Milan
1476

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

220-229

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'Milan: 1476', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 220-229. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92262 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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1476

1476.
Jan. 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
320. The kingdom of England has 36 lords of districts called sheriffs.
It has 52,080 towns, castles and villages.
It has 40,011 parish churches and parishes.
It has 40,205 noble fiefs, whereof the king holds 28,015.
When they wish to make a tax (taglia) in the realm the people agree to give 15d. in the pound. The total amounts to 38,930l. sterling, every pound being worth five crowns.
The extreme length from the Scotch border to the port of Hampton is 300 miles, and the breadthfrom the port of San Duger as far as the country of Wales (fino al contado di Gales) to Dover is 140 miles, and the circuit 440 miles.
[Italian.]
Jan. 16.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
321. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Burgundian Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
M. Grassia Bethes of King Ferando, returning from England, has been here. He has left and will visit your lordship, to whom he says he is bringing a fine gerfalcon and some other things of those countries. He is taking several greyhounds and birds to that king.
Neufchateau (Ex Castro novo Lothoringie), the 16th January, 1476.
[Italian.]
Feb. 9.
Potenze
Estere.
Bogogna.
Milan
Archives.
322. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
When I was speaking to the duke about the Turks, he told me that he had intended to do something notable for the Catholic faith, but the King of France and the King of England prevented him, as he could not trust the former, owing to his nature, or the latter because he was the friend of France, and so he could not trust him as he did before. I asked him how he stood with the King of England. He answered, Ill, because the act that he had done showed that he did not love him any more, and his Majesty feared the duke rather than loved him. Nay more, in secret he believed that the king hated him, owing to the claim and right which he had to that realm, for he has a most just title to the succession, and much better than the king's. (fn. 1) The latter fears that the duke may some day put his claim in force, as perhaps his lordship thinks of doing, once things have settled down a little (imo in secreto credeva lo avesse in odio per la rasone et drito a in quello reame che per successione del regno a justissimo titolo et miglior assai che quella: La quale dubita qualche volta non lo exeguista: como forse fa pensierò la Sig. soa quando sia rissetata alquanto).
Accordingly he gathers in Englishmen for his service, taking as many as come, so that recently he has enlisted more than 2,000 of them, in order to win popularity in that kingdom, in which he says he has a strong party and is much beloved. Once he has that kingdom he need only lift his other shoulder and forthwith he would be King of France (pero ogni di ricoglie di essi Anglesi ad li servitii soi quanti ne viene in modo novamente a tolto piû di ijm. Inglesi, per captare benivolentia nel regno nel quale dice a bona parte et he assay amato. Et quando avisse quello regno: non bisognare si non che alzasse laltra spalla che presentamente saria Re di Franza).
Jougne (Giogna), the 9th February, 1476.
[Italian.]
March 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
323. Branda Castiglioni, Bishop of Como, and Palavicino Marchio, Milanese Ambassadors to the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
We have heard here from certain leading religious, what they have learned from France, to wit, about the new council which the King of France announced his wish to have at Lyons. We find that the council will be held by virtue of a decree made at the last Council of Basel, providing that if three kings and three prelates agree they may choose a suitable place for assembling a council, and hold it there. The three kings were those of France, England and Spain with three prelates.
Geneva, the 1st March, 1476.
[Italian.]
March 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
324. Francesco Pietrasancta, Milanese Ambassador to the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
This evening a servant of a gentleman of the royal household of England has arrived here. He says his master will come to-morrow or the day after. The queen is sending him to Rome for M. de Scales, her brother, to supply him with letters of exchange for 4,000 ducats, so this man says, because all his money and valuables were stolen at the Torre di Baccano, and he is returning to Rome to recover them.
The servant says he had seen in England a great quantity of archers all ready, who were going to the pay of the Duke of Burgundy and were going to pass at once; he thinks they must have crossed by now. They would muster about 6,000. I shall try and learn more when his master comes.
I asked him about the manner of life of the King of England. He told me that the king devotes himself to his pleasures and having a good time with the ladies (mi dissi sta darsi piacere et bon tempo con le Dame), but he was making preparations to send the Earl of Rocimonte across the sea against the Turk with 3,000 combatants.
Turin, the 7th March, 1476.
[Italian.]
March 9.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
325. Julianus Castagnolla to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Don. Jacobo, sent to these parts by your Excellency, has given me the enclosed for your lordship, which I send by way of Genoa, directed to Francesco Spinula. I have frequently offered to visit M. Jacobo. I beg your Excellency to command me to allow me to repay a part of my indebtedness.
London, the 9th March, 1476.
[Italian.]
March 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
326. Jacometus de Mayno, Milanese Envoy in England, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
I have already advised your Excellency about my delay. I have not yet taken leave of his Majesty, who promised to give me two horses, but so far he has only given me one. I expect to have the dogs every day, as his Majesty promised them. So soon as I have them I will leave and return as soon as possible. When I was soliciting his Majesty for them he took me by the hand and led me aside, saying that the Duke of Burgundy had made an offer to the King of France to make the Duke of Orleans Duke of Milan, pointing out that he will make great war on the Savoyards to be near your lordship's state with his men-at-arms. The King of France and the Duke of Burgundy are to meet to discuss this matter alone, and if they agree, the King of France will not delay to cross the Alps.
London, the 10th March, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
327. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The duke said to me that he will send from here 100 of the English lances and some archers, perhaps 500 or 600, for the defence of Lorraine, to help the others there, and this because the English are the natural enemies of the French and will serve well.
Lausanne, the 19th April, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 21.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
328. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Yesterday the duke ordered the 100 English lances and some archers to go to Lorraine, as I wrote, and this morning they began to leave here.
We hear that the King of France has bought, for 24 or 30,000 crowns, Queen Margaret of England, daughter of King Réné, widow of King Henry and prisoner of King Edward in England, and has fetched her to France, it is supposed in order to get her to give up her claims to Provence as the daughter of King Réné.
Lausanne, the 21st April, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
329. Francesco Petrosancta, Milanese Ambassador to the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
A courier of the King of England passed this way to-day going Milan in great haste to Rome. He said there were great negotiations on foot between that king and the Duke of Burgundy to pass into Normandy against the King of France, and that the Normans are very much afraid. Also on the way he learned that 500 lances of the King of France are in the field and it is not known where they are going.
Turin, the 20th April, 1476, at night.
[Italian.]
April 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
330. Antonio de Asplano, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
As I have written previously to your Highness the English and Lombards (that is to say Italians, who are all called Lombards in these parts) have a quarrel with each other, to such an extent, that every day some one is murdered in the camp and the same in this town. If any one is slain, so much the worse for him, and no measures are taken or punishment given. Yesterday, for instance, a dispute arose between some English and three soldiers' boys of two men-at-arms of Madame here, named Gaborreto. These servants seeing that they were getting the worst of it, betook themselves to their quarters in this city, barricaded themselves in and climbed up to the windows, where they defended themselves wonderfully well with stones. The English, numbering seventeen to twenty, attacked the house with stones and beams, and at length, finding that they could not get in, they brought wood and straw to the door to burn them out.
When this news was brought to Court, Messer Rivarolo, magistrate of the household, went with the companies of the guard of Madame to succour those servants. He put out the fire, which had already caught the house door, and the English hurried back to camp. Madame's men returned to Court and nothing more was thought of the matter. However, in half an hour about four hundred English hastened to this town, with the utmost fury and more packed together than ever one saw pigs run. All the people closed their doors and shops and took refuge in their houses. The English made straight for Madame's Court, which was closed forthwith. When they tried to enter by force, the Bastard of Burgundy arrived, who made them give over and turn back. They found five or six Italians on the way out and back again, and killed them all.
I lodge away from the Court and on the road by which they came and went. So soon as this fury had passed I went to Court, and although I found them all upset, yet Madame, Monsignor de la Chapelle and the Governor of Niza made the utmost excuses for these English, and said it was impossible there should not be some quarrels and murders among so many troops of so many different nationalities, and any one who wished to make this a grave question, by any words, however lightly spoken, did not do well. If any measures are taken about this I will send word. I can say nothing here, only commend myself to God and let the water follow its course.
Lausanne, the 20th April, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 22.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
331. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Yesterday there was a very great disturbance in the camp between the English and Italians, so that both sides seized their arms, owing to some disorders committed at an abbey near here. The duke had to go in person to bring peace, because the Italians had slain some English, and they wished for revenge. At last, after the utmost trouble, the uproar was appeased, which has reached as far as Lausanne. Owing to this Englishmen cannot go safely in the streets, as they dispatch any Lombard they find in the middle of the way, especially in this land. These things disturb me, as seeing that the English and Lombards are slaying each other without remission the duke is making every effort to bring about peace. If he does not succeed great disorders will follow, because the English are a proud race without any respect, and claim a superiority over all other nations (perche Inglesi sono gente superba senza rispecto et voleno superchiar ogni altra natione), and the duke is as angry as possible against the soldiers for the act committed.
Lausanne, the 22nd April, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 22.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
332. Antonio de Aplano, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 2)
Yesterday about the 22nd hour, some Lombards, whose leaders (patroni) had been killed by the English, hearing that certain of the English were at the guard of an abbey, collected some of their companions and went to attack the English at the abbey, about seven miles distant from the camp. They killed seven and two monks. When M. de Burgundy heard of this he was displeased, and ordered that the Lombards should be beaten and cut to pieces on their return, because he had sent the English to guard the abbey. When this sentence was heard, all the Italians, called Lombards, armed themselves, horse and foot, in squadrons, and wearing their helmets, while on the other side the English also took to their arms to confront the Lombards. M. de Burgundy, although he was very angry, mounted his horse and restrained the English from attacking the Lombards. News immediately reached here that the Lombards had all united and were acting against the duke. All those of the camp who were within came out in great fury, and went to the camp on horse and foot, and little good was said of the Lombards, as your Excellency may imagine. If any of them had been on foot they would not have needed the holy oil, as they would not have had time to wait for it. However, by God's grace little harm was done in the camp, and the disturbance being appeased they all returned to their lodgments, it being then about midnight. This broil lasted two hours, causing the greatest imaginable terror, as no one knew what would happen, and everyone expected some great disaster.
Lausanne, the 22nd April, 1476.
[Italian.]
April 23.
Potenze
Estere.
Savoia.
Milan
Archives.
333. Antonio de Aplano, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Savoy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Because of the differences the other evening between the Lombards and English, the Duke of Burgundy yesterday caused to be beheaded with the sword Marco de Ferara, a gentleman and a good man-at-arms, they say of Giovanni Franco de Troylo, because he was one of the chief defenders of the Lombards who went to the Abbey. Some of these Lombards were taken and brought to the lodgments of the duke to be punished, and Marco seeing that one of them belonged to Troylo succeeded in rescuing him from the guards.
Lausanne, the 23rd April, 1476.
[Italian.]
May 1.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
334. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador to the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
They sent out this morning and found the body of your courier; his packet of letters was missing. The saddle of his horse and the shield of your arms were found in the hands of an Englishman, lodged near by with some of his countrymen. When questioned he gave them up, saying he found the dead man when going through the wood to seek for the goods hidden by the country people. I doubt they have committed this murder, as the English are quartered in this neighbourhood, and a thousand robberies and murders are committed. Orders have been issued for the arrest of those English, and I shall try to bring the truth to light and have an example made. Those taken this day and tortured have made no confession.
Lausanne, the 1st May, 1476.
[Italian.]
May 3.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
335. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The King of England writes a very gracious letter to the duke, and says he is sending his Lancaster king-at-arms here, who is entrusted to impart certain matters. Here they take this in good part, saying that the English and French cannot long remain friends.
Lausanne, the 3rd May, 1476.
[Italian.]
May 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
336. A Secretary to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The pope's servant here told me that when he was in England he met Jacometto, your Excellency's servant, who gave him a letter, which stated that he had had audience of the King of England three times, who had promised to give him dogs and horses, as he would have done but for the death of the king's sister, but he hopes to have them soon.
The pope's servant also said that he was in England when the Greek pirate Zorzo took the Genoese ship, and he heard many Genoese of those parts say that the King of France did not intend it, because if he wanted Genoa it would be better to caress the Genoese than to rob them.
Pavia, the 6th May, 1476.
[Italian.]
May 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
337. Gio. Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador to the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Last night the Italian infantry had a broil with the English, Picards and Greeks, and also with those of Gheler, who sacked the quarters of those infantry, and men were wounded and maimed on every hand, seven or eight being killed. The bastard hastened thither and the uproar ceased. It was about a woman. So many races cannot always remain of one mind, especially in the evening.
Lausanne, the 7th May, 1476.
[Italian.]
[1476.
May.]
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
338. Extract from Copy of the Orders newly made by the Duke of Burgundy in Camp. (fn. 3)
The infantry shall be divided into hundreds, and the hundreds into quarteroni and chamerate, and so it shall be for the other battles, for which the camp shall be divided into four parts. A fifth quarter shall be reserved for the maréchal des loges and the scudero lozatore of the battle of his house. In this shall be lodged during the whole expedition to accompany the said maréchal and esquire the companies of Sir John Dixfil and the English hundreds under him, Abrureton and the hundreds under him, Guillaume de Martigni with 200 lances and 500 foot under Garin de Varlusch. These troops shall not return to their companies and hundreds during the march, but shall accompany the maréschal and esquire.
[Italian.]
1476.
June 9.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
339. Giovanni Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador at the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 4)
The brother of the Queen of England, M. de Scales, arrived in camp on Friday. The duke has made much of him and sent to meet him. He will stay two or three days and then leave to go back to England.
The Camp, (fn. 5) the 9th June, 1476, before dawn.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Borgogna.
Milan
Archives.
340. Giovanni Pietro Panigarola, Milanese Ambassador to the Court of Burgundy, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke Of Milan. (fn. 6)
M. de Scales, brother of the Queen of England, has been to see the duke and offered to take his place in the line of battle. But hearing the day before yesterday that the enemy were near at hand and they expected to meet them he asked leave to depart, saying he was sorry he could not stay, and so he took leave and went. This is esteemed great cowardice in him, and lack of spirit and honour. The duke laughed about it to me, saying, He has gone because he is afraid.
From the Camp, the 11th June, 1476.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
341. Francesco Petrasancta, Milanese Ambassador in Francia, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Embassy of England has arrived here with thirty horses and the Embassy of the 15th September, Brittany.
Avantdomo, the 15th September, 1476.
[Italian.]
Sept. 16.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
342. Francesco Petrasancta, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The one who has come from England is not an ambassador, but a kinsman of the King of England, and is going to St. Antonio for devotion. Spoke about the matter I wrote of to your lordship at another time and sent back someone with the reply, and he is continuing his journey.
Avantdomo, the 16th September, 1476.
[Italian.]
Sept. 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Roma.
Milan
Archives.
343. Sagramoro, Bishop of Parma, Milanese Ambassador at the Papal Court, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Your Excellency will have received mine of the 22nd and learned what that Bartholomeo Damelia has brought back from Naples This has greatly pleased the pope. Since then, by his of the 18th dated at Gambalo, he relates what Miero Felice, Chancellor of the Duke of Urbino, says about the friendly disposition of his master, as well as of the king. His Holiness thanks your Highness for the news, and speaks like that. Nevertheless it seems to him that the said duke cannot refrain from wishing to have a hand in everything and to be a factotum, and if he does well, to quote his Holiness, then it is all right. He made me laugh at this point, remarking that when the representatives of his lordship begged him, if he had any business with the King of England or wanted anything from him more than another, that he would be good enough to use his influence, he said, Nowadays his art is known here; it would not have been done for his lordship if it had been known as well two years ago (fecemi ridere ad questo proposito, dicendo che a questi di soa Signoria la fece pregare che quando havesse a tractare o volesse dal Re de Engliterra una cosa pin che una altra quella volesse operare el mezo suo: Horamay la soa arte e cognosciuta qui. Non si seria facto per soa Serenissima essere stata cosi cognosciuta duy anni sonno).
Foligno, the 24th September, 1476,
[Italian.]
Nov. 4.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
344. Francesco Petrasancta, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
There is nothing fresh from England except that his Majesty decided some time ago to send 700,000 butts of wine to the King of England, and he is having them laded now. This is certainly a great and marvellous thing, but it is thought to be in order to ingratiate himself with the people of England.
Tours, the 4th November, 1476.
[Italian.]
Dec. 21.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
345. Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Jacometto de Mayno.
It seems that fortune permits those in whom she takes most pleasure to suffer the greater perturbation. We were especially fond of Brebur, whom the king sent; but whether from change of air or some other accident he fell sick and, though we gave him every care, he died. This has caused us much grief. We beg his Majesty to send another dog of the same race, from which you can choose one if there are any to send, as nothing could give us greater pleasure. If there is anything here which will give him pleasure I desire you to mention it, because we shall be singularly pleased to gratify his wishes. We send the present bearer for no other reason.
[Italian; draft.]
Enclosure.346. Galeazzo Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Edward, King of England.
The excellent dog which your Majesty sent us is lately dead, to our great grief, as your Majesty will learn from Jacometto, our chamberlain. We beg you to give us another of the same breed; nothing at the present time would give us greater satisfaction. We shall be most delighted if there be anything here which would please your Majesty, if you will inform us.
[Italian; draft.]

Footnotes

1 Isabella of Portugal, the third wife of Philip the Good of Burgundy and mother of Charles the Bold, was the daughter of Philippa, eldest daughter of John of Gaunt, the wife of John I, King of Portugal.
2 Printed by Gingins la Sarra: Depêches, ii, pages 84, 85.
3 Gingins la Sarra: Depêeches, ii, page 166.
4 Gingins: Depêeches, ii, 233.
5 On the 9th the duke's camp was before Morat. The Friday before, when Anthony Wydevil arrived, was the 7th.
6 Printed by Gingins la Sarra, Dépêeches, ii, page 236, where it is wrongly dated the 9th June.

Annotations

78 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 13:46:40)
Entry number 322 margin, "for Bogogna read Borgogna".
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