Milan
1469

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

128-134

Annotate

Comment on this article | View annotations
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Milan: 1469', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 128-134. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92255 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

1469

1469.
April 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
169. Luchino Dallaghiexia to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
I have not written before owing to my ignorance and unworthiness to write to your lordship, but reflecting on your great kindness I have decided, despite my deficiencies, to send you the news of these parts although at present it is of slight importance.
Several days ago an ambassador of the King of Naples arrived here; we cannot learn the reason. It is true that some of our merchants say that he has come to obtain that no alum except that of his master's shall be brought to this island, but I believe he has come for a greater matter, as he has taken a house and professes that he means to stay some months. If I hear anything later I will advise your lordship.
On the 5th inst. three ambassadors arrived from the Duke of Burgundy. What this embassy means we cannot yet discover. Some say they have come because the bickering between the King of France and the Dukes hould finish, and because he wants to strengthen him with the king here. Some say they have come to make peace between the King of France and the king here and that ambassadors from the King of France will shortly arrive. I shall try to find out why they have come and let your lordship know.
As your lordship will have heard, six months ago they discovered a plot against the king here and he had beheaded a baron, a knight and some squires and is keeping a noble, many knights and squires in confinement while he pardoned others their life but not their purse. It cost two cavaliers of this country who were in the conspiracy 50,000 crowns. I am sure of this because one of them is my neighbour and great friend (fn. 1) .
On the 20th ult. the queen gave birth to a very handsome daughter, which rejoiced the king and all the nobles exceedingly, though they would have preferred a son. This is the third girl. The princess, that is the first daughter, who is three years old, is contracted to the Earl of Northumberland, who is brother of the Earl of Warwick, a leading nobleman of this island.
Some three months ago Colombo, a man at arms of the King of France, captured in these waters a ship of the Venetians coming from Crete laden with wine, and had it ransomed for 6,000 crowns. He is said to have commissions from his king to take all the goods of the Venetians. All this to advise your lordship.
From this letter you will gather very scant understanding and knowledge, but I beg your lordship not to consider that but only my sincere goodwill.
Written at London in England, the 12th April, 1469.
[Italian.]
May 30.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
170. Sforza di Bettini, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
These last days they discovered at sea about thirty sail of the English, some of whom steered towards land in the neighbourhood of Bordeaux and Bayonne and disembarked at various places along that coast some 2,000 of the said English, under the pretence of being merchants. They had some merchandise with them, which they pretended they wished to sell in the places they went to, and also to buy, as merchants do. The king being advertised of this matter conceived a very proper suspicion about it and immediately sent the admiral of the sea to those parts directing him to have all the English found in his Majesty's territories arrested. This was done, and between Bordeaux and Bayonne the admiral took all those English, who, as mentioned above, number some 2,000. When they were examined, it was found, from what I hear, that they entered Bordeaux and Bayonne under the guise of merchants, expecting a great fleet of the English, which was to descend upon the land and come to take Bordeaux and Bayonne, so that the plan might have a better chance of success. It is thought that some in the towns themselves had a hand in this. It will be a great stew (macco) if all are to be punished for their fault, and I would not be the two-thousandth for a great deal. However, so far they do not propose to put to death or kill any one, but they will be kept prisoners and well guarded.
Later on, the fleet of the English appeared. They say that they have 25,000 men or thereabouts, and it is said that they have occasionally come on shore, and some of them have penetrated close up to Noion, taking some prisoners for ransom, and among others they took near Noion the barber of the Grand Constable of France. They pass through the territory of the Duke of Burgundy, as they cannot reach as far as Noion by any other way. Thus they go about taking individuals, and they have not as yet appeared in force on land in any place.
This proceeding of the Duke of Burgundy has not created too good an impression, as there is no doubt whatever that unless he had some hand in the affair, the English could not have penetrated so far as they did.
It seems that this Duke of Burgundy has taken great offence at the arrest of the Cardinal of Anger a and the Bishop of Verdun (fn. 2) , and I understand that when he heard the news he withdrew himself, and would not allow more than a few persons to see or speak with him, and when at last he came out into his dominions, he wore on his leg the Garter of the King of England
(fn. 3) . This is interpreted as an indication of his wrath against his Majesty the king. There are some who say that he has secretly given orders to his gentlemen to keep themselves in readiness and equipped, but of this there is no certitude, and so far no other sinister demonstration has been observed here except this action of the English. His Majesty expresses greater affection, friendship and loving kindness towards the Duke of Burgundy than ever before, and every day sends him messengers and ambassadors to confirm this great fondness.
Tours, the 30th May, 1469.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 8.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
171. Sforza de' Bettini Of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Nothing further has happened about the English taken at Milan Bordeaux and Bayonne. It seems that most of them wish to prove that they came to those towns as simple merchants with their goods, as they are accustomed to do, and knew nothing of any fleet that was to come or of any dealings in the towns. It was his Majesty's pleasure that some ten of the English taken should come to state their justification and so they did. I do not know what will be done to them, but I do not expect that they will get off scot free unless some composition or agreement ensues between his Majesty and the King of England. I think this unlikely, as it is certain that the English fleet is at sea and frequently shows itself off the coast by Bordeaux and Bayonne, threatening a landing, although none has taken place yet.
Amboise, the 8th June, 1469.
[Italian.]
June 27.
Potenze.
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
172. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
We hear nothing more of the English, and for some days now their fleet has not appeared off Bordeaux and Bayonne as it did before. At present the charge of those districts belongs to the Duke of Guienne.
Tours, the 27th June, 1469.
[Italian.]
Aug. 16.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
173. Luchino Dallaghiexia to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
This day I received your letter which afforded me singular Milan joy because you are pleased with my unworthy letters and the advices I sent. To fulfil my duty and observe your commands I will be more zealous in future to learn the affairs of this island and send word to your lordship.
As your lordship must have heard, the king here took to wife a widow of this island of quite low birth. Since her coronation she has always exerted herself to aggrandise her relations, to wit, her father, mother, brothers and sisters. She had five brothers and as many sisters, and had brought things to such a pass that they had the entire government of this realm, to such an extent that the rest of the lords about the government were one, the Earl of Warwick, who has always been great and deservedly so. He made a plan rendering himself the chief man in the government, as perceiving the state of affairs he has married his two daughters to the king's two brothers, and last St. John's day the Duke of Clarence married his wife at Calais across the water. During the nuptials a captain (fn. 4) rose in the northern part of the kingdom, a base man with a following of 40,000 men, though some say many more. He said that the king did not have good ministers about him and they wished to give him other ones and they wanted the heads of some of his ministers as well as some other articles which were all made in favour of the people, so that this captain might have a better following. This captain came from those northern parts, which are 200 miles away, as far as Avorantona, 40 miles from here, intending to meet the king, who was in those parts. On the other hand, the Duke of Clarence and the Earl came from Calais with a large force and went to meet this captain, as they were all at one. On the other side the Treasurer with many lords of his party, that is to say the king's, who also went, put themselves in array, and they are said to have had 30,000 men well equipped, and before the duke and earl had joined the captain he was attacked by the king's lords and a sharp battle took place which lasted about eleven hours. Many knights and squires perished there and about 7,000 men. Many lords were taken to wit Albert Earl of Pembroke, his son and heir, two of his brothers, the treasurer, the queen's father and one of his sons. The duke and earl had all these beheaded. This took place on the 12th of the month, the battle being on the 23rd of last. It is said that they have since taken the Earl of Devencioc, Monsignor de Schalex (fn. 5) . If this is true it will be known soon and it is considered certain that they will make an end as they mean to be the rulers at all costs. The Earl of Warwick, as astute a man as ever was Ulysses, is at the king's side, and from what they say the king is not at liberty to go where he wishes. The queen is here and keeps very scant state. The duke is to come here and a brother of the earl, archbishop of York, who was sometime chancellor, and they wish to arrange for a parliament to meet and in that they will arrange the government of this realm. Every one is of opinion that it would be better not; God grant it so.
The ambassador of the King of Naples left several days ago and is still at Bruges. I have never been able to learn the reason for his coming. The ambassadors of Burgundy are still here. I am very friendly with one of them, but have never been able to gather anything from him except that they are here to make a perpetual peace and to arrange some outstanding differences between the subjects of this realm and those of the duke in matters of trade. If I hear more I will send word. I have nothing else to tell at present. May God maintain your lordship in prosperity and give you victory against all your enemies, and grant us grace to serve you acceptably.
I forgot to say that the King of France is keeping ships and boats to the number of nine off these coasts of England, which are awaiting the galleys of the Venetians who are loading at Sandwich, and despite this they will have to leave. That king seems determined to do them every possible mischief. I will let your lordship know what ensues.
London, the 16th August, 1469.
[Italian.]
Sept. 8.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
174. Sforza di Bettinis, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
From England there is news how the Duke of Clarence and the Milan Earl of Warwick persevere more every day in persecuting the King of England and keep making a great gathering of troops to constrain him and deprive him of the crown. The king, on his side, makes every provision possible to defend himself. The Earl of Warwick has recently sent his ambassador to the Most Christian king to make an understanding with his Majesty. They left very satisfied from what I could gather. We have not yet heard, however, what arrangements they may have made together, and his Majesty is not making any sign of sending them any help or subsidy.
Pirraveo in Poitou, the 8th September, 1469.
[Italian.]
Sept. 28.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
175. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty has recently heard that the Duke of Clarence and the Earl of Warwick have taken the King of England. I do not fancy that they have very precise information, because in mentioning the matter his Majesty said: We shall wait to hear more precise and better advices before we can credit it entirely. I will keep on the alert for any authentic information and. advise your Excellency.
Tours, the 28th September, 1469.
[Italian.]
Oct. 23.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
milan
Archives.
176. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to the Duke Of Milan.
We hear from England that the Earl of Warwick has gone to Milan London and with him the King of England, not kept as a prisoner nor Confined, but still in the earl's power. It is said they have made some agreement together and that the earl has had one of his cousins beheaded, who was in high authority with the king (fn. 6) , and some other lords. Thus things there are in the air without it being possible to form a sound judgment as to what the end will be. Indeed his Majesty is puzzled as well as every one else.
Orleans, the 23rd October, 1469.
[Italian.]
Nov. 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
177. Sforza de' Bettini, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
(fn. 7) From England we never hear one thing like another, but always more different than day is from night. The last news received by his Majesty here was that the Earl of Warwick had gone to the North to take possession of the castles and estates of those lords whom he had caused to be beheaded. The King of England was with him, going freely to amuse himself by hunting wherever he chose. One day, being in the country, he took the road towards London, and entered the city, where he was very gladly and cordially received, as it seems that king is much beloved by the men of that city, while the earl is hated, and the king is making efforts to raise as large a force as he can to go against the Earl of Warwick (essendo con si el Re de Inghilterra quale liberamente andava a solazzo a le chaccie et dove gli pareva, trovandosi uno di in campagna, prese la via di Londra et entro dentro alia citta, dove fu molto volentieri et gratiosamente ricevuto; che pare sia molto amato esso Re da li homini di quella citta et prefato conte odiato et li si sforzadi fare radunata di gente el più chel puo per fare contra esso conte di Verruich).
His Majesty's correspondent upon this matter announces that the King of England already has a large force, and says that I know not what lords and military commanders have fled from the earl and gone to meet the king, in order to help him. Also that the earl and the Duke of Clarence are mustering all the men they can, to go and find the king and fight a fresh battle. We shall see what will ensue, but if things really are as reported then it is clear that the earl does not know the Italian proverb, He who must not be taken must not be forsaken (chi non e da pigliare non e da lassave).
His Majesty has given Monsignor de Concrissoldo (fn. 8) the command in Normandy, who was going to the said Earl of Warwick, as I wrote to your Excellency in another letter, until he can see more clearly what will be the outcome of these affairs in England.
The King of England has received the Order of the Golden Fleece from the Duke of Burgundy, as a greater sign of the union and confederation between them (fn. 9) . The Duke of Burgundy has recently issued orders for six hundred lances and for other very great preparations, as if they expected the greatest war that ever was, and this will not fail to come to pass, according to the judgment of every one here.
Tours, the 20th November, 1469.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Dec. 8.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
178. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 10)
There is no further news from England except that we hear Milan that the King of England has recovered himself to a great extent and war rages more fiercely than ever between him and the Earl of Warwick. Monsr. de Concressoldo remains in Normandy waiting to see the outcome in England.
Tours, the 8th December, 1469.
[Italian.]
Dec. 29.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
milan
Archives.
179. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
There is nothing clear from England, but we hear that the Milan king there is strongly reinforced and that he prospers constantly. However, they are plunged in war and the most serious troubles, and the English have enough to think about at home at present without making things unpleasant for others.
Tours, the 29th December, 1469.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 This seems to be a jumble of different events, though all are more or less connected. In June, 1468, Sir Thomas Plummer and Sir Thomas Cook were arrested on a charge of corresponding with Queen Margaret. Somewhat later Humphrey Hayford, one of the sheriffs “lost his cloak and many lost much good for such matters,” and the Earl of Oxford, Sir Thomas Tresham, the speaker, Thomas Hungerford son of the late Lord Hungerford and Henry Courtenay heir to the earldom of Devon were imprisoned. Hungerford and Courtenay were executed in January, 1469, while Cook had to pay a heavy fine. Ramsay: Lancaster and York, ii., pages 332, 335, 336.
2 Jean de Balue, bishop of Angers and cardinal, and Guillaume d'Haraucourt, bishop of Verdun, arrested by Louis in the month of April for having treasonable correspondence with the Duke of Burgundy.
3 Charles the Bold did not receive the Garter until the 4th February, 1470. Fœdera, vol. v, page 173. Comines: Memoires, ed. Jean Godefroy, vol. iv, page 368; but he may easily have been chosen in the chapter held on St. George's day, 1469.
4 Robin of Redesdale.
5 The Earl of Devon was taken and executed at Bridgewater; but Anthony Wydevill, lord Scales, took sanctuary and escaped. The date of the battle of Edgcott is generally given as the 26th July. William Herbert, earl of Pembroke and his brother Sir Richard were taken in this battle, and are said by the chroniclers to have been executed on the 28th. Richard Wydevill, earl of Rivers, the treasurer, with his son John were captured at Chepstow and executed at Kenilworth on the 12th August.
6 Apparently Humphrey Neville is meant, who belonged to the elder, Westmorland branch of the family; but he was not in high authority with the king, as he was and always had been a Lancastrian, and was among those attainted by Edward's first parliament. See Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1407–77, page 40. Humphrey and his brother Charles were beheaded at York in Edward's presence on the 29th September. Warkworth's Chronicle apud Chronicles of the White Rose, page 112.
7 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 421.
8 William Monypeny lord of Concressault.
9 Edward received this order on the 8th May 1468. Comines: Memoires, ed. Jean Godefroy, vol. iv, page 361.
10 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 423.

Annotations

73 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 12:41:24)
Entry number 169, for 'the Dukes hould finish' read "the Duke should finish".
Corrigenda to this volume


<--Previous:
Milan:
1468
Next:-->
Milan:
1470