as John Mundy, alderman of Calais, will commence against him in the court of the Staple or Chancery. Greenwich, 2 March.
Copy, p. 1. In the hand of Wingfield's clerk.
9 March.
Vesp. C. I. 98.
B. M.
1643. TAYLER'S SPEECH.
"Oratio responsiva ambaciatoribus Regis Castellæ dicta coram Regia Majestate et tota nobilitate Anglicana, ix. die Martii qui erat dies Dominica Passionis, 1515, secundum computationem Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ, J. Tayler."
A draft, corrected in Tayler's own hand, pp. 4.
9 March.
Vit. B. XVIII. 136.
B. M.
1644. SIR ROB. WINGFIELD to [HENRY VIII.]
Wrote last from Trent on the ... of the present, in answer to the King's of 16 Feb. Received letters from Henry yesterday, dated Greenwich, ... Feb.; and Mr. Pace, who was with Wingfield, received letters from Wolsey, and a commission from the King, authorixing him and Wingfield to treat and execute the matters contained in cipher in Wolsey's letters. Went accordingly with Pace to the Cardinal of Sion, and informed him of such things as it was necessary to disclose; had audience with Maximilian at 7 o'clock, when Pace delivered a credence addressed to his majesty from Wolsey, which after he had read, Pace in right good form declared all such matters as were necessary. The Emperor seemed well pleased, "as well for the comfortable [news] of such sinews of war, as ben in the way a ... as to wit that your highness hath auc[toryzed] Mr. Pace, as is above written." Thomas Cotton, Pace's servant, who brought the aforesaid letters, reported that he met Mr. Melchior, archdeacon of Novarre, going post to England. Yesterday, being with the Cardinal of Sion, expressed his astonishment that he and Pace had not been made privy to the Archdeacon's mission. The Cardinal replied he had been sent by the Emperor's desire, who particularly wished his charge to be kept secret. Being ignorant of its effect, he and Pace will keep their own charge in suspense until they hear from Henry. As Pace writes to Wolsey in cipher, will add no more. Trent, 9 March 1515.
P.S.—" As for news your highness may be sure that they ... much variable by reason of divers opinions and the ... writes, but for the conclusion I am in perfect hope t[hat] though there doth appear many and great difficulties, ... that the Emperor's Council would never believe that the ... should be removed from France, considering the poverty [of] the Emperor and lack of friends, and thereto adjoined the pro[fusion] of the French gold, and the wicked covetise of the Swy[ssers], and also peradventure their own more regarding the ... than the honor and weal of their master; where[upon], though the Emperor himself is not only animate an[d] desirous, and thereto hath commanded and ordained as ... ntly as possible, yet for lack of due execution many de[fficulties] there be; howbeit none so perilous as lack of money; w[hich] and may be found in time I doubt not but all sha[ll be] well, and the same, though it appears not to be ready at the ... yet my hope is that or the great need shall be ... shall be within six days that God, which is the ch[ief cape]teeyne in this enterprise, shall be proved so that his ... power shall not fail to be known the only thing ... course to all honorable and well founded e[nterprises] ... the armies of Almayns and Swissers which ... together should set forth toward the enemy ... by all outward show that appeareth, yet they [in]tend to strike battle. The perfection of their mind shall not fail to be known within twain or three days at the farthest, and the Emperor setteth forward this day from this city, and intendeth to be at the feast himself if it be possible. I pray God send him speed, as yesterday the good Prince received the sacrament and made his Paske, so that from henceforth he may the more liberally intend to martial acts, in which and all other things may answer to the vigilance and diligence that he hath and doth use, there shall nothing go amiss."
Hol., pp. 4, mutilated.
9 March.
S. B.
1645. HENRY VIII.
Ratification of the treaty of peace with Charles Prince of Castile, concluded by Cuthbert Tunstal and Wm. Knight on the part of England, William de Croy, Lord of Chierves, John le Sauvaige, Lord of Scaubeca, and Michael de Croy, Lord of Sempy, on that of Charles. Westm., 9 March 1515, 7 Hen. VIII.
ii. Ratification of the treaty of intercourse. Westm., 9 March.
10 March.
Giust. Desp, I. 189.
1646. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Two ambassadors have arrived from the Prince of Castile, one of them is the Lord de la Rosa [Roeux], formerly prisoner at Venice, the other a Bishop. They have signed the peace between the Prince and the King. On visiting these ambassadors they complained of their former harsh treatment at Venice; said their master meant to go to Castile, and spoke of his claim to the kingdom of Naples. These things did not please the French ambassador, who says that Francis claims the crown of Naples, because on the death of Germaine de Foix without heirs it would revert to France. The union between England and the Prince is very close. They then spoke of Venice, and reproached her for her spoliations; to which Sebastian replied as calmly as he could. London, 10 March 1516.
10 March.
S. B.
1647. For the COLLEGE OF ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Cambridge.
Grant, in mortmain, of the advowson of St. Mary's Hospital, Osprynge, Kent, commonly called "Le Meason Dieu." Del. Westm., 10 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 22.
10 March.
S. B.
1648. For JOHN WYNGFELD, clk.
Presentation to the church of Stokyntynhedde, Exeter dioc., vice Reginald West, deceased. Del. Westm., 10 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 24.
10 March.
S. B.
1649. For ALICE, widow of FULK LEE.
Wardship of Th. son and heir of the said Fulk. Del. Westm., 10 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 23.
10 March.
P. S.
1650. HERVY HAYWARD of Hamoll, alias of Portesmouth, Hants, yeoman of the Crown.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Ric. Wyngfelde, Deputy of Calais. Greenwich, 5 March 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 10 March.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 18.
10 March.
P. S.
1651. For FRAS. ALWYN, mercer, London.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Ric. Wyngfelde, Deputy of Calais. Greenwich, 6 March 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 10 March.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 18.

Footnotes

1 At the commencement of this letter a few characters occur in a different cipher, to which no key has been found.