Henry VIII
March 1516, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1864

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'Henry VIII: March 1516, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2: 1515-1518 (1864), pp. 460-475. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90901 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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March 1516

11 March.
Egerton, 985. f. 61b.
1652. DUKE OF SUFFOLK.
"The christening of Henry Earl of Lincoln, first-begotten son of Charles Duke of Suffolk and Marie the French Queen."
On Tuesday, 11 March 1515, 7 Hen. VIII., between 10 and 11 o'clock at night, was born at Bath Place the first son of Mary Queen of France and Charles Duke of Suffolk. Arrangements for the christening on Thursday after, when my Lord Cardinal, my Lady Katharine and the Bp. of Durham were to be present. Decorations of the Hall, &c. The King and my Lord Cardinal, godfather; the Lady Katharine godmother; the Bishop of Durham godfather at the bishoping. The King gave the name Henry. The Bp. of Rochester performed the ceremony, assisted by other prelates. The King was then served of water, the Duke of Norfolk bearing the towel, the Lord of Burgeyne the bason. The Lord Grey gave the assay. Sir W. Fitzwilliam and Henry Sherborne served the King with spice and wine. The King's gift borne next before the child by Sir John Peche, the Cardinal's by his steward.
Copy, temp. Eliz. or Jac. I.
Harl. 3504.
B. M.
2. Another copy.
11 March.
Giust. Desp. I. 192.
1653. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Went to the King to communicate the news. He has been somewhat indisposed during the last three days. He told Sebastian that the agreement between the Swiss and the French had not taken effect; they had all joined the Emperor, and taken the French King's money in payment of their claims upon him; that the Emperor and the Swiss are between Verona and Milan, and have so barred the passage that the Venetians cannot succour the Christian King; that the French with the Duke of Bourbon fled, and the Duke had shut himself up in the castle of Milan. In uttering these words he seemed to exult and wax warm, saying to Sebastian, "You see how you stand." Made the best apology he could; said that they were compelled to accept the alliance with France. "His majesty interrupted me here, saying, it was not necessary to abandon your friends, some of whom at least could and would have aided you," (alluding to his majesty himself); and he continued, "There could be no necessity soever for making you have recourse to such perfidy; and this he uttered with some indignation, becoming rather pale in the face." Seeing he was very irritated, Sebastian endeavoured to soothe him, by stating how much he had done for them. The King interrupted him, saying. "You speak the truth, I have done more for you than my father ever did." Sebastian replied, that Venice would remain faithful to him. The King rejoined, "Domine Orator, I have more money now, and greater force and authority, than I myself or my ancestors ever had, so that what I will of other Princes, that I can obtain;" and he grew wrathful as he spoke. After this he praised the Cardinal of Sion as a most worthy man, and said that the enemies of the Signory were of its own choosing; had they been so inclined he could have reconciled them. Sebastian replied they would have been glad of his good offices, but did not like to offend the Pope. At the end he declared that he had no intention to injure Venice;—that he was surprised they never sent him anything but stale news. It will be expedient, Sebastian thinks, to keep on good terms with England, for fear the Christian King should be worsted. London, 11 March 1516.
12 March.
Giust. Desp. I. 197.
1654. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
Had communicated all that passed at his interview to the French Ambassador, except the King's assertion that France was negotiating peace with the Emperor. Thinks that report was a fiction. The ambassador told him that 70,000 ducats had been despatched to the Emperor, and that the King was levying 10,000 men, who had orders to meet at Calais. Great disturbances have arisen at Naples between the partizans of France and Spain. Does not think the King intends these troops against France, as in that case his majesty would rather use his own subjects than other troops, because of their natural enmity to the French. London, 12 March 1516.
12 March.
R. O.
1655. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
Hears that Pawne has been appointed to go to Tournay to over-see the King's works there, and to take carpenters and masons from Calais. Thinks this would be injudicious, and, unless he bring a special command to the contrary from the King, will not allow him to take them. Sends a bill of the money he has disbursed to the King's spy in France. Begs Wolsey's attention to the necessities of the town. Calais, 12 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My lord Cardinal of York, Chancellor of England. Endd.: "Sir Rob. Wyngfild, 12 Marcij, principally for 22l., which he gave to a spy in France."
R. O.1656. TOURNAY.
"Divers things to be remembered to my Lord Cardinal's grace, of the not so soon furnishing of the Citadel of Tournay."
1. Complaining that my Lord Mountjoy is devising many things of no effect. 2. That he sent for Mr. Jaks of Douay. 3. His devising a bulwark, of which Mr. Hart had charge. 4. His making the walls of the citadel 21 feet thick. 5. The towers 25 feet thick. 6. Placing the tower in the mint contrary to the King's plan. 7. His "devising false brayes between Porte Broyle and the tower." 8. The same on the east side. 9. Beginning a countermure, 35 feet broad. 10. The citadel might have been all "vainewred," if the King's counsel had been followed.
ii. "Certain things laid to my charge, that, as it is said, I would not consent to nor suffer to be done."
1. At the beginning of his commission John le Sellier and Mr. Hart were at the payment of the laborers. 2. John le Sellier bargained for the lime and stone, &c. 3. As to suffering his books to be seen, the muster books had been taken away 4. Has always delivered to the deputy a view of the sums received. 5. Begs he may be discharged. Has served the King and his father 34 years, without incurring any rebuke.
Pp. 4.
12 March.
Calig. D. VI. 294.
B. M.
1657. SAMPSON to WOLSEY.
Has received his letters by Mr. Bartholomew, the King's servant, enclosing "a certain process from Rome [and an] inhibition including a citation and letters compulsory with certain instructions." He will publish the inhibition and citation on Sunday next in Tournay church, "with copies affixed in divers parties, paraventure also in Bruge, Lisle and Curtrey, if I think that it may be without danger, or if there shall be thought no great danger." Thinks that the process should be executed at Rome rather than in partibus. If in the latter, rather in Flanders. If in partibus, as the Spanish King comis ... towards France, none will ... dare to execute it, nor in all these parts does he know of any one to whom so weighty a matter can be intrusted. Will use the services of the dean of this church for the letters compulsory, but will write at length more hereafter. Tournay, the 12th day of [March].
Hol., pp. 2, mutilated.
12 March.
R. O.
1658. LEO X. to WOLSEY.
As he requires the services of Polydore Vergil, begs Wolsey will arrange for his instant departure. Rome, 12 March 1516, 3 pont.
Vellum. Add.
12 March.
R. O.
1659. CARDINAL HADRIAN to WOLSEY.
Wrote last of the return of the Pope to Rome. The Pope requires the services of Polydore, and his instant return, and has ordered Hadrian to write to Wolsey and Polydore accordingly. The Pope writes himself. Begs Wolsey will look to his interests in Polydore's absence. Rome, 12 March 1516. Signed.
P. S. Urging the same in his own hand.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Card. Ebor.
12 March.
S. B.
1660. For EDM. DEY of Suthwarke, alias of Westminster, Stepneth, and Mycham, Surrey.
Pardon. Del. Westm., 12 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 31.
12 March.
S. B.
1661. For TH. HANDRESON, native of Scotland.
Denization. Del. Westm., 12 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 22.
12 March.1662. For SIR RALPH VERNEY, jun.
Exemption from serving on juries, &c. Westm., 12 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 18.
12 March.1663. For WM. BAROWE, L.L.B.
Presentation to the church of Alscote, Linc. dioc., vice John Wetwode. Westm., 12 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 11.
13 March.
R. O.
1664. SIR RIC. WHETTEHYLL to WOLSEY.
The number of people in Tournay is nearer 20,000 than 10,000, as Wolsey had been informed; "whereby it is thought 1,000 men would serve, though here were no citadel," and so some of the "saugers" be discharged. The chief harm to be expected from the citizens must come by treason from without; and if so, no one can provide against it, nor can the soldiers be assembled who are quartered in different lodgings. As the city counts three miles in compass, has seven gates, two great sluices, and ninety-nine towers, there would be scarcely twenty men between tower and tower. Thinks it better, therefore, not to discharge any more, but as the rooms fall to leave them so, as the deputy does. The town is glad to see the English power diminishing, as it hopes to return to France. Considering the great charge the King has been at in building the citadel, thinks it would not be advantageous to put it in hazard for 300 men, and would rather have the trouble of taking ten towns than the shame of losing one. If they must be dismissed, requests he may have his letters of discharge. Were he at its capture and escape, he "scold be wandard at, hayned and disdanyd within the reyam as birdes do to a novill (an owl)." Would rather serve the King as a common soldier at 6d. a day. Tournay, 13 March.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: To my Lord Cardinal's grace.
13 March.
Galba, B. IV. 35.
B. M.
1665. SPINELLY to [HENRY VIII.]
Wrote last on the 6th. Next day the King's ambassadors arrived, and were met in the Prince's name by the Count of Horne, the Dean of Besançon and Ph. Dalle, one [of the] Prince's stewards. Had public audience on Sunday, when Master Tunstall "made a fair and well prysed oration." On the 6th came a gentleman from the Viceroy of Naples, and a Secretary of the Spanish ambassador in the Pope's court, to warn the Prince that since the French King's conquest of [Milan] and meeting with the Pope, Naples was in danger of an insurrection of the Ango ...; that the late King Catholic, to win the hearts of his subjects, had renounced an extraordinary aid granted by them; that the Pope's enterprize against the Duke of Urbino showed he was in the French interest; that the publication by Ferdinand in Naples of the renewal of his league with England was worth 1,000 spears; that they strongly urge Charles to the same course, and advise the Emperor's setting forward with the Swiss; that they have 1,000 good spears, 600 light horse and 4,000 foot on the Pope's frontier; that the revenues of Naples are in arrear, and they wish to know what is to be done as to a commission the late King gave to the Viceroy to go to the Emperor "... mind as well in Italy as on this side the [mountains]." Cornelis Ubert of Syryxea informs him that lately at Camfere he heard the French intended sending twelve ships into Scotland. Incloses a letter from a friend with news from Scotland. Hans Nagle says the ambassador of the Duke of Albany is gone to Ric. de la Pole 'at Metz. Has arranged that Nagle shall speak with Sir Edw. Ponynges. The French King is said to be dangerously ill. On asking Chievres touching the Almain foot, was told they lay about Masyers not far from Namur. The Governor of Champagne had come to them, for what he could not tell. Brussels, 13 March.
Hol., pp. 4.
13 March.
Galba, B. IV. 37.
B. M.
1666. SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Wrote on the 6th. Has written to the King of the arrival of his ambassadors. Ponynges is very welcome to this court. The Prince's Council have ordered the Spanish treaty to be translated into French to be deliberated upon. Was desired by Berges to keep this information secret, but has told Ponynges. Thinks they wish to bind England to assist them in case of open war with Gueldres. If the King's letters have been opened, as Tunstal tells him is suspected, it has not been done by the King's servant. Has answered Tuke's letter on the subject. Brussels, 13 March.
Encloses a letter from Sir Rob. Wingfield about the same matter.
Hol., pp. 2, mutilated.
13 March.
R. O.
1667. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER to WOLSEY.
Has written in cipher to Ammonius matters of importance communicated to him by the Pope. Beseeches Wolsey to use his influence with the King to second the Pope's wishes in these perilous times. Commends to him again the cause of John Campucci. Rome, 13 March 1516. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Tho. Card. Ebor.
14 March.
Galba, B. IV. 38.
B. M.
1668. PONYNGES and TUNSTAL to [HENRY VIII.]
Arrived at Brussels on the 7th. On the 9th (Passion Sunday) were admitted to the Prince's presence. Having a special credence besides the "proposition of consolation openly made," were told commissioners should be appointed to commune with them. Had a much better welcome than when they were here last, every one of the Council appearing to rejoice at their coming. Delivered the King's letters to my Lady Margaret, and informed her "of your token and remembrance brought by Richmond," which she ordered to be delivered secretly to such as she should send for it, lest its being known should prevent her advancing the King's interests. Next day the Count Palatine, Chiernes and the Chancellor came from the Prince, the Count being apparently joined because the two others feared to take the sole responsibility. After lamenting the death of Ferdinand, and offering to renew the league with the Prince, who by his letters to the King had intimated that Ferdinand had bequeathed to him all his dominions, were asked as to the contents of the treaty, which the [Prince's Council had not seen; as the Spanish bishop, who lately departed from England, had not yet arrived. Gave them a copy, and showed them the original confirmed by the King of Arragon's seal, "which y[our servants] took unto us at our departing." The commissioners thought the overture satisfactory, and would refer it to the Prince. An answer was not to be expected till after the obsequies of the King of Arragon. Yesterday the dirge was said; to-day the mass, in presence of the ambassadors of the Pope, Emperor, France and England. After which the Prince, "going apart into a travers, put off his mourning hood, and came forth with open face, yet clad in black; where his herald saluted him, and pronounced him the King of Spain, calling him the King Catholic." Henceforth he must accordingly be addressed by that title. Have delivered all the King's letters to Chievres, the Chancellor, the ambassador of Arragon, Berghes, &c. Brussels, 14 March. Signed.
Pp. 4, mutilated.
14 March,
R. O.
1669. BOYSY and BONNIVET to PALVOISIN (French ambassador at Rome).
Have received his two letters of the last day of February and the 4th of this month. The King approves of his communications with the Pope since the news of the King of Arragon's death. Francis has already sent, as proposed, an ambassador to his holiness to make a conclusion of the matter of the benefices lately treated of at Bologna. The King agrees with Palvoisin that the French will be more effectually aided by the Pope's name and favor than by the men of war he has consented to send to Milan. Nevertheless he should be induced to pay a certain number of Swiss, as Francis has already in his pay 12,000 of them, and fears he will have difficulty in paying them all. He has sent for 9,000 lance-knights who are on the confines of Burgundy; among them the Black Band; and has determined to meet the Emperor in person if he come in person. Though the King of England holds at present more gracious language than usual, Francis is on his guard. The Archduke continues amicable and has sent a new ambassador. Desire him to give the Pope's secretary assurances of the benefices promised him. Lyons, 14 March. Signed.
Fr., pp. 3. Add.
14 March.
R. O.
1670.BONNIVET to PALVOISIN.
Has made his recommendations to the King, the Queen and the ladies. The Queen will send the mules and litter for his holiness as soon as possible. His powers (privileges) are despatched, also the letters for the Sieur Octovien and the Cardinal of St. Peter ad Vincula, which will be at Milan before Easter, as he has written to him. His pension (estat) from the King shall be duly paid at Rome. The King has received notice from the general of Milan that it is no fault of theirs that Palvoisin's despatch has not been sent off. Has given his recommendations to the King on the part of the Cardinals Cornal (?), Siboux (Cibo), and Arragon. Is to make his in return, and not forget Redulon. Begs he will see to the sending of his Florentine picture, and the boxes and perfumes that he promised him. The King and his mother anxiously expect "Maitre Leonard." The King and the grand master have written to him of the news here. Lyons, 14 March.
P.S.—Will attend to his recommendation respecting Messire Hardinguel.
Fr., pp. 2. Add.
15 March.
Calig. B. VI. 99.
B. M.
1671. DACRE and MAGNUS to HENRY VIII.
On receipt of his letter dated Greenwich, 24 Feb, forwarded his letters to the King of Scots, with safeconduct for his ambassadors to England, of whose coming they have not yet heard, not withstanding the impatience of the Scotch Council for the safe-conduct, and the promise in Albany's letter of the 4th from Edinburgh, that Dacre should be speedily advertised of it. Enclose a copy of a letter of Dacre to the Duke, expressing his surprise; hope it will cause them better speed. By the King's desire have drawn a book of all "attemptats" and injuries done by Albany, (1) against the Queen of Scotland; and (2) the violation of the comprehension; the first part signed by the Queen's own hand, the second by Dacre. Since the above, Dacre has heard from the Archdeacon of St. Andrew's and Sir Wm: Scott, councillors of Scotland, "that it is marvelled the ambassador of France resident there hath no writing from your highness," touching his coming to England with the ambassadors. Enclose the letter with their answer. The queen's grace "amends continually," and is anxious to come to Henry. Desire him to have this in remembrance, as they wrote last by Sir Christopher Garneis.
Since her desire was known, Albany has made many offers to induce her to stay;—that she should have Lord Drommonde and the Bishop of Dunkelde set at liberty, restitution of lands to all her adherents, and "all the service and pleasure" that he may do her. This has given them some business, "provoking such Scottish personages as be familiar about her grace" and others writing to her from Scotland; but tho she does not acquaint them with everything, "yet she, as a great wise woman, persevereth and resteth upon this, that she woll do nothing without the consent of your highness." Though she has of late sometimes written to the Duke of Albany, hoping to have part of her pleasure, the writers have penned her letters, in such wise as the Duke would not consent, to prevent any renewal of friendship between them. Transmit a copy of the Queen's last letter to the Duke. Think the Queen's going southwards should be hastened, for the daily messages from Scotland trouble her mind, and put her in study what is best to do. Nothing comforts her so much as when his highness writes to her. Morpeth Castle, 15 March. Signed.
Pp. 5. Add.: Unto the Kinge's mooste noble grace. Endd.
Calig. B. II. 211.
B M.
1672. COMPLAINTS against the DUKE OF ALBANY.
i. "Hereafter enseweth the great, manifest, and detestable injuries and wrongs done and committed to me, Margaret Queen of Scots, by John Duke of Albany, sithen his coming and repairing into the realm of Scotland."
(1.) To deprive her of the government during the minority as bequeathed to her by James IV. and confirmed by the Pope, he had besieged her in Stirling Castle when she had no men about her to protect her, but only gentlewomen; taken her children from her and put her out of the said castle, "being my conjunct feoffment paid for by the King my father;" imprisoned her friends the Lord Drummonde and the Bp. of Dunkelde; forced her to write to the Pope, the King her brother, and the French King, that she voluntarily resigned the office of "tutrix;" and would have persuaded her to indent with him not to seek help from England. (2.) By depriving her of the profits of her conjunct feoffment he had brought her into great debt and danger; to avoid which she fled first to Blaketer, then to the nunnery of Coldstream, where she remained sixteen days, making much intreaty to Albany for her restoration to her children, which he refused. He also deprived her of her jewels and other riches in her houses at Temptallan, Edinburgh, and other places, where she remained after being driven from Stirling. (3.) He made proclamations through Scotland in the King's name that she and Angus and the Lord Home, the Chamberlain, intended to cause an invasion of Scotland by England for the destruction of the King and realm, especially in one proclamation of the 17th Sept., which in effect declared them traitors. He had accordingly raised an army of 10,000 men against her adherents. Being at that time great with child she was forced to seek refuge in England, where she was delivered within eight days after, on the 7th Oct., fourteen days before her time, and fell into such extreme sickness that her life was despaired of by all. The Duke, who had pursued her to the March on hearing of her departure from Scotland, returned to Edinburgh. (4.) Notwithstanding the Pope's brief, delivered to Albany at Holyrood on the 13th Oct. last, by Carlisle herald, he will not suffer her to enjoy the guardianship of her son, but wears himself the robe royal and the cap of maintenance, has the sceptre carried before him, acts in all points like a king, and appropriates the revenues of the Crown, so that it is much to be suspected he will destroy the young King, now that her son, the young Duke, is dead, most probably through his means. (5.) He withholds from her husband Angus the castles of Tantallan and Bothwell; has procured in Parliament the attainder of Lord Hoom, the Chamberlain; has destroyed his castles, and given away his lands; and because Lady Hoome, his mother, attended her in her sickness at Coldstream, he caused a Frenchman called Mons. de la Bawty, to take her from her house, and carry her on a trotting horse, in spite of her age, to Dunbar Castle, where he kept her six weeks on "brown stoore brede and watter" without attendance; from which treatment she still suffers. Signed: Margaret R.
Pp. 8.
Ib. 215.ii. "Hereafter followeth many and sundry attemptats done and committed on the partie of Scotland to the King our Sovereign Lord's subjects of England not only to the violation of the comprehension but to the total and extreme breach of the same."
The treaty between England and France, in which Scotland was comprehended on the 15th of May last, was well observed by Scotland till Albany came; he discharged the border officers appointed by the Queen, and put in unfit persons, which has caused great disorder. It was arranged in the comprehension that outrages committed by Scotland within the realm of England under the number of 300 persons should be redressed as in the last peace; viz., if any Scotchmen kill an Englishman within the Marches, the warden shall pursue, that they be taken and led to the diet appointed by the wardens on both sides, and, if convicted, delivered up to be put to death, on demand of the English warden. Minor offences to be redressed on application of the sovereign of the injured party to the sovereign of the offenders. If justice be denied or deferred six months, letters of reprisal may be given, but no war moved. Notwithstanding these provisions there have been nine Englishmen murdered by Scotchmen, and great robberies and burnings committed, for which no redress can be obtained after repeated demands. On the warden making application to Albany as governor of Scotland, the Lord Lindsay, the Laird of Bass, and Sir Wm. Scott, knts., were sent to the borders by commission, bearing date Edinburgh, 29 Aug. 1515, 2 James V., to meet the English warden. Several interviews took place at Cornell in England and Coldstream in Scotland, when a distinct demand was made of redress for the murder by Robt. Dalgles, John Dalgles, his son, and David Tate, Scotchmen, of Henry Mylne, Englishman, and though one of the murderers was present, in sight of the warden and commissioners, his delivery was refused.
On the warden writing to Albany that no redress could be obtained, he desired that all causes might be put in suspense till he could take proper measures for redress, which was agreed to. Immediately afterwards the following murders took place: (1.) Of Oliver Jakson of Rowclif, 16 July, by Matthew Dalgles, Thos. Dalgles, John Henryson, Sym Dalgles, Wm. Dalgles, Tom Dalgles, Sym's son, Wm. Johnson, the young Laird of Gretnoo, Will. Irwen son of Wat Irwen, John Irwen son of Edw., Peter Graham, and others. (2.) Of Robt. Herrison of the Trowghe of Levin, Englishman, 10 Aug. last, by Nicol Irwen, Wat Irwen, his brother, sons to Nicol Irwen, Jenkyn Irwen, Matthew Irwen, (his ?) brother, sons to Matthew Irwen, John Bell, Rynne Bell, and others. (3.) Of Robt. Blackborn of Birk-Tymber-Hill, Englishman, 20 Nov. last, by Wat Bell of Dolphin Flat, White Will Bell, John Bell, Rynne Bell, John Bell of the Cowshot Hill, David Bell of Mylnepeth, Geo. Irwin, the twin, Will Irwen of the Soo wath, Herbert and Edw. Irwen of the Milne Flat, Edw. Irwen of the Longshaw, Wat and John Irwen, Coll of Carruders, with others, to the number of 100 Scotch, who burnt the village of Birk-Timber-Hill, and drove away 60 kye and oxen, 10 horse, 100 sheep, 40 gate, and the "insight" of the said village. (4.) Of Henry Mylne, committed within England, 30 June last, by Robt. and John Dalgles his son, Dande Tate his "mawghe," and others. (5.) Of Ralph Stroder, within England, 29 July last, by Jok Yong of Otterburn, Jok Yong of Cesford, Will Yong of the Spittell, Thos. Chambre of Levyngton, Tom Smith of Clifton, James Glenwhoom and others. (6.) Of James Hardy of New Cartington, Englishman, on _ last, in England, by Robin Robson, Allan Robson, brother, Ralph and Jok Robson, Geo. of Fawley, Laird of the Wells, David Kirkton and others. (7.) Of _ of Haltwesill in England, 14th Jan. last, by Will. Gawin, and Arch. Elwald, brother, Will Elwald, called "Sydears," Rolle, Hob and Wille Elwald son to Jok Elwald of Thorley's Hope, Jok Elwald brother to Will Elwald of Thorley's Hope, Will Nykson called "fingerless Will," Will Nykson of the Stele, Ector Nykson, Henry Nykson's son, Ingraham Nykson, Lyon, Croyser, and others. (8.) Of William Hopper of Unthank, in the lordship of Bywell, 12 Feb. last, by Wille Elwald, called "Sidears," Jok Dande and Will Elwald, brother, sons to Jok Elwald, David Elwald, Jok Nykson, and others, who burnt the village, took away 60 kye and oxen, 10 horses and the "insight" of the village. (9.) Of Thomas Watson of Wynnershill on the water of Darwent in Northumb., committed in England, 20 Feb. last, by _. In Nov. last, John and Hob Borne his brother, Thom Mynto, Dande Moffet, Thom Younge, Jame Young, Jok Tate, Henry Tate, and others, to the number of 200, burnt the new town of Chillingham, and drove away sixscore kye and oxen, 30 horses, and the "insight" of the town. In Sept. last John Burn, Geor. Daveson, Tom Yong of Yateham, Edw. and Ralph Tate, "haresharde," Adam Tate, Geo. Middlemest, and others, to the number of eight score horsemen, robbed the town of Newton of seven score kye and oxen and the insight.
In _ last, Wille Elwald, "called Sidears," Wille Elwald son of John Elwald of Thorlishop, Rolle Elwald, Hobe Elwald, Ector Nykson son of Henry Nykson, Wille Nykson "called fingerless Wille," Nykson of the Stele, and others, to the number of _ men, burnt the old town of Hexhamshire, belonging to the Archbp. of York, Cardinal of England, and drove away the cattle, goods, and insight. Though it was provided that the comprehension should be void if an incursion were made by the subjects of the King of Scots without his permission, or that of his lieutenant or warden, with 300 or more persons, and murder, burning, robbery, &c. were committed by them, and not redressed within forty days, many invasions have been made by Scotsmen, to the number of 300 and far above. On the 5th Nov. last, Lance Car, Laird of Gateshaw, Dande Car, Laird of Graden, Geo. Daveson of Fowmerden, the young Laird of Mowe, with others, to the number of 300, burnt the town of Hessilrig, took 30 prisoners and drove away fourscore kye and oxen, 30 horses, and the insight. 12th Oct. last, Mark Car, Laird of Dolphinstown, lieutenant of the Middle Marches of Scotland, Lance Car, Laird of Gateshaw, Dande Car, Laird of Graden, the young Laird of Mowe, Dande Pringle, constable of Cessfort, Geo. Daveson of Fowmerden, and others, to the number of 400, came to Corkleeche upon Mylnefeild, and put forth their foray, eight score horsed men, to the town called Holborne, robbed it of all the insight and of 200 kye and oxen, 30 horses, and took the principal inhabitants prisoners. The country rose. The young Laird of Barmor, the Laird of Holborne, Ector Grey, and others, followed their neighbours' goods, and were taken prisoners within England, and with them 40 persons were conveyed to Cessford, to the warden's house, where he kept some, ransomed others and refused redress. 29th Nov. last, the Lord Maxwell, warden of the West Marches of Scotland, the Lord Carlell, with Sir John Murray, Laird of Cockpool, the Lairds of Johnston and Mowsfelde, Sir Alex. Jarden, comptroller of the Duke of Albany's house, the Laird of Hoolmendes, Hempesfeild, Gretnowe, Donwedy, Knok, Thornhok, Castellmylke, Kirkonnell, Tynnewold, and others, came to Solam Chapel in England, where the said warden "sent forth in a scrymage" the Laird of Johnstone, Capt. of Lochmaban, and others, to the number of 400 horse and more; the said warden keeping the "stayk" came to Arcturheth in the duchy of Lancaster, burnt a grange, and the whole village, to the number of 16 houses. Returning to Scotland, the warden sent forth "in another scrymage" Sir John Murray, Laird of Cockpool, Sir Alex. Jardine, the Laird of Mowsfold, Hempesfeild, Tynnewold, the Provost of Dromfreys, and others, to the number of 700 horsemen, who robbed Bownes, and burned 18 houses, with much corn, hay, &c., assaulted the tower and "barnekyn" for half an hour and returned; all which was in express contravention of the 1st article of the comprehension that it should be void if any invasion were permitted by the King of Scots. Anno r.r. H. VIII., 7°.
Signed: Thos. Dacre.
Pp. 16. Endd.: A book of many great wrongs and injuries done to the Queen of Scots by the Duke of Albany.
15 March.
Calig. E. I. 28.
B. M.
1673. BONNYVET to JEHAN THOMAS, secretary to Anthoine Marye Marquis Palvoisin.
Has received his letter. Thinks he had better wait till the Seigneur ... has left and is on his return, when he will devise for him better than he can do at present. Lyons, 15 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1, mutilated. Add.
15 March.
S. B.
1674. For WM. IDLE, chaplain.
To have a stipend, and allowance for bread, wine, and wax for the celebration of service in Penreth Castle. Del. Westm., 15 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 32.
See 4 Feb.
15 March.
S. B.
1675. For MARION, wife of MARTIN WYLDE, of Bruges, in Flanders.
Licence to import jewels and pearls, for three years. Del. Westm., 15 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 18.
15 March.
S. B.
1676. For JOHN and REGINALD NEWYNGTON, merchant tailors of London.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Richard Wyngfelde, Deputy of Calais. Del. Westm., 15 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 19.
16 March.
R. O.
1677. MARGARET OF SAVOY to WOLSEY.
Her maître d'hotel, John de Hedin, has been despatched to England on the part of the Emperor, to communicate with Count Decian, the imperial ambassador in England. Begs credence for them. Brussels, 16 March 1515.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Card. Ebor.
17 March.
Galba, B. IV. 40.
B. M.
1678. SPINELLY to [HENRY VIII.]
Wrote on the 13th. The [obsequies] of the King of Arragon began on Tuesday, and ended on Friday; at which the Prince was proclaimed King Catholic. Letters of André de Burgo, dated the 7th, at Trent, state that the Emperor was going next day to Verona; that the Swiss had crossed the Adda, on a bridge made at "Pontw," to Verona; that all the captains, Swiss and Almains, swore at Tre[nt], in the Cardinal Sion's lodging, to live and die together; that the Swiss are to be in the van under Galeazzo, the horse and ordnance to follow them, then the Emperor and the lanzknechts; that the French and Venetians have lost, in three engagements, 1,500 men and 300 prisoners, including the Earl of Martenyngo and Messire Malatesta, "ballyon of Perosa;" that they have about Brescia and Mantua 1,000 spears and 4,000 Gascons; "that the said French and Venetians ... that they would join together, nevertheless two ... had been setten upon the river of Po, whereby rather [appeareth] they intend to depart than to abide the battle;" that each of the gates of Milan was kept by 50 Gascons; that Jehan Jakes Trivulcio is supposed to be disaffected to the French, and to have intelligence with Galeazzo; and that Gurk, envying the omnipotence of Sion with the Emperor, tried to bring him to a peace with France, but, failing in this, has left for Salzbourg.
For all the promises of the Prince's Council, De Burgo can get no money. He has offered to serve the Viceroy against the Venetians, but can obtain no answer. The French King's servant is still with the Duke of G[ueldres], who writes that he will live in peace with these Kings, though his deeds are contrary. The estates have granted the Prince 30,000 philips. If the Emperor succeed in Y[taly] the Archduchess will have the rule here. Yehanlis, the French ambassador, left on Saturday; the President of Paris remains here. A post from Don Dego, who was at Lyons on Wednesday, states that the French King is in good health, and will shortly return beyond the mountains, and that many soldiers have been punished for returning to France against Bourbon's orders. Has just heard that the French King has sent an amicable message to this court. He is going to keep Easter at Lyons. The French are much troubled by the disaffection of the Milanese. The Almain foot in Champ[agne] have gone back to Italy. The estates have now consented to grant the whole 400,000 philip d'or. Brussels, 17 March.
Hol., pp. 4.
17 March.
R. O.
1679. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Wrote last on the 13th. Has written to the King. Sir Edw. Ponynges gave a dinner yesterday to the ambassadors of the Emperor and Arragon, Chievres, the Chancellor, Ysylstayn and Sempy, and a supper to Lord Nassow. The Chancellor told Spinelly he saw no difficulty in the treaty with Spain, but they could not treat before Easter. He denied that the Lord Yehanlis (Genlis) had done any good in France. The Bishop of Spain (Drinawar) on his coming from England makes good report of the King and Wolsey, and shows the Prince is much bound to them. The Bishop will write in two days. Ponynges and he have spoken with Hans Nagel, who shall go incontinently after Easter "where your grace wot of." If his servant does not return, and Wolsey sends no answer, will be obliged to come to England. Brussels, 17 March.
Pp. 2. Add.: Tho. Card. Angliæ.
17 March.
R. O.
1680. FRANCIS I. to ANT. MARIE MARQUIS PALVESIN, his ambassador with the Pope.
Understands from his letters, and from the Pope's ambassador, the Bp. of Tricary, the good-will the Pope bears towards his affairs; will employ all the force of his kingdom, and put his person at the Pope's service. Has got ready a force, both for his kingdom and Italy. Notwithstanding Messrs. of the League (des Ligues) have been pressed to recall their men who have left their country for the service of the princes, many captains have raised men for the French for the defence of Milan; and others, the principal men of the cantons, are in communication with them to carry out the treaty sealed and sworn between him and them. Expects to have more than 8 or 10,000 Swiss at his service. Not a day passes but captains make offers to him, whatever his enemies may say to the contrary. Begs the Pope will pay 4,000 of the Swiss, instead of 2,000, as he had promised; they will then have 12,000 between them to join the force already in the duchy, and those which the Constable (Bourbon) has levied there; sc. 28,000 foot and 3,000 men of arms, French and Italians. Has also got ready two other armies; one of 25,000 foot and 2,000 men of arms for France; the other 12,000 foot and 500 men of arms; with all his house and suite, to repass into Italy if necessary, in which case he will once more kiss the feet of his holiness. Hopes the Pope will not listen to bad advice, but remember the past conduct of the Emperor. The Emperor is now endeavoring to induce Francis to an amity through the Prince of Castile. Has no fear of England and the Prince of Castile. Henry cannot trouble him, being beyond the sea, and the Prince is enough occupied with the affairs of Castile and Arragon since the death of the late King. Even if they were inclined to interfere, an answer might be given to them without diminishing the force in Italy. Has sent to the Constable to inform the Pope of the intended movements of the army in Italy. Lyons, 17 March. Signed.
Fr., pp. 3. Add.
18 March.
Calig. E. I. II. ?
I. 137.
B. M.
1681. FRANCIS I. to HENRY VIII.
Is glad to hear that a diet' has been appointed in England to settle the differences between the Queen of Scotland and Albany. Has sent instructions to the President Bapaumes his ambassador in England, and to De Plains in Scotland, to be present. Lyons, 18 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1, mutilated. Add.
18 March.
R. O
1682. SPINELLY to HENRY VIII.
P.S.—This morning was assured by Andrew de Burgo that he would have money for the Emperor, and that the Viceroy of Naples would give aid. De Burgo thinks that, considering this King's treaty with France, and that he is not yet in possession of Castile, the Council must be cautious, and that their slackness is not from indifference. Brussels, 18 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To the King's grace.
18 March.
R. O.
1683. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
The Lord Reux and his colleague report well of their reception. Encloses letters from Almain. Brussels, 18 March.
The court removes next week towards Mechlin, thence to Artois, to make the Prince's entry, "accelerating in the meantime all provisions for his going into Hyspany."
Hol., p. 1. A postscript apparently. Add.: To [my Lord] Cardinal.
18 March.
Galba, B. VIII. 108.
B. M.
1684. SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Wrote last on the 18th. Encloses a letter of the Bp. of Trinople. Last night a post came from Verona, by which Andrew de Bourgo received letters dated the 9th, containing that the Em[peror] is on the way to Soave, to be nearer "... [wi]th his army that was departed with the Lord Marchan[tonio] out of Verona." The Swiss with Lord Galias, to the number of 18,000, the adv[ent]uryers included, are gone towards Pescara. The French and Venetians were joined together in Bressan, and seemed as yet determined to await battle. The French, who had garrisoned all the gates of Milan, have since left the city. A proclamation was made at Verona that the feudatories of the Empire should repair to the Emperor on pain of forfeiting their rights, and messengers were sent with it to Florence, Sienna, Lucca, Genoa, Montferrat and Savoy. The Pope has offered good [assistance to the Em]peror. The French are not expected to remain. If they do, they will be defeated. This King has ordered prayers for the Emperor's success. The Prince's Council have had a consultation upon the King's affairs. Yesterday the Chancellor bid him tell Ponynges "that he might make a good Pask, for he shall have a short and good resolution." When Jehanlis took his leave, he said he would tell his master that this King was inclined to peace with him, "howbeit that giving cause of ... ry that not only he shall not only himself with his subjects ... of his friends, and that the French King should hereafter reckon to deal with them, both with good words and deeds." Heard this morning from the Provost of Cassell that there was never more cordiality between England and this house than now. "Yf your grace yeryd spokynne the glory and prosumpcion of Spany, your grace mygth conyect they have not oonly the cowraggy to kepe Naples and Navarre, but to recowere Bourgoyne." Thinks they will not be at peace with France six months after the King's arrival in Spain. Brussels, 18 March.
Hol., pp. 2.
18 March.
Vit. B. III. 14.
B. M.
1685. _ to CARDINAL DE MEDICIS, legate in Verona.
Writes very short letters at present. The French King has [ordered] the letters to be shown him which were written to Antonio Maria, stating that he and the Pope were on good terms. Thinks the Pope will grant anything to the French King. They say they have gained the whole of the Swiss. They write that Francis will have 28,000 foot in Italy to settle the affair of the King of the Romans. He has in France 18,000 foot, among whom ... lanzknechts and 2,000 lances are reckoned in his pay; and is in no fear of England or the Archduke. Can say nothing of the designs of the army in Italy, but Bo[urbon] has received orders to inform the Pope of their movements daily. Gives the summary of a long letter sent to Antonio Maria [Palvoisin]. They say the King of the Romans has requested for him the government of Naples, and also of Castile, where he intends to send Gurk. The Archduke is making preparations for his departure by sea. Lyons, 18 March 1516.
Ital., pp. 3, very much mutilated, some parts in cipher, not decipherable. Add.
18 March.
R. O.
1686. BOYSY to CARDINAL DE MEDICIS.
Though he knows the Pope will provide all things necessary for Francis in Italy, and that the Cardinal will do all he can, refers him to Palvoisin, the French ambassador with the Pope, to whom the King has written, showing that the French affairs are in more prosperous condition than his enemies desire. Begs him to urge the Pope to take 4,000 Swiss into pay, whereby the King will have 12,000. Lyons, 18 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
19 March.
Harl. 3462, f. 221b.
B. M.
1687. FUNERAL of FERDINAND THE CATHOLIC.
Copy of a letter from Diego de Valdes, servant of Andrea de Burgo, dated Brussels, 19th March 1516, describing the funeral obsequies of Ferdinand in Flanders, celebrated on the 13th and 14th.
Ital., pp. 4.
ii. Extract from a letter of Andreas de Burgo touching the same, dated 18th March 1516. The funeral rites were performed on Thursday and Friday. The triumphal car was hung with the insignia of the kingdoms he had conquered. It was inscribed "Ferdinando Regi, Betico, Parthenopæo, Cantabrico, Africano, Indico, Catholico Invicto." There was a statue on the car of the King in armour holding a sword. On his saddle was a globe with the title "Mors." The car was drawn by four white horses, each with a unicorn's horn gilt in front. Another horse led the way. Another followed carrying the King's crown on a cushion. This was the first day. Next day fourteen horses with the insignia of his kingdoms, each followed by a standard-bearer with the same insignia. Many princes and bishops attended. After the funeral the Prince and his mother Joan were proclaimed "Kings" in the Cathedral. Everything is ready for the King's going into Spain. All is tranquil in that country. These countries have contributed 400,000 philips for the expenses of King Charles.
Lat., copy, p. 1, from a letter book.
19 March.
P. S.
1688. For JOHN BRYKYNDEN jun., of Portysmouth, alias of Beawley, Hants, alias of London.
Protection; going in the retinue of Sir Richard Wyngfeld, Deputy of Calais. Greenwich, 11 March 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 19 March 7 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 19.
20 March.
R. O.
1689. JOHN PECCHE to WOLSEY.
Encloses writings received this day, which, as he told the bringer, he thinks of small effect, excusing the not sending of copies of the old treaties between France and Burgundy, which the writer desired to have at his own cost to send to Wolsey. Wishes to know the King's pleasure. Calais, 20 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add. in Spinelly's hand: My Lord Cardinall's grace. Endd.
20 March.
Galba, B. IV. 42.
B. M.
1690. The BP. OF HELNA to [WOLSEY.]
Has had nothing to write of till now, except that Wolsey's blessing has accompanied him on his way hither, and preserved him safe. The Catholic King has received him most cordially, and shows him as much confidence as his grandfather did. Knows that Wolsey will rejoice in his prosperity. Brussels, 20 March 1516. Signed: Eunensis Episcopus.
Lat., p. 1, mutilated.
20 March.1691. For ELEANOR KNYVET.
Annuity of 10l. Westm., 20 March.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 22.