Henry VIII
February 1524, 1-14

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Institute of Historical Research

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J. S. Brewer (editor)

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1875

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35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41

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'Henry VIII: February 1524, 1-14', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 4: 1524-1530 (1875), pp. 35-41. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91186 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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February 1524

1 Feb.
R. O.
86a. JAMES STEWARD, POSTULATE OF DRYBURGH, to MATTHEW STEWARD, VICE CHANCELLOR OF MAYBOLE.
The lord of Lennox has given him the abbey of Dryburgh, which he had received from the Governor, to be disposed of for relief of his house and himself. Lennox has written to lord D'Aubigny for the bulls of the said abbey, which will not cost above 300 ducats. Begs him to solicit D'Aubigny, with all diligence, to leave the said bulls as security for the money in the hands of some banker at Paris or Lyons. Although the writer has the name of the benefice, "my lord of Lennox man (must) have the profit." Is to use the best speed for the sake of all parties. Glasgow, 1 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
1 Feb.
R. O.
87. THOMAS CROMWELL.
Fragment of an award between _ Bolt and Wm. Vyneyerd relating to a house. 1 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII.
Signed: Per me, Robt. Warner: Per me, Thomam Crumwell: Per me, John Purser.
P. 1.
1 Feb.
Vit. B. VI. 1.
B. M.
88. ITALY and CLEMENT VII.
"Extracts of letters written in cifres unto my [lord Legate] from Rome, by my lord of Bath and other the [King's am]bassadors there, of the first day of February."
The Pope tells them that Beaurayn is arrived at Genoa with the Emperor's letter to the duke of Bu[rbon], desiring him rather to remain in Italy than to go into Spain, for which intent he has been waiting at Genoa for a wind. The Emperor has made him lieutenant-general of his army in Lombardy, and has ordered the Viceroy to be obedient to him. The Duke is now going to Milan. Beaurayn is coming to treat with the Pope; the Pope does not know for what, but promises to tell them as soon as he knows. He hourly expects Mons. Mer[san] coming from the French king to treat of peace; but his Holiness will do nothing without the consent of the Imperial and English ambassadors. Francis makes great offers to draw the Pope to his side, and has promised large pensions to those who influence him. He is in great perplexity, fearing for the duchy of Milan; for Francis has lately sent to his army there 100,000 cr., and written to his Ad[myral] that the Imperial army coming from Spain is dissolved, and he intends to join his army as soon as he has finished a process for the deprivation of Bourbon. "The duke of Milan and the viceroy of Naples ha[ve] ... They have had by the Pope's means of the Florentines for a ... as may sustain their army against the French men until the my[ddle of the] month of March next ensuing." They say they will strike battle, and have begun to skirmish. They have slain 300 Swiss, and taken and killed as many horsemen. The Pope says two things put him in great perplexity. The Emperor's ambassadors wish him to bear all the charges of the war; which he cannot do, for in this see he found not the treasure of one groat sterling; and he cannot put the Florentines to excessive expense for other men's profit. If he knew the way the King would take for peace or truce, he would declare his mind. Thinks he should be informed of the King's mind, lest he should be compelled by necessity to do something contrary to the King's intention. All the court, which lives by the profits of expeditions sent out of France, are anxious to join his Holiness with the French king. Francis has written to his admiral that he is sure of him. Heard this from the duke of Suessa.
Interrupt the French practices to the best of their power, but they fear that unless the King and Wolsey help they will labour in vain. The duke of Suessa has asked them to go with him to ask the Pope to show * * * [since he] "hath obtained his high dignity then he hath done hith[erto]." The Duke intends to make the Pope declare against the French king. Have told the Duke that they will be always ready to do anything to further the common cause. Nothing would more cause the French king to abate his pride than for the Pope to declare against him. Remit to Wolsey whether the King had better allow him to come to Italy or not. Wolsey must write sharply if he intends to make the Pope declare against Francis.
P.S.—Mons. de Marshawe has arrived, and has had audience of the Pope, but has not declared the details of his commission. 6,000 lanceknights have lately arrived in the duchy of Milan, and the Venetians have ordered their army to join them, and then proceed to join the Emperor's army, which now numbers 30,[000] good footmen, and 2,700 men-at-arms, the French being much less in numbers.
Pp. 3. Endd.
3 Feb.
R. O.
89. JOHN LORD BERNERS to WOLSEY.
On the 3rd of this month, a Flemish prisoner, who had been kept in a house belonging to the writer's servant, came from Depe. He affirms that the letter which comes from Berners' servant, enclosed in this, is true. My lord Morley and other the King's ambassadors, and an ambassador from the Pope's Holiness, are waiting at Calais on account of the bad weather. Calais, Feb. 3.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
5 Feb.
Calig. B. VI.
445.
B. M.
90. JOHN DUKE OF ALBANY to DACRE.
Credence for John de Barbon. Edinburgh, 5 Feb. Signed.
Add.: "A mon cousin Mons. Dacres," &c.
Fr., p. 1.
5 Feb.
R. O.
91. [ALBANY to FRANCIS I.]
Desires credence for his secretary Jehan de Barbon, whom he sends with information about the prospects of peace between Scotland and England. Wishes to know his pleasure, which he will do his best to accomplish. Edinburgh, 5 Feb.
Fr., copy, p. 1.
5 Feb.
Calig. B. VI.
446.
B. M.
92. SCOTLAND.
1. Albany to Dacre.
Has received his letter by Karicq, and the credence and articles of John More. Sends an answer by John de Barbon. Edinburgh, 5 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Addressed as before.
2. Barbon's instructions.
Calig. B. VI.
325.
B. M.
"Pour respondre à ce que le seigner Dacres a envoyé, tant de la part du Roy son maistre que de luy par Carrik et Jehan More son secretaire, et par articles soubzscriptz de sa main. Fera entendre Jehan de Barbon, secretaire de monseigneur le gouverneur d'Escosse, depar ledict Sieur, ce que sensuyt":—
1. That, seeing no truce or comprehension could be made until some expedient be taken for preventing incursions, Albany is content that ambassadors be sent under safe-conduct, with power to pass over to France, like surceance of war being meanwhile granted by England to France, if the king of France will accept it. If France will not accept, Albany will. 2. Is to urge Dacre to put an end to these disputes, as delay occasions danger. 3. If he has no power to conclude, he is to accelerate the posts, as Albany trusted on the last occasion to have received an answer within 12 days. Will send one of his own servants with the post, if Dacre thinks fit, who, in the event of England's compliance, might pass into France. The said messenger to speak for prisoners, and recover such as he can out of France. 4. In reply to Dacre's proposal that Albany should visit England, he must know for certain if Henry desires the same, and on what conditions, as it would not be to his honor to make such a journey in vain. If so, the King must make it appear by his writings, subscribed by his hand. With such securities he will be willing to communicate with Wolsey, and will be better able to prevail with the lords. 5. Must know what respect is to be paid to him. If Dacre pleases, he may send Barbon to Wolsey, with permission to go or send to France. Meantime abstinence of war is to be taken between France and England, biding the answer of France. If it is needful for the king of England to advertise the king of Castile, Barbon shall require from France a safe-conduct for the messenger. Albany will spare no pains in going to Rome to promote the peace so much required by Christendom. 6. If Barbon likes appearances, he is to go to England, thence to France, or else return. If he does not pass, shall send Carrick, if Dacre agrees. If England consents, and Henry subscribes the conclusion with his own hand, and will send Barbon into France, he is to notify Albany. If he will not, nor give security for his passage, as he requires, subscribed by the King or the Cardinal, he shall advertise Albany thereof with all diligence, and send notice to France. 7. If England will consent, Albany will pass through the realm to repair to France and consult with the Pope. He will spare no pains. Edinburgh, 5 Feb. 1523.
Fr., pp. 9.
Add. MS.
24,965,f.161b.
B. M.
3. English translation of the preceding, in Dacre's letter book.
Pp. 6.
8 Feb.
Vit. B. VI. 3.
B. M.
93. CLERK, PACE, and HANNIBAL to DUKE [OF BOURBON].
The King their master is determined to persevere in the enterprise against the common enemy, as they hear by his letters of 27 Jan. Have declared them to the Pope, to his great satisfaction. Among other plans, the King intends to make a secret enterprise, beside the general one, by the aid of the Duke, and desires him to come to England as soon as possible, where he will be most honorably treated. The Emperor consents to this. Ask for an answer. Rome (ex Urbe), 8 Feb. 1524. Signed.
If the King had known that the Duke was still in Italy, and had not gone to Spain, he would have written, but, not knowing, he ordered them to write if he had not gone.
Ital., pp. 3. In Pace's hand.
8 Feb.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 166.
B. M.
94. DACRE to SIR THOS. FORSTER.
Hears that he has committed to ward Thompson, one of Candish's crew of 100 gunners, for taking certain goods in Scotland, and not giving them up. Neither the captain nor any other has power to assure any Scot without Dacre's consent. If they do, it is punishable. If they assure any Scot for obtaining information, they must inform Dacre in four days, if he be in the country; if absent, in four days after his return. Orders him to set Thompson at liberty without payment of gaol fees, till the captain returns, when Dacre will settle the matter with him. Being paymaster of the gunners, must see them ordered accordingly. Morpath, 8 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: "Copie of a lettre sent to Sir Thos. Forster, knight, marshall of Berwygk and deputie of the same, now in the absence of the capitain, and to others the counsall of the same."
8 Feb.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 165 b.
B. M.
95. DACRE to ALBANY.
Has received his letters of credence from Barbon and John More. Thanks him for the good mind he bears towards him, and for his offers. As Albany referred to him whether Barbon should return or go to Wolsey, has given him a safe-conduct to go; because, if he had returned to Albany, and Dacre had written, much time would have been lost. Thinks that, by his going, a final resolution will sooner be made, especially as Albany can conclude no surceance of war without advertising the French king. Will forward all letters from Barbon, or will send word of anything he hears. Morpath, 8 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII. 1523.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
8 Feb.
R. O.
St. P. IV. 71.
96. DACRE to WOLSEY.
Has received his instructions dated Westm. 22 Jan., with two safe-conducts in French. Wrote immediately to Albany, and encloses a copy of his letter which he sent by Carrick. Sent also a servant to Barbon, with credence about Albany's coming to England; of which there is a copy in the book he sends. Barbon took him to Albany, to whom he declared everything. Barbon, however, had previously written to say that Albany was gone to the West, but had left his intentions with the Chancellor and other lords. Sent, therefore, fresh instructions, of which he sends a copy, but they were useless, as Albany had returned. His servant was in Scotland 14 days, and returned with a letter from Albany, which he encloses. Barbon accompanied him, with instructions signed by Albany, of which he also forwards a copy. Wolsey will see that Albany wishes Barbon to go to England and obtain a safe-conduct, that he may show the French king what is being done; and if he will not accept the surceance of war, Albany will, and send ambassadors to England. Has given him a safe-conduct to go to Wolsey, as he had a credence to him; and Dacre thinks he has some privy instructions from the Duke, though it did not become him to ask anything about it. Albany has returned to Edinburgh. Before he left, he obtained licence from the lords, and made them promise not to take peace or truce with England without his consent. There is great dearth in Scotland. Wheat is 26s. 8d. a quarter, malt 24s., and oats 16s. There would be almost as great a dearth here if no ships came in. Morpath, the 8th night of Feb. 15 Hen. VIII. 1523. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 164.
B. M.
2. Copy of the preceding.
Pp. 3.
9 Feb.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 167.
B. M.
97. DACRE to SIR JOHN BULMER.
Writes today because he was "craysed" yesterday, and could not see him. Wishes him to discharge the watchmen of the East March, and the Northumberland men in his retinue. Ten of the eighty men assigned to keep Norham Castle can also be discharged, as there are ten gunners of Candishe's retinue in Berwick. If any of them are absent without licence he can check them. Morpath, 9 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: "Copie of a lettre to Sir John Bulmer, deputie to his fader, Sir William Bulmer, lieutenant of thest marche of England, foranempst Scotland."
9 Feb.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 167.
B. M.
98. DACRE to SIR WM. EURE.
Has paid to Sir William's servant, John Highington, a month's wages for him and his retinue, without any check, and wages for the watchmen of the Middle Marches within his charge. Now that Candlemas is past, and the cattle are so feeble that they will not drive, and besides, as he has spent all the King's money, and paid this month's wages himself, wishes him to discharge them immediately, and also the Northumberland men in his retinue, till more money arrives. Will see that those who are "no country men" are paid, even if he has to pay them out of his own purse. Barbon, Albany's secretary, has been here, and Dacre has sent him on to Wolsey. Morpath, 19 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: "Copie of a lettre to Sir Willm. Eure, knight, lieutenant of the Middle Marches of England, foranempst Scotland."
9 Feb.
R. O.
99. WOLSEY'S COLLEGES.
Grant by William abbot of Lesones, Kent, of an annuity to Ric. Clement of 10l., for the sum of 80l.; and a residence in the aforesaid monastery, called the Upper Gate-house. 9 Feb...Hen. VIII.
Lat., p. 1. Endorsed by Cromwell: "Ye wrote to me in your last letter that your errand was in good point. For God's sake forsake not that, and make much of them that offers it till ye know more. There can no man make me believe but as I have written. The 6th day at midnight, Master Pace hath written to me, and he opened the letter, but there was no harm in it." By Tuke: "Look whether the letter that came from Rome be opened or not."
Also endorsed: "Radulphus Mylforde versus Robertum Mellers, r. in 3 septimanas Paschæ atach."
11 Feb.
R. O.
100. MARGARET COUNTESS OF SALISBURY.
i. Two receipts by Margaret countess of Salisbury for 28l. and 40l. from Oliver Frankeleyn, her bailiff at Clavering, dated 2 July and 11 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII. Signed.
ii. Order for the payment of 5l. 11s. 10½d. to Frankeleyn, for repairs at Clavering for the year ending Mich. 15 Hen. VIII., including 500 paving tiles for the chapel, 20s.; laying them, and mending the wall, 5s.; a load of plain tile for the fermer hall, 5s.; four days to a tiler and his man for tiling the hall, 3s. 4d.; painting St. Edward and St. John in the chapel, 40s.; meting my Lady's woods there, 8d.; painting of a chamber for my Lady's council to lie in, 13s. 4d. Signed by the Countess.
iii. Receipt by Michael Byre of 15s. 6d. from the bailiff of Clavering. 17 Jan. 15 Hen. VIII. Signed.
13 Feb.
R. O.
101. CHARLES [DUKE OF BOURBON] to WOLSEY.
Wrote lately from Genoa to the King and Wolsey that the Emperor desired him to stay there. Received yesterday a letter from the English ambassador at Rome, dated the 8th inst., saying that the King wished him to go to him. Writes also to the King. With Wolsey's help and advice, affairs will be brought to a profitable issue. Will write often. Wishes to hear from him. "Au Camp de la Mothe," 13 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A mons. mon tres bon cousin et frere, mons. le legat d'Angleterre.
13 Feb.
Vit. B. VII. 53.
B. M.
102. BOURBON to [CLERK].
Has received his letters of the 8th from Rome, saying that the King wishes him to go to meet him. Has written to him, and encloses a copy. Assures him that his intention is to serve the Emperor and the King, as their affairs depend on each other. Asks him to send him news frequently.
Beaurayns is going to the Pope in four or six days, and will give Clerk information. "Au Camp de la Mothe," 13 Feb. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A monsr. lembassadeur pour le roy d'Angleterre a Romme.
13 Feb.
R. O.
103. HARRY [LORD] MARNY to LORD DARCY.
John Highfelde, Darcy's deputy steward at Dunstanburgh, lets and sells the iKng's land, as he says, by Darcy's order, who is steward and surveyor. Stewards have never done this, except to customary lands, of which there are none there. All other lands are let by the Chancellor of the duchy. There are many stewards and receivers in the duchies who have the same words in their patents, but they never let any but the customary lands. Prays him to refrain from doing so, as it belongs to Marney's office. One George Brotherwike has entered into certain of the King's lands, to the value of 4s. a year, of which the King is answered neither of his rent nor his other services. London, 13 Feb. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
14 Feb.
Calig. B. II.
290.
B. M.
104. ALBANY to BARBON. (fn. 1)
"Aujourduy seuleman, quy est le xiiij., jay resu les lestres et responsse de Mons. Dascres et de vous du viijme de se mois, et ay trouve bien estraunge de plus tost navoir eue la responsse, veu se que vous avois comande fayre tres exspresseman, et aussy le m'avies rescrist de Caldestram; du quiel lieu sestoist apsante Karic, auquiel jay faist connoistre quil la mal faist, et sy le ranvoye audit Cadestram pour n'an bouger et y faire, sen que li ay hordonne et m'envoyeret faire tenir les paques et lestres seureman; de la quyele chose je rescris a Mons. Dascres, suyvan se que maves mande, quil a acorde deles fere tenir seureman et courre, et ausy pour savoir la cause dela longue demeure des distes lestres, quy a este de vij. jours, et avant autres plus avan au austres propous (?) vous veus asouvenir pour ungne austre fois que de tiel lieu hou vous estes vous ne vous abuses plus a perdre le taumpz a rescrire a nul vivan que a moy; et nuse pas panse que eusies eu sy peu davis que dele faire comme aves. Sest asses pour seste foys queles sont tugbees (? tombées) an mes mains, et sy vous aves a despescher vostre frere, hou austres postes, ne le faistes plus, et sy luy desfandes de ne dyre riens a nul vyvan dumonde, ne ausy nest besoin quil antande riens des afaires, mes le tout soit tenus (?) secrest; et desa et dela, sy y passes hou anvoies estresises seste plume fors a moy, et la langue ancores plus; et par chifre hou austreman bien ampleman me porres donner avis delafaires pour le quiel estes, a se que mesages ne le puiset ascouter, ne nul vyvan que Mons. Dascres, quy me fera tenir toutes choses seureman, hou le ne porres despescher home seur; vous avisant que je suis contant de coy Mons. Dascre vous at ordonne et conseille vostre veage. Voise comman il porra aler, car il mest avis quil y va a bonne fin et intansion de vostre depars et pour le moins des mapart an aie faist le myen de voir sans quy puyse estre dist que par ma fauste soist demeure ne recule; et jay bonne esperance que tout yra bien, connoisan mons. le Cardinal personnage de sybon sans et vouloir pour parvenir a tiel effaist quil nest posible de plus, comen (fn. 2) vous ay donne charge a dreses vous du tout a luy et luy pries deparmoy que hou il ni auroist (?) aparansse de bon effaist il vous ranvoye tout aplus tost, et hou il li auroist bonne voye de venir a bon acort que jan puise estre averty par seluy que menvoyeres et par la poste antre deus, et selon que les choses pasent et aviendront de jour a austre, a se que la hou il se trouveroist dificultes et anpeschemans auvec son bon avis moians et invansions les racoustrer et adouber, car il ne tiendra a moy que je ny serve de tout le myen pouvoyr, et de sela lassasures (sic) et hou la surseans sera acordee, selon vos memoires et instructions auplus tost le me festes antandre, et ales au Roy et a Madame a laquele vous adreseres antante estreme dilyjansse hou anvoyes selon vos distes instrucsions et sur tout que dans le terme a moy prefis par vos lestres je puise avoir vostre response sur toutes choses et par seurte bien ampleman sans y estre pareseus ne faire fauste, et sy pases an Franse solisites ny ... jamais (?) vostre despesche et retour, car illan (il en) est besoin, connoisant les longueurs acoutumees, et anvoyes a ma fame ungnes lestres que luy anvoye an chifre pour nos afaires, a se quele aist de mes nouveles bien seureman, se me fera gran plaisir et ne (?) le faistes exstreme dilyjansse sans riens descouvrir ne dela ne desa autrepar que an aves la charge. Je ranvoye Caric a Kadestram pour fere les delijansses an seurte. A Edambourg, se xiiijme fevrier.—Jehan."
A P.S. of 13 lines in cipher follows.
In margin: "Dysy an aula (?) mestes chifres perdues cant sera besoin man anvoyer, car je ne veus que mesages entandest (?) riens."
Hol., Fr., pp. 3. Add.: A Jehan de Barbon, mon secretaire a Londres.
14 Feb.
R. O.
105. SEDITION at COVENTRY.
Receipt by William Umpton, of Coventry, draper, for 10l. from Sir John Daunce, by the King's commandment, as reward for discovering the insurrection intended to have been made by Francis Philippe and his adherents at Coventry, in addition to 5 mks. formerly received at Hampton Court. 14 Feb. 15 Hen. VIII. Signed.

Footnotes

1 The handwriting of this letter is very careless, and one or two of the words ambiguous. There is no punctuation in the original.
2 For "comme en" (?)