Henry VIII
September 1521, 21-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1867

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'Henry VIII: September 1521, 21-30', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 3: 1519-1523 (1867), pp. 664-675. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91074 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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September 1521

21 Sept.
R. O.
1597. PACE to WOLSEY.
The King has very few to attend on him in his Privy Chambers as he has licensed Sir Wm. Kingston to go to his country, and Sir Wm. Tyler is sick. He wishes you therefore to send home Sir Henry Guylforde and Frauncese Brian, with letters of occurrences there, or other errands as ye think meet. Windsor, 21 Sept.
Hol. Add.: To my lord Legate's grace.
21 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
335.
1598. GATTINARA to CHARLES V.
Thinks his letter of the 18th requires no answer, except as to the powder. Thought he said the Cardinal would write to his master. He has bidden them not visit him till Monday, bnt they will find means to present the letters of visitation. Advises Charles to write another letter. Wolsey has sent the master of the Rolls on three matters: to collate the ratifications; to inform them that the French had their ratification and safeconduct for the fishers, and they must have the same ready to exchange on Monday, for which reason he sends the copy of the French letters; and to ask for a safeconduct for John Heston, his butler, to buy 400 tuns of wine in Bordeaux, and carry it to England in Breton ships. Calais, 21 Sept. 1521.
Fr.
22 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
336.
1599. CHARLES V. to GATTINARA.
Has received his letters of the 16th and 18th. Approves of his intention to press the Cardinal to an early declaration. By no means wishes to delay it till he is in England, for he intends while there to do nothing but make good cheer, and pass quickly to lessen the expense of his navy, and for other reasons. Brussels, 22 Sept. 1521.
Fr., draft.
22 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
337.
1600. CHARLES V. to his AMBASSADORS at CALAIS.
Is grieved at the Cardinal's illness, as the sieur de Noircarmes has informed them. Is glad that the article for the fishery is not yet concluded, for his navy of 14 ships is already at sea. Had ordered his Admiral to withdraw it; but hearing that the articles were not yet passed, has today ordered him to set sail to protect the fisheries, and damage the enemy as much as possible. Encloses a letter from the Admiral, asking that an article for the safety of the dykes may be inserted. Brussels, 22 Sept. 1521.
Fr., draft.
22 Sept.
Galba, B. VIII.
77.
B. M.
1601. SIR RICHARD WINGFIELD and SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Wrote on the 17th. Yesterday a post arrived with letters from Rome, of the 9th and 11th, from the Papal and Imperial armies. The Pope's ambassador says, as we have already written, that they have entered into Parma, and compelled the French to withdraw into part of the city, separated by a little river, which the French have fortified. On Lautrec being informed of this, he approached within five English miles, with all his company and the Venetians. The same day Prosper Colonna and the other captains received news that the duke of Ferrara was coming towards Modona with 3,000 foot and 1,000 horse; on which the allies spoiled such portion of the town as was in their hands, withdrew and parked their field half a mile outside the town. They sent some horse and foot to Modona, and provided that victuals might not be intercepted. Nothing more was known of Lautrec's proceedings. It is thought the French will be content with having succored the town, not being able to assail the others; especially as the Venetians do not willingly put their army in danger. Bannisius writes from Trent, on the 13th, that he had word from the bishop of Veroli, in Switzerland, and the duke of Barri, at Felkirk, that Zurich and four other cantons, and the Grisons, had granted the Pope 12,000 men, who would be mustered on the 16th, and be in the duchy of Milan by the end of the month. The rest of the cantons had resolved to remain neutral, and stay at home. No letters have been received from Sion. The Emperor expects that before tomorrow Masieres will be assaulted. The Pope has promised to make the bishop of Palencia a cardinal. The ambassador of Hungary left on Friday for England. He wishes Wolsey to appoint some person by whom he may be "continually addressed to your presence," as his master has instructed him to be guided in everything by Wolsey's counsel. Brussels, 22 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 3, mutilated. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's good grace.
23 Sept.
Calig. D. VIII.
97.
B. M.
1602. FITZWILLIAM to [WOLSEY].
Please it your grace, that this day the French king showed me he had word from his [Chancellor that your grace] had advertised him that as this day your grace should have afore ... s this ambassadors trusting to make a final peace, or to ... truce at the least; and he bade me to advertise your grace, that for the Ky[ng my] master's sake and yours, and for no nother cause, there was ne[ither] peace nor truce that the king and your grace should think convenient that [he would] refuse, if he might do it with his honour, and thereafter he h[ad] given his said Chancellor instructions; and as touching the ... fishing, he said that though he had showed me afore, he would not co[ndescend] thereto, yet that notwithstanding, seeing your grace now requireth it so instantly, he will not refuse it, but is contented to the same according to your said desire; for he showed me the admiral of France is in Nav[arre], and that the Spaniards fortify Pampylyon, but he reckoneth they cannot fortif[y] it so strong but that it will be won; and the Constable, he saith, y[s] still at Leyroyne, but he heareth of no men they gather as yet. Further he showed me that Meysers holds, and he heareth not but that it so sha[ll do], and yet on Saturday last past the Emperor's folks shot, as he say[eth,] eleven hundred and threescore shot of ordnance at it, whic[h] they hardly believe. And as touching Italy, he saith the Pope's army recoils still, and will not abide the battle.
"And after that I had been with him, I went to Robert Tete to know wh[en] he dispatched their post, to the intent they might have this my letter conveyed by their said post, because my folks be so visited with sickness that I have none to send to your grace till ye send some of them again that be with you; and he showed me openly, in the presence of Mons. d'Alençon, Mons. le Grand Maistre, Mons. Latramoile, and divers others of the council, that there was never man handled himself better than your grace now did, wi[th] as many other good words as could be devised; and showed m[e] also that your grace hath been sore sick, and yet that in your said sickness ye sent for their said Chancellor to your bed side; which, I assure your grace, they esteem not a little. And I know not how far forth your grace is with their matters otherwise than by their saying, nor how ye entreat them; but I know right well that now they be well content, and so were they not afore, for I have been in the King's presence three times within this sevennight, and he would not speak to me, but give me a beck, and his council have looked somewhat strangely on me. And this day he and all his said council made as much of me as was possible; and by that I conject they be right glad when they h[ear] any comfort of peace. And, in mine opinion, the cause thereof is as I have written to your grace often in my other letters.
Also, [I cannot well] advertise your grace of their affairs, for the gentlemen and others [that I was] wont to learn news of give me now nothing so much com[fort as they were] wont to do; howbeit, I hear say that the walls of Meysers ... beaten, and that they within it lack victuals, and have sent for so ... victuals, which the French king hath sent them, and as this day ... enter into the town, but whether they be entered into the s[ame] or not, I know not as yet. Also, as I hear say, Mons. [de] Bourbon is within twenty leagues of the King, and brings with [him] 6,000 footmen and 300 spears, and they say the [rest] of his band cometh after as fast as they can, and Mons. [de] Vendome is come himself; howbeit, they say his band is ... leagues from hence; so, as I reckon, the French king shall [not be] hable to give battle till this month be at [an end]; bu[t] ... surely they had liever [remain] here till your grace had made some good [peace] than to be forced to go to the battle, for all gre ... Also, please it your grace, Robert de la Marche hath taken into his castle of Asden Brio ... Mons. de Mesiers with a hundred spears, which is r[umored] shall be a great impeachment to the Emperor's folks for their vita[ils; and] I hear say he shall have a great sun of money of the French king. Also, there is great death in Chalon and Raines, which be [two of] the chief towns in this country of Champagne; inso[much that] the French king and a[ll] the nobles of the court be fled out of Raines [and the] villages thereabouts, to the one of which two towns [the Emperor's] folks must come in case they get Mesiers, and so m[arch] forwards."
Begs that he may go home with Wolsey, considering the great business he has in England, "which charges as well my soul as my goods." Requires money, as he has served 60 days longer than he has been paid for, and wants 50 marks more for post money. Saint ..., 23 Sept.
Hol., mutilated, pp. 2. All cipher, undeciphered, but the last paragraph.
23 Sept.
Galba, B. VI.
215 b.
B. M.
1603. MARGARET OF SAVOY to WOLSEY.
Understands from Nicholas Perrenot her counsellor, who is now at Calais to secure the neutrality of Burgundy, Wolsey's disposition to protect her countries. The chancellor of France puts off the subject of the said neutrality on the ground of the demolition of Ardre, although she had nothing to do with that war. Begs that Wolsey will use his good offices in the matter, in accordance with his promise to her at Bruges. Brussels, 23 Sept. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: "Mons. le Legat, primat et lieutenen general d'Angleterre."
23 Sept.
R. O.
1604. P. DE VILLERS LYLE ADAM, Grand Master of Rhodes, to HENRY VIII.
I cam here as soon as possible after my appointment to the mastership, and arrived on the 10th inst. with my whole fleet and company in safety. I trust you will always find in me the spirit of a good and faithful servant; and having already experienced your kindness, I beg you to show favor to our religion in your kingdom. I found here Peter Texera, one of our knights, with orders from you, and he shall be dispatched with all speed. Rhodes, 23 Sept. 1521. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. Endd.
24 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
338.
1605. GATTINARA and others to CHARLES V.
Just as they were going to the Cardinal, received his letters of the 22nd, and the Admiral's of the 19th. The Cardinal apologised for not having met them so long, on account of his illness, but said he could not otherwise have gained so much time without causing suspicion to the French. On Thursday he will make overture of peace or truce, which he thinks ought not to be longer delayed, on account of the approach of winter, and that the cannot longer endure the air of this place. He has heard from the regent of France in reply to his letter advocating a truce. She says that a peace would be better than a truce; but, at the Cardinal's instigation, she has procured leave for the ambassadors to treat for a truce, if the meeting cannot treat for peace. Mons. de Norkerme had audience before they presented him the letters from the Emperor, which he read in a loud voice before the great personages of England by whom he is accompanied, and sends thanks to the Emperor for them. Wolsey asked whether they had the confirmation of the articles about the fishery. [Answered] (fn. 1) that Charles, when he wrote last, did not know of the confirmation sent by France; that he was not displeased at the delay of the French in confirming the articles, and that De Beures had written to him that it would be well to introduce some modification. The Cardinal took this badly, and said he had of himself procured this for the sole good of Charles's subjects, whom it concerned more than the French; and that by delaying the matter longer you would do little honor either to himself or to you, if that could be so easily set aside to which you had agreed, and your ambassadors had concluded. Do not think it advisable to speak of the safety of the dykes. The only effect will be that the French will be more inclined to make some attempt; and, besides, something must be granted of equal importance. Letters of confirmation and safeconduct similar to those sent by the king of France should be sent immediately. Calais, 24 Sept.
Fr.
24 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
340.
1606. GATTINARA to CHARLES V.
Mons. de Norcarme arrived on Sunday on his way to England, and had audience of the Cardinal the same evening. Sent on Saturday the minutes of the ratification and the safeconduct for the fishery, that they might have them returned the Monday following, which was yesterday, when the Cardinal intended to conclude the articles, as the French had their despatch. Wolsey is not pleased at the change in the Emperor's intentions; for, on the faith of his former letters, he had told the French that Charles would agree to the articles, and said he had better return home than be shamed in this way. Not to irritate him more, suggested that your letters were sent before you had received the draft of the ratification; that the ratification might still be made; and you did not consider the matter settled, as the French had asked time to consult their King. The town of Nieuport has sent to ask if the articles are concluded; for their season for fishing is nearly past, and that of the French commences in October, so that they have been prevented from fishing, while the French will fish freely. Is much perplexed, but would prefer to have the fleet kept up, which, as he hears, the Emperor has ordered the Admiral to disband. If it be still entire, he would have it maintained, and damage the enemy as much as possible. This would be the best way to protect the dykes, which must be defended by troops if there is no fleet. Advises him to write to the Cardinal, and say that he consented to the articles that his subjects might enjoy the fishery, but matters have been delayed till the season is past, and the articles would now be prejudicial; asking him to be content not to have the ratification, and lay the blame on the dilatoriness of the French. Does not wish this mentioned in reply to the other ambassadors, as it is different from their joint letters; for the news from Nieuport came too late for him to inform his colleagues before despatching theirs.
After Wolsey's general communication, he had a private discussion with Gattinara about the truce. I said the Pope could not be induced to consent to it, and without his consent nothing could be concluded. To this he answered that he could be induced to consent after the conclusion. I said this was dangerous, and might irritate the Pope; and if he did not consent, matters would be worse than before. I advised a truce for this side of the mountains only; but he thought this would be worse still, as all the French forces would be turned against the Pope. Gattinara told him that would ruin the French by the expense of crossing the mountains, and the ease with which the Emperor could reinforce his army in Italy. On which he said the French would not be so foolish as to consent; but Gattinara thought he might persuade them to it, considering their necessity. Thinks the war in Italy prevents other machinations of the French. The affair of Masieres will act as a warning to make thorough preparations before commencing a siege; but the siege should not be raised except by battle or truce. Spoke to him about the division (le partaige), which Charles wishes to be settled before his visit to England. As to the powder, he says he has not heard yet from Henry, but will see to it. Promised it should be returned, and said Charles would not ask for it if any was to be bought. The French have heard of the powder they sent him before, and have complained of it. Encloses the three letters which Charles ordered him to sign. Calais, 24 Sept. 1521.
Fr.
25 Sept.
R. O.
Ellis, 3 Ser.
I. 254.
1607. CLERK to WOLSEY.
The Pope has appointed next week for receiving the King's book in open consistory. Would have sent a copy of his proposed oration, but was prevented by the hasty departure of the courier. Rome, 25 Sept. 1521.
Hol. My lord Cardinal's grace.
26 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
347.
1608. CHARLES V. to his AMBASSADORS at CALAIS.
Has ordered the ratifications and safeconduct for the fishery to be sent off by the first post. In the French safeconduct they must provide for the article mentioned in the Admiral's letter and the safety of the dykes, if possible. Most of the towers and walls of Masieres have been battered, but the assault will not be hazarded. Hearing the enemy are coming, has given orders to provoke them to battle, and intends to lead in person a reinforcement of 300 horse and 18,000 infantry. Starts today for Mons. The sieur de Proisy has surrendered Mortagne, and the garrison have left. 26 Sept. 1621.
Fr., draft.
27 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
348.
1609. GATTINARA and others to CHARLES V.
Yesterday accompanied the ambassador of Hungary to the Legate, who told him the King of England could send but little assistance without the other chief princes, who could not do much while the war lasted. He then told Gattinara that the French chancellor said his master had ordered him to return, seeing the other party were so haughty, unless the Legate wished him to remain; adding that his master's affairs were prospering everywhere, for the imperial and papal armies had abandoned Parma and gone towards Reggio, when they heard that Lautrec had crossed the Po; at Masieres Zekinghe had abandoned his post, and crossed the water; the garrison there could always make sallies and receive succors; Navarre would be in four days in the King's power; but, notwithstanding, the Chancellor was to stay, if the Cardinal thought there was any likelihood of peace, or even of truce. Wolsey told him his intention was to bring about a peace, but, if that was very difficult, a truce; and asked him if the King would consent to a truce for this part only, omitting Italy. The Chancellor said he should advise the King to do so, for, besides being stronger than his enemies, he could not only reinforce his army, and guard the duchy of Milan, but could go thither, make a Pope at his will, and gain Naples and Sicily; but that, since it was a question of peace or truce, it would be better to suspend arms everywhere. Wolsey answered, that a peace would require a long time, and it would be better to endeavor to make a truce, and asked him to draw out articles for one. He made the same request to Gattinara, who answered that he had no such charge, but that at the first meeting overtures must be made for new treaties, as the old ones were broken, and the best way would be for each party to make their claims, Gattinara intending to claim the countries which Francis detains, and other rights. Wolsey can then make overture for a truce, if he please. He has since told them that he is at great expense in staying at Calais, and does not expect to recover his health till he crosses the sea. He suffers all these inconveniences for the Emperor's sake, and begs them to take some resolution for the truce.
The Emperor must consider the state of affairs in Navarre, Castile, Masieres, Italy and Tournay, and his finances, before deciding. Wolsey makes bitter complaints of some foot soldiers in the garrisons of West Flanders, who have taken a Frenchman prisoner; of the murder of a French peasant carrying fowls to Calais; and of the imprisonment at Nieuport of a young Genevese, whom he had commissioned to sell a jewel for Herman Rinck. He begs that these wrongs may be redressed, as otherwise some of the Emperor's subjects will be exposed to arrest. Advises Charles to write to him, or to commission them to say that the three points above will be attended to, so that he shall be content. Calais, 27 Sept.
Fr.
28 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
352.
1610. GATTINARA to CHARLES V.
When ready to go to the Cardinal, Boleyn came to say that the French chancellor was ill, and Wolsey would let them know when he was well enough to meet them. About 5 o'clock the Cardinal sent the master of the Rolls to say, that the president of Paris and La Bastie had been with him, and they had heard from their master that the Papal and Imperial army had raised the siege of Parma, and retreated six miles; that Lautrec was within the town, and considered it secure; that the duke of Ferrara, with 3,000 foot and 200 men-at-arms, had taken Corregio and Final; that in Switzerland everything was as he wished; that Syon had fled from Zurich to save himself; that Octavian Sforce, the bishop of Laude, was banished; that they had intercepted letters from Charles to Syon, showing that the Emperor had intelligence with England, of which they had sent copies to Wolsey. These are the letters he wrote from Gand, when the ambassadors were sent here first, saying that they were not sent for peace or truce, but to conclude his affairs with England. From this they wish to infer that the Cardinal only crossed the sea to abuse the French. They said also, that the siege of Masieres was raised, and Charles's army had crossed the river; that the French had victualled it, and were in no fear of losing it; and that Nassau had failed in some enterprise against Sedan, losing more than 100 men.
The Cardinal was displeased at the letters having been intercepted, and wished to know what news we had from Italy and the Swiss. He thought, if Masieres was abandoned before making the truce, the French would be less inclined to condescend to it, and was afraid that the delay had been too long to commence it now. He desired Gattinara to procure the liberty of a messenger from the French ambassadors to the King, who had been taken between Calais and Boulogne, of whose capture the Chancellor had complained, and said that another messenger had stopped on the road, not daring to go on. Being alone, thanked the master of the Rolls for the news, and showed him letters from Prospero Colonna to prove that matters in Italy were not so bad as the French represented. As to Switzerland, had no news; but could not believe Syon had left, unless he had found means to raise men to go to Milan. If it was true that the bishop of Laude was banished from Switzerland, it was good for them, as he opposed the Duke, and sided with France. As to the letters, said the Cardinal ought to ask for the originals, which he was sure Syon had received. They might have got a copy sent to the Lords of the Leagues, but there was nothing in the letter to support the charge, and Wolsey might tell the French this, and that, unless he had persuaded Charles, he would not have sent his ambassadors, from which he can show that he has done more for the French than for Charles. Knew nothing about Masieres of Nassau. As to the truce, he knew what had been considered, and the Legate could propose peace or truce, as he chose, when they would make their demands, and take time to deliberate. Promised to write to Beaureyn for the release of the messenger, and for the safety of future ones. Nicolas Mares, one of the ushers of the council, has murdered the usher of Gattinara's chamber. Wishes provision to be made for his wife and child at Saragossa. The post has just arrived with his letters of the 22d, and those of Lalemand. Has also received letters of the 27th, from Lalemand, who is with Madame, saying that they are to take no notice of the contents until he writes again. Heard of the surrender of Mortaigne eight days ago, from Norcarme, As to the powder, an answer is expected from London. Writes also to Lalemand. Calais, 28 Sept. 1521.
Fr.
Calig. D. VIII.
157.
B. M.
St. P. I. 62.
1611. WOLSEY to HENRY VIII.
understands by letters received from Pace, (fn. 2) dated the 20th, that the King wonders Wolsey should have so much faith in the French king, with other points to the same effect. First, the King had required Wolsey's opinion whether his subjects should repair to Bordeaux. He had accordingly advised, without intending to impute diffidence to the King, to send some ships to Bordeaux to avert suspicion. Defends the opinion he gave on that occasion, as Henry was not at liberty to break with Francis; otherwise Wolsey "would not for anything earthly" have acted as mediator between the King and the Emperor. There is a great difference between a promise made by word of mouth and one assured by oath and seal; and it was upon the latter that Wolsey relied. None of Henry's subjects knows better than Wolsey does the King's integrity in keeping his word; and if other princes were as scrupulous as he, peace would never be broken in Christendom. (fn. 3) Before he gave his opinion of the Bordeaux voyage, had heard that redress was made of complaints. Has received a letter from Mr. Secretary of the capture of two English ships, one taken to Boleyn and the other to Scotland. The complaint of Roche and Birch. Will endeavor, with the aid of the chancellor of France, to get justice done. Does not think with the King that the voyage of his subjects to Bordeaux should be deferred till (fn. 4) "Candlemas, so that by virtue of a truce to be taken here, they may then resort thither in surety. Under your favor and correction your said subjects, in mine opinion, shall be in more danger going then to Bordeaux than now; for if some suspicion and distrust be taken now by the French king, as your grace judgeth by the strange entreaty of your ambassador in his court, it is to be supposed that by that time it shall be further spread and increased. And to say that, if the treaty not yet declared to be broken, the placard, safeconduct and all the other remedies before touched cannot now stand in stead, tha[n] the abstinence of war, which may be as soon broken (if there be no trust), as all the other assurance cannot then prevail; specially considering that the amity betwixt you and the French king is not yet declared to be violate;" and while it remains in force, no truce can be taken between you and him, for that presupposes a rupture; therefore this truce must only be taken between the Emperor and the French king, for the indemnity of their subjects, which cannot help your subjects. The Emperor and the French will be both bound by the articles and the promise of their ambassadors to the indemnity of their subjects; whereas by the truce no such assurance can be made, as the King will not be a party to it. These remedies now provided, therefore, will serve your subjects better at this time than the abstinence of war will then, especially the safeconduct comprised in the placard for the resort of the English to France, of which I send you the original. If princes usually observe safeconducts to enemies, it is not to be supposed they will break them to friends, under the color of peace. On the other hand, the second vintage is commonly in February, about the Purification, and it is agreed by the treaty that the Emperor is to be with you in England in the latter end of that month, when the distrust will be largely increased among the French; and although the English might go in safety, they would not be able to procure wines of the second vintage for the entertainment of the Emperor, which would be a great want; for every town through which he passes, from his arrival in your realm till he go to Falmouth, must be furnished with wines abundantly. "And whereas it is further written that by this treaty taken with the Emperor it is sufficiently provided for your indemnity in the pension of France, to be paid by the Emperor if the French king refuse;" that depends upon your declaration, and it would be well to get this next payment made by the French king if possible. It is hard to say what the French king will be able to do next year in setting forth an army either by sea or land, although it is said his treasury is exhausted, as all the substance of his realm is wholly at his command. "And whereas it is alleged that my doubt is solved by mine own writing by these words: 'I suppose the French king shall not provoke your enmity, but conserve amity:' Sir, if my letter be well regarded, I writ that clause conditionally," that is to say, unless he be driven thereto by distrust. I have not written to oppose your opinion, but only to show the mind of myself and others of the council here, and the real meaning of my letters, which we are very sorry have been misunderstood.
Draft, corrected by Ruthal; mutilated.
29 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
358.
1612. GATTINARA and others to CHARLES V.
Met the Cardinal today; the Nuncio and the bp. of Elna were absent on account of illness. Wolsey commenced by advising a peace, and showing the necessity of new treaties, when they stated all the Emperor's old demands, claiming the duchy of Burgundy, the viscounty of Auxonne, &c.; 4,000 livres annually for Ostrevant; and the performance of the fondacions for the death of Duke John, according to the treaty. On behalf of Spain they demanded Narbonne, Montpelier, Toulouse, and Languedoc; for Navarre, Bierne, the counties of Foix and Bigorne, Champagne and Brye; and for the Empire, the kingdom of Arles, &c., the duchies of Milan and Genoa, and the county of Ast, with fruits and arrears since the occupation. The Chancellor denied these claims. They will meet again tomorrow at 3, and Wolsey will send the bp. of Ely and the master of the Rolls. Intend to listen to what the French propose. If they propose nothing, will propose the two following points: 1. That all treaties shall be considered void, and each in possession of the rights and claims held previous to the treaties; 2. That the king of England should be mediator in all the quarrels. Although they think the French will not consent, will get the Cardinal to say he will be content with these overtures, if there is a truce meanwhile, with the Pope's consent; and if he will not agree to a truce in Italy, a truce can be made on this side the mountains. Will take opportunity to ask Charles about these overtures, so as to gain time for the enterprise of Tournay, and to see if the Swiss can join the other army, which would win the game. Wolsey was angry that they had not the ratification when the French offered to produce theirs, for he had written to his master that the articles were granted; and if he found it was otherwise, it would bring Charles more harm than he thinks. He will go away, unless it arrives on Wednesday or Thursday. An article for the dykes can be afterwards inserted. He says if the French messenger and all he had is not returned, he will have one of Charles's people detained; and he makes similar threats about the Genevese taken at Nieuport, who was coming to him. Calais, 29 Sept. 1521.
Fr.
29 Sept.
Calig. D. VIII.
98.
B. M.
1613. FITZWILLIAM to [WOLSEY].
"Please it your grace, that yesterday word came to the French king that the Emperor's ar[my had left] Mesieres, and be reculed; and this day the said French King remove[d hence] towards his camp. And afore he departed he shewed me [that the] Burgonyons have taken a little town of his, and killed men, wo[men and] children that were therein; but he sayeth he will be shortly with them, for Mons. de Bourbon is now within these fow[r] leagues with his band, and Mons. de Vendôme within these ten leagues; and so he will incontinentl[y] march with the said bands, the Swiss, and the rest of his army, [to] the place where the Burgonyons be; and in case they recoil not, he will surely give them battle. And if they recoil he will be m[ete] with them shortly another way for the displeasures they have done h[im]; but into what part of the Emperor's countries he intendeth to go in c[ase] they recoil, I cannot as yet learn. Also he showed me that a cape[tain] Francisco is departed from Mons. de Nassau, and that they two be fallen at variance, insomuch that they were at their swords drawing. And they saith they have the reigning sickness marvellously sore amongst them in their camp. Furthermore t[his] day Robert de la March came to the court, and the French king showed me he had done [a] marvellous good service, for sithence Brione and Mons. de Mesiers entered into his castle of Asden, as I wrote to your grace in my last letters sent by the French post, he saith they have th[ree] times distressed the victuals of the Burgundians, insomuch that for lack of the same they were fain to recule, which b[e] no heavy tidings in these parties.
"Also, on Friday last past, the duke of Albany for a truth ca[me] to the court, for this day I saw him; and I understand the Admiral goeth forward on his journey, but I hear of nothing he hath done as yet. And as in Italy I hear say the Emperor's army recules still, and that the duke of Ferrara hath won a town or two of the Emperor's; but I will not assure your grace that this is true, for I hear it but by common bruit.
"Also, by the next letters I send to your grace, I shall advertise you surely what number the French king's army is, as well horsemen as footmen, and what artillery they have, for, as I hear say, the French king will be in his camp within these two days." Pountfeverger, 29 Sept.
Hol., mutilated, p. 1; cipher.
R. O.2. The same, deciphered by Tuke.
29 Sept.
Galba, B. VI.
74*.
B. M.
1614. DE LANNOY to the ENGLISH AMBASSADORS at MONS.
Has received their letters, and apprised the Emperor of their arrival. The Emperor, hearing that Mons was infected by the plague, has sent the grand bailly of Hainault to ascertain, by tomorrow at dinner time, whether it has grown worse, as they say this will be best known at waning of the moon (sur le deffault de ceste lune.) His majesty, if he go to Mons, will not stay there long, as he desires to advance upon his enemies. Bins, 29 Sept. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
30 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
365.
1615. CHARLES V. to GATTINARA.
Has discussed the partial truce mentioned in his letters of the 24th, but thinks it will not be to his honor or profit. Wolsey should also solicit the Pope's consent to the truce, for he has great influence with him. He must remember to ask for the powder. Bins, 30 Sept. 1521.
Fr., draft.
30 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
363.
1616. CHARLES V. to his AMBASSADORS at CALAIS.
Has not answered their letters of the 24th, on account of his preparations for advancing towards the enemy. Consented, at the Legate's request, to the articles for the fishery, thinking they would be signed in time for his subjects to fish; but the French have so delayed the matter that now they would be prejudicial to him. They must tell the Legate this; but if he persists, they may promise that the ratification shall arrive in three days. As to the Legate's saying that the regent of France, at his request, had written to the ambassadors to treat for truce, if a peace was impossible, they shall say that he has letters of the 8th from his viceroys, and has seen others of the 13th, with good news from Spain and Navarre, and that he is going to join his army here with 18,000 foot and a goodly number of horse; nevertheless, he is inclined to take Wolsey's advice, knowing that he will regard his honor and profit, and wishes to know what conditions the French have proposed. Will consent if he can do so honorably. Wishes for a general cessation of war, if the Pope will consent. Sends the copy of a letter from his ambassador de Burgo, by which they will see how the Turk is gaining ground. They must show it to the Legate. Bins, 30 Sept. 1521.
Fr., draft.
30 Sept.
R. O.
1617. SIR RIC. WINGFIELD and SPINELLY to WOLSEY.
Wrote last from Brussels on the 27th; came since to Mons, at the Emperor's order. He intended to come here, but has gone to Bynse, three leagues hence, for fear of the plague. Wrote to the Grand Escuyer to know the Emperor's pleasure, and enclose his answer. Will hear today from the bailly of Hennego whether the Emperor comes or not. Last night the Marechal des Logis paid them a visit at the Emperor's wish. The Emperor's coming will depend upon the reports of the Bailly and others, who were inquiring whether the sickness had spread at the renewing of the moon. The Marechal told us that lord Nassawde was on this side Masieres, and had been in want of victuals by reason of Robert de la Marche, and his men had suffered much from the flux. Nassau wished to return to the Emperor, but the latter sent him word by Monforte, that he must remain. From disease, desertion, and dissensions among the captains, they are not so prosperous as formerly, as their enemies no doubt know. The Emperor has a fresh band of horse and foot, but he will have to join those who have been infected and lost their courage. Considering that the season is so far past, we think he should not do so, if any other means can be found to save his reputation, but we do not know how you would wish us to act in this matter. Mons in Hennego, 30 Sept. between 8 and 9 o'clock in the forenoon. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: To my lord Cardinal's good grace.
Vit. B. IV.
156.
B. M.
1618. [CLERK to WOLSEY.]
On the 14th certified him of the delivery of the King's book to the Pope, and of the Pope's pleasure for the commissions of the peace; according to Wolsey's commission of the 26th Aug.,—of the duke of Ferrara having set forward with 300 men-at-arms and a number of foot, and how the Pope's army being at Parma, and likely to obtain it by treaty, had retired, fearing the Duke's enterprise against Reggio or Modena. The French have revictualled it, and the Pope is much displeased. The Pope had proposed to raise money by creating cardinals, and has since borrowed 300,000 ducats, and in Rome 200,000. Knows of two persons who had offered 40,000 or 50,000 ducats each for the cardinalate. The Pope has refused to create them, as they would lean to France. The French king has 5,000 or 6,000 Swiss in pay at Milan; but some, as the Pope says, have gone home again for want of wages. They will only join the Pope for defence. His army is only three miles this side Parma. Does not expect much from it.
Hol., cr., deciphered, pp. 4.
30 Sept.
Mon. Habs.
373.
1619. CHARLES V. to GATTINARA.
Has received his letters of the 28th Sept., and has already sent a short answer. Is well satisfied with what he has done. Has bestowed the vacant place in his household as he wished.
Fr., draft.
Mon. Habs.
372.
1620. CHARLES V. to his AMBASSADORS at CALAIS.
Has received their letters of the 27th and 29th Sept. As there is no means of treating for peace, a truce must be arranged, as he has already written, while waiting to see what happens to his army in Italy. They must try and discover what the French will propose, so as to answer it, as he supposes they have already done, or in default to propose the two methods mentioned in their last letters. His wish for the repose of Christendom, and for the repulse of the Turks, who are in Hungary, induces him to consent to a truce, and he will try to persuade the Pope to it. They are to discuss the truce without stating that they have any charge about it. Knows nothing of the French messenger and the Genevese servant taken prisoners, but writes for their release to please the Legate.
Fr., draft.
Sept./GRANTS.1621. GRANTS in SEPTEMBER 1521.
12. Sir John Talbot and 'Margaret his wife. Licence to alienate the manor of Albrighton, and parts of the manors of Eggemoundon, Fordysham, Newport, Salop, Monyngton-on-Way and Dyllewyn, Heref., with lands, to Sir John More, Sir Th. More, and Anth. Fitzherbart. Also licence to Sir John, Sir Thomas and Anthony to regrant the premises to Sir John Talbot and lady Margaret, with remainder to John, son and heir. Westm. (sic), 12 Sept.—Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 3, m. 19.
13. John Dalton, of London, merchant-tailor. Protection; going in the retinue of lord Berners, deputy of Calais. Signed: John Berners. Del. Calais, 13 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII.—P.S.
23. John Wiar, of London, salter. Protection; going in the retinue of lord Berners, deputy of Calais. Calais, 20 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII. Del. Calais, 23 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII.—P.S.
24. Th. Stanwey, of Ippiswich, Suff., merchant; also of Hertford Bridge, in co. "Hampt." Protection; going in the retinue of lord Berners, deputy of Calais. Signed: John Berners. Del. Calais, 24 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII.—P.S.
26. Roger Pantwall. Lease of the farm called Blakwyne, in the lordship of Maunsell Lacy, parcel of the earldom of March, for twenty-one years; rent 20s., and 3s. 4d. of increase. Del. Calais, 26 Sept. 13 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 1.
30. Th. Alford. To be spigurnel, alias sealer or signer, in the Chancery. Calais, 30 Sept.—Pat. 13 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 2.

Footnotes

1 There is some confusion in the original, owing probably to the words "Nous avons repondu" having been accidentally omitted.
2 Another and shorter draft of the first part of this letter is in Calig. E. II. 25. and is printed by Strype (Mem. I. 28.) The second portion in Calig. E. II. 23. is printed by Strype at page 30.
3 Here commences Calig. E. II. f. 31. which is followed by Strype (Mem. I. 31.) These drafts are in Ruthal's hand, and were printed by Strype as three separate letters.
4 The remainder of the letter is in Galba, B. VII. f. 55.