Henry VIII
April 1516, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1864

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'Henry VIII: April 1516, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2: 1515-1518 (1864), pp. 497-510. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90904 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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April 1516

11 April.
R. O.
1757. SIR ANTH. UGHTRED, captain of Berwick, to WOLSEY.
On Thursday, 10 April, at 10 o'clock before noon, the ambassadors of Scotland came to Berwick, where they remained that night. Their names are the Bp. of Galloway, Monsr. de Plane, the French ambassador, Sir Wm. Scot and an abbot called Ogleby, with 60 followers. The day after their arrival the Lord Chamberlain of Scotland sent him secret intelligence that they dare not refuse any reasonable demand from the King, they are so in dread of his displeasure. This must by no means get abroad, or it may be confusion to the said Lord Chamberlain, with whom, since the beginning of this business, Ughtred has dealt kindly for the King's sake. Berwick, 11 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My Lord Cardinal. Endd.
11 April.
S. B.
1758. For MAURICE APPARRY.
Annuity of ten marks, of the issues of Stannton Lacy, Salop; and two messuages called Barnaby fee, in Bewdeley, Heref., which John Edwardis, deceased, held;—on surrender of so much of patent 2 May 7 Hen. VIII. as relates to the same, held by Maurice Ludlowe, deceased. Del. Westm., 11 April 7 Hen. VIII.
pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 28.
12 April.
Calig. B. III. 32.
B. M.
1759. DACRE to HENRY VIII.
Received on the 1st his letters dated 23rd March, directed to himself and Magnus, by which the King appoints "the gests" of the Queen of Scotland, to commence on the 7th, when Sir Christopher Garnyshe will be ready at Morpeth. He arrived there on the 5th,—the litter and horses not till the afternoon of the 7th. Tuesday, the 8th, she set out, attended by himself, Lord Ogle, Sir Henry Woodrington and others. Was received at Newcastle by Sir Thomas Parr and the mayor. On the 9th removed to Durham. Was there met in a most goodly manner by Lord Lomley and Sir Ranf Bowes the sheriff. Here Dacres returned to be ready for the ambassadors. The Earl of Anguysshe and the Lord Chamberlain, knowing the Queen's resolution to visit her brother, have suddenly gone over to Albany, contrary to their promises made before Dacre and others. On the 1st of the month rode to Etall; on the 2nd and 3rd had a long communication with them, remonstrating upon their disregard to their word. The Queen is in much heaviness at their conduct, but professes her willingness to be guided entirely by Henry. The Bp. of Galloway, Sir Will. Scott, James Ogilby Abbot of Dryburgh, the Scotch ambassadors, with Mons. de Planis, are this day at Morpeth. Dacre demanded and examined their commission. The reason of the delay will appear by Albany's letter enclosed. Sends another of the same, delivered him by the ambassadors. The Bp. of Dunkeld, Angus's uncle, goes with him to speak with the Queen, "as the Holy Trinity knows," &c. Durham, 12 April. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add. and endd.
12 April.1760. For TH. PYGOT and RIC. BROKE, serjeants-at-law, JOHN HERON, ROGER LUPTON, clk., GODFREY TOPPYS and TH. ARTHURE.
Licence to alienate to the House of Jesus of Bethlehem, Shene, possessions to the annual value of 15l. 15s. Westm., 12 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 30.
12 April.
S. B.
1761. For PETER DE BUSTIS and ROLAND DE FRENES, the King's servants.
Licence to retain customs, for five years, to the amount of 1,000l. Del. Westm., 12 April 7 Hen. VIII.
13 April.
R. O.
1762. TOURNAY.
Receipt indented for 13,846 cr. at 4s. 4d. the cr. and in white money 8d.=3,000l. by Lord Mountjoy Lieutenant of Tournay, and Sir Edw. Benstede treasurer to Sir Ric. Jerningham, captain of the Guard. 13 April 7 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1.
14 April.
Giust. Desp. I. 210.
1763. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
News is come that the Emperor is in the suburbs of Milan, with a powerful army, and that the French and Venetians had retreated. Since then have heard that the Emperor, who had advanced as far as Milan, had gone back, and to his great shame crossed the Adda, perceiving the determination of the people to maintain their allegiance to France. The report is not believed in England. None of these tidings produce any stir here. Saw the Bp. of Durham, who apologised for the expression used by the lords. Today Franc. Chieregato, papal prothonotary and nuncio, arrived. He told Sebastian he should have great power with the King and Cardinal as he had brought strong letters from the Pope. He is not here, as many think, to collect Peter's pence; but to negociate public affairs and establish a general peace. Has promised to assist Venice if he is not deprived of the credit of his good offices as he was before. Possibly some of Sebastian's despatches were detained with others at Calais, by command of the King, to see what had been written by the French ambassador, who was strongly suspected of writing to the worst of his knowledge and ability. As all Sebastian's letters were written in cipher, does not think any of his could be intelligible. London, 14 April 1516.
14 April.
Galba, B. IV. 51.
B. M.
1764. PONYNGES and TUNSTAL to [HENRY VIII.]
Received the King's letters on the 10th, dated Eltham, the ... inst. Met the commissioners of the King Catholic, and told them Henry desired the new league to apply to all their master's dominions, but trusted he would be content with the article about rebels, which his grandfather held to be satisfactory;—that none of the King of England's Council could advise him to be at the charge of the 4,000 men demanded. Yesterday, Chievres, the Chancellor and Sempy brought them the King's reply that he was content to renew the amity without alteration, and was satisfied with Henry's reasons for declining the aid. They asked the English commissioners, as they had done before, if they knew Henry's mind touching the prest desired by the Lord Durees: to which they replied they did not, and declined to write to Henry in that behalf. Afterwards, Ponynges reminded Chievres privately, that Henry had lent their master 6,500l. sterling; and though the King had written for its repayment, no answer had been returned. Chievres replied that the letters had not been received: to which Ponynges answered that he had delivered them to Charles himself. Chievres then proposed that bonds should be given for that amount, as well as for the sum now desired.
After this they mentioned that the French King had been sending into Naples messengers to excite the Viceroy and others to rebellion, of whom two had been taken, and their letters intercepted; that they had also made an enterprise upon Navarre, which proved unsuccessful, so that he now gives up his title to that country, but claims at least half of Naples—which the French ambassadors have been all this month very urgent to get their master to acknowledge. The Council replied that if he could establish his right before persons appointed to judge it, a reasonable answer would be returned. A diet was proposed at Cambray, which was objected to by the French as an Imperial town, and Noyon was ultimately agreed to, merely, as they said, to deprive France of an excuse for making war on them till their master arrived in Spain, when he will little esteem "these contrived demands." Cannot tell if this be really all their object in treating with France. Brussels, 14 April. Signed.
Pp. 6, mutilated.
14 April.
Galba, B. VII. 20.
B. M.
1765. SPINKLLY to [HENRY VIII.]
Wrote last on the 7th. No news has come from the Emperor except from Verona by Inspruck. By letters dated Augsburg, the 8th, to Casius, it was stated that the Emperor was continually in the Frenchmen's beards, studying night and day to bring them out of their field. By letters from Verona of the 3rd, it is advertised that the Emperor had cut off the waters of the Novilio of Martesan and the Tesyn, which served the mills at Milan. Thinks that the reason why no letters have come from the Emperor is owing to the ways being straitly watched, and that the Emperor is on the site of Lodi and Pavia. Hears that many posts pass to and fro, and that the French King is more than ever anxious for a truce with the Emperor. They are more courteous to Don Diego than ever before. Francis gives out that the attempt of the King of Navarre for the recovery of his dominions was without his consent. The King's Council has received letters from the Council of Castile, dated 28 March, Madrid, and stating, that on learning the attempt of the King of Navarre they had despatched reinforcements. After their letters were closed they were advertised that the King of Navarre had taken St. John Pied de Port. At Burgos the courier heard of the defeat of Navarre and the French; that the Marshal, the Earl of St. Stephen and others were prisoners; 5,000 men lost. On Spinelly's inquiring as to the truce between France and the Emperor, the Chancellor told him they left that and other matters to him, being anxious only to keep their country in peace. The bark of Davy Fawkener, taken by the Gueldrois, has been sent armed to sea. Loys Gilbert met it. Hearing that certain hoys were preparing for war in Frisland, the Duke of Gueldres sent word to the town of Dort that they must take the consequences, as he was minded to remain at peace. Spinelly thinks it mere dissimulation. Brussels, 14 April. Signed.
Pp. 4.
14 April.
Galba, B.V. 175.
B. M.
1766. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
"The dean of this King ..." has informed him that the abbot of St. [Martin's], Tournay, perceiving the King's determination in the building of the citadel, and losing hope [of the city] returning to French obeisance, sent lately to take counsel of a doctor at Louvain about putting his abbey, "by way of renunciation or coadjutory," into the hands of some Cardinal who would take up his cause. Has sent warning to Mountjoy, and also to the Bp. of Worcester, that the Pope be written to not to suffer the resignation or coadjutory to pass. Is writing to Tuke to remind Wolsey of his brother's affairs and his own. "If any fault hath been in opening the King's letters, it come not of me." For his services here, refers to the report of the ambassadors. Requests to have 20s. a day, like the others. Ponynges knows he spares no expence in the King's service. Chievres and the Chancellor are to take a resolution with the King's ambassadors this afternoon. They have caused Andrew de Burgo to write to the Emperor that all is concluded. Brussels, 14 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Tho. Cardinali Angliæ. Endd.
14 April.
S. B.
1767. FOR JOHN HERON, treasurer of the Chamber, and WM. COWEPER, clk.
Next presentation to the deanery of St. George, Windsor. Del. Westm., 14 April 7 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 26.
14 April.
S. B.
Rym. XIII. 547.
1768. For PHILIP VANDER MERSH.
Licence, at the request of the King of Arragon, to buy cattle, sheep and pigs in England, for victualling certain ships for transporting the said King to Spain. Westm., 14 April 7 Hen. VIII.
ii. Licence to the bearer to buy cattle and sheep in England for the use of the Abbot of St. Bartyn, in the town of St. Omers, Flanders, for victualling the said monastery.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 28.
15 April.
R. O.
1769. LORD DARCY and TH. STRANGWISSHE, master porter of Berwick.
Darcy agrees to pay 68l., which he owes to Strangwisshe, out of the "water farm" of Berwick, which Strangwisshe farms for Darcy, at the rate of 20l. a year. On the dorse, receipts for the payments, signed by Strangwisshe. 15 April 7 Hen. VIII.
P. 1.
15 April.
P. S.
1770. For ROB. ASTELEY of London, mercer.
Exemption from serving on juries, &c. Greenwich, 12 March 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 15 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 26.
15 April.1771. For SIR JOHN BAKER.
Annuity of 40 marks. Westm., 15 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 27.
16 April.
R. O.
1772. CHARLES KING OF CASTILE.
Commission for Wm. de Croy and others to treat with Sir Edw. Ponynges and Dr. Cuthb. Tunstal, for renewal of the peace concluded with Ferdinand of Arragon. Brussels, 16 April 1516. With seal.
Lat.
16 April.
Galba, B. VII. 22.
B. M.
1773. SPINKLLY to [HENRY VIII.]
Wrote on the 14th. Yesterday a post came from Fellynger, stating letters had been received from the Emperor of his intent to "withdraw from his enemies," leaving the Swiss within five miles of Milan. He had advanced and taken Lodi, thence to Buginosa, not doubting to draw his enemies out of their field. Fellynger states the French have nothing but wheat for their horses; and have commanded the suburbs of Porta Toea to be burnt; that George Supersaxon, a Swiss on the French side, has been taken; that the Emperor is well victualled. It is thought the French will not fight, but delay the time, and compel the Emperor to break up his troops for want of money. Suggests that money be sent him.
The President of Paris has left, after concluding that a meeting shall be held between the two countries at Noyon in the ensuing May. April 16. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.
16 April.
R. O.
1774. MAXIMILIAN to WOLSEY.
Received his letter dated 27 March. Has heard already from Wingfield and Pace, Wolsey's devotion to his service. Will never be wanting in anything that may contribute to Wolsey's dignity. Refers him to Wingfield for further information. Terzilas, 16 April 1516, 31 Max. Signed.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. and endd.
16 April.
Vit. B. XIX. 50.
B. M.
1775. SIR ROB. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
[Has received] a packet of letters directed to Pace, who is now in the field with the Swiss near Milan. Considering the urgency of the occasion, and the impossibility of sending the packet to Pace, by the advice of Sion he opened it. Found letters to the Emperor from the King and Wolsey, and one from Wolsey to Sion. Delivered the latter at once. When the Cardinal had read it he judged it right that the letter to Pace should be opened and deciphered. Though they contained no commission to himself, but only to Pace, delivered the letters to the Emperor, who was very thankful. "Howbeit, as to[uching the canses] which I had showed being the occasion that ... salutifyr oygnemente was so long delayed ... [he had] small belief in such excuses, but heartily gl[ad he was] that the King's grace had so gracio[usly]... John Heedynge for ... quickly which was and had been in great peril for default"... As to the overture Wingfield had made touching ... crowns he was very thankful to the King and Wolsey for procuring the same.—Does not communicate the reply made by the Emperor relating to the league to be entered into by the three Princes mentioned in Wolsey's letter, as he was present the day before, when an answer on the same matter and others of importance was made to the Cardinal of Sion, who will no doubt communicate it to them.
Besides Wolsey's letter to "your secretary Mr. Pace" was another also directed to him, which Wingfield opened. It is one of the first he ever opened without consent of the party. Did not wonder when he had deciphered it that there was no letter for [himself] in the packet, "conciderynge that he which I have lovyd and honorde [not only] for youre saake but also for his learn [ing] and the cold. ... (Line lost) ... with a more fervent charity ... at some time advised him to chau[nge] ... hielde for lakke of the expeeryence of thinge ..." He grieves that [Pace] should have so dishonored himself as to [com]plain of him, who has always dealt so fr[iendly with him in] all points. He sends the "said lettyr in ziphirs" with the deciphering ... "which lettyr, or the wryter of the same ... nott but your grace shall knowe by the hande who [wrote it, I know] no moore thanne the man that I nevir saw."
"And wheere in the parte by which he towchith me he ca[lleth me] Grene Somer, veryly, my good lorde, it is longe sythe that I h[ave had] to wryte to such as I was famylier with that somm[er was] grene, which to good interpretours I am sure was ... or constrwid, ner yitt I in my conditions mysestemy [ng] ... because that the residw of matter conteynyd in the say[d lettyr] shall maye apere [unto] youre grace by redynge of the same, in these I wyll [write no] ferther but remytt all to youre moost prwdente c[ounsel] and jugemente." [Has had] to rectify errors in Pace's conceit, which but for himself would have produced the greatest mischief. Can prove by many and great witnesses that if the enterprise fail, it will not be his fault. Notwithstanding the disclosure which he has made, he will always treat Pace as kindly as if he were his own brother. "For I am of such nature and coustom, rather to rejoyce whanne I am ille delte with, and have nott merytid the same, thanne to be grevyd or soory." But for this charity, the "longe erumpne" which he has had to endure in his ambassadorial office would have worn him out, body and life. His health and property have been seriously impaired, as it is. If he is useless, prays to be sent home. "And where provision ... to say 200l. sterling, the entre of which ... last past, so that the same after the ra[te]... last unto the end of July," his charges are so great that it will not suffice. Has written to the King, but nothing "of charge," as he knows Sion is writing to the King and Wolsey. Tomorrow rides towards Trent to prepare for receiving and conducting the "oynement." Prays God it may come in time. "And your grace may [understand] though I am but an easy herald in mine own ac[tions, that it is] no small parell and charge to have ordy[ryd and brought] alle the fyrst oygnement in sawffte by so many [perilous] passages and longe weeye to the dwe place." Dated at the village ... soole, the xvjth day of [Ap]ri[ll].
Hol., pp. 5. Add.: To the Cardenalles grace. Endd.: 16 April.
16 April.
R. O.
1776. JEROME PRUNNE to SIR ROB. WINGFIELD.
Came to Augsburg on 14 April. Found there Master Adrian, chaplain of Cardinal Sion, who was sent on by Wingfield, after the departure of the writer, to procure the pay of the Swiss foot. By the order of the Friscobalds, 8,000 scudi had come to Welser's hands. As soon as Vilinger had received instructions from Adrian he induced James Fucker to add to that sum 20,000 florins, which he now transmits to Trent with Adrian and one of his Swiss. Begs Wingfield to obtain an order from the Emperor that the money be forwarded, "cum scorta secure," to Master Richard (Pace) or the Swiss. Remains at Augsburg, by commission from the Emperor, to ask for money. When he gets it, will lead more Swiss soldiers by Bellinzo[na] into the duchy of Milan. The other money from Wingfield is daily expected; and will be sent to Trent to pay the foot for the third month. Has written now to Nich. Ziegler, who will inform him further. Will not rest till the pay of the Swiss is fully in the hands of Wingfield or Pace. He shall shortly hear from him again. Further acquittances must be sent to the writer or the treasurer, or a full mandate to quit all the merchants who account to Wingfield, as Adrian has more at large signified to the Cardinal. Augsburg, 16 April'16.
Hol., Lat., p. 1. Add.: Magnifico, &c., Roberto Wingifield, &c.
16 April.
S. B.
1777. FOR JOHN CROSSEWELL, of Odyam, Hants, clothier.
Protection; going in the retinne of Sir Ric. Wingfeld, Deputy of Calais. Eltham, 14 April 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm, 16 April.
Fr. 7 Hen. VIII. m. 16.
17 April.1778. FOR TH. PIGOT, RIC. BROKK, JOHN HKRON, ROGER LUTTON, clk., GODFREY TOPPYS, and TH. ARTHURK.
Mortmain licence to alienate to the House of Jesus of Bethlehem, Shene, the manor of Portepole and lands in St. Andrew's Holborn, and the advowson of the chantry pertaining to the said manor, Middx., escheated by the death of Rob. Chigwell without heir; to be held to the annual value of 10 marks, 3s. 4d. Westm., 17 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 30.
18 April.
R. O.
1779. ALBANY to DACRE.
After answering his letter brought by Unicorn last night, this afternoon Carrick arrived with Dacre's answer to the letter he took to him about an intended raid of Dacre's. Dacre says he had apprised Albany, by letters of the 23rd March, sent by Wm. Hadrington his servant, and by others of 9th April, that he did not consider himself bound to abstain from invasion if the King commanded him to the contrary. Reminds Dacre that he was the first to propose an abstinence till the coming of Albany's secretary, John de Barbon. Albany had agreed to it, though he knew the English borders were not well defended. Hears, moreover, that his said secretary has been taken by Englishmen at sea between Calais and Dover. If this be so it is right strange, yet he would rather suffer such injuries himself than have them done to others. Has news from France, some of which came by the West Sea in four days, that his secretary "had his expedition ready to come his way." Dacre's own letters disprove his allegation that "nothing was accept by the Cardinal or you." He will understand this by other letters more at length. Writes no more till he hears of his secretary's coming, or knows of his capture. Edinburgh, 18 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
18 April.
Calig. E. II. 96.
B. M.
1780. JERNINGHAM to [WOLSEY].
Received his letters, dated Westminster the x ... April, commanding him to send a large carriage mulett. Has despatched a servant to Brussels to recover the same. Dr. Sampson has delivered him 350l. towards the expences of the 100 laborers. Would rather take his journey to Jerusalem than be treasurer in such a company. Is exposed to many pains and evil reports; all the delay in payment is attributed to him. Victuals cannot be had without ready money. The King's works have been much delayed since the departure of Wm. Pawne. Sends a bill of the charges. Two of his spies that have been taken prisoners have escaped, one with my Lord Nasso's band, the other with the Duke of Cleves'. "The black band" has departed; 3,000 are gone to the land of Freys. Those that were slain were greatly against the w ... the Bp. of Cologne, the Duke of Cleves, Mons. de Nas[sau]... "for it was done by the peasants"... Has sent unto Master Marney the ... of the yeomen of the guard. Wishes to know the King's pleasure in the matter. Tournay, 18 April.
Hol., mutilated, pp. 4.
18 April.
Vit. B. XIX. 52*.
B. M.
1781. MAXIMILIAN to [HENRY VIII.]
The news conveyed to him by their mutual friend, the Cardinal of Sion, was very acceptable. Has replied on all points to Sion, from whose letters the King will learn his answer. Ex Valle Solis, 18 April 1516.
Hol., Lat., p. 1, mutilated.
18 April.
Galba, B. VI. 18.
B. M.
1782. SPINELLY to HENRY VIII.
Wrote last on the 16th. Heard this morning from Chievres that the Duke of Gueldres had entered Friesland with 2,500 foot, pretending that it was only against the Earl of Owerende, an ally of the King Catholic. Isselstein is therefore commanded to retain a certain number of foot. The French King is bent on interfering with the King Catholic's going to Spain. His ambassador in Gelderland is gone home. This King has promised the Swiss 45,000 ducats, which the late King of Arragon owed them. He is determined to do as much as he can for the Emperor. It is hoped the Emperor has re-crossed the Adda and joined the Swiss, but the latest letters are of the 5th. Has already written that the meeting at Noyon, between the Commissioners of this King and of France, is to be in the beginning of May. There will be Boysy and the Bp. of Paris, or the Chancellor of France, on one side; Chievres and the Chancellor on the other. Hopes the King will confirm the new treaty on Sunday, and that the ambassadors will have their despatch next day. Brussels, 18 April.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. and endd.
18 April.
R. O.
1783. SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Has written to the King, whom Sir Rob. Wingfield will advertise of German news. Leonard Friscobaldi is gone to Germany. The Archduchess is much displeased, as he has not kept his promise, and put the Emperor's enterprise in great peril, fearing some evil may arise before her steward Edyn comes to his majesty. Alamyre and Hans Nagle have returned from Messer Richard De la Pool, who came back from the French King two days before their arrival. Will send by next post Alamyre's memorial of their information. Dondego (Don Diego) has likewise written of De la Pole's being at the French court. Bruxelles, 18 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Tho. Card. Angliæ. Endd.
19 April.
R. O.
1784. HENRY VIII. and CHARLES KING OF CASTILE.
Treaty of peace concluded by William Lord Chievres, John de Sanvage, and Michael de Croy on one side, and Edward Ponynges and Dr. Tunstal on the other.
The seals of Chievres, De Sauvage, and De Croy are appended. Heads of the treaty printed in the Materials for the Foedera, p. 119.
Add. Chart. 1519.
B. M.
R. O.
2. English counterpart of the same. With seals.
3. i. "Tractatus amicitiæ inter Henrieum Regem Angliæ et Carolum Hispaniarum Regem." Dated Brussels, 19 April 1516.
ii. Confirmation of the same by Charles in his own behalf and that of Johanna Queen of Castile, and by Sir Edw. Ponynges and Dr. Tunstal on behalf of the King of England.
Draft headed by Tunstal.
Vesp. C. VII. 23.
B. M.
4. His oath to the same. Signed.
19 April.
Vit. B. III. 25.
B. M.
1785. [FRANCESCO SFORZA DUKE OF BARI] to HENRY VIII.
Has hitherto no opportunity of writing to the King until the arrival of Wingfield at Trent from the Emperor. Hopes the King will be successful in his restoration, for which the writer will be eternally grateful. Trent, 19 April. 1516. Signature burnt off.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
19 April.
Vit. B. XIX. 53.
B. M.
1786. [FRANCESCO SFORZA DUKE OF BARI] to WOLSEY.
... "non esset inspectura literas quas scribo ad regiam majestatem ... mearum tarditatem, quam non negligentia sed distantia ... regiisque oratoribus causata est. Et nunc primum nac [ta opportunitate] in Angliam mittendi, cum in hanc regionem venerat Magnificus ... alter regius orator, nam vir præstans atque eruditus d. R[icardus secretarius] vester a bellicis rebus non abscedit." Expresses great gratitude for Wolsey's kindness, and promises that, if ever he should be restored to his paternal duchy [of Milan] "ita ser ... suæ majestatis, sicut servat Cantium et Nortumbria, cæteræque ejus [regni] provinciæ." Trent, 19 April.
Dated in margin in a modern hand: Trident. Card. Sedunens. 19 April 1516.
Add.: Rmo, &c. T. Cardinali Eboracensi D. meo collendissimo.
19 April.1787. For JOHN ALLKRCOTE, husbandman.
Pardon for having killed John Pygot of Dunster, Somerset, in self-defence, 31 Aug. Westm., 19 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 27.
20 April.
Vit. B. III. 24.
B. M.
1788. HENRY VIII. to the POPE.
Begs he will not delay chosing those methods of security [which] the King has proposed to him. Refers him to Worcester. Ex prætorio nostro Eltan, 20 April 1516. Signed.
Let., p. 1, badly mutilated. Add.
20 April.
Giust. Desp. I. 214.
1789. SEB. GIUSTINIAN to the COUNCIL OF TEN.
The King and nobles here are receiving nothing but false news, and consider it certain that the Emperor is powerful in the Milanese, and the French have retreated. Does not choose to dispute with them. Visited the Cardinal, "as all really depends upon him." He said he regretted pending hostilities, and the Venetians ought to use their best offices to prevent it. Sebastian said he could not suppose that the French King would refuse to concur in what was just, as no one could be a greater obstacle to his progress than the King of England. The Cardinal seemed anxious for an arrangement, and that the Signory should interpose. London, 20 April 1516.
20 April.
R. O.
1790. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD to WOLSEY.
Has received two letters from the King, one dated Greenwich, 25 March, the other 13th ult., directing that Th. Tatte and Ralph Browke should have six men in petty wages. Thinks it objectionable. Has written a letter to the King to that effect. Encloses a copy. Solicits the reimbursement of such sums of money as he has laid out by the King's command. Recommends his suit to Wolsey. Calais, 20 April. Signed.
Begs credence for the bearer.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Cardinal of York and C[ha]ncellor of England.
R. O.ii. Enclosures referred to above. The bearer is Barth. Tate.
20 April.
Vesp. F. III. 42.
B. M.
1791. CHARLES [KING] OF CASTILE to HENRY VIII.
At the Emperor's desire is willing to take the oath of confirmation to the treaty between the Emperor, Henry, and himself, with the exception of the words, "emolumenta et proventus." Malines, 20 April.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
20 April.
R. O.
1792. SION to SIR ROB. WINGFIELD.
The Master of the Posts, the bearer, came today from Trent, and brought the ducats, according to the schedule inclosed in Wingfield's letters. Has received three letters from Wingfield, lamenting his not having heard from Augsburg or from dominus Adrian, stating also that he had received one from Sion full of good news, and sending a packet for Master Richard (Pace) "et similiter de la obviata; et hever del Sor Duca de Bari datte noticia, et chomo quella dona Barbara (?) non ha fatta, sed altri hano servitj de quelli dinari." Sion answered briefly. Hopes Wingfield has heard how 32,000 Rhenish florins were sent from Augsburg, part of which had been imprested by the Welsers, part by James Fuckar. This was Adrian's doing. Gurk and Filinger have been very diligent. Yesterday received from Adrian letters for himself and for Melchior and Barth. Tizone, the Emperor's ambassador. There is an advertisement that if you require more money to be remitted from Flanders or England, Fugkar is disposed to assist without loss of time. Frischobald's delay of Fieschi (questo Freschobaldo ce fa stare Fieschi) places them in peril, and they will lose 100,000 ducats. Adrian has arrived with the resolution about the money brought by the Fugkars, who ask for a receipt signed by Wingfield and Pace. Sion has sent the receipt for Pace to sign. Yester- day received a letter from Jas. Bannisius by Francis de Taxis, mentioning the victory of Navarre by Spinoli over the French, and stating that tomorrow Baptista (Pabsta nostro) departs with 90,000 gold crowns of the sun obtained from England. [His] letters are dated Brussels the 10th inst; he will arrive here within eight days. Has sent the letter to comfort the Swiss, and urge them to proceed, hearing the Spaniards have done their duty in Navarra."
The whole army has returned from Loddi to Martinengho. The French took and sacked Loddi. They have made a bridge across the Adda towards Bergamo. The Swiss say they will do nothing without money. Time must not be lost. Sion has twice assured them of the money. Those in Bressa have divided the money and taken the keys (ziaue) of the city. The governor and "potone" have retired into Rogka. The soldiers have ordered those in the tower (de la Torra) to provide their entire pay, or they will sack or sell it as God prompts them. 300 Spaniards and 50 Almains have returned the money to the governor, not wishing to be participators in the treason (tratto). Some wished to kill them, but they took refuge in the castle. "He datto ordine che una pars exercitus li se ponat versus Brissiam propinquius, et hine inde alii; ad zio (cio) sia provisto ad tall periculo, anchora quelli del campo ponerano remedio." They had heard of the coming of the Swiss. The Swiss have departed from the Adda to meet with the money; they do their best to prevent the dissolution of the army.
The Emperor has written to Wingfield. The Fuckars and those who bring the money will be in Numarck tomorrow; and because the journey to Trent would take too long a time, "erunt in hospicio coronæ." The Emperor wishes Wingfield to go there tomorrow, and bring them and the money hither. Wingfield can cause his horses to come hither from Trent. Sion retains the 2,000 Rhenish florins till more money arrive. Writes to Pace. Male, 20 April 1516. Signed.
Wingfield can send the two enclosures to England.
Hol., mongrel Ital. and Lat., pp. 2. Add.
20 April.
Calig. E. III. 116.
B. M.
1793. FRANCIS I to MONS. DE LA [FAYETTE], Captain of Boulogne, and MONS LE PRESIDENT [BAP]AUSMES, his ambassador in England
* * * "... les cousins de ... stat audit traicte. Et en y allant ... [auc]uns petitz lieux en la ville de Bergamo ... argent, pour ce quil en estoit mal garny. Mais ... ledit Empereur dune entreprinse que mon cousin ... [Mons.] de Lautrec avoit sur luy sest advance daller ... pays sans faire long sejour jusques audit ... lieu de la grant crainte quil a eu ny a guere[s] ... incontinent a tire oultre la dite ville et tous ses ... quil avoit amenez en Ytallye sont retournex apres 1[ui]." The Swiss likewise ... remained at Lodi. They were so ill led that they were shut up in the town and suffered greatly from hunger, and had to make a sally in great force to obtain provisions; but when they ventured out they were defeated by the French men of war and light horse. They crossed the Adda in great disorder, retiring into their own country, but a considerable number died of famine, and many were slain. The money given them by the Emperor has been altogether thrown away. It has, however, been of service to Francis in the preservation of his estates; for he had not more than 14,000 or 15,000 foot there, to oppose the Emperor. [Here a passage is unintelligible from mutilation.]
"Javoye fait lever par ... ballier en mon royaume 12,000 hommes de pye ... gros nombre de lansquenetz pour les mener ... cousin le connestable, pour le reinfort de ... et ja estoient es comfins de l'Ytallie, mais i[ls sont prets a] retourner en mon dit royaume, pour men servir et ay[der, si] laffaire le requerra." Desires him to show this to the King of England, who, he is sure, will rejoice at his success. Coullumbier, 20 April.
P.S.—If they are on their return homewards, are to give the news to ... to be conveyed to the King of England. Colombier, 20 April.
Signed: Fra[ncois].
Fr., copy, pp. 3, mutilated. Endd.: "[Doub]le des lettres que le Roy [a escript] a Mons. de la [Fayette], cappitaine de Boullogne, [et] Mons. le President [Bap]ausmes, son ambassador en Angleterre."
20 April.
Vit. B. III. 21.
B. M.
1794. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER to AMMONIUS.
Has no news except that he is in despair of the management of this affair. [Hadrian] regards him with the white of his eyes, and always [insults him] to his face. Has had no news, except by way of Bruges. Of all the letters which have arrived none have come for him "(chel diavolo sia in ano)" but by the ordinary [messenger?]. Of those that Ammonius has written, that from the Master of the Posts of Flanders is wanting. The ambassador from the Prince, first sent by the late King Catholic [remains] for the present. Wise and prudent as they are, they do not send the letters but by Mantua in the middle of the night, by a messenger on foot with certain peasants, through the shortest mountain passes. But Worcester's party, kept without intelligence from want of activity, lose reputation. Sends the letters for the Prince's court, to the English ambassadors, to be forwarded. Thinks they will be well received, "ma jo [non posso] a niuno modo posare ne maggiore nebero ... una fantasma."
Has written five or six times since his return from Florence, but received no letters from ... Letters have been delayed at Mantua more than once ... not being able to pass safely; and in consequence of the Emperor's retreat, the French and the Venetian cavalry scour the whole of Lombardy. Pace has been urgent with him for two months to induce [Ev] angelita to lend 40,000 or 50,000 florins: but [Ev]angelita has not a groat and cannot get one. "[Sel S.] Campucci havesse pure il quarto ingegno che anon ... lui bene havere trovato lui uni (?) il modo di mandar qual[che] lettere per via di Bruggia; e per la bella noza Franccia ... in so mã non e homo da simile cose." [Has had] a letter from Polydore of 29th March. "Non so ... are che quando io mi lamento di S. Campucci che io ... [n]on vistolo tanto adormentato che ogni schal ... passare qualche lettere da lui in fuora." This "ribaldo" Hadrian does not cease speaking evil things of him; and no man is a greater enemy of England. "Tamen io nonllo posso perva ... ami(?) Cardinale ogni homo cia in simili cose m ... [re]spetto per che non vi si puo sinon perdere et dubit ... assai chel papa spesse volte le dia qualche fede ... jura et scongiura come un giudeo." Does not know how to send the gold ring (anno) of the Cardinal, given him by Galeazzo. Rome, 20 April 15 ... (fn. 1)
Hol., Ital., pp. 3. Add.: Rev. D. Andreæ Ammonio Regis Angliæ a Latinis secretario [et S. D.] N. collectori. Endd.
R. O.1795. CROWN LANDS.
Roll of the lands assigned by the King to, and recovered from the King by, divers persons from 20 April 1 Hen. VIII. to Mich. 7 Hen. VIII, "quibus de causis minus ad eofuras dicti domini Regis nunc Henrici VIII. hoc anno regni sui vijmo quam in anno xxiiijto nuper Regis Henrici VIImi."
20 April.1796. For ROB. NORTON, yeoman of the Guard.
Wardship of Peter Graunte an idiot, heir of Rob. Graunte of Launsyng, Sussex. Westm., 20 April.
Pat. 7 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 29.

Footnotes

1 This document is so much mutilated, and the handwriting so extremely difficult, that I am by no means sure of the sense of it.