Milan
1498

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Allen B. Hinds (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

341-364

Annotate

Comment on this article | View annotations
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Milan: 1498', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 341-364. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92280 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

1498

1498.
Jan. 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
554. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Dom. Raymundo de' Raymundis de Soncino, his Ambassador in England.
We were most pleased with your letter of the 18th ult. about what the Venetian ambassador said to his Majesty, and you have both shown ability and great prudence.
We have received what you wrote in cipher and commend what you say therein.
[Italian; draft.]
[1498.]
Jan. 30.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
555. The news received this day from England by letters of the 30th. January from the Court of his Majesty, my master, firstly:
The king was then at his palace at a place eight miles from London with his queen and all the Court, in good health and merry, thank God.
His Majesty has recently made peace with the King of Scotland, for which that monarch petitioned through the Spanish ambassador.
They recently celebrated with great triumph and festivities the marriage between Prince Arthur, his son, and Katharine, daughter of the Queen of Spain, and in this good time they hope she will be brought to England with great splendour.
Thank God the kingdom of England was never in such tranquillity or so loyal to his Majesty as now, both nobles and people being in great obedience to the king. It is true that the night before Christmas Eve a fire broke out in the palace where his Majesty was staying with the queen and all the Court, by accident and not by malice, catching a beam, about the ninth hour of the night. It did a great deal of harm and burned the chapel except two large towers recently erected by his Majesty. The damage is estimated at over 60,000 ducats. The king does not attach much importance to the loss by this fire, seeing that it was not due to malice. He proposes to rebuild the chapel all in stone and much finer than before.
The boy who called himself Duke of Orche has fallen into his Majesty's hands with his wife, and is clearly proved to be the son of a barber of Torne in Picardy, and all the people know this quite well.
Within a few days, by God's grace, we shall have a footman, and your Excellency shall have the news the same evening. If your Excellency wishes to write to England within five days a relation of mine is leaving, who will prove an excellent carrier for the letters.
[Italian.]
1498.
Feb. 2.
Potenze
Estere.
Roma.
Milan
Archives.
556. Cardinal Ascanio Maria Sforza to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
When I told his Holiness of your lordship's intention to remove Messer Raymondo, your ambassador, and leave a Genoese merchant in his place, the Pope said nothing except that he regretted that we did not see better indications of the disposition of the King of England.
Rome, the 2nd February, 1498.
[Italian.]
March 10.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
557. Raimondo de' Raimondi of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Since my letter of the 7th inst. sent by the courier Franceschino, nothing has happened except that his Majesty's ambassador, who went to Scotland this December, has returned with the ratification of the peace made by that generous king, nominating your Excellency, and I have seen it. (fn. 1) I believe that his Majesty now wants to go further, to wit to friendship and an understanding with that king, and I hope he will succeed if the Catholic sovereigns of Spain labour as they did for the peace.
The Venetian ambassador will leave in four or six days. (fn. 2) He has made the king a present of 12 bits and four bundles of white candles and three barrels of Damascus syrups. Four nobles were given to the bearer of the presents.
The Genoese merchants here have always persevered in favouring and honouring me for love of your Excellency, and M. Petro Penech constantly does the same.
London, the 10th March, 1498.
[Italian.]
May 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
558. Letter of Don Pedro Ayala, Spanish Ambassador to Scotland, and by reason of his embassy staying sometime in London.
Don Pedro regretted I was not in London without a companion at the death of King Charles, (fn. 3) as more fruit was gathered in an hour than had been in seven months. Don Petro desires to be a good servant of your Excellency.
The Duke of Orleans has sent a herald-at-arms called Normandy to King Henry to advise him of his accession to the throne, calling himself king and the Majesty of England, cousin, brother and colleague. They have made no reply to this, and are in no hurry to do so.
He thought I should return to England.
That I should remind your Excellency of the importance of Scotland and that you ought to make it a friend or an enemy, and that that Majesty in the English peace made by Don Pedro has included your Excellency, so that you ought to thank him and try to make the friendship closer, for which he offers his services.
On the death of King Charles Don Pedro was asked by the English king not to allow the friendship between the Bang of Scotland and the Duke of Orleans to continue, and provision was also made that another herald-at-arms, sent by the Duke of Orleans, should be passed on to Scotland to ask for such friendship.
If your Excellency wishes to send some one to Scotland, Don Pedro promises his good offices. If you wish to write to Scotland before sending, he will do the like.
If you wish to write to that king you must write to his brother as well, also called James, Archbishop of St. Andrews and Duke of Ros. You should also write to the Archbishop of Glasch and to a protonotary who has a great deal of influence, named Andrew Forman, a friend of Don Pedro and myself.
London, the 6th May, by way of Venice.
[Italian.]
May 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
559. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Agustino Spinola, his Agent in England.
From Raimundo, who has been for us to that kingdom, we have learned with the greatest pleasure of the well-being and prosperity of his Majesty, whom we desire you to congratulate on our behalf, saying we wish him every good. As his Majesty has designed to honour M. Raimundo and treat him so liberally, we thank him cordially, assuring him that owing to certain important events it was necessary to recall M. Raimundo home, but we hope to send him back soon to remain some time to treat of certain matters common to his Majesty and us.
You will also give his Majesty to understand that we shall immediately have … his Majesty's desire that his lordship (fn. 4) … may be promoted to the Cardinalate with every … we have written about it to the most reverend and illustrious … our brother, and we shall not cease to … to send them this cause … we are able, his Majesty may be.
Italian affairs are practically as they were the last time we wrote to that kingdom, except that the Florentines, wishing to be on good terms with the league, all the rest thought it would be proper to invite them to join the rest of Italy, only Venice is unwilling to restore Pisa and they persist in wishing to send more troops there. As we are convinced that this is not for the welfare of Italy, we have refused them a passage, so that they cannot send as many as they wished. They have sent a few horsemen through the dominions of the Duke of Ferrara. They express resentment at our action, and have chosen three ambassadors to send to this new French king who calls himself Duke of Milan. Nevertheless in this matter of Pisa, and in other things, we shall not cease to do our duty to Italy. You will inform his Majesty of these things, declaring that we are determined to employ all our means to this end.
We also desire you to thank the [Genoese] citizens living in London, who have so kindly treated our ambassador and honoured him at his departure, informing them that they could not do anything to please us more.
You will also thank Maestro Gulielmo Ariotto, our citizen of Milan, who has entertained the ambassador so kindly at his house.
[Italian; draft, corner torn off.]
May 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
560. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Peter Le Penech, Royal Councillor.
Cordial thanks for all he did for Raimundo, the duke's ambassador to the king, with the hope that Fortune will afford some means of making a return for such kindness.
[Latin; draft.]
May 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
561. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to [Piero Carmeliano] (fn. 5) of Brescia.
Pleased with letters which show his good-will. Would wish to have persons of his excellence everywhere, especially with his Majesty, whom he loves as a father. Desires to be commended to him. [Latin; draft.]
May 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
562. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Brother Giovanni Antonio de Carbonariis.
Gratified at what he wrote of the Ambassador Raimundo and his urbanity and diligence in fulfilling the instructions given him and at what he said to him out of regard for the duke. If love of his country claims him the duke will be delighted but if the kindness of his Majesty detains him in England, will perform those offices for him that are his due. Desires to be commended to his Royal Highness.
[Latin; draft.]
May 16.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra,
Milan
Archives.
563. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Henry VII, King of England.
Regi:
Declaravit nobis D. Raimundus qui fuit orator noster quod paterno affectu nos diligat Celsitudo vestra quod etsi autem multis indiciis perspectum habebamus jocundissimum tamen fuit idem intelligere. Ex eo ejus fidem probatam habemus magnopere autem … quod ipse Raimundus ita sit in curia vestra versatus ut. V. Majestas scribat ejus discessum non libenter tulisse a se visum et fuisse sed nos ilium non revocavimus per alia ratione nisi quod in quibusdam negociis illius opera uti volebamus, statuimus tamen eum prompte remittere apud V. Altitudinem aliquo tempore, mansurum, et cum ipsa tractaturum nonnulla ad vestrum (ut speramus) nostramque utilitatem et honorem pertinentia. Quod autem Majestas V. eundem Raimundum tam splendide tractaverit nobis gratissimum fuit et ex honore ei prestito pl. … debemus V. Majestati Cui… aliquid … omn… ad. … velimus et si qua ratione fieri potest Initam inter nos amicitiam augere cupiamus.
[Draft; torn.]
May 27.
Potenze
Estere.
Roma.
Milan
Archives.
564. Cardinal Ascanio Maria Sforza to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
I reminded his Holiness again about sending to England; he replied that he would send. While thanking your Excellency for communicating what Messer Raymondo has brought back, I promise to leave nothing undone to obtain satisfaction for that sovereign in the matter of the promotion of Messer Joanne Giglio of Lucca, Bishop of Worcester, when the appointment of Cardinals is under consideration.
Rome, the 27th May, 1498.
[Italian.]
June 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
565. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Dom. Raimundo de Raymundi of Soncino, his Ambassador in England.
Although it was our purpose to employ you for Italy in some negotiations begun by you, and then we wrote recalling you from England, yet seeing what the king writes about your residence, we have decided to gratify him, and therefore we desire you to return to that kingdom and reside there for some time, keeping us well advised of what his Highness commands you and of what happens in those parts, while we will tell you the events of our state and of Italy, so that his Majesty may be well informed of everything.
You will tell him this at the first audience, commending us to him and assuring him that we consider him a good father, and informing him of the present state of Italy. You will inform him that the title of Duke of Milan usurped by the new French king, as well as by some of the Dukes of Orleans, his ancestors, in no way pertains to him. You will dilate upon this, advancing all the arguments we have given you in writing. We do not wish these arguments to be published at present; it will suffice that his Majesty alone, whose judgment we esteem highly, may know that the house of Orleans never had any right to this our state.
As we desire to tighten our friendly relations with his Majesty, we shall gladly receive the order of the Garter, and you will take steps so that it be sent.
Nor does this bond, though a strong one, satisfy our desire, but as his Majesty has two daughters, and we understand that the younger is of an age corresponding to that of the Count of Pavia, our firstborn, you will tell his Highness that if it pleases him to give his younger daughter as wife to the Count, we shall gladly receive her as our daughter-in-law. (fn. 6)
[Italian; draft.]
June 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
566. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to M. Raimondo de' Raimundi of Soncino, his Ambassador in England.
So that you may know how to speak of affairs of state touching Italy to the King of England, we give you this example of a document telling you all that has happened up to the present. We will advise you of what occurs later.
[Italian; draft.]
June 15.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
567. Raimondo de' Raimondi, Milanese Ambassador to England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
This morning I received the enclosed from Don Pedro de Ayala, the Spanish Ambassador for Scotland. He has stayed a long while in London, and is loved by King Henry. Although your Excellency is not without interpreters, I have obtained the enclosed summary from the Spanish ambassador, to whom Don Pedro writes. When I am despatched I will start on my journey. I wish to know what I am to do if I meet on the road the courier sent to England by your Excellency, to whom I commend myself.
Milan, the 15th June, 1498.
[Italian.]
June 17.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
568. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Raimondo de' Raimondi, his Ambassador designate to England.
In this visit of yours to the King of England, as we know that the Spanish ambassador has influence with his Majesty, we counsel you to show every confidence in him, and that you have a special commission for this from us. We do not say that you are to speak as yet of the marriage alliance with him, but after you have seen his Majesty, and the ambassador may have heard about it, you will conduct yourself in such sort that it may not appear that we are mistrustful of him.
Since the King of Scotland, according to what you have written and reported, has named us in the peace he has made with the King of England, we have thought fit to write to him the enclosed, to thank him and assure him of our reciprocal good-will.
Lodi, the 17th June, 1498.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
569. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to D. Raymundo de' Raymundi of Soncino, his Ambassador in England.
We have heard with pleasure the summary of the letters written by the Spanish ambassador in England, and we enclose a copy of the letter we have written back for you to deliver. We also enclose a copy of our letter to the King of Scotland. We have also written to his Majesty's brother, the Archbishop of Glasgow, and M. Andrew Forman, and sent you the letters to despatch at your pleasure. If you meet the courier whom we are sending to England on the road, you will open the letters, so that you may know what course to pursue.
We desire you to take two couriers with you, one to notify your arrival and to send with your letters after you have made your first exposition and fulfilled some part of your instructions, especially with regard to the marriage alliance (parentato) and the Garter, and the other to send to Scotland with the letters for the king and the others, with orders to return and do what may be required of him. In the letter to the Spanish ambassador we have arranged that you shall write to him if he is no longer at the English Court.
We send you letters of the Spanish ambassador resident here to the said ambassador and to the others resident with the King of England, which you will deliver when you reach the Court.
You will inform the Spanish ambassador in England of the state of affairs in Italy in the way we have given it in writing, and you will also send a copy to the one in Scotland.
[Italian; draft.]
June 20.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
570. Agostino Chalco to his father, Bartolommeo Chalco, Minister of the Duke of Milan.
The duke has ordained that two couriers shall go to England with Messer Raymundo; the latter desires Philippo da Panchiate to be one, and Agostino thinks Ambrosio de la Chiesa would do for the other, as he is poor and deserving. Asks for Ambrosio's appointment.
Soncino, the 20th June, 1498.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
571. Agostino de Spinula, Milanese Agent in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforzia, Duke of Milan.
On the 11th inst. through the present courier I received your Excellency's letters dated the 15th May. I went at once with the courier to present the letter to his Majesty here at Westminster. After he had read the letter I spoke to him as your Excellency commanded me. He seemed glad to hear of what had taken place in Italy, and was especially pleased at what your Excellency did at Rome with M. Ascanio, brother of your Excellency, that the Bishop of Worcester (Vingormen), his ambassador at that place, may be promoted to the Cardinalate. He thanks your Excellency and begs you to continue your labours, so that he may obtain his intent by such means. His Majesty has given us a letter in reply, which is enclosed.
There were three other letters, one for Messer Piero Carmeliano, one for Messer Piero Penech, and one for Messer Giovanni Antonio de Carbonariis. I will keep the last until his return. He left recently with five ships, which his Majesty sent to discover new islands. (fn. 7)
I have also thanked your devoted subjects, the Genoese merchants, for your Excellency, for what they have done for your ambassador. Although these are slight matters, they are always eager to act for your service and advantage.
I have done the like to Maestro Guliermo Arioto, who answered to much the same effect, offering his devoted service.
There is little fresh to advise except that on the 12th inst. at midnight Perichino Oxbeke, when sleeping between two warders in the wardrobe of the king's palace at Westminster, escaped through a window, but was found on the following day in the Carthusian monastery of Sheen (Cartughia de Shyna), seven miles from that place. He was brought here, and after receiving much contumely, he remains in the Tower of London under better guard.
His Majesty will leave Westminster, I think, to-morrow, for Sheen and Windsor (Vyndexora) and afterwards for other castles and parks of his throughout the kingdom, for hunting and pleasure. He seems in great peace of mind, as he will not return to court before the octave of Michaelmas.
London, the 20th June, 1498.
[Italian.]
June 21.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
572. Peter Penech to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Illme. ac potentissime Princeps et dne. mihi semper metuen. post humill. commen.:
Accepi letteras v. Celsitudinis cum illa qua potui reverentia quibus sane perlectis mirum immodo oblectatus sum tum que V. Celsitudo ad me scribere non dedignata est meque tali Indignum honore Insignire tum que ipsa mihi tam se humanissimam offerat quo nil mihi gratius jocundiusve aut magis optatum esse potest. Qua de re V. Celsitudini quas possum ex Deditissimo corde gratias habeo perpetuoque sum habiturus. Et vero V. Celsitudo mihi gratias agat pro nescio quibus in Rev. Dom. Raymundum paulo antea hie penes Ser. Dom. Regem nostr. oratorem vestrum fretis beneficiis. Equidem Illme. princeps, sique mihi ipsi Dno. Raimundo prestita fuerunt plurimum gaudeo, magisque et magis superinde letarer si in aliquibus V. Celsitudini gratificari possem quamque certe ipsum dom. Raimundum sua potuis humanitate quem humanissimum expertus sum, V. Celsitudini que ulla alia meorum erga se meritorum causa hec retulisse existimo. Ceterum Intelexi qualiter D. Raimundus denuo ad nos venturus est qua in re non parum jocundor cui si in aliquo aut obsequii aut servitutis officio morem gerere valeam me semper illa quam in eam gero observantia paratissimum inveniet V. Celsitudo laudarem Insuper que V. Celsitudo una cum dno. Raimundo oratore vestro litteras precipue ad Dom. Camerarium daret, De qua causa paulo ante recessum ipsius D. Raimundi comunicavimus ac et que non ab amicitia alienum videretur Rmo. D. Cardinali necnon Rev. Dnis. Dunelm. ac Lond. nam hii sunt qui plurimum possunt penes Regiam Majestatem, Restat igitur ut felix sit et incolumis V. Celsitudo ad vota cui me humill. comendo.
Londoniis, xxi. Junii, 1498.
[Signed:] Petrus Penech.
[Endorsed:] Illmo. ac Potentissimo Principi Dno. Ludovico Duci Mediolani etc. dno. meo permetuendissimo.
June 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
573. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to D. Raymundo de' Raymundi of Soncino, his Ambassador in England.
The ambassadors of his Holiness for France have arrived here; among them is M. Adriano de Corneto, who has a mission, after performing his duty with the king, to go to the King of England. His Holiness has told him to have a good understanding with you and to communicate to you all that happens. We desire you to do the same with him, though you will not speak of the secret matters in your commission. If he should surmise something, you will act so as not to excite his mistrust. You will go and show him your instructions to honour him and be on good terms with him, making every effort to give him pleasure. Cremona, the 24th June, 1498.
[Italian; draft.]
June 29.
Somarii.
Milan
Archives.
574. Summary of letters of Secundino Malabayla, written at Asti, the 29th June.
You have received the letter from Messer Alexandro Malabayla from Pontoise of the 25th inst., stating that never did a king obtain the crown in France so quietly as the present one.
On the 24th an ambassador arrived from the King of England, (fn. 8) and intimated the satisfaction of his king and his desire to serve the King of France; and that he might go on a solemn embassy to conclude excellent things with his Majesty.
The Ambassador of the King of the Romans was also etc.
[Italian.]
July 13.
Potenze
Estere.
Roma.
Milan
Archives.
575. Cardinal Ascanio Maria Sforza to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
It is true that an English knight Hospitaller was slain recently by bandits with his company, near Viterbo, but he had not the title of ambassador, as your Excellency was informed. The reason for the event is supposed to be because at Viterbo he happened to remark that he had a considerable sum of money.
Rome, the 13th July, 1498.
[Italian.]
July 14.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
576. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Maximilian, King of the Romans.
Serme. et Invictissime Princeps et Domine Dne. mi observatme.
Destinavi oratorem meum apud Ser. Dom. Regem Anglie Rev. Dom. Raymundum de Raymundis secretarum nostrum et cum in presentia itineri se accinxerit et iter per Germaniam facturus sit comissi et ut me Mti. Vre. commendet et nomine meo quedam exponat cujus verbis Rogo earn ut plerum fidem prestare velit non secus ac si coram ipse earn alloquerer.
Mediolanum, xiiii. Julii, mcccclxxxxviii.
[Signed:] Ludovicus Maria Sfortia, Anglus Dun Mediolani etc.
[Endorsed:] Principi et Invictissimo Dno. meo obsermo. Dno. Maximiliano Dei Gratia Romanorum Regi.
July 18.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
577. Summary of letters of Philip Valperga, written at Paris, the 18th July. The King of England sent as his ambassador Messer Joanne de Sombreset, (fn. 9) his first chamberlain, and on the 14th inst., in Notre Dame de Paris, they swore to the treaty of peace which existed between his king and the late king Charles, and the present king similarly swore to it in the sight of all men.
[Italian.]
July 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
578. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Agostino Spinula, his Agent in England.
We have read the letters brought by our courier, which have afforded us great pleasure. We recognise your great goodness, as we have done nothing to merit such great kindness. We thank you heartily and shall all your kind acts, showing our gratitude when we have an opportunity. You have done what we desired with his Majesty, and we commend your action both in this and in the advices you have sent about it. Nothing more occurs to us to write at present, except that we are sending back M. Raymundo well instructed upon present affairs, and he will arrive soon.
[Italian; draft.]
July 20.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
579. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Raymundo de Sonzino, Milanese Ambassador in England.
Among the letters we have just received through a cavalier returned from England, there is one of M. Petro Lepenech, who reminds us among other things that it will be advisable for us to write something to the King's Chamberlain, the Cardinal and the Bishops of Durham and London. We are glad of this reminder and looked to see to whom we wrote when you went. We find that we wrote only to the Lord Chamberlain, probably the same as M. Petro calls the King's Chamberlain. As we know nothing of the other three we have decided to send you three sheets under our seal, so that you may present a letter in our name to each of them if you see fit.
As the Spanish ambassador has written that he has instructions from his masters to act for us in all eventualities not otherwise than for their Highnesses, you will speak as we have told you, and behave afterwards according as you see his promptitude and good disposition.
[Italian; draft.]
July 24.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
580. Instructions to Dom Raymondi de Soncino, Milanese Ambassador designate for England.
We have recently sent M. Anzolo Comesech and M. Francesco de Montibus to urge His Holiness and King Frederick to make war against France and to inform them of the affairs of Italy. We have now received letters from his Holiness, announcing that he is all ready to make war. We wish to inform his Majesty of the state of affairs and hope he will not fail in this enterprise. As we fear you may be delayed by your indisposition, we have sent Mons. de Burgo to inform his Majesty of our disposition. However we desire you to go to England now, travelling through Germany, and tell his Majesty of the state of affairs, and we shall eagerly await your report.
We especially advise you that his Majesty advises us that he has made an arrangement with some leaders of the Swiss, and we shall do all in our power to consolidate this agreement, though no sign of it has appeared as yet.
[Italian; draft.]
Aug. 3.
Potenze
Estere.
Roma.
Milan
Archives.
581. Cardinal Ascanio Maria Sforza to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Pope showed me letters of the 23rd from the King of France with particulars of his treaty with the archduke. The Pope added that as that king had a perpetual peace with the King of England, when the allies were mentioned to the latter he denied categorically that he had an alliance with anyone, but was free and did not desire to hear a syllable breathed about the allies, for he knew how little reliance could be placed on them.
Rome, the 3rd August, 1498.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
582. James IV, King of Scotland, to Don Pedro de Ayala, Protonothary of the Apostolic See, Ambassador from the King and Queen of Spain. (fn. 10)
Were we not moved by the love of peace, and by the oath taken to that effect, we should wish to punish the recent intolerable outrages perpetrated by the enemy, in violation of that peace solemnly sworn to, by the sword rather than by prayers; but as we will in the first place try our utmost before violating that peace and confederacy, we appeal to you, who mediated for the truce and peace, and had cognisance of the attacks subsequently made on our lieges of our wishes and envoys sent so often on this account to our very dear brother the King of England, and how his Highness sent them back without satisfaction. Being aware of the care and exertions bestowed on our beloved attendant Lion King at Arms, bearer of these presents, we now, as a third effort for the preservation of peace and amity, send our said attendant with letters to his Highness, recommending him to your prudent guidance, appealing to you to stand by him as witness of all past proceedings, should any point be gainsaid.
From our town of Stirling, the 28th August, 1498.
[Signed:]—James Rex.
[Latin; copy.]
Sept. 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
583. Raimondo de' Reymondi of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 11)
By the grace of God and good fortune I have arrived safely in England, not without great trouble, because the French took me for a spy and lay in wait for me between Dunkirk and Gravelines, the archduke's country. Although I had decided not to cross before I knew that the passage was safe, yet M. Marco Antonio da Figino, vicar of Mons. San Severino, came of his own accord to warn me, and I think it was practically impossible to cross had not a nephew of Fulco Portinari, who is living at Gravelines, with his prudence and authority, provided for the passage and given me an escort by the Captain of Gravelines to which place also they sent me an escort of forty English horse who brought me safely to Calais. There, by the advice of the Captain, I hired a ship of war and crossed on the eve of our lady of September. I have not found his Majesty, who has gone to his devotions (a sue devotione), and is not making a stay anywhere; but by the advice of your loyal Genoese here I have despatched a messenger to the Court, from whom I shall learn where his Majesty is and when I can go to him. That done I will forthwith advise your Excellency of everything.
London, the 12th September, 1498.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
584. Raimondo de' Raimundi di Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
I crossed to the island on the 7th inst., and at Dover I found the courier of the Genoese sent by them to bring me to London. There they all came to meet me, and took me to a house which Agustino Spinola had prepared for me, decorated with his hangings and plate. They gave me a fine banquet, and left me in the house, where they visit me every day with the utmost kindness, especially Agostino.
The Genoese thought that on no account should I go to his Majesty before giving him some notice, and so I despatched a man to the Court. The Carmelliano, by royal command, wrote to me that if I had matters of importance I might go to Woodstock on the 24th inst. Subsequently, M. Petro Penech called upon me, and showed me a royal letter, by which his Majesty directed him to make me remain in London, as he will come after Michaelmas. I have asked the reason for this delay, and most people agree that it is because his Majesty while thus wandering about, has kept little state and does not wish to be seen thus; but I believe those who tell me it is due to a private messenger of the King of France, who crossed practically at the same time as myself, and is now at Court to arrange a composition about a great ransom made heretofore by the Duke of Orleans, father of the present King of France, when he was prisoner of the Duke of Somerset, maternal grandfather of his Majesty; and I think that with the peace so recent he does not wish to offend the King of France.
The King of Scotland has sent a herald hither, who has brought the enclosed letter to Don Petro de Ayala. If God does not provide there will be trouble between these two sovereigns, and the King of England has nothing to fear except a Scotch war.
M. Adriano da Corneto has not come, and will not, from what I hear, either because that is the will of his Holiness or because he does not dare, so I understand he has to render account for a round sum of crowns dispensed at Rome by his Highness here, who is not satisfied with the way in which it was done. A friar minor, Bishop of Cally, a man of the Cardinal of Perugia and perhaps of the pope, has indeed come and spoken to the king. He professes to have come to have possession of the church of Worcester, to which the said M. Adriano has been promoted. I cannot learn what he is about. If I hear more I will advise your Excellency.
London, the 19th September, 1498.
Postscript.—The courier of Scotland has not yet left, because they intend to conduct him with me, and to obtain the written licence signed by the king, as otherwise one cannot pass. Seeing this delay, Don Petro de Ayala, who is never going back to Scotland, has written for his passport, and when this is obtained the courier will start on his journey.
[Italian.]
Sept. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
585. Raimondo Raimundis of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sporza, (fn. 12) Duke of Milan.
By mine of the 12th I advised your Excellency of my arrival in England and the danger I ran from the French, and although I am now in a safe place, I have more fear of the French at present than when I was at Dunkirk, because the danger was much greater than I imagined. Zoane Gabriel Bonconti, a Bolognese, your devoted servant, writes me from Bruges that he hears on good authority that the French had sent messengers to take me with orders to torment and even hang me. If this is so, they will undoubtedly try to take me on my return, so your goodness and wisdom must help me. I think it would be a good plan to thank the archduke for his welcome at Brussels and the safe conduct he granted and the care he took of me by his captain of Gravelines, in bringing me safe from Dunkirk to Gravelines, and to beg him to direct that captain and other officials of Flanders to do the like on my return. It will be all the better if your Excellency sends the archduke the armour which he desires so much.
Here in London the Bishop of Cambrai, the archduke's ambassador, recommends himself to your Excellency, asking for your favour in obtaining the red hat at the next creation (and I think he will get the King of the Romans to write to you). I have promised to act the good ambassador. The bishop is brother of M. de Bergies, who is powerful at the Court of Flanders, so I beg your Excellency to give him a favourable reply, so that I may obtain some favour from him on my return. As Messer Agostino da Cremona, vicar of Mons. San Severino in Taravana, knows the Court of Flanders, it will be well to write to him also, and get him to make all the provision necessary.
I also beg your Excellency to thank Folco Portinari for Messer Antonio da Landriano for the favour shown to me, without which I could not have left Dunkirk. With these precautions I hope to return safe.
London, the 19th September, 1498.
[Italian.]
Oct. 11.
586. James IV, King of Scotland, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 13)
Was much rejoiced by the letters lately delivered to him by the duke's attendant. With regard to the duke's thanks for having been mentioned by him as his confederate in the treaty made by him last year with the King of England, (fn. 14) does not consider himself entitled to them, as what he did proceeded from mere honest friendship, but declares the wellnigh Godlike wisdom and innate courtesy of the duke caused him to long for future opportunities of doing what may prove to his honour and advantage.
Is deeply impressed with the many honours which for his sake were afforded by the duke to Robert, Archbishop of Glasgow, his councillor and ambassador when the king's affairs were in course of negotiation with the duke.
Edinburgh, the 11th October.
[Signed:] James.
[Latin.]
1498.
Oct. 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
587. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Raymundo de Raimundis di Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England.
We have received yours of the 27th August and the 12th of the following. We are pleased at what you have written, and especially to hear of your arrival in England. We await advices of your subsequent proceedings. We send what we are writing to Agostino Comertio.
[Italian; draft.]
Oct. 11.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
588. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to Agostino Comertio.
We have received yours of the 25th and commend your efforts.
You will continue to keep us advised of the events of those parts.
[Italian; draft.]
[1498.]
Oct. 12.
Sezione
Storica.
Autografi
Archivescori.
Milan
Archives.
589. James, Archbishop of Saint Andrews and Lord of Ross, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Ex jam datis Vestre Magnificencie litteris clarissime videmur intelligere quo animo Vestra Clemencia non solum sovranum dominum nostrum Regem illiusque Regnum verum et nos amor ac gratia molita sua ex clemencia prosequitur petitur hoc quid primum et in quo satis Vestra Exellentia consulitur quod merito a nobis insularibus admodum feret petendum tum tanto principe amorem et amicitiam ex corde temperare quo procul dubio nichil aut Ser. Dom. Nostro Regi ut arbitramur aut nobis acceptius esse potest propter multas et justissimas considerationes nobiscum quia petendum cum Reverendissimus et Illustrissimus pater Vestre Exellentie germanus Sancte Romane ecclesie vicecancellarius quam meritamur omnibus in rebus nostris apud sedem predictam peragendum perlectorem hilarem et liberalissimum se sua clementia dedit in quo satis sue prime parti obligamur. Nosque possit Vestra Magnificenza nos plus ad gratiam Recognoscere quam super hiis sue Reverendissime per gracie agere. Et ut breviter justissimus vestre in petitur Vestram Illustrissimam Celsitudinem absoluam quamdiu vita nobis comunis curabimus pro virili inter Ser. Dom. Nostrum Regem preclaramque Vestram Magnificentiam amorem et amicitiam perpetuam arbitrantes. In vero hoc et ipsum in plenum posse efficere prout tenemur ac hoc si regnum habet in quo poterimus voto Vestram Illustrissimam Magnificentiam complacere eandem accuratissime et ex corde obsecramus quod tunc innata sua de benignitate nos velit ad hoc certiores reddere duximus enim unquam officium boni et paratissimi amici et pro vobis et Reverendissimo Domino Vicecancellario predicto facere bene valete feliciter longeve Illustrissime princeps ad vota.
Ex palacio nostro Edinburg, xii. Octobr.
[Signed:] Devotissimus Jacobus, Archiepiscopus S. Andreae, Dominus Rossie.
[Endorsed:] Illmo. potentissimo principi ac domino honorando, dom. Ludovico Duci Mediolanen. nostro tanquam domino et benefactori optimo.
Oct. 12.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
590. Andreaw Forman, chaplain protonotary, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
On receiving the letters of your Excellency I at once saw that he should have speedy dispatch with his Majesty the King of the Scots, because after so long a stay in Italy I feel I can do no less. The King of the French is trying to bring about a perpetual friendship and league between his Majesty and the King of Denmark, of whom my sovereign is nephew. I am the unworthy instrument chosen for this end. When I was in England these last months for negotiating a peace between the Kings of Scotland and England, I had a word with his reverence, the ambassador of your Excellency, whom I recognised as admirable in many arduous affairs, and offered him my services with my sovereign. I believe that our king can do much for your Excellency if you will write to him. You might write to him direct or to his kinsman James, Archbishop of St. Andrews, Duke of Ross. (fn. 15)
Edinburgh, the 12th October.
[Latin.]
Nov. 4.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
591. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to M. Bartholomew Chalco, his chief secretary.
M. Bartholomeo: We send you the enclosed letters of M. Raymundo and Agustino Spinula; you will acknowledge the receipt and commend what they have written and express pleasure at their arrival in England. You will also write letters of fair words to all those whom he indicates and send them to him.
Pavia, the 4th November, 1498.
[Signed:] J. Av. Chalcum.
[Endorsed:] D. Bartholomeo … remo Secretario … no.
[Italian.]
Nov. 14.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
592. Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan, to D. Raymondo de Raymundis of Soncino, his Ambassador in England. (fn. 16)
Although we have heard of your arrival in England, we have as yet no news of your having seen the king, and we are advised from various quarters that his Majesty is agreed with the King of France. If that be the case, we do not see how any good can come, as if they are agreed his Majesty will not want to be with us also. With regard to the matter for which you have gone, you can stay on, but if you perceive that they are putting you off with words and dragging matters out, it will be better for you to take leave in a friendly way and return home; but we leave this to your prudence. You must in any case take care that your leaving does not anger his Majesty. You will do what seems best and will send us a full account of your proceedings.
[Italian; draft.]
1498.
Nov. 17.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
593. Raimondo de' Raimondi of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Sends the reply which his Majesty made to him in writing, after having given it verbally and afterwards put in writing, but not as he intended, and therefore his Majesty had it done and ordered that not a word should be changed. His Majesty put off hearing him for forty days for no other reason except in order not to give offence to the King of France, from whom he obtains more money than in the past and values it more; moreover his Majesty did not speak so graciously as on the previous occasion. The change of affairs in Italy has altered him, not so much the dispute with the Venetians about Pisa, about which the king has letters every day, as the league he understands has been made between the pope and the King of France, which he calculates the Venetians will join against your Excellency, as he cannot believe, supposing the Venetians lose Pisa, that they will not break with your lordship.
The peace of Spain with France also makes him move cautiously, and more than all the large pensions prevail, which are paid at the Court of England by the French with the king's knowledge.
The King and the English think that they need no one, and they do not want to arouse suspicion in the French unless they first see everything upside down. In the kingdom there is nothing new and never will be so long as the king lives.
The King of Scotland, to whom they attach great importance, is on very good terms with the King of England, and negotiations are on foot to give him England's eldest daughter, who is not more than eight years old, because the negotiations of M. de Roano about Britanny are at an end, although that sovereign is more inclined to the eldest son of Denmark, who is fourteen years old, not only on account of his age, but because Dacia is more formidable to England than to Scotland.
Antonio Spinula is arrived and recommends himself and his brother to your Excellency. M. Raymundo begs that the means of living may be sent to him.
The purport of the royal reply is firstly to express pleasure at hearing what your Excellency set forth about your claims to Milan, and thank you for the information. As regards the marriage, he thanks your Excellency, but as his daughter is three years old, and cannot be betrothed before seven, he cannot give a definite answer before she attains that age. But when that time arrives, if your lordship cares to treat of the matter, or send an ambassador to ask him, his Majesty sending over to you, he will show every readiness and see that the matter takes effect in every honourable way.
With respect to the Order of the Garter, he said that the statutes of the order require that if any one of the brethren of the order is attacked, the others and especially the king are bound to assist him, if he has a just cause; and as there are at present movements of war between many potentates of Italy, and the King of France threatens war on your Excellency, it would be necessary for the king and the other brethren of the order to help your lordship, which his Majesty would not consider opportune at this time. He therefore thinks it best to postpone the matter a little until a better understanding or mutual alliance ensues between you. When his daughter is seven years old he might contract the alliance and grant the order simultaneously, as his Majesty inclines to both, and then for every reason he would be bound to defend your Excellency.
A letter of M. Petro Lepenes, thanking your Excellency for what you have written, and M. Raymundo mentions the good office performed by him for his affairs, repeating his good disposition and referring to the good work done by M. Raymundo for him.
London, the 17th November, 1498.
[Italian.]
Nov. 17.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan.
Archives.
594. Raimondo de Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 17)
My most illustrious lord: Having asked the king for a reply, he sent for me on the 11th inst., and with as much graciousness as could be desired he answered me in the manner your Excellency will see by the enclosed. As I wished to be perfectly certain of what I should write, I repeated what his Majesty had said. The king considered that I was not impressed with the good feeling which he desired, and with his native kindliness (sua nativa mansuetudine) he said it all over again. As I wished to express his sense to your Excellency I said I would make a minute and correct it in the presence of his Highness. This pleased him, and after I had drawn it up in Latin I took it to him on the 15th inst. He said that I had understood the general sense, but he would like to have seen it written more at length, and he would have a minute prepared in the form he thought most suitable. Accordingly, yesterday evening, the 16th, M. Petro Carmeliano called, who had drawn up the minute with his own hand, corrected by his royal Highness, and requested me on behalf of his Highness not to alter the phrasing. I promised, saying that the reply of your Excellency would prove that I had obeyed his Majesty. I have therefore copied it word for word, and enclose it herewith. I would gladly have sent the original, but M. Petro said that the king wanted to have it back.
With respect to this royal reply, I have some small matters to notify. After his Majesty was advised of my arrival in London, I remained about forty days without audience. I fancy for no other reason than not to give offence to the King of France, from whom, I hear, they obtain more money than in the past, chiefly to pay the ransom of the former Duke of Orleans, (fn. 18) who was a prisoner in England. Although I have spoken four times in secret with his Highness, he has never referred to what he said last year, as when he told me to write to your Excellency that if the French king wanted to go to Italy, there would be remedies, and when he charged me tell to your Excellency that he attached importance to your alliance, because by way of Genoa he might give considerable help, and other similar words. Partly through the most humane conclusions of the prince, partly from matters which I have investigated from another side, I perceive that the changes of Italy have wrought a great difference in him.
It is not so much this dispute with the Venetians about Pisa that has changed him, about which he has letters every day, as this tacit or open alliance which the pope has made with the King of France, with whom he believes the Venetians must join against your Excellency. If they lose Pisa, which he considers unlikely, he cannot believe that they will not make war on your Excellency. I fancy also that he attaches more importance to the King of France than he did in the past, either from obtaining a greater sum from him, or because he values him personally more highly or from their old standing friendship when they were defending the Duchess of Britanny against France. The peace which the sovereigns of Spain have made with France also makes him move more cautiously. But the great pensions count more than all, which are paid by the French at this Court with the royal knowledge. His Majesty, who among his other virtues does not sell his words, lamented to me and expressed surprise that the league contracted with so many ties had broken up thus. I gather that his Majesty believes, and the English here say as much, that he has need of no one, and having peace with all, and seeing so many divisions, I do not think he would put his reputation at hazard for nothing. I feel sure that he will never move against France unless he sees everything upside down, and he would never wish to cause them any uneasiness unless he could do so with the utmost safety and advantage.
In this kingdom there is nothing now, nor will there be so long as this king lives. We hear from outside that the King of Scotland, to whom they attach the greatest importance here, (del quale se tene qui grandissimo conto) is on very good terms with his Majesty, and I hear of some negotiations to give him as wife the king's eldest daughter, who is not more than eight years old, the negotiations with M. de Roano of Britanny having altogether fallen through, although the said monarch leans more to Denmark's eldest son, who is fourteen years of age. His Majesty's reason is not only on account of age, but because Dacia is more formidable to this kingdom than Scotland.
There is some ill feeling between the English and Flemings by reason of new duties imposed in Flanders upon English cloth, and the common people threaten war against Flanders. It is possible that under the name of war, by means of a fifteenth, a sum of nobles might find their way into the king's purse, but in the end the princes will come to terms, and those who suffer must bear the loss.
Antonio Spinola has arrived. He recommends himself and his brother Francesco to your Excellency. I also beg for some provision, as I shall soon be destitute, as I have previously written to your Excellency.
London, the 17th November, 1498.
[Italian.]
Nov. 17.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
595. Raimondo de' Raimundi of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Bartholomeo Chalco, the duke's chief secretary.
Filippo the courier, who is about to return to Milan, finds himself penniless from having been longer on the road than when he came. Accordingly, for the honour of our master, I have got Agustino Spinula to supply him with 15½ gold ducats. I therefore beg you to repay this sum to the sons of M. Napoleone Spinula at Milan, so that the credit may be kept for all of us who go abroad, as we frequently need such help. If you chance to send couriers here, be so good as to send this Filippo, as it is difficult to train fresh people, as your Magnificence knows.
London, the 17th November, 1498.
[Endorsed:] Mco. ac prestantmo. Dno. Bartholomeo Chalco, ducali primo secreto. pri. hon.
[Italian.]
Nov. 19.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
596. Peter Lepenec to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Illme. atque Excellme. Princeps Posthumill. commen. et prospera V. Celnis. successuum incrementa:
Accepi tam ex finis litteris V. Sublimitatis Reverendo patri Domino Raymundo de Raymundis oratore suo viro prof … clarissimo ac prudentissimo referente Illam quam non meis meritis verum sua humanitate in me fidem habet utinam Inclyte Princeps vires meae voluntati corresponderet Quatenus quo sibi ingenio deditus sim facile experientia docente magis indies Probaret V. Subltas. verum neque voluntate neque facto quantumcunque et minimis: Jmmo (ut rectius loquar) aut ineptis aut inutilibus usque V. Deero Celsitudini aut ipsi Rev. patri D. Raymundo oratori suo aliisve servitoribus aut negociis suis. Precipiat igitur obsecro sibi pare re Cupienti; eoque ad vota continue utatur. Convenit primum Invictissime Princeps si ingratitudinis vicium vitare me profiteri velim, Necessarium est quod pro tanta sua humanitate atque inaudita erga me exhibita benevolentia gratias habeam V. Celsitudini reseranque possibiles cum pares negaram. Accipiat igitur loco condigne satisfactionis supplici sui servitoris animum. Cujus erga ipsam affectus neque verbis neque scriptura aut factis quibusvis sufficientur Apperiri probarive possent. Insuper ex litteris sui oratoris intelliget Vra. Excell. hilarem vultum jocundumque animum quem sibi demonstravit Sacra R. Majestas serenissimi principis Regis supremi D. mei quantum que sue Maj. grata acceptaque fuit provincia sibi ad earn commissa. Namque (id dicere Confidenter audeo) Princips Illme. ex quo Seren. Regem sup. d. meum Novi non vidi suam Maj. adeo letam jocundamve post Audentiam alicujus oratoris quemadmodum illam magis indies V. Celsitudinis oratoris adventu gaudere agnosco Cujus virtutes optimique mores ac Prudentia ipis suae provinciae non parvam penes R. Maj. addiderunt gratiam. Optasset citius forte Audientiam dilatam propter spem Sacr. R. Maj. quem tunc hinc dum applicuit D. Raymundus peregre Discesserat locaque satis incommoda et hospitiis visitabat proposueratque post peractam peregrinationem Continuo huc redire quo honorabilius Aptius que oratorem V. Sublimitatis reciperet atque Audiret Negociis in Inopinanti supervenientibus opportuit Suam Maj. justicia quam summopere colit inter subditos administranda ductius inter eos conversari mihique illico ut oratorem V. Celsitudinis advenire intellexit sua precepit Maj. quod ab eo Donec reedisset non discessissem Parui ipsumque oratorem ad Regiam Maj. una cum Decano de Wyndesora secunda Die post ipsius Adventum in palatium. Westmonasterie Concomitati sumus Reliquia que successerunt ex litteris quas ad eum mittit orator suus V. Sublimitas intelliget, ea namque primum Regie Maj. solum ipso oratore suo postulante cognita sunt. Postea per Regiam Maj. cum ah qui bus suis consiliariis ad quos V. Sublimitas litteras dedit consultata intelliget tum ex predictis litteris Amicam responsionem quam habuit a regia Maj. qua de re ne tedio V. Sublimitati sim, hiis eandem amplius obtundere mihi non visum est. Proposueram tandem Prin. Excell. jamdudum urbem petere verum cum ex litteris V. Celsitudinis Rev. D. Raymundi oratoris sui Ad seren. R. Maj. Adventum futurum. Accepi hic illum Celsitudinis servicii gratia et contemplatione immorari. Tunc Decrevi ea spe Ductus facta sibi grata responsione jocundius propositum meum adimplere possem, verum mihi aliter Contingit sum namque jussus ipsi Celsitudinis oratori inherere. Ita ut ab eo discedere non valeam Donec hic manserit non sine mediocri mei jactura quam parvifacerem dum modo V. Celsitudini honeste inservire me posse Arbitrarer. Faciam tamen quod Ingenii corporis que vires mihi largiri non negabunt. Gaudebo interea Admodum si V. Celsitudo sua continue mihi mandata ac beneplacita precipere confidat. Reliquum est ut V. Celsitudo felicissime valeat ad vota meque in quibuscunque possum ut servitore suo utatur.
Dat. Londini, Decimo Nono Novemb, 1498.
[Signed: Ejusdem V. Sublimitatis Servitor humillimus, Petrus Lepenec.
[Endorsed:] Illmo. atque Excell. Principi D. Dno. Ludovico Mdli. Dno. meo.
Nov.
Sezione
Storica.
Autografi,
Vescovi.
Milan
Archives.
597. Report of the Apostolic Nuncio, the Bishop of Cagli, of the Order of the Friars Minor, on his way back from England. (fn. 19)
He quitted Paris on the 18th October, 1498, and arrived in Turin on the 4th November.
He crossed over to England together with Monsig. Raimondo, whom the king, being a hundred miles away, caused to remain in London, while he, the bishop, was admitted to audience. Urged the reception of Raimondo, but the king answered that he did not yet well understand the intentions of the Italian powers, so mutable were they, and that he was about to return shortly to London. The king forwards to the King of France all the letters received by him from Italy, so great is his wish to maintain the friendship of that sovereign.
On returning to Paris, Monsignor of Rouen showed him the letters from the King of England, announcing the arrival there of Raimondo. Monsig. of Rouen talks much more of the Milanese expedition than the king himself. The King of France, expecting always to be deceived by the pope, did not believe in the coming of Valenza, (fn. 20) until he heard of his landing at Marseilles. Even now he is not satisfied, as the pope still insists on the marriage to the daughter of King Federico.
The truce has been made between the two kings, and Monsig. de Ligny is gone to conclude it.
The Venetian ambassadors are much caressed by the king, and transact all their business through Monsig. de Ligny, but nevertheless it is not said as yet that they have made any special agreement with France.
The king never gives ought to anyone in the world, and devotes himself to lascivious pleasures to his utmost.
The king was to quit Paris for Blois, and hoped for the settlement of the divorce from his wife, that he might espouse the Duchess of Britanny, with whom it is affirmed that he consummated marriage before she quitted France.
The Florentine ambassador, the Bishop of Arezzo, not being treated respectfully at the Court, departed, but on reaching Lyons, he received letters from his Signory, and came straight back.
[Italian; copy.]
Dec. 6.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
598. Henry VII, King of England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 21)
Antonio Spinula, our esquire and attendant, has told us how much favour and kindness your Highness has shown to him for our sake, in his various suits and affairs, and also in exacting the money due to him from his debtors. For all this we thank your Highness most heartily, and for showing yourself so kind and liberal towards our servants, nor do you ever cease to deserve well of us. Therefore, whenever an opportunity occurs for making a return, you will find us most ready to give you satisfaction. For the rest we wish your Sublimity every good fortune, and further recommend to you again and again this same Antonio Spinula and Francesco, his brother, in their affairs.
From our Palace of Westminster, the 6th December, 1498.
[Signed:] Henricus.
[Latin.]
Dec. 8.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
599. Raimondo de' Raimundi di Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 22)
Although all the affairs of France are well known to your Excellency, I nevertheless report that Richmond, the royal herald, recently returned from France, declares that all the fortresses of Britanny are free in the hands of the widowed queen, and she is not inclined to that marriage if she can in any way avoid it; also they have decided in Britanny upon three stately embassies, one to the emperor, a second to the Catholic sovereigns of Spain, and the third to his Highness here, and they say this embassy may be expected any day. If it comes I will try to learn the reason.
Similarly his Highness here is sending on a stately embassy to the emperor, a knight, a doctor, and a herald. (fn. 23) They will start in the coming week from what his Highness said to me. I am certain that he does not desire peace between Germany and France.
His Majesty thanks your Excellency for the favour done to M. Antonio Spinola, and asks that he may be preferred in everything. Certainly he deserves it, as if he could everything would go admirably, and every day I see some token of this. M. Antonio desires that your Excellency will show favour to his brother Francesco, and help him to something good. I am sure it will prove most acceptable to both.
London, the 8th December, 1498.
Postscript.—I beg your Excellency to provide me with bread.
[Italian.]
Dec. 14.
Potenze
Estere.
Inghilterra.
Milan
Archives.
600. Raimondo di Raimundi of Soncino, Milanese Ambassador in England, to Ludovico Maria Sforza, Duke of Milan. (fn. 24)
Your Excellency commands me to show every favour to M. Antonio Spinula, but he favours me in all things and has no thought but to serve your Excellency; and although I have twice written that his Majesty here thanks your lordship for what you have done for M. Antonio and again recommends it, yet it is my duty to beg your Excellency to favour him at every opportunity, and his brother Francesco, for whom M. Antonio cares above himself. I am sure M. Antonio will be most grateful for every favour; he desires to serve your Excellency, to whom he humbly presents his respects.
London, the 14th December, 1498.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The ratification of the treaty is printed by Rymer, Fœdera, vol. v, part iv, pages 120–3. William Warham, Keeper of the Rolls, acted for Henry, and Pedro de Ayala for James.
2 Andria Trevisan left London on the 15th March. Venetian Calendar, vol. i, page 268.
3 Charles VIII of France, who died on the 7th April, 1498, and was succeeded by Louis, Duke of Orleans, known as Louis XII.
4 Giovanni Gigli, Bishop of Worcester. See no. 564, at page 345 below.
5 Latin Secretary of the Duke of Milan.
6 Mary, Henry's second surviving daughter, was born on the 18th March, 1496. Massimiliano Sforza, Count of Pavia, eldest son of the Duke of Milan, was born in 1491.
7 Cabot's expedition, in all probability, which consisted of five ships and' sailed in May.
8 Two ambassadors were appointed, Sir Charles Somerset, Garter king at arms, and Dr. Thomas Routhale. Rymer, Fœdera, vol. v, pt. iv, page 124. Apparently it is the former who is meant here. See no. 577 below.
9 It should be Sir Charles Somerset, Garter king at arms. See no. 574 above.
10 Venetian Calendar, vol. i. no. 769.
11 Ibid., no. 770.
12 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 772.
13 Ibid., no. 774.
14 Signed at Ayton on September 30, 1497, for seven years, and extended on the 5th December to the lifetime of the two kings.
15 The peace referred to must be the treaty between Scotland and England signed at Ayton on the 30th September, 1497. Raimondo, the Milanese ambassador, reached England in August of that year. James Stuart, Duke of Ross, was made Archbishop of St. Andrews soon after the death of his predecessor, which took place on the 28th January, 1497. A treaty between Scotland and Denmark was signed on the 14th March, 1499.
16 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 775.
17 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 776.
18 Charles, Duke of Orleans, father of Louis XII, who was taken prisoner at Agincourt. He remained in England until November, 1440, when he was released for a ransom of 50,000 marks, 20,000 down and 30,000 to be paid within six months. Ramsay: Lancaster and York, vol ii, pages 25, 27.
19 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 774 (repeated).
20 Caesar Borgia, Archbishop of Valence.
21 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 777.
22 Ibid., no. 778.
23 The knight and doctor were Sir James Tyrell, captain of Guisnes, and Robert Middleton, Dean of Leicester collegiate church. Rymer: Fœdera, vol. v, pt. iv, page 133.
24 Venetian Calendar, vol. i, no. 779.

Annotations

82 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 14:19:41)
Entry number 589 margin, "for Archivescori read Archivescovi".
Corrigenda to this volume.
83 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 14:25:40)
Entry number 594, paragraph four, for 'nothing now, nor will' read "nothing new, nor will".
Corrigenda to this volume.


<--Previous:
Milan:
1497
Next:-->
Milan:
1499