Henry VIII
May 1516, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1864

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'Henry VIII: May 1516, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 2: 1515-1518 (1864), pp. 537-556. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=90907 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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May 1516

11 May.
Vit. B. XIX. 60.
B. M.
1871. [SIR ROB. WINGFIELD] to HENRY VIII.
Wrote last from the town of Arke on the ... transmitting [intelligence] from the Cardinal of Sion and Master ... "[The] day after Mes. Hesdynge and Leonard Friscobald [came to the town] of Ryve, where the Emperor lay, and forthwith we [sent a servant of] the said Leonard's to the army with 32,000 crowns." On the 7th the Emperor sent him, Hesdin, and Friscobald to the army, to consult with the Cardinal and Master Pace. That night the Swiss were paid in "largest manner, so that it was hoped they would have remained firmly another [month], which should begin the 15th of this month." But early next morning 3,000 of them left, so that there remained little more than 3,000, which compelled the army to depart early in the morning, "when they passed ten mi[les] from the town of Piskayre." Would fain have gone with them, for the wind was so contrary that he could not return by w[ater]. On coming to the said town, the remaining Swiss said they would depart next [morning], which they did on obtaining safe conducts through the Emperor's country. Wingfield accompanied them for twenty miles, and afterwards went towards Ryve with the said [Hesdin] and Leonard Friscobald, who were both afraid to go by water, "by mean of great ... by land, doubting the stradiottis. Howbeit th[ey] ... could in no wise reach the said town of [Ryve] ... day in the morning the Emperor was departed towards this city and left orders ...
Transmits a letter he has received from the said Cardinal touching the Emperor's affairs, which are surely in very great peril. Undertakes, with the consent of Pace, to make it appear that the enterprize "shall not be so pernicious to your most worthy father, which hath not only ventured his life in the same ... as now appeareth to many, nor yet to you his son, so displeasant as many would." Hopes his services will be taken in good part, considering the greatness of the crisis, and that his joint commission with Pace "is in manner buried till it may revive." Hopes to give more full information in his next. If he has misconducted himself, is willing to suffer for it. Written at ..., 11 May 1516.
Hol., pp. 3, mutilated. Add. and endd.
11 May.
Vit. B. III. 30.
B. M.
1872. FRANCESCO SFORZA DUKE OF BARI to HENRY VIII.
Is grieved to hear of the ill successes in Italy, as much for the King's sake as his own. Trent, 11 May.
Hol., Lat., p. 1, mutilated. Add.
11 May.
Vit. B. XIX. 68*.
B. M.
1873. FRANCESCO [SFORZA DUKE OF BARI] to WOLSEY.
Laments the ill success of affairs in Italy. Thinks that matters can be remedied only by Hen. VIII. Trent, 11 May 1516. Signature mutilated.
P. 1, mutilated. Add.: Reverendissimo, &c. Cardinali Eboracensi. Endd.: Dux Barry, xj. Maij.
11 May.
Vit. B. III. 31.
B. M.
1874. HADRIAN CARDINAL ST. CHRYSOGON to WOLSEY.
Understands by the letters of Chierigati, the Apostolic nuncio, of Wolsey's friendship to him, now that he has discovered the falsehood of his maligners. After his departure from Milan the Emperor crossed the Adda, and is now in the Trentine mountains with Sion, waiting for the pay for the Swiss. Letters came on the 29th April that a large sum of money had reached the castle of G ..., where the Emperor would shortly be. This day the rumor is denied. The Swiss have taken their guns to Brescia, and are going to Verona. If their pay does not come, they will leave tomorrow, and the French will command Italy. Many false rumors are told, and letters intercepted. Peace prevails in Naples. The Sicilians say they will not have anything to do with the Spaniards (?); they have, however, ... themselves to the King Catholic. Pirates swarm from Taracina to Pisa. A fleet of them lately attacked the port of Corneto, and then took post at Mount Argentario near Corneto, where the writer was born. They consist of Turks and Moors from Africa. Rome, 11 May.
Hol., Lat., pp. 2. Add.
11 May.
R. O.
1875. NEWS.
Extract "ex literis secretarii illius amici," dated Mechlin, the 11th inst.
Is to tell Count Ticionus secretly that the writer is sorry to see his majesty's affairs managed so badly, and in his judgment the English ambassadors do not treat matters skilfully with the Emperor. If some remedy be not found, fears the result. The Emperor is well inclined to the King. Begs his recommendations to the King and Cardinal of York. Hopes they will not listen to any ill reports against him. Headed: "ii."
Lat., p. 1.
12 May.
Vit. B. III. 210.
B. M.
1876. EXTRACTS from the BP. OF WORCESTER'S LETTERS, [xij.] May.
Sends the bull of safeconduct for the Council, published in the last sessions but not yet printed. Defers sending the other bull, for the reformation of Italy, till next post. The Council must send a fitting mandate of adherence to the Lateran Council, which the Pope understands was done long since, and is surprised was never exhibited. Supposes Wolsey was offended because in the said mandate he was simply called "orator." Insists on the difference between the dignities of "orator" and "cardinal" in the Roman ceremonial. Thinks he was right in refusing. Advises the appointment should not be given to any Cardinal. Some proctor must be appointed for the English clergy. If what he wrote in cipher be concluded, the Pope will expect a splendid embassy, such as befits a prince who has gained a victory over two kings. Poland and Portugal have both sent splendid missions. In the train of Portugal there are forty collars (torquati). Money must be sent two months beforehand to find proper lodgings. The Emperor is very anxious to have Cardinal Gurck appointed legate for Germany. The Consistory will not consent, urging the dissensions which will arise. Gurk has left in great dudgeon. He told the writer that he was unpopular for having advised the Emperor to make terms with France, which he stoutly denies.
Lat., pp. 2, mutilated.
12 May.
R. O.
1877. PACE to WOLSEY.
Wrote three letters from the city of Lodi of the Emperor's sudden and wilful departure from Milan, which he might have taken had he stayed two days. He has left the Swiss at Lodi till he return with a greater army and more ammunition, none of which he left with the Swiss. As he does not keep his word, and his soldiers in Brixia have intercepted 25,000 florins of the King's money, they have gone to Bergamo. News came that the Cardinal of Sion had been sent as the Emperor's lieutenant, and was bringing the money; at which the Swiss were so much delighted they ran to Pace's house saying they would fight the French without the Emperor. The Cardinal brought only 21,000 florins; at which they murmured, saying they were deceived. The French, hearing that 7,000 or 8,000 had left, drew near to Bergamo with the Venetians, compelling Pace and others to evacuate. The Swiss prepared to fight. Killed several Frenchmen with our artillery; the rest fled. There was no pursuit for want of cavalry. The Swiss advanced to Bixausane, where Sion, the Count Cariate and Pace were put in prison, charged with deceiving them. Sion was in great danger of his life. The same night a messenger arrived with [3]2,000 florins, when they were all delivered. Next day came Leonarde Friscobalde with sufficient pay for three months.
Galeazzo could not leave Brescia on account of the Venetians, but got away by night. Went down to the Lake di Garda, and came to Pace by water. Hears the Emperor will not join them any more. The Swiss cannot prosecute the war without him, but promise they won't join the French. The Emperor is now in the field with only a small force sent to defend Verona and Brixia. Wrote to Wolsey from Bergamo, who will be glad to hear of the arrival of his four letters. Hears they are intercepted, as throwing the blame on the Emperor. He is so degraded, it signifies not whether he is a friend or enemy; as Pope Julius said of him, "Imperator est levis et inconstans, alienæ pecuniæ semper mendicus quam male consumit in venandis camuciis, et tamen conciliandus nomie diaboli et pecunia ei semper est danda." As Lord Galeazzo writes at this time in ciphers, to be declared by Mr. Anchises, does not repeat what he wrote from Bergamo. Received yesterday his letters of 22nd April, with a copy of the King's and Wolsey's to the Emperor and Sion. Sir Rob. Wingfield delivered it. Trent, 12 May.
P.S.—The Emperor was never driven back by the French army, as Wolsey has heard, but retreated voluntarily and shamefully. The French never dared cope with the Swiss.
Hol., pp. 11. The two last leaves found apart in different places: the address attached to a wrong letter. Add.: Tho. Card. Ebor. Endd.
12 May.
Vit. B. XIX. 63.
B. M.
1878. [PACE to WOLSEY.]
There was lately shewed him a proposal from the Emperor to make the King his adopted son, and give him the [duchy] of Milan. Thinks the offer a delusive one; for, however friendly the Emperor might be, it is hard to see how the whole empire would consent to it, "or suffre thys dignities to be [de]latidde owte off this nation." The name of the Emperor is all the glory of Almayn; and if the King should accept the honour, there might grow dissension between his grace and ... Admires the Emperor's purpose to leave it to one more worthy to [have] it than himself. Thinks, though the Emperor may give investiture of the duchy of Milan to the right heir, he cannot take it from him lawfully. It would cost the King more to keep it than it was worth, for the people would never be content except with a Duke of the house of Sforza. It would, therefore, be better for the King to put in the right heir. The Cardinal of Sion wishes to put aside the Duke, fearing he would not treat him well; whereas Pace knows that he would deal with him as the King and Wolsey should command him. Has learned since coming hither not to trust the Emperor's promises. Has come to Trent to meet the Emperor this day by his desire, who has declared to him that he will never desert the King, and has never practised with France. Nevertheless, one of the Emperor's secretaries has informed him that the Pope's ambassador here has proposed a peace between the Emperor and the French King. The former replied that he could make peace when he pleased without the Pope's intervention, and that if he did it would be to his holiness's destruction. Whether this answer be good or evil, leaves to Wolsey's consideration. Trent, 12 May.
Hol., pp. 4.
12 May.
R. O.
1879. PACE to WOLSEY.
The bearer arrived according to Hesdyn's arrangement, but too late. He offered 100,000 marks to renew the enterprise, and had made provision already of 150,000 fl. in Augsburg. Will meddle with no such things without Wolsey's commission. Knows no other that could have made such an offer to any sovereign. Has given him a memorial for Wolsey. Highly recommends him for his confidence and liberality. Trent, May 12.
P.S.—The bearer can show the order and receipt of the King's money. Mr. Leonard Friscobald sent his servant post with Pace's letters of the 12th promising to be with Wolsey in two or three days.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: Rvo, &c. Thomaæ Stæ. Ceciliæ, &c.
12 May.
R. O.
1880. PACE to WOLSEY.
Whatever letters he may receive from the Emperor or others, none are to be trusted except the Lord Galeas. The French have borrowed 200,000 francs brought by the general of Normandy into Milan. The Swiss have taken leave of him. Incloses their letter for the King. Trent, 12 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
May.
Vit. B. XIX. 62.
B. M.
1881. [The SWISS CAPTAINS] to HENRY VIII.
..."Causam discessus nostri a ...D. Galeas vicecomes dux simul et pater n... Paceus majestatis vestræ apud nos orator q...majestati vestræ relinquimus. Nos tantum invictis[sima]...dicemus eam nobis in omnibus promissis suis liberalissim..." They are always ready. faithfully to serve the King in order to relieve their country from the perfidious intrigues (tractatus) of the French. Trent,... May '16.
Hol., Lat., p.1, mutilated. Add.: Christianissimo atque invictissimo Angliæ et Franciæ Regi, domino nobis colendissimo.
12 May.
S. B.
1882. For CUTHBERT TUNSTALL, LL.D.
To be Master of the Rolls, with the house of converts annexed, and a cask or two pipes of Gascon wine annually. Del. Westm., 12 May 8 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 2.
12 May.
Pirk, Epist. XXX. 22.
1883. ERASMUS to BILIBALD PIRCKHEIMER.
Is preparing for his journey. The New Testament is finished at last. St. Jerome is rapidly approaching completion. Is now printing his treatise, De Institutione Principis. Basle, postridie Pentecostes, 1516.
13 May.
Vit. B. XIX. 65.
B. M.
1884. [SIR ROB. WINGFIELD] to HENRY VIII.
Wrote from Treut the ... of this month, "and with the same a lettyr ... silffe daye from the Cardenall Sedun directed to ... [bearing] daate at Veroone the Xth of the same, which and the ... comprysid in the same was of soo greett importance ... perceeyvynge that my trust is, thoow the sayde Carden[all's writing] is much dificill to be redde, youre highnesse and counc[il] hath used diligence to perceyve and pyke owght the pith ... in such wise, that I, which have nott hethirto ben promp[t] or redy to accuse, neede in thoose matters to wryte moore ampy[lly]." For though Wingfield knows as much of the King's affairs as others, yet, as the charge has been committed to them, he will remit the answer to them. Doubts not that the King will be satisfied with him, considering that the charge entrusted to him (now more than six years ago) was chiefly to break the alliance which then existed between the Emperor and the French King Lewis; to repair the breach between the Emperor, Pope Julius, and the Catholic King, and to conserve the amity between the Emperor and Hen. VIII.; all of which has been brought about, "I beinge the only instrumente in the ... to wyrke and conveeye the same; and the fy[rst] ... that is to saye the dysolvinge of amyte ... nott only ben much vigilant and cawte but also usyd my witt and power to kepe theym dissevyrd and to conserve the amytie of such as were in my charge." Owing to his services, the friendship of the Emperor with France, and that between France and the Catholic King hang upon the will of Henry VIII. He therefore prays the King's protection against those who desire to "greve and hyndyr" him. * * * "And because that, as I esteme Mastir Pace... mastyr much ampylly afftyr his manner I in myn ... advyse youre highnesse what I have don ..."
Of the sums of money sent to these parts for the p[ayment of] "or rather traffick with" the Swiss, has consented at different times to apply part in such things. as have seemed to others, less perfectly informed than himself, to be the Emperor's proper affairs; but which he knew to be "perfectly commune" to both him and Henry VIII. But, supposing the Emperor's affairs and the King's were "particular and separate," it should be remembered that the Emperor has helped the enterprise in times of need with his own mon[ey] as far as he could. For example, the money purveyed for the payment of the Almayns and Spaniards he caused to be de[livered] to Pace for the Swiss; which has caused the Almayns and Spaniards such indignation that now at the departing of the Swiss they would have all abandoned the Emperor, had not the Card. Sion promised payment to them out of the residue of the King's money. The good Cardinal remains at Verona as pledge, to redeem whom, and to show that the King is unwilling that the Emperor shall lose Brescia and Verona [in] default of his help, he has "nott oonly consentid to delyver alle the sum [that remay]nyth in the subvention of the arme ... hooly at this daye reducte in to Veroone ... but, at the advice of the Cardinal, order has been given in the King's name to provide 60,000 fl. "of the Ryn" to enable the Emperor to reinforce his army and take the field again. Though the Emperor's affairs in Italy are in as great peril as Wingfield ever knew them, yet the enemy will be in worse if the Emperor's army be reinforced; for they both suffer want of money, and fear Henry's invasion of France; a very slight rumour of which will suffice to make them withdraw from Italy; and if this happen, money enough could soon be found to provide an army to pursue them, and to remain some months.
Touching the said "ordonnance" given by himself and Pace to "the said" Leonard [Friscobald] without authority from the King, Leonard has obtained an obligation from the Emperor and others for the repayment of the "said sum." When Leonard sends in his account, will inform the King of the amount delivered to the Emperor above the 20,000 crowns given him by Henry VIII. The causes which have brought the enterprise into such peril are—
(1.) Though the Emperor had kept his ambassador four years with the Swiss to restrain them from joining with France, and Pace the King's ambassador has been with them for the same purpose, "surely in ... hadd not ben for shame, to witt so many greet offyrs maade... themperor and you, in which thoow they hadd noo grett hoope yitt they dyd cumulate... Emperour, which they knew well was ... trustynge that yiff he grauntyd to the same... a good occasion to leve hym and joyne with France ... the thingis grauntid, for well they knew that it... his ease to performe theeym, in which theey had nott ben... yiff at the poynte the sayde grauntis had nott ben performed [with] youre money," as will appear by Pace's account. At last when they saw they had no occasion to leave the Emperor they suddenly determined to serve hi[m]; "for as touching your highness they would scantly believe that [the] matter was of effect, considering that the French being amongst them preached continually of the entire and faithfully amity that is betwixt their King and you." Numbers of captains came, offering to seal indentures and bring footmen, but according to their own laws and without diminution. They also insisted, that the Emperor should go in [person] with them, and thinking there would not be enough money for the second month of their pay they must needs go to Italy by such a circuit that the first month would be ended before they arrived there and return ... the same if they were not "putt in certeynte" by a payment on account of the second month before the first should have expired. "Which was proved in deed; for where the first month be[gan] the 15th day of February, and they arrived in this city the second d[ay] of March, from whence the captains would not depart till they had distributed amongst them four or five... and the 9th day they would not pass the river of ... [till] they had received 4,000 florins." At last, after being ... paid, four thousand of them left within three days' journey of Milan, four or five days after the remainder followed, having received full payment for the third month, which does not expire until the 15th of the present month.
He attributes the ruin of the enterprise to want of money and gunpowder. The expense to the Emperor of maintaining a war for nine years as Archduke of Austria against the Venetians, and this year against the Venetians and French united, was insupportable. The season was also unfavorable. He took no artillery but field-pieces for want of beasts and powder. The Viceroy of Naples did him great injury by carrying off the bridge that remained at Verona, and all the gunpowder. Now, however, the enterprise seems more likely to do well than when he began to write, for the Emperor has sent to tell him that 400 spears are on their way to him from Naples, paid for four months. Trent, [13] May 1516.
Hol., pp. 7, mutilated. Add. Endd.: Sr Robt. Wyngfild, xiij. May.
May.
Vit. B. III. 32.
B. M.
1885. The WAR in ITALY.
"The copy of ... which came from Trent, and the which servant ... from the beginning to the ending, and departed ... day of this present month of May."
The Emperor had never more than 15,000 Swiss, ... "Hans knyghts" and 2,500 horse. The French and Venetians challenged him, but on his coming retreated to Milan. On Easter Eve he left Caravassa for Arivolta on the Adda, the French and Venetians being posted on the other side, who had cut the river to prevent any bridge being made. The French fled on his crossing, and drew back to Milan, where they were refused admission. They then fled to the castle, the Venetians being compelled to remain in the garden. Next day the Emperor went to Fontenello, stayed there two days; when he received an invitation to dinner from the Duke [of Bourbon]. Knowing his cracks and boasts, the Emperor sent him no answer. The Duke sent another messenger, asking him why he did not come,—that he would come and breakfast with the Emperor tomorrow. On this, being the third day of Easter, the Emperor set forth. The Swiss entered at Porto Rencia. The Emperor was on foot with a moris pike in his hand. He then sent to the Duke, saying he would come to sup with him, and told him to come out; but the Duke said it was not his time.
The Swiss disobeyed his wish to retire to Fontanella, but were at last compelled, to their great displeasure. Had they stayed two days, the town must have yielded for lack of victuals. The Emperor was afraid the Swiss would sack the town. The Swiss, without leave, retired to Body [Lodi]; on which the Emperor sent reinforcements under Antonio Colonna, but before they arrived the Swiss had taken Lodi and killed all the men and children they found there, at which the Emperor was greatly displeased, saying they would have done the same at Milan, and he wished to conquer Italy another way, and not with cruelty. On this he retreated to Bergamo, towards which place the Swiss retired, and wished to sack it, though it had made a composition with the Emperor. They stayed here till they had nothing to eat, waiting for their pay from England, which had been sent to Brescia, and taken by the lanzknechts and Spaniards to pay themselves with. Meanwhile the Emperor went to Valdesona, where Leonard Frescobald arrived with the money. The Swiss made Galeazzo and Pace prisoners for their pay, which came to Wingfield at Trent, who despatched it to the Emperor at Reyna, where Sion then was, who took it to the Swiss. Sion is hated for having forged letters appointing him general of all the Swiss. They refused obedience, preferring Pace and Visconte. They arrived at Trent on Whitsun even, on very bad terms with the Emperor. Propositions for a new expedition. The writer left the Emperor on the 13th. He had ordered them to be ready for a new enterprise, but the Duke of Milan, Galeazzo and Pace are gone into Switzerland to prepare them. Pace has desired 60,000 fl. of Leonard Friscobald over and above the money received.
Pp. 4, badly mutilated.
14 May.
R. O.
1886. SIR RIC. JERNINGHAM to HENRY VIII.
Has received his letters discharging Sir Edw. Benstede of the office of treasurer of Tournay, and appointing himself in his room. Will do his best notwithstanding his little experience. The works of the citadel are going well forward. The Lord Lieutenant writes to the King by Sir Edw. Benstede. Tournay, 14 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
14 May.
Shrewsb. MSS.
P.f. 25.
Coll of Arms.
Lodge, I.16.
1887. [The EARL OF SHREWSBURY] to SIR THOMAS [ALEN].
Thanks him for the baked conger, "which was very good and sweet." Sends money for hangings made by Mr. Hart at Tournay. Has spoken with Mr. Th. Babington, who thinks it best that Alen should not be too hasty in knowing my lord Cardinal's pleasure touching the Earl's coming up to London. Is out of horses and servants. Kept his bed yesterday. The sickness was so extreme at Wingfield that he has put away all his horse-keepers, and turned his horses to grass. [Alen] is to keep in the Cardinal's sight, and, if he asks about the Earl, to say, "I have sent the substance of all my servants to their friends, saving only twelve or sixteen, which I have here with me."
Corrected draft, pp.3.
15 May.
R. O.
1888. MAXIMILIAN to HENRY VIII.
Has received his letters dated 16 April. The ambassadors on both sides will more fully inform the King of the communication made them by the Emperor. Trent, 15 May 1516. Signed.
Lat. Vellum. Add.
15 May.
Vit. B. xix. 69.
B. M.
1889. [MAXIMILIAN] to [HENRY VIII]
"...periculum quod iminebat nedum nobis et ser ... Christianitati sy illa expedicio interrumperetur, ideo [induximus] oratores serenitatis vestræ ad obligendum se una nobi[scum pro lx. mill.] florenorum, cum nos omnia nostra et personam nostram... et omnino hanc expeditionem prosequi intendi[mus] ... rogamus enixe serenitatem vestram velit hanc rem probare ... pecuniis satisfacere in termino promisso per no ... [com]mendatum habere Friscobaldum Leonardum, qui persona [m suam] pro servitio utriusque nostrum posuit in mangnum di[scrimen], et ulterius providere ad beneplacitum serenitatis vestræ et ... de bona voluntate sua admonere. Et omnia lac[ius] a suis et nostro oratoribus serenitas vestra intelliget." Trent, 15 May 1516.
Hol., p. 1, mutilated.
15 May.
R. O.
1890. MAXIMILIAN to WOLSEY.
Has received his letter of 16th April, exhorting him to continue the war. Has done his very utmost not to leave the victory in the hands of the enemy, but thinks every thing possible with England's help. Was obliged to retreat as the enemy would not come out, and his army were hampered for want of pay and provisions. Has written to his ambassador touching steps to be taken for the renewal of the enterprise. Refers him to the letters of the two ambassadors of Henry VIII. and Wolsey, [Wingfield, and Pace]. Begs him to encourage the King to persist. Trent, 15 May 1516, 31 Max. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
15 May.
Vit. B. xix. 69*.
B. M.
1891. MAXIMILIAN to [WOLSEY].
Has written to the King that, in consequence of the critical state of affairs, he had induced the English ambassadors to be come sureties along with himself for 60,000 fl. Hopes Henry will approve, as he ventures his own person and fortunes. Commends Leonard Friscobald to the King. Fuller details will be given by the Emperor's and the King's ambassadors. Trent, 15 May 1516, "manu propria."
Hol., Lat., p. 1.
15 May.
R. O.
1892. EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS.
Of Jacobo Gallarate, ambassador of the Duke of Bari with the Emperor.
The Duke is at Trent,—desires Anchises to give his compliments to the King and Wolsey, and tell them to proceed energetically in restoring him to his dominions. He will repay the expenses, and lay himself at his majesty's feet. Trent, 9 May.
ii. Of Saxo [Galeazzo ?] Visconti.
The French have entirely destroyed the palace of Galeazzo Visconti, and stuck up a notice at the corner where the wall stood, "Hæc erat domus Galeatii Vicecomitis." The Italians are exceedingly exasperated, and look anxiously to England for help. Galeazzo has spent 15,000 crowns (scut.), but of the 500 English crowns per mensem has not touched a penny. Trent, 15 May.
iii. Of Galeazzo Visconti.
The Emperor, being in great straits, urgently demanded of the English ambassadors 60,000 fl. Wingfield assented; Pace refused, as the army was broken up, and was threatened by the imperial agents for being the occasion of the Emperor's treating with France. They deny that this was the Emperor's meaning. Pace was carried sick to the Emperor, and at last consented, on condition that the Emperor would write to the King with his own hand. Galeazzo's house destroyed by the French. Trent, 15 May.
iv. Of the same date [?]—
Galeazzo is going to the Swiss. The Pope is sending a nuncio to the King; must be stirred up. The Cardinal Sta. Maria is to be written to, to keep the Pope well disposed, who must be warned to desist from making war against the Duke of Urbino. "Cæsar furiis hac causa ducitur, et nimium in literas proruit. Postea ex gentibus utriusque potest uti usus contra Gallos; et hoc multum recordat et exhortat fieri debere." Pace is to go to Augsburg. Galeazzo has been deprived of all his horses by the French. Begs the King will let him have four good hobbies, and that Wolsey will oblige him also. He is only a boy of sixty years old, and needs nags that go easy. Leonard and Philip Frescobald are much devoted to the King's service.
Lat., pp. 3. In the hand of Anch. Visconti.
16 May.
Shrewsb. MSS.
P.f.13.
Coll. of Arms.
1893. SIR RIC. SACHEVERELL to the EARL OF SHREWSBURY.
Was asked to dinner today by the Duke of Buckingham, along with Lord Hastings and Master Vowse. "At supper I was with his grace, where it liked him to walk into ys garden, and to take me by the harm, and began to break with me as followeth: 'Sacheverll, the cause that I sent for you is to let you know part of my mind. The last day at the court it fortuned my Lord Cardinal and me to sit together without any company, [w]here he brake with me that I should let my son come to the King and the Queen, and to be acquainted. And I said to him that I had but one son, wherefore I would be loth he should come...browed, specially for dread of contageous...if he had once a wife and a child he would no[t]...him.' And he axsed, 'Why do ye not marry him' ... said he wist not where. And he answered, say[ing, 'My La]dy Salisbury has a good young lady to her [daughter.' A]nd I said I thought it were not ... [he]r daughter that I would axke, and if she did, she must leve (live) the more barly monny yerres. Then my Lord Cardinal should say, 'What sai[th he] be my Lord Steward's? Else I know none within these parts.' Then said my Lord of Buckingham, 'Nay, my lord, I know my Lord Steward's mind, that he will never marry his son without the advice of the King's grace, and there as shall be his pleasure.' 'Why, my lord,' saith he, 'this dare I promise you, that if my Lord Steward were here, the King's grace would speak to him with all his heart; and if he come not shortly, his grace will write to him with all his heart. It were both to the King's honor and surety to see you two knit together. And this shall I say that if ye vary in anything the King shall give the stroke betwixt you himself.'"
The Duke then proposed to Sacheverell cross marriages between his son and the Earl's daughter, the Earl's son and his daughter; "and to meddle with you 1,000 marks [better cheap than] with any other. And when all this wa[s]...done, his grace moved me to write and...your lordship, and he would bear my ma...And I answered that I knew not whether I should find...shortly I trust to be delivered, and then I w[ould spea]ke with you in all the premises, but my owns[war he would not] accept, but needs that I should send without delay; and he is content to tarry till Monday come se'nnight for to have knowlege of this matter."—No news but that "my Lord of Nor[thum- berland] came forth of the F[l]eet on Saturday," and was with the King on Wednesday in his privy chamber.
The jousts are to be on Monday and Tuesday: challengers, the King, Suffolk, the [Earl of Essex, Sir George] Carewe; "the defenders who w ... I here no thenc ... [b]ehond the se(beyond the sea ?) nother of the Fr[ench] King nor of the ... not lately, but I hear that my Lord of Sowthfoke with t[he French] Queen depart shortly into Northfowke and Sow[thfowke, there to rest much of this summer. I hear nothing ... the King's grace will this summer. My Lord Cardinal is [disea]sed and has been this two days, so [that] he comes not abroad nor my Lord of Durham, but no da[nger]."—Buckingham is in great favor, and says the Earl is as much beholden to my Lord Cardinal as he can be.—Is glad the Earl, my lady and the little, are so well escaped the foul sickness. "My lord, I beseech you, come no more there this summer. Your lordship is wise, and if ye should go thither again many would speak of it." London, 16 May.
Hol., pp.4, mutilated. Add.: To my singular ... my Lord ...
16 May.
Calig. E. II. 77.
B. M.
1894. MOUNTJOY to [HENRY VIII.]
Has received his letter by Lancaster herald, dated Greenwich, 21 April, containing a pardon for Lacy. Packman has been hanged, drawn and quartered. Dissuades the King against having his court sovereign in the Chancery in England, as too oppressive to the inhabitants of Tournay. Will assist what he can in accomplishing the restitution of Mortaigne. Does not advise large sums to be paid to De Ligny for it. The Prince of Castile is offended with him for his excessive demands. Have caused Sir Edw. Bensted, late treasurer at Tournay, to make over his charge to Sir Ric. Jerningham. Geo. Lawson is returning to England, and will give account of the payment of the works. Desires that recompense should be made to the inhabitants whose houses have been pulled down. It will not exceed 1,100l. Will comply with the King's pleasure that he should not leave Tournay till Michaelmas or All-hallowtide. Gives an account of the money, and begs more. Tournay, 16 May. Signed.
Pp. 5, mutilated.
16 May.
Galba, B. vi. 34.
B. M.
1895. SPINELLY to HENRY VIII.
Wrote on the 6th from Brussels. As the ambassadors were ordered to follow at a day's journey behind the court for lack of lodging he has not had leisure to write till now. Hears that Sion with the army at Bergamo is going to return against the French, but nothing is said of the Emperor. Messire Mercury, chief captain of the stradiots with the Venetians, has been defeated and taken prisoner. Those of Bergamo, who made a difficulty to pay 20,000 ducats to the Emperor, have been compelled to pay 44,000. Was told last night by Berghes that the only cause why the Council do not assist the Emperor is, that they fear his prosperity might enable him to rule these countries at his will. Is told the King means to leave his sister, the Lady Eleanor, gouvernante, pro forma saltem. The French commissioners, at the meeting with Chievres and the Chancellor, stuck fast for the realm of Naples, so that the latter took their leave, and are to be at Arras tonight, where the court will be tomorrow. The Archduchess thinks new communications will be opened before the court leave Arras.
John Austry, of Mechlin, newly called to the Prince's counsels, told Spinelly yesterday that the "going on this side into France" proceeds partly from fear, and partly from affection, but that little good will be done with the French. A post is just come from Noyon from the Great Master to the French ambassador, stating that the French commissioners remain. Francis, it is said, will shortly be at Paris, though Spinelly can hardly believe it by reason of the affairs of Italy. The King has confirmed to Andreas de Burgo his old pension, and promised him a new fee in Castile. Hopes to hear soon how D'Isselstein has sped touching Gueldres. The Abbot of St. Martin at Tournay has taken a cardinal for his coadjutator, and expects bulls from Rome. The French King swears he will recover Naples. Douay, in Artois, x... of May.
Hol., pp. 5, mutilated. Add.
16 May.
R. O.
1896. PACE to WOLSEY.
The Emperor, having the consent of Sir Rob. Wingfelde, desired the bearer, Leonard Friscobald, to lend him 60,000 fl. On Pace's refusal to comply, he stated that he was sure the King of England would not for that sum allow him to lose his honor and his cities in Italy, and sent to Pace, then sick in bed, to say that if he would not consent he would write to the King and declare that Pace had ruined the whole enterprise, and had compelled him to make peace with France. Had himself carried, sick as he was, into the Emperor's presence; remonstrated that whatever money was paid never came to the army; but in the end, to prevent his union with France, Pace consented. Begs the bearer may be repaid; has the Emperor's bond for repayment: "sed Cæsar solvit and Græcas kalendas." The Emperor intends sending Hesdynge again into England for money. He has kept back 1,200 se. of the King's money "for himself, and paid against the merchants' will (no cause known why) 11,000 se. with more." He dislikes Pace because he will not consent to spend the King's money. The French have sent one to poison the Duke of Bari, who has been punished for his crime. Trent, 16 May.
Pp. 5. Add.. Rmo T. Card. T. Ceciliæ &c. Endd.
16 May.
R. O.
1897. JULIUS CARDINAL DE MEDICIS to WOLSEY.
In behalf of Lewis de Rossis to be coadjutor to John de Boys Abbot of Tournay, for whom the Pope writes to the King of Spain. Rome, 16 May 1516.
Lat., p.1. Add.:D. Card. Eboracensi. Endd.
16 May.
R. O.
1898. SILVESTER BP. OF WORCESTER to HENRY VIII.
In behalf of Lewis de Rosis of Lyons, recommended in the brief that the Pope now sends to the King, to the coadjutorship of St. Martin's, Tournay. Rome, 16 May 1516. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. and endd.
16 May.
S.B.
1899. For CUTHBERT TUNSTALL, Master of the Rolls.
To cancel a recognizance of 120l., made by Humph. Stafford of Codered, Herts., Sir Christ. Pykeryng of Kyllyngton, Westmor., and Sir Th. Burgh of Gaynesborugh, Linc., jun., 6 March 5 Hen. VIII. 16 May 8 Hen. VIII.
16 May.
S. B.
1900. For SIR JOHN GYFFORD, RALPH TOMSON and JOHN HASILBY, servants of Queen Katharine, and JOHN WATSON, jun., of Weddesbury, Staff.
Wardship of John Smith, an idiot, son and heir of Ric. Smythe, and custody of his possessions in Bromwiche and Weddesbury, Staff. Del. Westm., 16 May 8 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII.p. 1, m.2.
16 May.
P. S.
1901. For SIR PETER EGGECOMBE, SIR NICH. WADHAM of Merefeld, Somers., and JOHN WYSE of Sydenham Maverey, Devon.
Release of their recognizance of 500 marks, made 3 Dec. 7 Hen. VIII., before the Barons of the Exchequer, on condition that the said Peter give up possession of the manors of Collaton Ralegh, Wythecombe Ralegh, Bollam and Fyrdell, Devon, parcel of the possessions of Wimond Ralegh, and the person of Walter Ralegh, son and heir of the said Wimond. Greenwich, 6 May 8 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 16 May 8 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m.2.
17 May.
Vit. B. xix. 70.
B. M.
1902. [SIR ROB. WINGFIELD] to HENRY VIII.
Wrote from Trent the ... of this month. Wishes he could be present when the King receives this letter, so as to prevent any misinterpretation of his words and of the Emperor's intention, and also that he might know how the King has taken his letters, having had very few answers. Would undergo any punishment for his temerity if he could not satisfy Henry. "[Thi]s daye in the morning" the Emperor sent for him, and, no other person being present, expressed himself to the following effect (Wingfield professes to give his very words):—Though he had written with his own hand to the King and Wolsey, and sent instructions to his ambassador in England, and was about to send Hesdyng thither, yet, knowing Wingfield's influence with the King, he would confide to him what he made no other man privy to, viz., "First, I desire you to make my most hearty and affectuous recommendations unto my most dear and well beloved brother, the King your master, which by word doth call me father; and I do call him son, which I do take right gladly upon me, and that by reason of years; for in effect his bounty, kindness, affection, and comfort hath been and is so medicinable to me, that he is to be esteemed and taken for my father, and I for his son: insomuch that he shall be sure to have me at all times and in all points that may be in my power as glad and as desirous to advance all that may be to his honour and laud as though I were his proper son, and also in all things that may be to his weal and surety as though I were his natural and lygytyme father; and so I require him in most hearty wise to take me." He acknowledges that not only cities but realms of his have been saved by Henry's assistance, and considers that with a little further assistance he will be successful. His army will soon take the field again; for, owing to the 20,000 florins he sent to the Swiss, 3,500 men are coming to join him. The enemy will probably make little resistance, and as Henry has formerly urged him to make peace with the Venetians, (fn. 1) he now offers to do so on whatever terms Henry thinks reasonable. Thus the Pope, "which hangith no[w in doubt], shall be more quick to join with the more hoolson [side]," as also will the Swiss. He offers to grant Henry the duchy of Milan; but Henry must accept "the adoption which I have made of him," and the empire which Maximilian has promised to resign to him, at such time and place as shall be agreed between them.
2. He begs Henry's assistance in inducing his nephew (Charles) to join them against the common enemy.
3. He desires that Henry will "breeke warre with Fraunce" as soon as possible, for by that means alone can the "enterprise of the duchy of Meleeyn" be brought to the desired conclusion. Henry should cross the sea with 2,000 horse and 4,000 archers, to Ypyr in Flanders. thence by Tournay, Mons, Namur, Marche and Bascoyne in Luxemburg, to Treves, "where I will nott f[ayl] ... and also all the electours and pryncis ... nott oonly shall be accomplished my [resignation of the] empyre and the investure of the dwchye of M[eleeyn ... but] there shall be an arme alredy prepaaryd, with ... and all oothir thinge nessessary to entyr into Fran[ce ... of which] arme I woolde my broother shulde leeve the Dwke of Su[ffolke] or some other prince to be the captain," the Emperor accompanying it "as a superatendente," while [Henry] passes with 1,000 horse and 1,000 archers through the Emperor's territory to a city in the mountains called Coyre, the bishop of which is the Emperor's subject and friend; then through the bishoprick to the lake of Combe, 25 miles from Milan. The Emperor will then proceed with him to Rome, where he shall be crowned Emperor. He will then be in a position to make as honorable a peace with France as ever any of his ancestors were; or if not, he may fight until be recover the cr[own], to attain which he would have the aid of the Pope and of all Christian princes.
After the Emperor had finished his discourse, [he and Wingfield] "arguyed somewhat uppon the same. He shewid [me that same] mornynge he had gevyn awdyence to ... [and] that by such overture, as he had made, there appeared that [the] said Duke doth yet doubt what end the affairs of Italy shall take," and would gladly, as subject and kinsman of the Emperor and the French King, help to make peace between them. But the Emperor will conclude no peace without the consent of Henry, "or elles it shall be perfectly sene and knowin that he is destitute and abandond of alle succours, and thanne noo remedy but patience."
The above matters are so important he will add nothing to them. Trent, 17 May 1516.
Hol., pp. 4, mutilated. Add. and endd.
17 May.
S. B.
1903. For CHAS. BOTHE, clk., LLD.
Custody of the temporalities of the bishopric of Hereford during its voidance by the death of Richard [Mayhew]. Del. Westm., 17 May 8 Hen. VIII.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 11.
18 May.
Galba, B. IV. 63.
B. M.
1904. SPINELLY to HENRY VIII.
Wrote last on the 16th from Dowey. The King made his entry into Arras ... After supper Spinelly visited [the Chancellor], and this morning Chievres. Gives their account of their going to Noyon and the conferences there. Not being able to come to any conclusion touching the kingdom of Naples, they agreed to another meeting in ten weeks' time, when they hope their master will have gone to Spain. They report the extreme hatred the French bear to England. It is thought very strange the French should have hoped to gain anything by the meeting, or that two such persons should have been sent on this side without first knowing the object. Spinelly thinks they only wanted to keep the French quiet till their King should arrive in Spain. He believes the French will overreach them.
The Duke of Gueldres is increasing his power in Friesland. He only sent his steward to Noyon, who said he had not received his commission, and the French offered "if this King would send to Paris and his rights and tytres, they shall cause those of Gueldres to go thydre," which Chievres and the Chancellor declined, seeing that they intended "to pay many great promises with fair words." It shows their suspicions are aroused that Chievres and the Chancellor say their master should co-operate with England to prevent the Swiss joining the French. They have little confidence in the Emperor, but speak better of him than they did. They say the Emperor will have a difficulty in keeping Brescia without dividing his army, and " ... specyaly doubting his magest[y] ... tel in this second enterprice against the Frenchemen." They have letters from him this morning, however, saying he was determined to go in person. The Venetians have engaged to pay x ... footmen to the French for six months. There is incredible poverty in France. The French are much displeased about Tournay. The King will write to his ambassadors in England to communicate with Henry. Arras, 18 May 1516.
Andrew de Burgo told him yesterday he expected to be sent to England.
Hol., pp. 5, mutilated. Add. and endd.
18 May.
R. O.
1905. R. BP. OF OSTIA CARDINAL ST. GEORGE to WOLSEY.
In favor of Bernardus, son of Raphael Ganotus of Savona, who has been long trading in London, and desires to be made a denizen (fieri denexmi civis). Rome, 18 May 1516. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.: Tho. Card. Ebor. Endorsed in a 17th century hand, apparently Agarde's: Non rejiciendæ literæ Latinæ.
18 May.
Vit. B. XX. 48.
B. M.
1906. [SFORZA] to WOLSEY.
"D. Ricardus Paceus secretarius vester de rebus hujus curiæ harumque regionum nihil incog ... quia tamen ex eodem Domino Ricardo percepi magnificum [D. Leonardum] Friscobaldum nuntium regium esse reverendissimæ dom. Vestræ ... in Angliam redeunti dixi aliqua memorato R supplico ut in cunctis quæ ipse Dominus Leonardus ... [fidem] illi, &c. præbere dignetur." [18] May 1516. Signed.
Add.: Cardinali. Eboracen., &c.
P. 1, much mutilated and blackened.
18 May.
S. B.
1907. To SIR RIC. JERNYNGHAM, treasurer of Tournay.
To pay John Russell, spear in the city of Tournay, 6l. 13s. 4d., to be employed by him in "making of a tilt within our said city." Greenwich, 18 May 8 Hen. VIII.
18 May.1908. ORDNANCE.
Commission to Sir Sampson Norton, Anth. Nele, Nick. Marland, Th. Twaytys, Christ. Conwey, Brian Wilkynson and Wm. Briswoode to make inquiry concerning the ordnance, &c. of Calais, and deliver it to Sir Wm. Skevyngton, Master of the Ordnance.
ii. Similar commission to Sir John Cutte, Sir Hen. Wyatt, Sir John Daunce, Sir Ric. Cholmeley, Sir Sampson Norton, John M ..., Oliver Tournour and Anth. Neele, in respect to the Tower of London or vessels within its precincts. Westm., 18 May.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 2d.
19 May.
Vit. B. XIX. 74.
B. M.
1909. [SIR ROB. WINGFIELD] to HENRY VIII.
Wrote from Trent the [17th] of last month. As the letter was of great importance, sends a duplicate with this. [This] day they [Wingfield and Pace] have made a covenant with Mes. Leonard Frysco[bald], and have made him acquittances sealed and signed by Wingfield and Pace. Today the Emperor sent for them, but Mr. Pace, "whiche hathe kept his bedde five or six dayes as [well] by meane of a dysease in his legge as oothir maladie, a[ppeared] nott." Went, therefore, along with Leonarde only. The Emperor explained to them what conclusion he had come to with the Marquis of Brandenburg and the Signor M[ark] Antony Colonna and his other captains, and gave them a bill of the number and form of forces which are to set forth now, and what aid he d[esires] of the King for their maintenance. Sends a [copy] with this; the original the Emperor sent to be delivered to Henry by Friscobald, who departed post this day towards Augsburg "so that the rest of the 60,000 fl. which he has g[otten] to provide, and paid part already," may be sent speedily lest the army be idle. Before they left, the Emperor "wente dow[n into the] garden, and sent for Mr. Pace, "which wa ... before him," be not only explained, as he had before done to Wingfield and Friscobaldi, but shewed "a platte [pour]trayid," and upon it the routes of the two armies and their place of meeting, expecting not only a complete victory over the French army, but its total destruction if it await their union.
Just before their departure news arrived of an unsuccessful assault upon Brescia by the Venetians. Reinforcements for the garrison are expected there shortly, and preparations are being made for victualling it, which is likely to be done the more easily as the French army remains on the other side of the Abdwa, the report here being that the companies of the Duke of Lorraine, and of Mes. Rob. de la Marche, have returned into France to assist Lorraine against the Earl Gerelsek, who is there with a large force. The Emperor daily expects to hear whether the King "wyll trowbyll Fraunce with the sayde arme or nott." Touching the Swissers with the 35,000 who ben coming to the Emperor of new there shall be in all upon 5,000, which [sha]ll pass in the Signor Mark Anthony Columpnis company and they be not revoked by their super[iors] ... doubtid for themperour's ambassadours r ... have advertised his majesty that the Frensshe ... labour to the Swyssers that theey do not only ... soldiers which ben in themperours wages but ... do entermete to make a peace between themperour ... and that the French King may enjoy pesable [possession] of Meleeyn, and he will give unto them in full satisf[action] of the appointment made at Dogion (Dijon) 200,000 crowns, in so [much] that now they hold a diet at a place called Sucge (Zug) for [the] same purpose."
The Emperor has sent to that diet the Bishop of Constance and others to thwart the French designs, and to declare the answer he gave to the French King, who offered peace on condition the Emperor would suffer him to possess the duchy of Milan and rest[ore] Brescia and Verona to the Venetians; for "whilste he shulde t ... in his hands, he neither might nor would desist of m[aking] war with the Emperor as confederate to the Signory of Ve[nice]." The Emperor replied that until he had restored to him the duchy of Milan and the duchy of Ghe[ldres] he would have no peace with him. If the Swiss "shall for cove-[tousness to] attain the said cc.m. crowns, revoke the said fy[ve] thowsand that ben now in stypende, there is no rem[edy but to] restore the number with lanceknights, which w[ould be] done with lesse coste and quikly spede the matter. [But it is to] be esteemyd that the Swyssers will nott sho[rtly be induced] to serve France against the Emperor, [seeing that by him] they have been so well entreated and paid for the [sa]id service; and yiff so be that the velayns have noo respecte [but] to their own intemperate will and unbrydylde covetise, there is no remedy but frunte the French and them with lanceknights, and let God work out the rest." Trent, 19 May 1516.
Pp. 4, mutilated. Add.: To the King's highnesse. Endd.: Sir Robert Wyngfild, xix. Maij.
19 May.
S. B.
Rym. XIII. 548.
1910. For JOHN LORD BERGHES.
To attend as Henry's proctor at a chapter of the Golden Fleece to be held by the King of Spain, 8 June next. Greenwich, 19 May 8 Hen. VIII.
Fr. 8 Hen. VIII. m. 10.
20 May.
R. O.
1911. LEWIS DE ROSSIS, Prothonotary Apostolic to Hen. VIII.
Begs the King's favor, in obtaining the coadjutorship of the Abbey of St. Martin's, Tournay, to which he has been nominated by the Pope. Florence, 20 May 1516. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. Endd.
20 May.
R. O.
1912. LEWIS DE ROSSIS to WOLSEY.
In the same behalf. Florence, 20 May 1516. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add.
20 May.
Galba, B. VI. 38.
B. M.
1913. SPINELLY to [WOLSEY].
Wrote last to the King on the 18th. This morning received Wolsey's letters dated Whitsunday, touching De la Pole and Spinelly's going to Fowler at Antwerp. God knows what he has done in the first matter at his own cost. Will send over Alamire in all haste. Would have much to do to write everything touching that matter, but will not spare ink or paper when there is anything of consequence. Would be loath to put any man's life in danger on a mere report. But where anything is to the King's prejudice will spare none. Was told yesterday by the Chancellor that, at Noyon, Jehanlis said to him that Rob. Latimer is delivered out of prison, that he was taken by his own will, and declared he did not care to return to England if the world did not change. Goes this afternoon to Antwerp on the King's service. The Council here sent bonds yesterday to Fellinger for a sum of money due to him in the Emperor's name; some say 40,000, some 50,000 florins; whereupon the Fokers will help the Emperor. The Council at Madrid are urgent for the King's going into Spain. The city of Malaga was lately in insurrection against the Admiral, and a town given to the Duke of Alva by the late King. Preparations for the voyage are going on but slowly. The next meeting with the French is to be on 1 Aug. Hears that the Deputy of Calais [with others] is coming hither in embassy. Not knowing if he shall have returned from Antwerp when they arrive, has written to tell them how the business stands. The Chancellor was told by the French ambassadors that the young King of Scots was dead. Spinelly thinks this must refer to the younger brother. Has requested Ponynges and Tunstal to write in his behalf to Wolsey. Arras, 20 May.
Hol., pp. 4, mutilated.
20 May.
Vit. B. XX. 52
B. M.
1914. GALEAZZO VISCONTI.
"Ex literis D. Galiatii [xx. Maii]ed D. Anch[isem]... '
(1.) Says he will write freely, "quæ referri quin a nullo mortali dependeat quam ab ipsis patria nam nisi in ipsis confisus esset patria, (fn. 2) Dom ... primos suos concives frueretur, quod cognitissimum es[t Dom. Ricardo] Paceo."
(2.) Says he has persuaded the Emperor. "ut faciat Christianissimum Regem ... quod optat fieri posse, quin tam Duci Barri quam sibi ... mum, sed opinionem esse fundatam tantum in aere, et ... modo possible, et quod si Helvetii hane re[m] olfacerent ... rent sicuti putat esse certissimum, et Chr. Regi et ... quamquam res esset possibilis, si fieret deceptionem tamen sape ... et Helvetii valde fuissent decepti, qui hoc animo et ha ... et promissis hoc inceptum pro parte sua sunt aggressi ut ... Mediolani Duci Barri traderetur. Item quod pro certo ha ... qui hoc Cæsareæ Maj. persuaserunt quos putat malo ... fuisse disturbatores bonorum operum eos ipsos persuasuro ... haberet Mediolanum ad modum eorum civitatum quæ lib ... sub imperio quod esset simpliciter impossible nam nobis ... neum nullo pacto ad eum modum posset gubernari, et ... ait jam pro certo cognovisse agi de danda singulis ca[ntonibus Hel]vetiorum sua portione de ducatu Mediolanensi quod [Hel]vetii tam potentes redderentur, quod in ipsa viscera Tivoli penetrarent, et demum ipsum comitatum Cæsar ... quemadmodum sunt alias conati, et tamen hoc a Cæsare ... cui etiam invito est benefaciendum, et bono dolo fallendum e ... hoc, videlicet, modo ut vel expeditio validissima fieret ... informationem pridem a se missam, et non aliter, nam a ... esse inania, et agendas gratias Cæsari ingentissimas ... et significandum optimis verbis donum acceptari, et * * * [d]e conducenda existimare nihil ease opportunius quam [Gali]atium suum locumtenentem in Italia et in hac expeditione ... re.
Præterea quod bene super tota re cogitans quod valde judicat [exped]ire ut Dux Barri una cum exercitu ducatur, ut populi [ex amor]e quem erga ipsum gerunt facilius ad defectionem a Gallis ... endant, et etiam quia pro certo novit quod Rex Gallorum [ma]xima celeritate vocavit ad se Ducem Maximilianum ex [P]arisiis Lugdunum," where he treated him most politely, proposing, if his own men could not resist, to send the said Duke Maximilian, and on certain conditions to give up all the forts to him. It is certain if the people saw (?) the Duke on one side, on the other the Germans, they would rather have the Duke and even the Devil than the Germans, who first plunder and then get drunk in the stews. Desires what he has written should be communicated to the Emperor by Henry and Wolsey. Says it is as true as the Gospel. The Swiss will go more willingly on the expedition if they have with them the Duke of Bari, whom they love vehemently. If they get scent of the Emperor's "imaginings" they will at once turn against him, and perhaps go over to the enemies. The Emperor [says] the Duke of Bari is too young. Replies he is too young, but that he is old in mind, and would cheerfully use and follow the counsel of the old. If he is poor the Emperor is to blame, "quem utinam Sfortiæ nunquam cognovissent." He ruined the Duke Lodovico, from whom he took 1,500,000 ducats, and then the Duke's ruin first began. When he adhered to Cæ[sar] "et postquam expeditis * * * Barri sine ducatu remanebit bene contentus et ... satisfiet, et ad hunc modum prout Chr. Rex et ... existimabunt, poterunt Cæs. Majti ac D ... cui Cæsar multum credit, scribere gratias agendo ... bona verba accumulando."
(3.) "Item quod nunc apparet quis possit educere Helvetios ... quum fuerint quidam qui promiserint Cæsari se eductu[ros] millia, et tamen licet haberent secum xx. milia floren[orum] ... quidem adhuc potuerunt educere et quod licet sibi reddi ... difficiliorem." They do not doubt' he can [ha]ve as many as he likes, and if the King have acted on his information, and provided money at Augsburg, and horses for artillery, which [Leonar]d Friscobald could carry out, he hopes to expel the French, not only from Italy, but inflict great loss on them.
In other letters dated on the same day he signifies:
(1.) That the Emperor yesterday evening had disclosed to him how that he was much afraid of losing Brescia, "et quod cogebatur [concor]dare cum Venetis, et nihilominus quod proponebat esse [perpe]tuus inimicus Gallorum quemadmodum semper fuit ... si ad effectum * * * Imperatorem et Venetos sequeretur et etiam ... mitteretur, si expeditio, de qua jampridem scripsi, fia[t] ... brevi converterentur ad nutum Christianissimi Regis; in qua [expe]ditione nulli nobis utiliores esse possunt istis Frescobaldorum pecuniis.
(2.) Desires to serve the King as long as he lives, if he and Wolsey think it of any use to pursue this expedition. Advises that what is done be done at one great blow.
(3.) Many think himself and Pace no friends of the Emperor because they write the truth. Those who contradict them either do not or will not know the facts.
(4.) Says that he mentioned in other letters (which have been intercepted) the attack made by the French on his house by command of the French King. It is clear from this what sort of agreement he has with them. [Dated from Trent.] (fn. 3)
In the hand of Ammonius, pp. 4, much mutilated.
20 May.
S. B.
1915. To HUMPH. BRADBOURNE.
To determine the complaint of Th. Golde of Mircaston, against John son of Wm. Ferne, of Perwiche. If either party prove refractory he is to certify the King and Council, in the octaves of Trinity next. Greenwich, 20 May. Signed: Jo. Veisy, dean,
Signature stamped.
20 May.
S. B.
1916. For JOHN COPYNGER, page of the Wardrobe of Robes.
To be keeper of the Wardrobe in Nottingham Castle vice William Davis. Greenwich, 3 May 8 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 May.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 20; and p.2, m. 15.
20 May.
P. S.
1917. For WM. DALBOURNE, groom of the Bows.
To have a corrody in the monastery of Waverley vice Hugh Warryngton, deceased. Eltham, 30 April 8 Hen. VIII. Del. Greenwich, 20 May.
20 May.
P. S.
1918. For JOHN MAYER alias HANS GONNER.
To be gunner in the Tower of London, with 6d. a day, vice Humph. Walker, deceased. Greenwich, 3 May 8 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 May.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 11.
20 May.
S. B.
1919. For SIR OWEN PEROT and KATHARINE his wife.
Lease of the mill of Haverfordwest for 21 years, at a yearly rent of 15l., as held by ... ap Howell. Del. Westm., 20 May 8 Hen. VIII.
20 May.
P. S.
1920. For TH. WARDE, yeoman "harbinger."
Annuity of 5l., with arrearages, out of Denbigh, N. Wales. Greenwich, 25 March 7 Hen. VIII. Del. Greenwich, 20 May.
Pat. 8 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 2.

Footnotes

1 This passage is marked in the margin by a different hand.
2 The punctuation of the original is preserved.
3 According to the margin.