Henry VIII
March 1524, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

J. S. Brewer (editor)

Year published

1875

Pages

64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82

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'Henry VIII: March 1524, 16-31', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 4: 1524-1530 (1875), pp. 64-82. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=91189 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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March 1524

16 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 182.
B. M.
163. FRANKELEYN to DACRE.
Has received by Chr. Thirlkilde his letter and a book of his accounts for Norham. Both himself and the auditor are so busy that they cannot look at it now. When he comes home after Easter will attend to it. Leaves on Thursday next, and asks Dacre if he has any commands for the South. Duresme, 16 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
17 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 186.
B. M.
164. DACRE to ALBANY.
Has received his letter dated Edinburgh, 14 inst.
Considering that great incursions and warden rodes would greatly hinder the present business, and that it would be meritorious to stop them as Passion time is coming on, is content that none shall be made till he hears from the King or Council, and advertises Albany. Supposes by that time Barbon will have returned. He shall not be delayed after he arrives in England. Morpath, 17 March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
19 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 184.
B. M.
165. LORD DARCY to LORD DACRE.
Has today received the King's letters, ordering him to prepare 100 horse for garrisons on the Borders, where Dacre thinks most convenient, and that the latter will pay them for coats, conduct money, and wages. Wishes to know when and where he will have them, and whether he will be content with men from Bywell and other places in Northumberland and the Bishopric, who are meetly well horsed. Reminds him that this country was never called upon for horsemen before these wars, that their nags are "evill, and at gresse," and that the provision of victuals in the Marches will not be likely to improve unless the seas are better looked after. Asks credence for the bearer. At my cabin at Templehirst, 19 March. Will not lack good will to serve the King as Dacre thinks best. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
20 March.
R. O.
166. THOMAS CROMWELL.
Thomas Cromwell, dwelling besides the Freres Haustyans, owes, from 30 Sept. 1523 to 29 Feb. 1524, for a quarter of ling, 32s. 8d.; 27 yds. black velvet, at 9s. and 9s. 6d.; 3 gold rings with sapphires, 8l.; 7 yds. of fine black sey, at 3s. 4d.; a gold bracelet with a jacinth, 6l. 13s. 4d.; 1¼yd. fine black satin, at 9s.; total [30l. 8s. 1d.] Due to Cromwell from 3 Oct. 1523 to 20 March 1524: for ready money received from him, 16l. 8s.; for two rings taken back, 4l. 13s. 4d.; for money "laid out for me Mr. Recorder," 6s. 8d.; total [21l. 8s.]
Pp. 2. Endd.: Mr. Vaughan.
20 March.
R. O.
167. ACCOUNTS IN ZEALAND AND ELSEWHERE.
"Payments paid by me, William Seyntpeir, in Selond, and Brabond, and Flanders, about the King's business, as it appeareth in another book."
Received, of Wm. Lelegrow, to convey the ships out of Zealand to Calais and other places, 285l. (fn. 1) From Sir John Daunce to prest John Degilders and Adrion Johnson, from London to Berwick, 5l. st. = 7l. 10s. Fl. To convey two ships laden with clappole and barrel board from Calais to Portsmouth, by command of the Cardinal, 30l.; in prest for their wages, 20l. From Lelegrow, at Dunkirk, Newport, Antwerp, Zealand, and Holland, to make up every last of small barrels, 6s. st.; for the large barrels, 9s. st. 97l. 15s. Fl. paid to coopers and others. For a ship recovered in the "Amarlte" court, against John Williams, of Tergose, 60l. 4s. He charges himself with 37½ last of small barrels, 16l. 17s. 6d., 18,000 hoops at 7s. a 1,000, and 900 "bothens" at 9s. that were deficient in the Sovereign. Total, 526l.
Dunkirk, 20 March 1523, costs of shipping barrel boards. To Matthew Cowper and his eight fellows, for the carriage of 130 lasts of barrel boards to the water side, 21s. 8d.; toll, 38s. 3d. To Thos. Brasse, for carrying the above from the water to the store house in London, 11s. 6d.; for carrying 35 lasts, 4s. 6d. To John Erdeley, for lading the said 130 lasts and 5,000 hoops in John Degyley's ship at London to go to Berwick, by the Cardinal's order, 19s. For part payment of the freight, 4l. 10s. To John Estall, rent of a house for the boards, &c., 2l. 10s. To Adrian Bartells, for the freight of the said goods, 6l. 10s. Total, 18l. 3s. 11d.
Lading of 5,500 clappole and 16,000 hoops from London to Berwick, by Adrian Johnson, by command of the Cardinal, 15s. To Peter Barker, for unloading at Berwick, 33s. 6d. To Johnson, for freight, 3l. To Jacob Johnson and his fellows, unloading the clappole at London, 12s. 6d. To Gyles Robyn, freight of boards and hoops sent from Dunkirk to Berwick, 15l. To Antony Stoveler, for freight, 17l. 10s. To Henry Franke, 11l. 5s. Total, 49l. 17s._To the master of the "warkeners," for the carriage of 24,500 hoops to the ships, 8s. 2d. Customs, 2l. 0s. 5d. Unloading the stuff at Berwick, 10 May to 23 July, 2l. 12s. 9d. Ladders, 2l. 10s. 4d. Seyntpere's expenses from London to Berwick, 24 days, 4l. Presting seven coopers of Dunkirk to go to Berwick, 3l. 10s. Their conduct money from Berwick to London, 30s. Presting six men of London to go to Berwick, 4l. 10s. Housing the barrels they made at Berwick. Total, 27l. 9s.
Newporte. For freight from Newport to Calais, to Adrian Johnson, 5l. Adrian Bosse, 2l. 2s. 6d. John Verlor, 35s. Carrying 173 lasts of barrel boards to the water side, 28s. 10d. Telling the same, 2d. a last. Carriage of 1,000 clappole, 12s. Toll, 3l. 4s. Total, 20l. 11s. 2d.
Osteyende. Meill Feynke, freight to Calais, 3l. 10s. Carriage of 130 lasts of barrel boards, 21s. 8d. Toll, 31s. Total, 7l. 9s. 4d.
Selond and Holond. To Wm. Garsson, carriage of 291½ last of barrel boards on to the ships at Flushing, 2l. 10s.; and to Adrion Mathewson, at Camfere, 2l. 12s. 7d. Carriage of 291½ last of "bothens," at 2d. a last, and 11,000 hoops at 4d. the 1,000. Telling the above, 7l. 14s. 6d. Toll at Fiossyng, Ermew, Canfere, and Tergo, 21l. 7s. Freight from Selond to Holonde, 3l. Selond to Calais, 3l. 6s., &c. Total, 79l.
Costs of discharging 15 ships from Newport, Ostend, Zealand, and Holland, at Calais, Seyntpere being only bound to deliver them at the water side. 882 loads at 1½d. and 2d. a load; total, 6l. 17s. 1½d. Stuff carried from one store house to another, 4l. 1s. 10d. For discharging 928½ lasts of unwrought wood, 251 lasts of bothens, and 24,825 hoops from the 15 ships, at 2d. a last, and the hoops at 6d. a 1,000. Wages of men repairing the barrels, 8d. a day. Total, 30l. 13s. 10d.
Wages of the coopers attending on the ships at Zealand and Holland, from 1 April to 11 August, at 8d. st. a day; total, 71l. 10s. Fl. Wages of Ric. Blake, Seyntpere's servant, and Thos. Brasse, 19 Feb. to 10 Aug., at 8d. st. a day. Seyntpere's costs for two years and a half, 91l. To Clesse, of Danycke, for going into England to ask Daunce whether the ships should go, 26s. 8d. Total, 159l. 2s.
Costs of the goods shipped at Antwerp. Prests to various men, by indenture. Wages of labourers housing 1,439 lasts at 2d. a last, carrying them to the ships at 3d., and 128,000 hoops at 6d. the 1,000. Telling, at 2d. a last. Toll at Antwerp, 4l. 13s. 4d. Toll of Frank Antony's and Chr. Cornell's ships, 30s. Seyntpere's costs in prison at Camfere, and for sending his servant to England for money, and to see Dr. Knight, for remedy for the action the shippers had against him, 15l. Total, 140l. 2s. 10d.
Cost of the lading of two ships from Calais to Portsmouth. Seyntpere's costs from London to Calais, 15s. Wages of laborers, 6d. st. a day, from 22 July to 7 Aug. For surveying the barrels, hoops, &c. that remain in Calais, 42s. Carriage at Calais, 1½d. and 2d. a load, 3l. House rent, for 1¼ yr., at 5s. st. the quarter, 35s. Fl. Seyntpere's costs, 15s. Total, 16l. 2s.
Costs of going to Portsmouth to discharge the ships. For freight, to John a Baro, 6l. 11s. 6d.; to Thos. Parce, 10l. 13s. Hire of a horse from London to Portsmouth, 18s. 18 days food for himself and horse, 27s. Costs riding to the More and St. Albans to get money from the Cardinal, 30s. Total, 20l. 19s. 6d.
Freight paid for the long lying of the ships in Zealand. To Adrion Johnson, Adrion Busse, John Mathews, and others, at a rate varying from 5l. to 11l. a month. Total, 98l. 3s. 6d.
He makes the following demands for payment. For house rent at Calais, Portsmouth, Berwick, and London, 30l.; for barrels, as appears by Lelegrow's book, 97l. 14s. 10d.; for 374 lasts and 1104 barrels made at Calais and Berwick, 5s. on every last; and for 156 lasts, at 6s. a last. Total, 315l. 14s. 4d.
Spent in recovering John Williams' ship in the Admiralty court, 9l. 14s. 10d.
Total of payments and demands, 1,074l. 6s. 6d. Prests, losses of barrels, &c., 526l. Remainder due to Seyntpere, 548l. 6s. 6d.
He also demands to be allowed 25l. 11s. for loss of barrels, hoops, &c., which were destroyed from their long lying.
P. 21. Many items are signed by the receivers of the money.
21 March.
Add. MS.
24,265, f. 183b.
B. M.
168. LORD DACRE to LORD DARCY.
Received by the bearer his letter dated Templehirst, 19 inst. The King and Cardinal wish the garrisons to consist of men from Yorkshire and elsewhere, but no more than six Northumberland men in every 100, to act as guides; so that he can levy his 100 men anywhere except in that county. They must come to Morpeth, and shall have their conduct money and wages accordingly. Assures him that he did not advise the King to call upon Darcy and others so far off, for he thinks it better that the men should have been taken nearer, as the number is not great. Morpeth, 21 March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
21 March.
[Calig.
E. I. II. ?]
I. 214.
B. M.
169. FRANCIS I. to the ADMIRAL [BONNIVET] and MONTMORENCI.
Has received since his arrival their letters of the 13th. Approves of the resolution they have taken, and intimated to Des Lignes by Gaspart Sormanno. Has written to Boisrigault to comply with their orders, and expects a rapid termination to the war. Does not wish them to be foolhardy. They will understand that he has taken all the trouble possible for their payment whilst at Paris and since, well knowing the importance of the affair. They will see by his last letter that he has spoken about it to Pommeraye, who has ordered the payment of 100,000 francs. If there were any good cause to hope from Rome, he would have heard from the Pope and Fle ...; there is reason to believe that things "vont ... et en dissimulation." Expects to hear by the first post from St. Marsau[lt]. Madame, who had a very bad fever with great rheum and catarrh ("quaterre"), is better. Hopes to give good news of her tomorrow, which will be the 12th day of her illness. At_, 21 March.
Copy, Fr., pp. 2.
21 March.
Vit. B. VI. 19.
B. M.
170. CLERK and HANNIBAL to WOLSEY.
Extract of the letters sent by the bishop of Bathe and master Hanybal to my lord [Legate], dated at Rome, 21 March.
Received on the 17th Wolsey's letters dated 28 Feb., with letters from the King and Wolsey to the Pope. Delivered the letters to his Holiness, who seemed to rejoice much in them. Declared the contents of Wolsey's letters, the arrival of Melchior with the briefs, for which the King and Wolsey were very grateful, and that they were determined never to forsake his Holiness; that they commended his intent to procure peace; that notwithstanding the reasons for continuing the war, the low estate of the enemy and the assistance to be had from Bourbon and his own subjects, the King will be conformable to the Pope's desires. Told him many things that must be considered in making peace, the arrears of pensions and other matters.
He answered that he knew the King's and Wolsey's goodwill to peace, and that he had sent the archbishop of Capua to the French king, that he might go with a better resolution to the King and the Emperor, and he would omit nothing that concerned the King. He asked what Wolsey thought would best further the matter. Said that Wolsey thought the French king would never be reduced to good order except by force, for which the King was as ready as ever, but there was some doubt of the concurrence of the allies. He advised the Pope to procure the sending of some person from France to England to make first overtures; but the conclusion should be remitted to the Pope, so that he should have all the honor. The Pope thought this a very good suggestion, that it might be easily brought to pass, and that it is often seen that a merchant can make his own bargain better than another man.
Asked him to see to this immediately, because the season for continuing the war is approaching.
He said he would send a courier by and by to the archbishop of Capua; but matters are too raw to speak of peace, and they must begin with a truce. His Holiness has done all he can to make the armies strike battle, and thinks the Emperor's army is very slack not to have done it before. The French are at Vigevano. Word has just come that our army will risk a battle, but they have said so so often that no one believes them. They must fight or depart, for there is no money to give them. 10,000 ducats were lately sent them from Seanes, and the French took it between Parma and Plesance.
Hear that the ambassador of the duke of Milan told Wolsey that the imperial army had money for four months. The Pope says it is not so; but unless they fight, the army must dissolve after this month. The Pope thanks Wolsey for his kindness to Melchior. Rome, 21 March.
Copy, pp. 5.
21 March.
R. O.
171. W. FRANKELEYN and SIR WM. BULMER to WOLSEY.
Have made a commission in Wolsey's name for musters in the bishopric of Durham, according to the King's commission which Wolsey sent to them, and have appointed commissioners. Can alter them if not approved of. Find every one as yet ready to serve Wolsey. Have not inserted in Wolsey's commission the clause in the King's commission for inquiry into the value of goods from 5l. upwards; for it would have caused them to murmur. Wish to know how they shall act, for there has been no such precedent here. It would be a good thing if the clause were taken out of the commission, and "note" enrolled in the Chancery above for precedent. As Wolsey intends to give the subjects of the Bishopric wages when serving against the Scots, which has never been the custom, doubts not that he will see the liberties of St. Cuthbert kept in as ample a manner as ever has been done. Have appointed as justices of peace the persons who have before held the office until he hears Wolsey's further pleasure. Durham, 21 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To, &c. my lord Cardinal's grace.
21 March.
R. O.
172. SIR ROGER GRAY to LORD DARCY.
Sees by his letter that he has communed with Sir Robert Constable about the marriage of Gray's son, Thomas. Will perform the promises Darcy made on his behalf, and pay the money he owes him between this and Lammas. He shall have every penny of the feoffment when he puts Gray's son to the Inns of Court. Horton, on the morning after Palm Sunday.
"Vera copia of Sir Roger Gray's letter of Horton sent to my lord Darcy."
E. 1. Endd. in Darcy's hand: "No. XVo. Sir R. Grey's answer to my brother Constabill."
22 March.
R. O.
173. SAMPSON to WOLSEY.
Has just received his letters by Jernyngham's servant. Is sorry for the "light demeanor" of his own servant and Jerningham's in the delivery of their letters. Will take care to prevent it for the future. Has spoken several times with the Emperor for the assignment of Wolsey's pensions, and written to the bishop of Bath that Charles has ordered his ambassador at Rome to assign both of them on the archbishopric of Toledo, but has heard nothing since from the Bishop. The present archbishop of Toledo has not yet received his bulls; but before sending for their expedition "he sent his secretary to me, and wrote your Grace's name and titles jointly with the expedition of his bulls to assign your pension also upon the same," in case the bishop of Bath has sufficient power from Wolsey to discharge the other two sees of the former pensions. The bulls are expected daily.
Has received the transumpt of his bull for the pension of Palante, as he wrote before. His diligence has little availed, though the Emperor wishes it to be paid, provided it is not from his own coffers. Has demanded it from no one but the Emperor, as Wolsey wished. He has committed it to the Chancellor, De La Roche and John Allmaine, but especially to Allmaine, who is very anxious to serve Wolsey. The difficulty of getting it is not to be marvelled at, as the money must come from a Spaniard; "for the Emperor of some of his own treasurers, though it be in their hands, cannot have it many times but at leisure." Cannot say when it will be paid. Wrote six months ago that he should receive 2,000 ducats within a few days, and has received only 1,300, and those from the Emperor, in such small sums and with such trouble that, poor as he is, he would rather go without it unless he were in extreme need. Is obliged to sue to the Emperor for 300 or 400 ducats at a time, as if for the most weighty matter. Asks for money for his diets. The bishop of Pacence, shortly after his return, went to his diocese, and does not seem disposed to return. His promise to Wolsey was "a Spanish promise for to serve the time." Burgos, 22 March.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: To my lord Legate's grace. Endd.
22 March.
R. O.
174. CHARLES V.
Commission to Lewis de Praet to treat with the English ambassadors for an invasion of France, and a subsidy to the duke of Bourbon. Burgos, 22 March 1524, ann. 5 Rom. Signed.
Great seal attached.
22 March.
Vesp. C. II.
332.
B. M.
175. CHARLES V. to [WOLSEY].
Has heard from his ambassador De Prat the interest that Wolsey takes in his affairs. Jerningham, the bearer, will communicate to him of their common affairs. Sends him the sign [symbol] as proof of his fidelity. Fies del Val, 22 March.
Hol., Fr., pp. 2.
23 March.
Vesp. C. II.
289.
B. M.
176. CHARLES V. to HENRY VIII.
Jerningham, who is returning with these letters, will give him information. He has written to De Prat, by whom, and by the token Henry can learn the news. Bourgos, 23 March.
Hol., Fr., pp. 2.
23 March.
Vit. B. VI. 17.
B. M.
177. ENGLAND and FRANCE.
Commission to Clerk, Hannibal, and Pace to treat for peace or truce with France, by mediation of the Pope, and with the consent of the Emperor. London, 23 March 15 Hen. VIII.
Lat., copy, pp. 3.
23 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 186 b.
B. M.
178. DACRE to ALBANY.
Last night a post came with writings from the King and Council, and a letter to Albany from Wolsey, which he sends by the bearer, Wm. Hathrington. Perceives that the King is disposed to have peace with Scotland, if, according to promise, ambassadors are sent up without delay, with sufficient power to conclude a peace. Has the safe-conduct ready to be delivered to them at the water side, before they are out of Scotch ground. They will be well entertained and heard, and he doubts not peace will be passed in as large a manner as ever has been between the two realms, if they do not speak of the comprehension of France. If they attempt anything for France, their safe-conduct is to be void. The King will in nowise agree to mix Scotch and French matters, on account of the great importance of the latter, and his promise to the Emperor. If the ambassadors do not come speedily, war will commence again. The King and Wolsey think his proceedings are more for the sake of delay than for the effectual setting forward of peace, considering that the King has before this plainly answered that he cannot mix French and Scotch matters, but that the former must be spoken of by ambassadors from the French king or his mother. If any one is sent, trusts he will have favorable audience and answer. Barbon's passage into France was Albany's doing, on account of the message to be declared by him to the French king. A safe passage was allowed him, but the Cardinal was not inclined to solicit or set forth any such affairs by his letters. Advises Albany, if he really wishes for peace, to see that the king of Scots sends ambassadors with all diligence, or else, if Scotland takes harm, the blame will rest on him, as he has the rule there; for the well advised lords would gladly have had peace during the King's minority, and would have sent ambassadors if Albany had been absent. Morpath, 23 March 15 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 2. Headed: Copie, &c.
23 March.
R. O.
179. WM. KNIGHTE to WOLSEY.
Lylgrave has been here, by Suffolk's orders, to pay the limoniers and wagonners who served in the last journey, and has found great fraud in those appointed under Hesdyn to take the wagons, for their books contain prests to the sum of 136l. to persons who never served in the field, as appears by the books of musters. He wishes to know what he shall do, and will not inform Hesdyn till he hears from Wolsey. He has 255l. in hand, and wishes to know whether he shall bring it to England, or employ it at Calais or elsewhere. Mechlin, 23 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To my lord Legate's good grace. Endd.
23 March.
[Calig.
E. I. II. ?]
/?./ 214 b.
B. M.
180. [MONTMORENCY ?] to [BOISSI,] the Grand Master [of France]. (fn. 2)
Has received his letter from Paris of the 15th. The money was necessary, or they would have been bankrupt. The King has written (l'on a escript) to the Admiral. The sum he proposes to send is all very well, but will not serve for the dislodgement of this place, as the Swiss have left. Thinks he is aware of the death of the general of Normandy. Hopes he will send him a large sum of money, as it is impossible to conduct such an army without it. Hears that the Swiss are beginning to move (desce[ndre]). At Vigesne, 23 March.
P.S.—The enemy are retiring to Alexandria.
Copy, Fr., pp. 2, mutilated.
24 March.181. For the MONASTERY OF DERLEY.
Assent to the election of Th. Grevys, canon of the monastery, as abbot, vice Hen. Wyndley. Westm., 24 March.
Pat. 15 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 14.
25 March.
R. O.
182. SUFFOLK to WOLSEY.
Eight or nine years ago, the King made him joint patentee with John a Pillisdon for the constableship of Caernarvon Castle, with augmentation of the fee of the sum of 400 mks. This patent, with others, was made void by the Act of Resumption in the late Parliament, while Suffolk was beyond sea. On his return, asked Wolsey to obtain its renewal with the old fee, and now repeats the request, as he hears that Pillisdon is dead, or like to die, and the castle is the key of the country, of which he has the ordering. Southwark, 25 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To my Lord legate's good grace.
25 March.
R. O.
183. [ROWLAND PHILLIPS], vicar of Croydon, to WOLSEY. (fn. 3)
Many prisoners about London remain in prison for their fees, though the King has commanded that the poor be released without fees. This order is observed in all places except London; but here, so near the King, it is not only neglected, but in the Marshallsye the sum is increased to 10s. 6d., by which many remain in prison, and many go into the city to beg their fees. You know best what should be done. The prior of Bynham, who is under the subjection of St. Albans, desires to have your tuition and aid because of large expenses he has incurred by long suits and loss by thieves. I write in his behalf, because he has had great trouble, and is a good religious man, and because he was my scholar in Gloucester College, London. Festo Annunciationis Beatæ Virginis.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To, &c. my lord Cardinal and legate a latere. Endd.
25 March.
Add. MS.
15,387, f. 109.
B. M.
Theiner, 540.
184. HENRY VIII. to CLEMENT VII.
Thanks him for his letter of Feb. 23, describing the present state of affairs, and what is favorable and injurious to their common cause, and declaring to the King his counsel and mind. Nothing could be more agreeable to the King, both on account of the declaration of his firm affection for the King, the description of the state of Italy, and the information as to how much assistance Henry can look for, and because he does not wish to hold out hopes he cannot fulfil. His and the Emperor's ambassadors have pressed the Pope to declare himself, as Henry thought at that time it was the best course; but now the Pope thinks differently, and that it will be better if he remains neutral. Agrees that this is the wisest course, especially as his Holiness has promised to be friendly in other ways, though he declines declaring himself. Leaves all to his judgment. His ambassadors will reply to the rest of the Pope's letters, and the news sent by the English ambassadors and Melchior Langus. Greenwich, 25 March 1524.
Lat., modern copy, pp. 9.
25 March.
R. O.
St. P. VI. 278.
185. WOLSEY to CLERK, PACE, and HANNIBAL.
Has received their letters from Rome, dated the 23rd ult., and a duplicate of the 24th; and, by the hands of Langus, the Pope's briefs to the King and himself. Thanks them for their judicious proceedings, in bringing the Pope into a good disposition to the King and their common affairs. The King is well satisfied, and sends special letters to the Pope, as does Wolsey. As the Pope seems anxious to know the King's mind, they are in the first place to thank him for his candour; "whereas if there should be demonstrations and colorable dealings used, as in some other parts there hath percase been, sounding more to a show and visage than to any perfect fruit, it should be but a vain consumption and waste of time, with detriment and danger in the latter end."
The King trusts that the Pope will never be turned from his plain dealing by the subtle abuses of the French, considering in what danger the see Apostolic would be if the French king should obtain the monarchy of Italy. The King therefore thinks that the Pope should omit no occasion to "fatigate" the French army now in Italy till their victuals be exhausted; considering that, if the confederates are compelled to abandon the field, the French will be omnipotent; and remembering the King's expenses, his loans to the Emperor, and his wars with Scotland, the Pope should exert himself for a small season; for, if the French army be once defeated, the tranquillity of Christendom may be established. The King will not press the Pope beyond what he can conveniently bear, or ask him to declare himself for the present.
If they find there is no chance of a battle with the French, or of the army of the confederates being maintained, they shall urge the Pope, as Father of Christendom, to propose, as of himself, overtures for peace. Suggests the arguments which the Pope should use to the French King in this matter, and the inducements for withdrawing his troops from Italy. He shall exhort Francis also to send some honorable person to England to treat upon the same, and propose an arrangement for settling the dispute touching Milan by marrying the Duke to the French king's daughter.
These overtures being made by the Pope, as of himself, may induce the French King to withdraw his troops from Italy, and to avoid the inconveniences which would arise if the French faction obtained the superiority. Sends them ample commissions in lieu of those void by the death of Adrian.
Vit. B. VI. 32.
B. M.
2. Corrected draft of the same.
Pp. 14.
25 March.
R. O.
St. P. VI. 261.
186. WOLSEY to SAMPSON and JERNINGHAM.
Is surprised that no letters have been received from them since theirs of 12th and 24th Nov. The same may have been occasioned by accident, but is very unfortunate, as it was important to know the Emperor's purpose as to certain matters mentioned in Wolsey's last, and in others sent by Chastel, Lurcy, and others. The King has omitted nothing for the general welfare; in proof of which encloses copies of correspondence with the Pope, which they are to translate into French as much as shall be meet, and show to the Emperor. It will be seen by these letters that, notwithstanding the Pope's inclination to France, he has consented to join their common cause; though he is of opinion that, by remaining neutral, he will do them the greatest service.
Though the King is ready to maintain the war, if the Pope and Emperor will concur with him, yet, from the information he has received, the state of the enemy's countries, and the poverty of Italy, the King, though he has not received any portion of their common conquest, has not expressly declined to hearken to peace, provided it be offered on reasonable and honorable conditions. It is important to know the Emperor's mind, one way or the other, that the King may adopt measures accordingly; and they are to urge the Emperor to take the deliberate advice of his council, and determine what he can and will do, and not to suppose that by politic drifts he can "compass things sounding and tending to particular benefit," rather than by plain and direct courses. They are to urge the Emperor to be more studious of giving plain intelligence to the King of his intentions.
A proposition has been made by the Imperial ambassadors in England that the King should contribute to the army in Italy. Sees no likelihood that this army will be able to defeat the French, or enter France; or that the Venetians will leave Italy. To advance the army on the frontiers of Guienne is more important; and the King trusts that the Emperor will not fail to attempt it. Until then he defers treating about the entertainment of the Italian troops.
Is to urge the Emperor that the provost of Utrecht be dismissed from the lady Margaret's council, as he and the lord Hoghstrate are wholly inclined to the French. So long as the Provost remains the King will hold no secret communication with the lady Margaret.
Thus far, when letters arrived from them of the 18th, 19th, and 20th of December, 15th, 18th, and 26th of January, 26th of February, and 4th of March, announcing the recovery of Founterabye. Thanks them for their intelligence and suggestions. As it appears from these letters that no assistance can be looked for from the Emperor, and that all that he will do is to defend the Low Countries without recovering the King's patrimony, and that, satisfied with the recovery of Founterabye, he is wholly inclined to peace, or, that failing, to strengthen his army in Italy, the King trusts that in consideration of his disappointments, and that all which has now been done tends only to the Emperor's benefit, strict regard will be had to his interests in arranging the peace; that "like as the charges, labour, travail, and study of his Grace in these wars hath tended only to the Emperor's advantage, ... so the Emperor, now largely and highly advanced and furthered by the wars, will semblably in communication of the peace employ his charges, labour, travail, and study to the King's benefit." The King does not think it reasonable that any arrangement should be made with France, without he receives an equivalent for the former pensions due from it, the money for Tournay, the dower of his sister, and his other rightful claims: "so as the same conditions may be of such sort as they may far exceed the value of the indemnity, as to good reason appertaineth; for the which the Emperor standeth bounden unto the King's grace."
They shall, therefore, urge the Emperor to be tender of the King's interests, considering what advantages he has obtained by this alliance.
In anticipation of this result, the King has desired his ambassadors at Rome to advise with the Emperor's, "forbearing to send any commission to you for that purpose, forasmuch as by the answer of the French king and mons. de Lautrect made unto the archbishop of Barri's letter, and refusal of the passage of his secretary, there is none appearance in that matter." If any overtures be set on foot, they are to take care that a convenient person be sent to England by Francis or his mother, to treat of peace.
For the same reason the King has sent no commission to Bourbon, as the Emperor has done. It is not prudent at present to enter into further relations with the Duke, and therefore the King is content he shall remain in Italy, and not come to England.
Instructs them what answer they are to make, if, in any deliberations respecting the peace, the French ambassadors should inform the Emperor that the indemnity for which he is liable to England is of greater value than the sums that were due from France. They are to keep this secret, and make use of it as a means for urging the Emperor to demand a large and sufficient recompence. Is to thank the Emperor for his labours in advancing Wolsey to the Papacy at the last vacation; and to beseech him, in Wolsey's name, that as in the war he has "done no great act sounding in any wise to the King's emolument and profit," now, in communication of the peace, he will supply the omission, and give Wolsey an opportunity of advancing his interests in England.
Jerningham is licensed to return.
Advertises them that, in consideration of the state of the Pope, the princes of Italy, the Emperor's answer, the charge of the King, the difficulty of finding money for the wars, "it is more than necessary, by all the honorable and good ways that may be devised, to lean unto the peace." (fn. 4)
Complains that De Praet, the Imperial ambassador, is a man "not of most experience," and makes sinister reports to the Emperor and lady Margaret. They are to request the Emperor to give credence to their relations made in the King's behalf, "and not so entirely to trust the words of those which, to seek favor, will compare themself a thank as his Majesty shall do unto the truth."
Westminster, 25 March.
Vesp. C. II.
290.
B. M.
2. Copy of the same.
R. O.187. _ to [WOLSEY].
"My most singular good lord, I have much dreamed of the matter that your grace last showed me," and I think that the Emperor's "hasty intended enterprise" arises from some sudden displeasure after the raising of the siege of Fontarabia. If so, it is probably, or will soon be, "refroyded;" and the King should not make any great preparations before the second message on this matter comes from Spain. Thinks the Emperor will do no more this summer than burn and plunder, as the French did in Hennawde, and the King's army in Picardy. If the King send an army over the sea, it must besiege some place, Picardy being all destroyed, unless they go farther than would be honorable or profitable. If they do, they will waste much time in going and returning, though the Burgundians would desire it, for the great profit they would get thereby.
If the Emperor does nothing but make "excourses," and the King besieges Boulogne, which would be most profitable and least expensive, these two diversities of war "should be far from good equality and parility, which should always be kept in treaties." If, therefore, any capitulation is made, both princes should be bound to lay sieges in the same places, with express stipulations as to the time of commencement and duration, the number of Burgundians who shall assist the King, the quarter of the town to which they shall lay siege, and when they shall begin; and that musters and views of the artillery be held in both armies by the lieutenants or their deputies jointly, at least weekly, "for the Burgundians are accustomed to come to the first show in their full number, and after many of them privily do depart." I ought to have showed this in person, but I write, not to hinder you in your much business. When you have read the latter, cast it in the fire, for it is of no value.
Pp. 2. Not signed.
R. O.188. The WAR WITH FRANCE.
* * *
On the other hand, the King may be inclined towards peace or truce by the following considerations:—1. That he cannot continue the war without the Emperor, who, by the last letters from Spain, is neither able nor inclined for it. 2. The Low Countries are not likely to grant further aid except at the King's charges. 3. The new Pope is unable to give assistance beyond the mountains, and will only contribute to the defence of Italy. 4. The duke of Milan and the Venetians must do the same for their own surety. 5. Bourbon has lost all his goods, and can get no help from the Emperor. 6. The Emperor's councillors care only for Milan and Naples. 7. The King may consider what compacts and bonds heretofore made have been kept by the Emperor Maximilian, Ferdinand of Spain, the present Emperor, or the lady Margaret, and what likelihood there is of the Emperor paying him the indemnity. 8. For lack of horsemen the King would have to subsidise the Burgundians, who have done him no good hitherto, are costly, desire always to enrich their own countries with the King's money, cheat the King in their numbers, and try to defraud the King's soldiers of their booty. 9. If the Emperor, continuing the war, were to recover any of the King's inheritance, how readily he would give it up may be judged by the last letters from Spain. 10. If the King attempt no more than defensive war, the sea must still be kept, and any rumor of an attempt to besiege Calais, Hammes or Guines would make him send a large army; garrisons would have to be kept in Calais and Berwick, and watches everywhere along the coast; while, in case of a Scotch invasion, the King would have to raise an army royal. The enemy meanwhile would be able to recruit his forces, and would try to detach the King's friends. 10. If the King were to invade France by his lieutenant, the soldiers might be unruly, and the lieutenant might mistake the King's purpose; while the enemy would 'hold the army in less esteem than if led by the King in person, and the difficulty of keeping them in the enemy's country would be greater. 11. If the King invade in person, besides the danger to him, the following things must be taken into account, viz.:—the doubt and almost impossibility of the Emperor's concurrence, the unlikelihood of aid except at the King's expense, the cost of maintaining the army, lack of ready money, and difficulty of raising a great sum, and the danger that if the invasion do not succeed well the enemy will be less ready to offer terms, or even to accept them. Even if he offered as good conditions the King's money would be spent, whereas now he can save the proceeds of the subsidy.
If a truce only be determined on, it must be considered:—1. That if for a long term it will enable the enemy to gather money and friends, and fortify his countries. 2. If for a very short time it will hardly allow time to treat for a peace, and the King's money will be exhausted by standing on the defensive, and his friends unable to help him in an invasion. 3. If the term be neither too short nor too long, a diet may be held to arrange differences, and it may be ascertained at the same time what the Emperor, the Pope, the duke of Milan, the Venetians, &c., are minded and able to do. 4. Meanwhile the King can gather treasure for the wars, which, if an honorable peace be not offered, will enable him to do notable exploits. 5. If peace be made, the King will have secured a firm ally in the Emperor, put Francis in dread of attempting anything new against him, and largely increase his revenues and his estimation through all Christendom.
Pp. 4, large paper, originally a roll. The second leaf is numbered "iij" in a contemporary hand.
25 March.
Add. M. S.
24,965, f. 158 b.
B. M.
189. DACRE to LADY PARRE.
Has received her letter dated Greenwich, 15 March. Is sorry that she has decided thus, on account of the labour he has taken because of his friendship to her son. She cannot marry her daughter elsewhere so well and profitably. Lord Scrope demanded nothing but what she would have granted, if she had not been moved by others. The jointure, 100 mks., is not far from the custom of the country, which is 10 mks. of jointure for every 100 mks. of money. Morpath, 25 March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
25 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 158.
B. M.
190. DACRE to MR. CONYNGESBY.
His cousin Thos. Pikering has brought him letters from Lady Parr, asking him to write in his behalf. He says that Conyngesby has given him the bequest of his "grandom," and promised him that of his father James Pikering. Desires Conyngesby to appoint a day when he will pay it, and to give him a remembrance of it in writing. His claim to his father's goods should be referred to the award of four indifferent friends. Morpath, 25 March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
25 March.
R. O.
191. THOMAS ASHWELL.
Wm. Cokeborne, horsemarshal, deposes that, his wife being hired to keep Thos. Ashwell's wife while sick, he dined one Tuesday with Ashwell, who asked him to go on an errand for him to the Duke his brother. Cokeborne answered he was a banished man, and could not go to Scotland. Ashwell asked if he knew any Scot who would guide him to the Duke his brother. Told him he might have plenty in Carlell. Ashwell said he did not know the way thither, but would pay Cokeborne to guide him. Said he was going to Kendal on Whesonday, and would go on with him to Carlell if he would pay his costs. A fortnight after a Scotchwoman came to Thos. Ashwell's house, saying she came from his brother the Duke to know his welfare. He sent for Cokeborne, told him she was come from his brother, and that he wished to send him a letter; and if Cokeborne would carry it, he would pay him well. Told him, as before, that he was a banished man, and durst not; but that if the woman or any other would go into Scotland, he would remain on the Borders to receive any tokens for Ashwell from the Duke. Ashwell asked of the woman, in Cokeborne's presence, what kinsfolk he had in Scotland. She answered, lord Hamlytoun, abbot of Inchaffray and the earl of Lynnes. Then Ashwell said he would fain have some of these men to guide him to the Duke his brother.
P. 1. Headed: 8 kal. April 15 Hen. VIII.
Another copy. Endd. Durram. Ashwell, horselege.
26 March.
Add. MS.
15,387, f. 114.
B. M.
Theiner, 540.
192. WOLSEY to CLEMENT VII.
Thanks him for the expressions of his affection through Melchior Langus, which he will endeavor to deserve. Was glad to see from his letters of Feb. 23 to himself and the King that he will act sincerely with them. Will endeavor in their negotiations to repel the dangers which threaten Italy and all Christendom. The King trusts that he will take care that the people of Italy prepare the necessary expenses for the war. He approves of the Pope's opinion about the declaration. Desires credence for the ambassadors, to whom he has written fully. London, 26 March 1524.
Lat., pp. 7, copy.
26 March.
R. O.
193. WARHAM to WOLSEY.
Writes on behalf of the prior and convent of his church at Canterbury. They gave the next advowson of Allhallows, Lombard Street, to two laymen, that the prior's brother might have it of their gift when next vacant. A chaplain of Wolsey's has entered into the benefice, without presentation or consent either of the convent or of the two laymen. They are thus deprived of their presentation, and Warham of his jurisdiction for giving institution and induction. Asks Wolsey to remedy it, and show the favor which he has often said he bears to the church of Canterbury. It will be but a small thing to provide some other benefice for his chaplain. Asks for an answer by the bearer. Knoll, 26 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To, &c. my lord Cardinal and legate de latere. Endd.
26 March.
Tit. B. I. 334.
B. M.
194. CHARLES V. to WOLSEY.
Intends to visit the count d'Egmond. Has charged him to pass by the court of England, to make his compliments to the King and Queen, especially to inform him of the taking of Fontarabia. Burgos, 26 M[arch]. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: A mons. le cardinal dYorck, legat, &c.
26 March.
Vesp. C. II.
305.
B. M.
195. CHARLES V. to DE PRAET.
Has received by Cilly the packet of the 25 Jan. Hesdin is going to England. The enterprise on Picardy has not failed from want of money on the part of Margaret. There is no truth in the report that the Emperor has raised no army here, as Jerningham can testify. Has had no object for his arms except Fontarabia. Has kept his army on foot, without failing in a single day's payment, to the commencement of March. Since the taking of Fontarabia he was obliged to allow them to recover, having suffered so much from the winter. De Praet need not trouble himself about the articles brought by the archbishop of Barry, who is indifferent to them. Will take care that he is better supplied with news henceforth. The Pope favors the Emperor, and does not lean to cardinal Soderini. Recommends England to send an ambassador to the Pope. Sends a favorable message to count de Ponthievres, who has arrived in England, of his claim to Britanny. Gives an account of the four articles which had been proposed by the ambassadors of England for the war of that year. A long discussion has taken place, the Emperor complaining they were too hard upon him. Sends a brief of his answer to them, chiefly insisting on the unadvisableness of the arrangements already made with Bourbon, and that if he complied with the King's demands he would have to abandon the enterprise in Italy, on which the safety of his whole kingdom and of Christendom depends. Offers the English ambassadors three points. Is to report his arguments to the King and Cardinal. Gives him full powers to treat. Burgos, 26 March '24.
Fr., official copy, pp. 6.
26 March,
[Calig.
E. I. II. ?]
I. 213.
B. M.
196. FRANCIS I. to BONNIVET, Admiral of France. (fn. 5)
Has received his letter of the 16th. Is sorry to hear that Marshal Montmorency has been attacked with a fever and pains in the reins. Madame was extremely ill: the flux has not left her, but she is better today. Is to urge the Sieur des [Lignes] to make another descent with their people by ... Varetz and Bergamasque. This will compel them to succor Milan, or abandon it altogether. He is not to run any hazards. Has ordered 50,000 francs to be sent him. Has seen the contents of the letters of count de Carpy and St. Marsault. Since then has heard from the seneschal of Lyons of the arrival of the archbishop of Capua, who wishes his mission to Paris to be kept secret. The more he considers the affair of Fontarabia the more he is convinced of the mistake that has been made. Madame has taken this morning nine pills of rhubarb, "qui ont fait bonne operation." She is now out of danger. Bloys, 26 March.
Copy, Fr., pp. 3, mutilated.
March.
[Calig.
E. I. II. ?]
I. 212 b.
B. M.
197. FRANCIS I. to [BONNIVET] the Admiral, his lieutenant in Italy.*
Has received his letters of the 19th. Is glad to hear [of the recovery] of Montmorency, and that affairs go well. All that is possible shall be done for the payments. Madame is improving. Bloys, ... March.
Copy, Fr., p. 1, mutilated.
26 March.
Cat. Cod.
MSS. Bib. Bod. 221–8.
198. JESUS-IN-THE-SHROWDS, LONDON.
Order of the fraternity that prayers be said for Sir Barth. Rede, mayor of London, and Eliz. his wife.
Fol. 16.
27 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 199.
B. M.
199. ALBANY to DACRE.
"Copie of a lettre sent from the duke of Albanye, brought by Unicorn pursevant and the Duke's poticary, to my lorde Dacres, the principal sent up by poste to my lord Cardinall in my lord Dacre's lettre next afore, dated 1 Aprill."
Thanks him for his letters and Wolsey's received from William Hathrington, by which he understands that the King and Wolsey will not consent to the comprehension of France, but only to a truce with Scotland, for the King cannot break his promises to the king of Spain; and that if he does not speedily send ambassadors the danger which Scotland will incur will be imputed to him, for before his coming the Lords would have accepted peace. Dacre must know that the three estates have often unanimously concluded that they will do nothing against their alliance with France, no more than the king of England would against his confederates. Thinks he is too virtuous, and Wolsey too honorable, to advise the king of Scotland to do otherwise. Trusts that at Bourbon's return a good expedient will be found to further peace. Wolsey will know that he has proceeded honorably. Would be vexed if he thought otherwise. Writes to him at length, and sends him such overtures that he ought to be content therewith. Dacre will be shown a copy thereof. The messengers will take his advice whether to go on or remain. Wishes him to send word by Carrick if they go on. Edinburgh, 27 March.
Copy, pp. 2.
28 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 198.
B. M.
200. ALBANY to WOLSEY.
"Copie of the Duke's lettre sent to my lord Cardinall. Sent up by post. The copie of the duke of Albanie's lettre brought by Unicorn pursevant and the said Duke's poticary, by them translated out of French into Scotts language."
Has received Dacre's letter dated 10th inst., in answer to his previous letter, and stating that he is displeased at the passage of John de Barbon into France without letters from Dacre to the French king's mother, and without a truce or abstinence of war, as well for France as Scotland. It was never the intent of the king of England to comprehend France in the truce, as Albany has often been informed. Dacre shall find him honorable. The Secretary shall not be kept, but will come again to Dacre, having his help and Albany's advice. Intends to act honorably to obtain peace. Dacre knows the way that he takes.
Barbon had no charge to pass without the truce and comprehension; but as Dacre says that it was not convenient to do anything without the king Catholic, so the king of Scotland will do nothing without the Christian king. Will spare neither body nor goods, without using any dissimulation, for the good of Christendom. Thanks him for his desire to communicate with him. The Secretary tarries a long time because he was not despatched till he came to Paris, whither the King was coming from Blois. The King writes that he will make his answer good and short. If the Secretary does not bring what will fulfil Dacre's intention, will send him a wise clerk with good instructions for peace, and will procure a great personage to come over from France. Edinburgh, 28 March.
Assures him that he will not dissemble nor do anything against his honor.
Copy, pp. 2.
28 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 187 b.
B. M.
201. DACRE to SIR WM. BULMER, Lieutenant of the East March.
Has received his writing, dated Newton, by Wm. Thomlynson. Doubts not that he knows Dacre has none of the King's money. Has sent to York for some, but it has not come. Cannot, therefore, pay him now, as he has spent a good sum of his own money. Asks him to make all haste about the men, and he will pay them conduct money when they arrive at Morpeth, after taking musters. He may be as sure as though he had it beforehand. Soldiers are not accustomed to receive any conduct money before coming to Newcastle, and they need not grudge to tarry till they come hither, which is but 12 miles further. Will pay him his wages when he comes. Morpeth, 28 March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
30 March.
Add. MS.
24,965, f. 189.
B. M.
202. DACRE to DARCY.
More men have arrived for the garrisons than are required, and some will have to be sent home; so that Darcy needs not send his 100 men till he has further orders. Will give him 25 days' warning. Morpath, penult day of March 15 Hen. VIII. 1524.
P. 1. Headed: Copie, &c.
30 March.
Vit. B. VI. 23.
B. M.
203. BOURBON to the COUNT OF POINCTYEVRE (Penthievre).
Has written often since he left Genoa, but had no answer. Asks for news. Cannot induce his enemies to fight, although he has taken many towns and castles whence they obtain their victuals. On the Saturday before Easter (Sabmedi de Pasq[ues]) took a place called Sertes[an], where there were 1,000 men of war. One of the captains, marquis Bar[nabo], was killed; the other two, Jehan d'Abirago and count Hugues [de] Poppulo, lieutenant to Fourgose, governor of Genoa, were taken. France ought to be attacked also on the other side. Hears Fontarabia is taken. Au camp St. George, 30 March. Signed.
Fr., mutilated, pp. 2. Add. Endd.: The duc of Bourbon's letters.
30 March.
R. O.
204. DUKE OF BOURBON to HENRY VIII.
Has not written for some time, because there was no news worth sending. Three towns have been taken by assault, from which the enemy obtained their victuals; and on the Saturday before Easter they took the town and castle of Sertesan, where there were 1,000 men. The marquis Barnarbe, one of the captains, was killed; and the two others, Jehan d'Abirago and conte Hugues de Poppulo, lieutenant of Fregouse, governor of Genoa, were taken. Keeps close to the enemy, but cannot make them fight. Does not think, however, they can part without a battle. Trusts neither the King nor the Emperor will fail in following up the enterprise, especially now that he hears that Fontarabia is taken. "Au camp St. George," 30 March. Signed: Votre tres humble et tres houbeissant serviteur et cousin, Charles.
Fr., p. 1. Add. Endd.: "The last day of March."
30 March.
R. O.
205. DUKE OF BOURBON to WOLSEY.
To the same effect. "Au camp St. George," 30 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: A mons., &c. le cardinal legat d'Angleterre. Endd.: The last day of March.
30 March.
Vit. B. VI. 22.
B. M.
206. ADRIEN DE CROY to DE PRAET.
Is much troubled at not hearing from him, for most of their affairs depend upon the King.
Madame writes that there has been no news from Spain for four months. Is surprised at this, for at his departure the Emperor sent two couriers to England. Are daily pushing the French back to their country. Four days ago 2,000 Spaniards took by battery and assault the town and castle of Sarteran, commanded by the Count Hugues de la Pole, Jan le Bicagues, and two or three Italian marquises. The French, who were five miles off, did not stir to assist them, though they had promised to do so. Hopes at their first change of camp to drive the enemy to the extremity of the duchy.
The King and the Emperor have never had, nor will have, such an opportunity to avenge themselves, for the enemy have lost the good will of the inhabitants, and are in want of money. Bourbon could gain most of the French men-at-arms here, if he had money, which is very scarce, though they can make it last until the end of May. If the French are defeated, Bourbon will pursue them closely. He had letters from his friends eight days ago, telling him that he will find more favor than ever.
Supposes he knows of the taking of Fontarabia, and the journey of the archbishop of Capua to the Emperor.
Wishes him to tell the news to the King and Wolsey. "Du Camp à St. George," 30 March.
Copy, Fr., pp. 2.
31 March.
Calig. B. I.
272.
B. M.
207. QUEEN MARGARET to HENRY VIII.
Her son will shortly be able to do for himself. He has desired the governor to give the archbishopric of Glasgow to his master. Desires a safe-conduct to pass and repass with a ship of six score tons and 24 mariners for the expedition of his bulls. 31 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
31 March.
S. B.
208. For SIR JOHN WALOP.
To be Marshal of Calais, vice Sir Edward Guldeford, knight for the Body. Del. Westm., 31 March [15 Hen. VIII.]
Pat. 15 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 21.
March.
Vesp. C. II.
303.
B. M.
209. CHARLES V.
Communication made by Charles V. to the English ambassadors.
1. & 2. The command of Bourbon to be lieutenant-general in Italy cannot now be altered, but, had he known Henry's wish before, he would have done all he could to oblige him. 3. If Picardy is to be attacked, it must be early in the year, and not at the end of the summer; and if the imperial allies prosper in Italy, Picardy will receive the benefit of it. 4. & 5. If England will raise an army on its own hook, it shall be assisted from Germany with men and ammunition to such an amount as Madame shall notify De Praet; and if the army is victorious in Italy it shall be transported into France at the Emperor's own expense; or, if the King desire to make an attack on Bayonne, the Emperor will assist him, Henry paying a proper share. 6. But on his refusing either alternative, if Henry will contribute to the expense of the transfer, the army in Italy shall be transported into France in the manner already notified to De Praet. 7. In this event Henry must provide immediately 200,000 ducats, and his Majesty will do the like. 8. And, considering the great expense, he is contented to put off their great enterprise for a time.
Fr., official copy, pp. 3.
March.
R.O.
210. [LORD DARCY] to RIC. LYSTER.
Lyster feels sure that he owes the writer but little of what he has hitherto received for him. Is so certain of the contrary that it is folly to write or send, but they must meet with all the books and discharges. Is no such fool as to be satisfied without this, for he has reason to believe there are greater sums than Lyster declared in his last account. Will pay his expenses to come directly after Easter. If he is too busy, will meet him in London at Easter term. Dated March 15 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Endd.: March ao XV. Copia to Mr. Lyster.
March.
R.O.
211. THOS. BISHOP OF BANGOR to WOLSEY.
Has received his letter asking him to grant the archdeaconry of Anglesea to Thos. Rauncorn. Heard a year ago from Wm. Glynne, L.L.D., his vicar general and advocate in Wolsey's court, from Rowland Bulkeley, the Archdeacon's brother, and others, that the Archdeacon was dead, and therefore granted the office to Glynne, giving to his chaplains the archdeaconry and benefice surrendered by Glynne. The Archdeacon, however, is not dead, but intends to resign the archdeaconry to Glynne, who is his nephew. Asks Wolsey to consent, as he is very virtuous, of good name and fame, and able to do Wolsey good service. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To, &c. my lord Card., legate and chancellor.
March. Add.
MS. 24,965, f. 188.
B. M.
212. SIR WM. BULMER to DACRE.
According to the King's orders, has endeavored to raise soldiers for the Borders. It is very hard, as horses are "wery ewill to git," and the men will not come without conduct money. Asks him to give the bearer a sum by way of prest money, and to pay him the wages of himself and 24 men since his going to London, which the King allows him, and about which Wolsey has written. Newton. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
March./GRANTS.213. GRANTS in MARCH 1524.
1. John Bawdayn, native of Normandy. Denization. Del. Westm., 1 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
1. Wm. Horseley, yeoman of the Guard. Lease of the lordship of Cropton, parcel of the lordship of Sherefhoton, York, with appurtenances for 21 years; rent, 36l. Del. Westm., 1 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
Copy of the preceding in the R.O.
1. Gilbert Wylch, captain of The Menyoon. Protection for Simon Baron, of Romfford, Essex, brewer. 1 March.—P.S.
2. Th. Notyngham, alias Hobson. Custody of the priory of Lenton, Notts, in the King's gift by the death of Th. Guyllam. Del. Westm., 2 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
2. Thomas Spert, yeoman of the Crown. To have the crown fee of 6d. a day, vice Roger B ... mp. Del. Westm., 2 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
2. Commission of Sewers.
Linc. The abbots of Crowland and Swynshed, the prior of Spaldyng, Sir Rob. Brudenell, Sir John Husee, Sir Giles Husee, Thos. Guylham, John Cleydon, clk., John Lytelbury, John Hardegrave, Thos. Holand, Thos. Guyldon, Anth. Ireby, Hugh Clerk, Wm. Quadryng, John Turnour, Geo. Quarles, Hugh Edwardis, Francis Broun, and David Cecil, for the district from the town of Bekyngham to Tidd, and from Waldernhall to the sea, in Kesteven and Holand, Linc. Westm., 2 March.—Pat. 15 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 19 d.
3. Ric. Coo, captain of The Rossymos (The Erasmus?). Protection for Wm. Rede, of Exceter, mercer, in his retinue. Del. Westm., 3 March .. Hen. VIII.—P.S.
3. Ric. Forster, yeoman of the Chamber. Reversion of the custody of the water and fishery of Fosse, near York, formerly granted by Hen. VII. to Ric. Borowe, and by Hen. VIII. to Ric. Newton, and now held by Thomas lord Darcy. Del. Westm., 3 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 16.
7. Simon Baxster, of Thetford, Norf., inn-holder. Victualler's license. Del. Westm., 7 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
8. Wm. Skypwyth. Licence to hold a weekly market on Thursday at Kettyllysby, Linc., and two fairs annually, viz., one at Whitsuntide for three days, and the other on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Katharine the Virgin. Del. Westm., 8 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
15. Sir Th. Borough, jun. Lease of the King's mills in the lordship of Kyrton, in Lyndesey, Linc., the tolls of the markets and fairs in the town of Kyrton, the fisheries of Bykersdyk in Messen, parcel of the sock of Kyrton, and of the water of Idell there, for 21 years, at certain rents. Del. Westm., 15 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
16. John Legh, marshal of the Hall. Grant of an annual rent of 6l. paid by the abbot and convent of Shrewsbury, for the forest or hay called Lethwoode, Salop; which rent is at present held by John Pole, vice Ric. Crump. Hampton Court, 16 March.—Pat. 15 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 21.
16. Henry Conwey, a clerk of the Signet. Reversion of the corrody in the monastery of Cirencester, now held by Wm. Meryman. Del. Westm., 16 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
16. Morgan Morice. Lease of the manor of Maidcrofte, Herts, late of the countess of Richmond, for 21 years; rent, 19l., and 3s. 4d. of increase. Del. Hampton Court, 16 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
17. Rob. Wrothe. Reversion of the stewardship of the manor of Chesthunt, Herts, which, with the stewardship of Ware, is now held by Sir Th. Lovell, treasurer of the Household. Del. Westm., 17 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 15.
21. Sir Nic. Ridley and Hugh Ridley. Lease of the towns of Plenmellour and Grendon, with lands and other appurtenances, for 60 years, at stated rents. Del. Westm., 21 March 15 Hen. VIII.—S.B.
23. Wm. Brereton, groom of the Privy Chamber. Annuity of 10l. Westm.,_April, 15 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 23 March.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 20.
24. Sir Ant. Ughtredd, captain of Berwick. Protection for Th. Ball, of London, mercer, and of Maldon, Essex, yeoman. Del. Westm., 24 March 15 Hen. VIII.—P.S.

Footnotes

1 The money throughout this account is Flemish, 1l. Fl. = 13s. 4d. st.
2 Printed in 1515 in error.
3 Probably about this time, but the year is uncertain.
4 This paragraph is in cipher.
5 Printed in 1515 in error.

Annotations

189 jacob.ellis - (Wednesday 08 Apr 2009 14:20:32)
Entry number 180: In heading, for "[Boissi]" read "[The Bastard of Savoy]".
Errata to this volume.
190 jacob.ellis - (Wednesday 08 Apr 2009 14:27:27)
Entry number 183: The comma after "College" should be a full stop, and the full stop after "London" a comma.
Errata to this volume.