Milan
1470

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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134-145

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'Milan: 1470', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 134-145. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92256 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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1470

1470.
Jan. 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
180. Emanuel De Jacoppo and Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassadors in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
We hear that the King of England is at London with a large force and the Earl of Warwick holds the country with a great army and the war is fiercer than ever.
Amboise, the 10th January, 1470.
[Italian.]
March 13.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
181. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 1)
From England we hear that the king and the Earl of Warwick are thoroughly agreed together. We also hear that they are preparing a fleet to descend upon France (fn. 2) ; but this seems unlikely.
Tours, the 13th March, 1470.
[Italian.]
March 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
182. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Clarence have left London, having fallen out worse than ever with the King of England. They are said to have gone to the country of Anorte and as the king went after them with a great force, it is thought that a battle will have taken place by now. The king here is greatly rejoiced about it, considering it good news, and he is devoting himself more than ever to preparations for war.
Tours, the 20th March, 1470.
[Italian.]
April 3.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
183. Sforza di Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
This morning before mass his Majesty received news confirmed by various persons, that the Earl of Warwick had engaged in a fresh battle with King Edward, each side having all the power and advantage possible to it, and finally the earl gained the victory, which was such, that besides a great number of the leading barons and lords of the king's side being slain, King Edward himself is dead, and everything remains in the hands of the said Earl of Warwick, the conqueror. To-day after dinner his Majesty happened to see me, and very joyfully told me this news, charging me to inform your Excellency, saying, what indeed is the truth, that he thought it would give you exceptional pleasure, seeing that it all tends to the welfare and advantage of this kingdom and of his affairs. Nothing is said as to how the affairs of that lordship and realm of England will be disposed. It is true that his Majesty remarked to me that for the time being the Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Clarence, his son-in-law, remain masters of the country, and the general opinion is that the tart must be divided between them (come le cose de quello dominio et regno de Ingalterra se habiano ad disponere non si parla. Vero e che la Maesta del Re me ha dicto che fin mo el conte de Varouicho et el Dacha de Clerenza suo zenero restano dominatori del paese et pure e opinione comune che la trota se debba dividere tra loro).
This news will have a great influence in favour of the affairs of the king here, and it will naturally delight all his friends and allies.
Tours, the 3rd April, 1470.
[Italian; copy.]
May 17.
Potonze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
184. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador to the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Since the departure of Messer Alexandro Spinola there is little news. His Majesty has been here at Amboise all the time, closely closeted and in secret councils about these affairs of Warwick. It seems that they give him plenty to think about, especially as it appears that his Majesty does not repose in him the most implicit confidence in the world, and does not show any inclination to help him in his kingdom. On the contrary, from what I gather, he is urging him, by every means in his power, to get him to return to England, and has sent to offer him ships and troops to fight, advising him to return to the enterprise of England. Accordingly it is believed that he will return soon, taking with him, so they argue, the Prince of Wales, son of King Henry, and will take the part of that king to see if, in that way, he will enjoy better success than he did in the other (pare che gli diano pure da pensare assai et maxime che pare che la Maesta soa non pigli di luy la magiore confidentia del mondo ne li monstra volersi adiutare d'esso nel reame suo. Ymo se sforza per quanto se intende el piú tosto li sia possibile di farlo ritornare in Ingelterra et ha mandato ad offerirli navilii et gente de combattere, confortandolo ad retornare al impresa de Ingelterra et cosi se stima che in brevi li debia retornare et menare con se, per quanto se ragiona, el principe de Galles, figliolo al Re Arigno et pigliare la parte d'esso Re per vedere se per questa via la cosa gli reuscira meglio che non ha facto per l'altra).
These things are such that I seem to be dreaming as I write of them, so much variety do they contain in one cause. However it is my duty to write what I hear, let what may happen afterwards. From what they say, the Earl of Warwick still holds the castle of Calais, while the King of England holds the town with the help of the Duke of Burgundy.
The matter of war with the Duke of Burgundy has very much quieted down, and it is thought that for this year both sides will remain in their present state of peace and ill will. His Majesty here has many reasons for not beginning warlike operations, the chief is that he has no money; the second the affair of England and the other that the Duke of Britanny seems stronger than ever in his understanding with the Duke of Burgundy and more reluctant to comply with any wish soever of the king. Apparently he has good cause, for when his Majesty had the news that the Earl of Warwick had routed and slain the King of England, he immediately wrote to his ambassadors who were at Angers, negotiating an adjustment with the Duke of Britanny, not to conclude anything, when the affair was already considered as good as settled, as I reported to your Excellency, but that they should return to him; and so they did, because he had a way to obtain better terms. When matters subsequently went the other way, he wished to render to his friend like for like, but, from what we hear, he will on no account accept, at this stage, what he would have accepted before the negotiations were on foot. Accordingly there is little hope, and in short it does not seem probable that his Majesty will begin war against the Duke of Burgundy this year, while the duke, on his side, does not seem anxious to attack unless he is attacked himself.
The 17th May, 1470.
[Italian; draft.]
May.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
185. Information received from an English Knight who was on his way to Jerusalem.
The Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Clarence left London on bad terms. He put in his company Lord Talbot, Stanley, Sclop and 35 other knights and squires. King Edward publicly outlawed George Plantagenet, alias Duke of Clarence, his brother, Richard Nevil, alias Earl of Warwick, and some others of their followers. The Earl of Warwick, judging it best not to give battle to King Edward, betook himself to Bristol and carried off some forty English ships, proceeding afterwards to Calais. He also took fifty Burgundian ships.
Lord Guifre, one of those outlawed, asked the Earl of Warwick for 30 ships to go towards Antona to take some merchant vessels laden with wine. He let himself be taken by King Edward with some friends of the Earl of Warwick, upon the said ships, and thus betrayed the earl.
The Earl of Warwick did not remain at Calais because the port was not strong (per essere quelo porto male forte).
The Duke of Burgundy has gathered a large fleet to go against the earl, but as he has gone to Uneflor, a port of the King of France, it is thought certain that the Duke of Burgundy's fleet will be rendered harmless. (fn. 3)
When King Edward sent some of his men to take certain lands which were in the hands of the Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Clarence, his brother, the people rose and would not receive them. The lord of Inam and Lord Bossier were taken with three other lords and handed over to the Earl of Warwick. As they feared that King Edward might do mischief to the friends of the Earl of Warwick, taken on the ships mentioned above, they sent word that if he did them any harm they would send him the heads of those five.
A brother of King Henry has gone to Arcis in Champagne, on behalf of the mother, who is going to the King of France. They are preparing lodgings for the Prince of Wales, son of the said king, who is going to the King of France. It is thought that the Earl of Warwick will receive him on his ships and land him in England.
[Italian.]
June 2.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
186. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty left here to-day for Dengen, about eight leagues from Torsi, where he is to meet the Earl of Warwick, who comes to make him reverence. It is considered certain that they will arrange a marriage between a daughter of the earl and the Prince of Wales, King Henry's son, and by thus raising up once more the party of that king the earl will return forthwith to England. It is thought that in this way his affairs will prosper. His Majesty assists him with money and men, nothing being omitted to render him victorious, and he is very hopeful.
The Duke of Burgundy is in his country of Holland, and we hear he is making great preparations of ships and men to go to the assistance of King Edward.
Amboise, the 2nd June, 1470.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
187. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Yesterday evening the king returned from seeing the tilting, together with the Duke of Clarence and the Earl of Warwick. I presented myself and told him of the birth of another son to your consort. He was very pleased, saying: This is indeed good news, Sforza. He then turned merrily (tutta allegra) to the duke and earl and told them. Seeing his Majesty so delighted they also expressed great pleasure and all three spoke in high terms of your Excellency, especially his Majesty.
Amboise, the 12th June, 1470.
[Italian.]
June 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
188. Sforza de'Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Duke of Clarence and the Earl of Warwick arrived in this place on tne 8th inst., and were received by the Most Christian King in the most honourable and distinguished manner imaginable. His Majesty, all the principal lords who happened to be at the Court, three or four leagues to meet them, and he himself went some distance out from the castle on foot to receive them, embracing them in the most friendly way. He also made her Majesty the queen come to the door of the castle to receive them and be kissed, according to the custom here. His Majesty then took them to their chambers in the castle and remained with their lordships two long hours most privately and with great familiarity. And so every day his Majesty has gone to visit them in their rooms and has remained with them in long discussions, while he honours and feasts them, giving them tournaments and dancing and everything else of distinction.
To-day they have left and gone away, the Duke of Clarence to Normandy to the ladies, and the Earl of Warwick to Dengin and to Vandoma, passing the time without taking any further steps, until the arrival of the queen, wife of King Henry, and the Prince of Wales, her son, who will be here or at Tours in six or eight days. The Earl of Warwick does not want to be here when that queen first arrives, but wishes to allow his Majesty to shape matters a little with her and induce her to agree to an alliance between the prince, her son, and a daughter of Warwick, and to put aside all past injuries and enmities. That done, Warwick will return here to give the finishing touches to everything, and immediately afterwards, according to all accounts, he will return to England with a great fleet, taking with him the said prince, in order to raise up the party of King Henry, and to see if his plan will prove successful this way. Many are very hopeful about it, and his Majesty the king more than all (sono molti che li hanno buona speranza et la Maesta del Re gle la ha sopra tutti). For the present his Majesty will give Warwick 25,000 crowns and, according to what they say here, 25,000 more two or three months hence.
For the greater security of his said Majesty, the Duke of Clarence, his wife, as well as Warwick's wife, and other daughter, the future princess, will stay away from these parts (romagniranno dal canto de qua per piú sicureza di prefata Mayesta el Duca di Clarenza et la mogliera et similiter la donna di Verruich con l'altra sua figliola futura principessa).
The Duke of Burgundy, as I have written before to your Excellency, is in his country of Holland, where he is preparing a great fleet for sea to send to the help of King Edward. We shall wait to see who fares the better.
Amboise, the 12th June, 1470.
[Italian.]
June 29.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
189. Sforza De' Bettini Of Florence, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Queen of England, wife of King Henry, and the prince, her son, arrived in this place on the 25th inst., and were received in a very friendly and honourable manner by his Majesty the king and the queen. His Majesty has spent and still spends every day in long discussions with that queen to induce her to make the alliance with Warwick and to let the prince, her son, go with the earl to the enterprise of England. Up to the present the queen has shown herself very hard and difficult, and although his Majesty offers her many assurances, it seems that on no account whatever will she agree to send her son with Warwick, as she mistrusts him. Nevertheless it is thought that in the end she will let herself be persuaded to do what his Majesty wishes (e stata ed e ogni di prefata Mayesta in lunghi ragionamenti con essa Regina per indurla al parentado con el Conte de Verruic et al lassare andare el prencipe suo figliolo con esso Conte al impresa de Inghilterra. Dimostrateseli fin qui molto dificile et dura essa Regina et per niente quantunque prefata Mayesta li oferisca molte assicurationi pare si voglia acordare a mandare el figliolo con predicto Verruic difidandosi di lui. Tuttavolta si stima che alla fine la, si lassara ridurre a quello che prefata Mayesta vorra).
Warwick has gone to Normandy to his troops and has left his Majesty with full powers to promise and undertake whatever he thinks fit, and he will accept everything. He is waiting for this arrangement to be made, as without the said prince it seems he is unwilling to return to England. I shall be on the look out for further events, and your highness shall be advised of them.
Amboise, the 29th June, 1470.
[Italian.]
July 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
190. Sforza de'Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Duke of Burgundy, these last days, has caused to be detained and sequestrated all the goods of his Majesty's merchants which were at the fair of Antwerp, declaring and protesting that they shall never be restored until his men and merchants are indemnified for the damage and the robberies committed by Warwick and his fleet. His Majesty has passed it over without appearing to attach more importance to the circumstance nor has he chosen, on this account, to take any measures against the merchants and subjects of the Duke of Burgundy (fn. 4) . On the contrary he has caused all that has been found to be restored to the said Burgundian merchants, and has forbidden Warwick to do the least harm any more to the subjects of the Duke of Burgundy or of Britanny either. His Majesty is devoting all his efforts to bring about this agreement with the Duke of Britanny, and, if he succeeds, he will call to mind the old and the new against the Duke of Burgundy, and it is thought that he will enter upon war without any interval.
The Queen of England, wife of King Henry, has been induced to consent to do all that his Majesty desires, both as regards a reconciliation with Warwick and the marriage alliance. The said queen and Warwick are expected here in a day or two, to arrange everything finally, and then Warwick will return to England without losing time. The Prince of Wales will not go with him this first time, but one of his uncles will go, a brother of King Henry, who is here. If matters go prosperously, then the prince will go back immediately, otherwise he will not set foot there.
The Duke of Burgundy, with all his power, has sent assistance in ships and troops to King Edward, in order to prevent Warwick from descending again upon England, but it is thought he will not be able to prevent it because Warwick will go to land in the country of Wales, where it is presumed he will be gladly received, because all the men of that part are thorough-going partisans and servants of King Henry and his brother, and these last months they have already been in rebellion against King Edward and when that monarch sent one of his captains with men at arms the better to secure that country and put the bridle upon it, they all rushed to arms and went to fight this captain, so that there perished more than six hundred of his men, from what we hear, and the captain was very glad to turn back. We must wait to see what happens.
Angers, the 20th July, 1470.
[Italian.]
July 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
191. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Queen of England and the Prince of Wales, her son, arrived here the day before yesterday, and on the same day the Earl of Warwick also arrived. The same evening the king presented him to the queen. With great reverence Warwick went on his knees and asked her pardon for the injuries and wrongs done to her in the past. She graciously forgave him and he afterwards did homage and fealty there, swearing to be a faithful and loyal subject of the king, queen and prince as his liege lords unto death. They have not yet spoken of the marriage alliance, though it is considered as good as accomplished, and it is argued that they are only waiting for the arrival of King Réné, who may come any day, to announce it.
Angers, the 24th July, 1470.
[Italian.]
July 28.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
192. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The marriage of Warwick's daughter to the Prince of Wales is settled and announced. His Majesty has sent for the lady to Amboise, where the marriage will be consummated. In two days Warwick will leave for his fleet, to direct it under the auspices of St. George to the enterprise of England. King Henry's brother, the Earl of Pembroke, is going with him, and if their affairs prosper the king himself will immediately follow them.
Angers, the 28th July, 1470.
[Italian.]
July 31.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
193. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Queen of England and the Earl of Warwick left this Milan morning together for Normandy to celebrate the nuptials of their children, as Warwick wishes to see them united before he proceeds to England. Immediately afterwards he will proceed with his enterprise.
Angers, the last day of July, 1470.
[Italian.]
Aug. 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
194. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Earl of Warwick departed, as your Excellency has heard. He did not wish to lose time in waiting for his daughter's marriage. The ceremony will take place at Amboise, according to what they say. The Earl has not yet gone on board, but we expect to hear, at any moment, that he has sailed in the name of Saint George, and … we shall wait to hear how matters progress in England, before any movement is made against the Duke of Burgundy, and if things go prosperously for Warwick, as is hoped, fire will immediately be applied (intenderem i progressi dele cose de Inghilterra inanzi che si faccia motivo alcuno contra el Duca de Borgogna et passando prospere per Veruic come si spera imediate se li dara fuoco). (fn. 5)
Angers, the 7th August, 1470.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 14.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
195. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Earl of Warwick, in the name of St. George, left the port of la Ogha with all his fleet and with the fleet of Queen Margaret on the 9th inst. and sailed towards England. We are anxiously waiting to hear of their victorious progress. The fleet of the Duke of Burgundy has not since put in an appearance. It is thought to have gone to the English coast to prevent Warwick from landing. We shall hear more soon. Warwick has taken the Duke of Clarence with him for more favour.
Omans, the 14th September, 1470.
[Italian.]
Oct. 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
196. Giovanni Arcimboldo, Bishop of Novara, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty has heard from England that Warwick has pursued his enterprise with spirit and has practically the whole of the island in his power. King Edward is a fugitive and in hiding, his whereabouts being unknown, for which reason the Duke of Burgundy has broken out into ill temper and is much alarmed.
Ex Monte Rizardo, the 12th October, 1470.
[Italian.]
Oct. 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
197. Emanuel de Jacopo and Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassadors at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Most Christian King has just sent for us and informed us with extraordinary joyfulness that the brother has returned, whom his Majesty sent to England with the Earl of Warwick, and had brought him word that immediately the earl landed in England countless multitudes thronged to him in his favour and they continually pushed King Edward hard. Upon two occasions they had crossed swords with his vanguards, and had always beaten them. Recently they captured the Grand Constable of England, who had command and control of King Edward's forces. Warwick had him beheaded forthwith (fn. 6) . Accordingly the king, in alarm, gave up further effort and fled in disguise upon a fishing boat, so that no one has seen him since, and it is thought that he has gone to the country of the Duke of Burgundy (immediate che esso conte discese in Inghilterra, lo hebbe concorso de gente infinita in suo favore et continuo perseguito el Re Adouardo per doy volte fece facto d'arme con li suoy antiguardi et continuo li ruppe et essendo ultimamente preso el gran conestabile de Inghilterra, qualli havea el carico et governo de la gente de esso Re Adoardo, al quale immediate, prefacto Veruich fece mozare la testa, esso re, sbi gottito, abandono l'impresa e stravestito se ne fuggi in su una barca di piscatori senza essere poy più reveduto, et se stima sia andato in el paese del Duca de Borgona).
A great number perished in the battle, chiefly Flemings (morirono in la bataglia grande quantita de homini et maxime Flamenghi).
After this victory the Earl of Warwick went to London, where he was received in most friendly fashion (gratiosissimamente). He immediately set King Henry at liberty and he was crowned and proclaimed through all the town of London with the greatest festivities and pomp as the true king and lord of England. There also they have joined with the Earl of Warwick to celebrate the greatest festivities and triumphs (et con grandissime feste et solemnita fo coronato et gridato per tutta la terra de Londres vero Re et Signore d'Inghilterra, dove insieme col prefacto conte de Veruich se ritrova ad fare grandissime feste et triomphi).
In this way your sublimity sees how great a change has taken place in a moment, so that it seems a miracle or a dream; yet it is so, according to what his Majesty told me.
Your Excellency may imagine how much his Majesty has been comforted and rejoiced by this good news. For this reason he has gone to his devotions in Poitou (fn. 7) , whither he did not wish anyone to accompany him except a few chosen ones of discreet speech. He will not stay there but only perform his devotions and then return to Tours.
Tours, the 20th October, 1470.
[Italian.]
Dec. 5.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
198. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
To-day I had audience of the king and congratulated him on the news from England, which has so delighted him. The Queen of England and the Countess of Warwick, with their children, are still here, as although his Majesty took leave of them some days ago for them to return to England, yet he has changed his mind, and it is thought that he will detain them until a reply has come from his ambassadors who have gone to England, who left about twelve days ago. It is thought that they will leave immediately the reply arrives.
Duke John is still sickly at Barcelona. Despite the revolution in England he will not hear a word about repudiating the articles signed with the Duke of Burgundy. He has sent a copy to Duke Réné, his father, who wishes him to do what the king desires.
A bastard brother of the Duke of Burgundy has recently come to the king; not the principal one, but Baldovino di Cercha by name, 25 years old. It seems he had command of the fleet which the Duke of Burgundy sent this September against the Earl of Warwick to prevent him crossing to England. The Duke accused him of negligence for not effecting this and threatened his liberty; so, out of fear, he has fled hither, where the king has welcomed him and shown him many favours (fn. 8) .
Amboise, the 5th December, 1470.
[Italian.]
Dec. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
199. Sforza de' Bettini of Florence, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty has received a reply from his ambassadors who went to England. Words fail them to express the honourable and noble way in which they have been received and welcomed, so they state in their letters to the king, both by the king there and the Earl of Warwick principally, and then by all the other lords and the people of England, with a marvellous demonstration of love and affection towards his Majesty. In this they seem more persistent every day, expressing their readiness to take up quickly and promptly any plan conceived or suggested by his Majesty, especially anything against the Duke of Burgundy, for which they show the utmost enthusiasm. Your Excellency may imagine how rejoiced his Majesty is at this (in la quale dimostrano ogni di più volere perseverare con offerirsi presti et prompti a ogni proposito disegno et parer della Mayesta sua et maxime in le cose contra el Duca di Borgogna in le quali si mostrano ferventissimi, restane sua Mayesta tanto gioiosa quanto vostra Ex. puo stimare).
The Queen of England and the Countess of Warwick, with the prince and princess their children, have left and returned to England, to the unspeakable satisfaction and content of his said Majesty.
Tours, the 19th December, 1470.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 426.
2 “Le Mercredy 13 Februrier [1469/1470] furent levies et publiées és carrefours de Paris le mandement patent du Roy signé Guillaume de Cirisay, par lequel le Roy mandait au Prevost de Paris qu'il estoit duement acertainé que le Roi Edouard l'Angleterro et les Princes seigneurs et populaire dudit Royaume, que pour long temps avoient este en grant guerre et division entre eux, avaient fait leur paix et pacification entre eux. Et que tous iceux estans assemblez en conseil avoient conclud, promis et jure de venir descendre en plusieurs et divers licux de ce Royaume, en intention de y prendre, saisir et gaster villes, places, pais et forteresses, et destruire ledit Royaulme et les habitants d'icellui, tout ainsi que autrefois il avoit fait. Pour les quelles causes et voulant par le Roy de tout son pouvoir et puissance obvier aux dampnées et fausses entreprises les dits Anglois, ordonna son ban et arriere ban estre fait.” Chronique Scandaleuse.
3 The duke put a fleet of forty or fifty ships under the Zeeland admiral Henry de Borssele. It was Warwick who went to Honfleur, whither Louis sent a large force of frane archers to protect the ships. Basin: Hist. Lud. XI, lib. iii, cap. 2.
4 Basin, on the contrary, writes Quod non dissimiliter, hoc intellecto, Francorum rex fieri jussit de bonis subditorum ducis Burgundie, quae in nundinis generalibus prope Sanctum Dionysium, quas vulgus Indictum (Le Lendit) appellant, seu alias ubicumque in terris suis potuerunt inveniri. Hist. Lud. XI, lib. iii, cap. 1. The Antwerp fair was at Whitsuntide, the 10th June in this year, and the fair of Le Lendit began on the 13th of the same month, well before the date of Sforza's dispatch.
5 The decipherment of this passage has been lost; the key of the cipher used by Bettini is preserved, but I cannot succeed in making sense of the first ten signs, though the general meaning of the passage is perfectly clear.
6 John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester and Constable of England is said to have been beheaded on Tower Hill on the 18th October (Ramsay. Lancaster and York, ii, page 361), but it seems impossible that the news can have reached Tours in two days.
7 At Notre Dame de Celles, Deux Sevres. Chronique Scandaleuse.
8 Baudoin of Lille, a natural son of Philip the Good. According to Basin he fled because of the discovery of a plot in which he was engaged to assassinate Duke Charles, his half brother. Hist. Lud. XI, lib. iii, cap. 4.

Annotations

74 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 12:46:59)
Entry number 188, for 'will stay away from these parts' read "will remain in these parts".
Corrigenda to this volume.


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