Milan
1474

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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177-189

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'Milan: 1474', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 177-189. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92260 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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1474

1474.
Feb. 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
255. Christofforo di Bollato, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
With respect to English affairs, I wrote recently how his Most Christian Majesty complained bitterly about the English Earl of Oxford, because he was told how that earl had deceived and defrauded him, giving him to understand that he was an enemy of King Edward, but that he afterwards kept his feet in two shoes, practising a double treachery. A brother of this earl has since come here and another lord from England, recently banished. These reported several days ago to his Majesty how the Earl of Oxford, by the greatest ingenuity, had captured and held an impregnable fortress in England on the sea coast, (fn. 1) against King Edward, and asking for assistance in victuals. Accordingly his Majesty sent one of the ships of Normandy laden with munitions. But, from what the English who navigated her report, they encountered such tempestuous weather that, in order to save the human beings, it was necessary to empty her, so that all the victuals were thrown into the sea. For this reason they have returned, alleging their misfortune and asking for further assistance. His Majesty accordingly has obliged them with another ship, laden with twenty cross-bowmen, four gunners (shioppateri), two light mortars, as well as flour and other victuals for a month for forty mouths. And so they departed and returned to succour this same castle, which is called Saint Michael. In the meantime news arrived that King Edward had set siege to the said castle, which was defended by no more than twenty persons, with food for fifteen days. Moreover, there were six English ships at sea to prevent any succour approaching. Accordingly his Majesty was in a dilemma whether he should send other ships to help the first. But up to the present he has not come to any decision.
No other movement of a larger force is heard of in England except what has been already mentioned. They say that there are very great dissensions in England between the king and the people and among the lords because King Edward cannot raise in its entirety the subsidy granted last year for the expedition announced for the invasion of this kingdom and against his Majesty (dicono essere in Inghilterra grandissime dissensione fra lo Re et populi et fra li Signori, perche lo Re Odoardo non puo exigere integramente lo subsidio posto l'anno passato per la expeditione divulgata de venire in questo regno contra la Maesta del Re).
On the other hand, that the Duke of Lancaster, (fn. 2) who by force had taken to wife the daughter of the late Earl of Warwick, who had been married to the Prince of Wales, was constantly preparing for war with the Duke of Clarence. The latter, because his brother, King Edward, had promised him Warwick's country, did not want the former to have it, by reason of his marriage with the earl's second daughter.
Sault, the 7th February, 1474.
[Italian.]
Feb. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
256. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
A Florentine has recently come here from England, a very modest person. He tells me that in England they are at peace and agreement among themselves. King Edward is pacific and obeyed by his brothers and every one. At present there is no disposition or movement to cross to this kingdom, though he states that the embassy of the Duke of Burgundy is always there urging on this step as much as they can. It was true that the castle of St. Michael's Mount had been stolen (furato) by the Earl of Oxford, but King Edward attached no importance to this or to any other demonstration except to prevent them from receiving provisions.
Senlis, the 19th February, 1474.
[Italian.]
March 22.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
257. Christofforo Bollato, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Six ships of Normandy have left, partly laden with victuals, partly with troops of war, which his Majesty is sending to England; according to the common rumour, to succour that fortress of St. Michael which I have reported was taken from King Edward by the Earl of Oxford. However, the real reason for sending these ships I am writing in my letter of the 24th inst. It might easily serve both purposes, as the English have no force at sea at present.
Senlis, the 22nd March, 1474.
[Italian.]
March 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
258. Christofforo Bollato, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty is advised on good grounds that the Duke of Milan Burgundy means to make war, and that 6,000 English and Scots are crossing to Flanders, although the duke, as a sign that he desired a long truce, had sent to tell him that he had sent word to them not to come. Nevertheless his Majesty has sent out the eight (sic) ships I wrote you the 22nd inst. under the eyes of England, putting abroad a rumour that they are going to succour the castle of St. Michael. I believe, however, for many reasons, that he rather intends them to strike crosswise (per dare ad traverso) and catch the said English and Scots if they pass over, because he does not attach so much importance to that fortress as to send those six ships to the coasts of England. His Majesty has ordered all his captains to be with their troops in two days. He is preparing a great quantity of food, is inspecting all the fortresses on the frontiers, is having heavy artillery changed about and ordered every one to be ready by the end of the month, at which time the truces expire.
Senlis, the 24th March, 1474.
[Italian.]
March 29.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
259. Christofforo Bollato, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
There are some who fear war. A person has recently come from Scotland who says that the King of England is making preparations to send 6,000 English to the Duke of Burgundy. (fn. 3) These will be those I wrote of. They also fear that if war is not made they will conclude some truce for a year or eighteen months, during which time the old suspicions will not diminish, and each side will mistrust the other.
Senlis, the 29th March, 1474.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 3.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
260. Christofforo Bollato, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty told me he was advised by his people who were with the Duke of Burgundy how that duke boasted loudly about the articles and treaty recently made with the King of England. (fn. 4) They were to the effect that for two years from now that king could not raise any force, but on the expiry of the two years he had bound himself to cross and land here with all the power of England. His Majesty remarked that a great many things will crop up in two years (el quale in effecto era che de qua ad duy anni non poteva dicto Re far alcuna armata, ma che se era obligato omnino al tempo de dicti duy anni passar et descender de qua cum tutta la possanza de Inghilterra, dicendo soa Maestà che in duy anni maturarno le cose assai).
There are now some English ships at sea, but not in very great numbers.
Senlis, the 3rd May, 1474.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 28.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
261. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Burgundian ambassadors have arranged another extension of the truce until the middle of June, and I understand that they will then make one for four months or a year, from which I hear they will exclude King John of Aragon. His Majesty here makes every preparation for war, and has gathered a larger fleet and land army in Normandy than ever before.
It has come to my knowledge that the English are making a strong fleet (fano bona armata).
Senlis, the 28th May, 1474.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 17.
Potenze
Ester.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
262. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
[News has] come from Scotland that this year the King of Milan Scotland and the King [of England are preparing] to have war together, and it has already been declared and the 1st of July next appointed as the day of battle. However, the Most Christian up to the present has no letter or certainty about this; it is merely a general rumour.
Noyon, the 17th June, 1474.
[Italian.]
June 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
263. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty very kindly showed me all the instructions and original letters about the coming and exposition here of Duke Stephen of Bavaria, sent by the Emperor, so that your Excellency might know all. The emperor asks for a league with his Majesty and mentioned as his allies the Kings of Denmark, Scotland, Bohemia and Poland, four or five dukes, the Margrave of Brandenburg and many other lords, counts and communities of Germany, offering his Majesty 250,000 combatants against the Duke of Burgundy whenever asked. The king replied that he would be glad to enter the league and would send his ambassadors to the emperor.
Noyon, the 19th June, 1474.
[Italian.]
June 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
264. Yesterday about midday I met the herald of France with news that the truce had been signed again. I would not go to the duke in order not to appear too curious, but learned from a friend that the truce was for a year. He would have preferred war with France to the war of Germany and fears that the King of France may make some attempt against the duke's country. He told me in great confidence that the King of France desired a conference with the duke. I asked if this would do, but my friend said no, as it would only mean diverting the duke from the enterprise of Germany, and also might generate suspicion between the duke and the King of England and the Duke of Britanny.
This morning I went to Court. The duke sent for me and told me that the truce had been made until the 1st of May in the following year. He had reserved all his alliances. He was going to send immediately his ambassadors to the King of England and the Duke of Britanny to inform them that he had made the truce in the said form. He had consented to this for their satisfaction, as it was more convenient for him to make war on France at the present moment than to wait, even though he were alone in that war and without the help of the English or the Duke of Britanny. He had secret intelligence in France and certain lords and nobles were ready to move, the moment the duke began the war. He also heard that the king's army was ill ordered, ill paid, and disaffected and the country in a bad state through scarcity and taxation. The whole country was famine-stricken, and few troops were in Amiens and Sangutaro, and if he had waged war he hoped to win honour, and he thought he had lost a great opportunity, but to please the King of England and the Duke of Britanny he had agreed to the accommodation.
He told me that he had reserved his allies; among them the King of Aragon, so that if the King of France attempted anything against that monarch they would consider the truce broken and at once make war. Moreover, if the King of England and the Duke of Britanny heard that the King of Aragon was attacked, they also might declare war. He had ordered his captains to remain on the frontiers and begin war at the least news of the Duke of Britanny.
Luxemburg, the 24th June, 1474.
[Italian; without signature or direction.]
Aug. 9.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
265. Lionetto de' Rossi to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The duke has betaken himself to Flanders, and the confusion which you may imagine has been permitted in order that he may confer with the English, who have crossed. From the musters which I hear of here, there are 22,000 in their pay and up to this present moment they value them very cheaply indeed. According to the latest information we have, the English have begun to invade Picardy, by way of the duke's towns. I fancy that his Majesty has decided not to fight them as they used to do in the past, but has munitioned all the towns which are to be held, and left open the weak ones so that they may not attract attention. In this way, and by always keeping 1,000 to 1,500 lances on their flank, he reckons to tire them out, turn them about and consume them, without peril, and I think this will be done, as although he fears them, yet in this way and in three months, by not allowing them to get any footing, they expect to see them return home in fragments; because the English consist of sturdy mechanics, who do not readily obey their lords (la Maestà del Re mi pare habii deliberato de non li combatere como per lo passato usaveno de fare ma ha fornito tutti li lochi che sono da tenere et i debelli spianati, perche non pigleno rispetto et a questo modo fa conto con dare loro del continuo m. et md. lance a la coda, lassarli volteggiare et consumarli senza pericolo et credo li verra facto et se loro gli teme a questo modo et tre mesi non gli lassando piglare loggiamento anno viso de tornassene in pezi, perche gl'inglesi sono di forte gente mechanice et male obediente a Signori loro).
I have forgotten to mention that the king has a countless number of troops in the country of Guienne and Normandy, so that on those sides he cannot be attacked by the English or others. In case of need he will be able to obtain 20,000 men and have the places well supplied.
The 9th August, 1474.
[Italian.]
Aug. 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
266. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The king told me that he had not yet heard of any movement of the Duke of Burgundy against the Swiss, and from England he had nothing certain about any preparation or movement on their part. He remarked to me about this business of the fleet, that that sovereign was very merry over it (che essa Maesta ne era molte zoyosa).
Etampes, the 12th August, 1474.
[Italian.]
Aug. 18.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
267. Christofforo Bollato, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
A herald has been here from King Edward of England, who desired to present himself before his Majesty. He brought the king a letter containing the declaration that that sovereign was satisfied with the mention made of him by the Duke of Burgundy in the last truces, which he approved and ratified. The letters then contain a clause about giving credence to the person of this herald, upon which he has already been twice to very intimate discussions with his Majesty, at which no one else was present but my lord of Concressault. The subject of these discussions is a marriage alliance which King Edward asks for, between his daughter and my lord the Dauphin, showing that he is inclined to return again to those designs which were suggested upon other occasions against the Duke of Burgundy and i or the ruin of his state (la materia de dicti rasonamenti e de parentado che demanda lo Re Odoardo per mezo de una sua figliola cum Monsig. lo Delphyno, dimostrando essere inclinato de pervenire ad quel le pratiche quale altre volte se sono recercate contra el Duca de Brugogna et in pernitiem del Stato suo).
An English lord, who had this matter in hand on a previous occasion, in the time of the Earl of Warwick, with King Edward's consent and by his instigation, has sent one of his servants with this herald, to present a pair of greyhounds to his Majesty, and to ask for a safe-conduct to come as ambassador with all instructions upon this matter, in the name of King Edward. This safe-conduct has been made out, so that he is expected to come from that sovereign.
Notwithstanding all this, there comes most authentic news that these same English are equipping a great force all the same, and are already lading the artillery upon their ships. Accordingly many are led to make various conjectures, which resolve themselves into two suspicions: either that this King Edward suggests this marriage alliance as a sham and pretence so that he may afterwards be able to claim that he tried the way of peace and concord before war, and by this negotiation see to cooling and delaying the provisions and preparations of his Majesty against the English; or else that King Edward is proceeding sincerely in this alliance, owing to some hidden indignation and wrath he may have against the Duke of Burgundy because of the constant incitement with which he stirs up the English people to make war on this kingdom to recover their ancient rights. And as King Edward is by his nature more inclined to quiet and peace than to war, many adhere to the latter opinion (molti se sono inducti ad varie conjecture, quale se resolvano in due suspicione: aut che lo dicto Re Odoardo tempta questo parentado con finctione et simulatione per poterse poi justificare non seguendo che prima habia recercato le vie de pace et concordia cha de guerra et sopra questa pratica vedere de refredare et dilatare le provisione et apparati de la Maesta del Re contra loro Anglesi, aut che lo dicto Re Odoardo sinceramente proceda in questo parentato per qualche oculta indignatione et alteratione habia cum el Duca de Brogogna per li continui stimuli che sempre li va excitando, cum li populi anglesi de fare omnino guerra ad questo Regno per recuperare le rasone loro vechie etc. Et essendo esso Re Odoardo de natura sua piu inclinato alla quiete et pace che alla guerra, molti adheriscano ad questa opinione).
The purport of these transactions against the Duke of Burgundy is as follows: the King of France is to give to the English a part of Guienne or Normandy, on the understanding that they shall assist to destroy the Duke of Burgundy, and from the duke's state the king will afterwards give the English an equivalent for what they claim pertains to them of this kingdom. The English will then give back to his Majesty what they hold of his and further surrender to him all the rights which they claim over this kingdom (lo effecto de la dicta pratica contra el duca de Borgogna e questo: che la Maesta del Re de Franza dovea dare ad Anglesi una parte de la Ghiena aut de Normandia cum hoc che adiutasseno destruere el duca de Burgogna et del stato suo darne poi ad essi Anglesi equivalentia de quello se pretendono gli specta de questo regno et lassare poi alla Maesta del Re quello che tenessero del suo et farli assione et liberazione de tutti li dreti hano Anglesi sopra questo regno).
Carnoti, the 18th August, 1474.
[Italian.]
Sept. 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
268. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The herald of England who is here asked the king to agree that the truce for this year should apply to their merchant subjects and that they might carry on trade between the two kingdoms. They told him that they would not do it for one year only, but if the King of England desires to make a truce with his Majesty for a longer period they will agree here.
Megli, the 6th September, 1474.
[Italian.]
Sept. 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
269. Christofforo di Bollato, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Most Christian King here is advised by the community of Bordeaux in a letter which I have seen and heard read how, according to the account of one of their fellow citizens recently come from England, King Edward has held for many days a long and grand council about the proposed hostile invasion of this kingdom. In conclusion he resolved to come in person in March of next year, when he will come with a great number of English to recover the duchy of Guienne. It is added that the money which has been demanded and obtained on previous occasions from that island for similar undertakings has always been spent in other ways, and never has been forthcoming at the time it was wanted; so that it may fail this time also. It is even said that the money will never be paid until the force is seen upon the water and all the other preparations ready for a start. Subsequently by another way his Majesty has also received notice of the movement of the English and how they are making a fleet and that they are putting in order a very old ship, to which in their superstition they attach great importance and esteem, saying or pretending that it is the ship upon which St. Thomas of Canterbury crossed to England, and for this it has I know not what charm (meteno in poncto una nave antiquissima de la quale per loro superstitione fano uno grande caso et stima dicendo o fingendo che la nave sopra la quale passo Sancto Thomaso de Conturbia in Inghilterra; et per questo havere nescio quid fatatum).
Further, by letters and the accounts of men come from Scotland, at this same time his Majesty is also advised that at present they have 3,000 men equipped in England to come here; and by another way it is confirmed that they have fourteen ships at sea and every day they will attend to supplying them with troops for war, in the most secret manner possible, pretending that they are going as merchants to Bordeaux to buy wine, with the safe-conducts such as they have solely for this purpose. Under this colour and pretence they will enter as far as possible up the River Garonne, which is three, four to five leagues broad, and continues of this breadth for about twenty leagues. When the English have pushed up the river, they propose to land and then go to the assistance of Perpignan in favour of the King of Aragon. (fn. 5) This will be easy, because from Bordeaux to Toulouse is no more than 28 leagues and one can go from Toulouse to Perpignan in less than two days.
His Majesty attaches the greatest importance to this last part, although the truth is not so firmly established as it might be. He has made admirable and well-conceived provision to frustrate this design of the English. Similarly, I believe he has sent my lord the admiral into Normandy to put in order all the coast towns, so that they may be on their guard and watch with their barques whether this fleet from England is coming or not. Since then he has written to the seneschals and bailiffs and to all the barons and lords of the provinces surrounding Bordeaux and the Garonne upon this suspicion, warning them to stand on their guard and in readiness to prevent their entry into that river or their landing. His Majesty has stated that if this is true he will go in person against the English.
For the rest, he has sent a present of two coursers to King Edward. I believe this is for no other purpose than to investigate thoroughly the truth and certitude of all these things, and if it were not for a very secret intrigue in which his Majesty is engaged in these parts I believe he would have betaken himself immediately to the city and district of Bordeaux, as he is not without suspicion of some intrigue on the part of the people of the place, since it was English for a long time.
The King's intrigue is about the state of Lorraine, which he hopes to bring to such a pass that in a short time it will be in his hand and power. This will be an excellent thing, as afterwards the Duke of Burgundy will not be able to pass from Flanders to Burgundy when he is at war with the Germans. I am assured that this intrigue was a most powerful reason why his Majesty made the truce for a year, as well as the other respect of the duchy of Anjou, for with this in his Majesty's hands, as I have written before, the Bretons will no longer have the way into France which they had before. I advised your Excellency that if this design was realised it was practically certain that his Majesty at the expiry of the truce would press the Duke of Burgundy with a vigorous war, making no doubt but that he would win both the duchy and county of Burgundy.
Megli, the 12th September, 1474.
[Italian; the words in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 17.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
270. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador at the French Court to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
At the last conversation I had with the Most Christian King his Majesty told me and charged me to write to your Excellency how certain lords and barons of Scotland had urgently begged him to be pleased to intervene and use his influence in favour of some marriage alliance between the prince of Scotland, the King's eldest son, and one of the daughters of your highness. (fn. 6) Accordingly his Majesty says that he would commend and advise this match to your Excellency, reminding you that the house of Scotland is ancient and most noble and has the most honourable alliances with many realms. Furthermore, whereas it might perhaps seem unlikely that your lordship could derive advantage and honour, owing to the remoteness of the kingdom of Scotland, to his Majesty it seemed easy and feasible in this way: for instance, supposing your Excellency wished to make war on the Venetians or any others in a very short time they would always be able to send across to Normandy 10,000 to 12,000 Scots, at a moderate rate, as at a crown per man you can levy as many as you please. His Majesty added that as he experiences every day, they are a fierce and warlike people. They would also pass through this realm as through a country friendly to us, so that all the money would not be spent for their maintenance. Again his Majesty would not wish your Excellency to spend too much for the dowry. He ended by telling me that it seemed to him that it would redound to your advantage and honour, and he would depute the Seneschal of Saintonge, who is of Scottish nationality, (fn. 7) to manage and treat of this matter with me, asking credit for him.
I answered his Majesty that I would write everything to your Excellency, and immediately I had the answer I would inform him. I did not think it advisable to say anything about your most illustrious daughter being married, according to what your Excellency wrote to me recently about the course followed with Madame of Savoy, who has made everything quite clear to his Majesty, as also to leave this reply to your lordship if you choose to make it. (fn. 8)
Subsequently the Seneschal of Saintonge, who enjoys the highest authority and is among the foremost about his Majesty, spoke to me at great length on this subject, urging and advising it etc. He told me that, supposing they had a favourable reply from your Excellency, his Majesty had said to him that he desired him to go as ambassador and that I should go together with him on behalf of your Excellency, and that in like manner we should return afterwards from hence together.
Upon the question of my going, I beg your Highness to command all that you wish me to do without reference to my own personal preferences, but for the welfare and profit of your Excellency. I do not think it would be a bad thing for me to return for once, as it will always prove an advantageous step for the one who has to stay here always to make an interval of two or three months every two years. This will be repaid with interest, as those employed could remain longer in the service, whereas in time past no one has been able to serve for longer than four years.
My Lord, I feel sure that this idea of a marriage alliance proceeds from the king's own imagination and policy, for the purpose of impeding and preventing the King of Scotland from concluding another marriage alliance with the King of England, since his Majesty has found out and surmised through the ambassador of Scotland, who is here, that the two kings are treating very closely for a marriage together (Segnore mio, questa facenda de tale parentado sono certato che e proceduta da propria ymaginatione et pensiero de la Maesta del Re, ad effecto de impedire et obviare che lo Re de Scotia non concluda altro parentato cum lo Re de Inghilterra, havendo essa Maesta intesa et presentita per via de questo ambaxatore de Scotia, che e qua, chel se tracti fra li dicti molto strectamente matrimonio insieme).
For this reason I think that even if your Excellency does not wish to conclude any such alliance because you do not care for it, for Scotland certainly is in finibus orbis, yet the negotiation would be grateful and acceptable and would greatly please his Majesty, who has never spoken to me on the subject except with the utmost eagerness, which has led me to consider the consequences.
Jeura, in Beossa, the 17th September, 1474.
[Italian.]
Sept. 27.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
271. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The king has again spoken to me about the question of the marriage with Scotland, saying it would be a great honour for your Excellency to have a king at your command, and he would be very pleased if you entertained the proposal. He desired that the ambassador of the King of Scotland and I should confer together, to make a beginning in the matter. In obedience to his Majesty, I did this, but my words were merely chosen so as to impress the Scottish ambassador favourably with the affection and care his Majesty feels for the King and realm of Scotland, and for that reason he had thought of this alliance and had spoken to me in the highest terms of the King of Scotland, and I would write on the subject to your Excellency.
Chartres en Brie, the 27th September, 1474.
[Italian.]
Oct. 3.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
272. Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan to Christofforo di Bollato, his Ambassador at the French Court.
By your letters of the 12th, 16th, and 17th ult., we are advised firstly of the preparations made by the King of England, of the castles taken by the Duke of Burgundy in the Nervense country, and finally of the Most Christian King's remarks about a marriage alliance with the King of Scotland.
In reply we have to state that as regards English affairs there is nothing to say except that you will keep us advised of the details of what takes place as fully as you are able.
With respect to the marriage alliance with the King of Scotland, we must say that if the Most Christian King considers that our taking up this negotiation would be advantageous and help his affairs, we will do so gladly, and you will be able to let his Majesty understand that we do not propose to carry it through to a conclusion, for two reasons: first, because we have married our daughter, as his Majesty knows, and secondly if we only had one daughter, which is not the case, we should not want to marry her so far off as Scotland would be. Thus you will make his Majesty see everything by telling him that so far as taking up the business to gratify him we will do it with all our heart.
We shall await your reply about these matters and of the wishes and intentions of his Majesty.
Pavia, the 3rd October, 1474.
[Italian; draft.]
Oct. 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
273. Christofforo di Bollati, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
No other movement has been heard of from England since the rumours I wrote of. However, the English have gone to Gascony to buy wine in the usual way, without any fleet or other occult demonstration of war. The city of Bordeaux has made a very spirited reply to the king about this suspicion, saying that they are strong enough to guard the land against such dangers. Accordingly this anxiety has quite vanished.
There is nothing of consequence from Britanny either except something about the duke's remonstrances upon the Perpignan affair. This is due to the constant prompting he has from the ambassadors of the King of Aragon, the English and the Burgundians with him.
Chartres, the 24th October, 1474.
[Italian.]
Dec. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
274. Christofforo de Bollate, Milanese Ambassador in France to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The admiral remarked to me that your Excellency ought to lend them six of your galleys to join with his Majesty's fleet to resist the coming of the English. I told him I was here to write all that his Majesty commanded and to impart to him what your Excellency ordered. He said I should speak to the king about it, but I was not anxious to meddle in such a matter, and nothing further has been said to me. I hear, however, that the admiral is sending to the Genoese coast for some men expert in building galleys, to have some built in Normandy, where they have a quantity of wood suitable, though I do not know what use they will be, as they have no men accustomed or trained to manipulate galleys.
Paris, the 19th December, 1475 [rectius 1474].
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 St. Michael's Mount, in Cornwall.
2 Gloucester.
3 There is a commission of the 30th March to Sir John Parre and John Sturgeon to muster thirteen men at arms and a thousand archers, to be sent to Charles, Duke of Burgundy. Rymer: Fœdera, vol. v. part iii. page 35.
4 The treaties made between Edward and Charles the Bold, published by Rymer, are dated July 25–27. Fœdera, vol. v. part iii. pages 40–4.
5 Perpignan, taken by the King of Aragon, was besieged by the Sieur de Gaucourt for the King of France in June, 1474, and it finally surrendered on the 14th March, 1475.
6 James, son of James III. of Scotland, was born on the 16th March, 1472. The two daughters of Galeazzo Sforza were Bianca Maria, born in 1472, and Anna, born in 1473.—Anderson: Royal Genealogies. The King of Scotland was at the same time in active negotiation with England for an alliance, and on the 26th October a marriage was arranged between the little Prince James and Edward's youngest daughter, Cecily. Rymer: Fœdera, vol. v. part iii. pages 48–50.
7 William Monypeny, Lord of Concressault, appointed Seneschal of Saintonge on the 10th October, 1473.—Lettres de Louis XI, vol. iii, page 157, note.
8 Galeazzo's eldest daughter Bianca Maria was contracted to Philibert, Duke of Savoy, son of Duke Amadeus and his wife Jolande, sister of Louis XI. The duke died in 1482, when his wife was only ten years old.


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