Milan
1532

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1912

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548-556

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'Milan: 1532', Calendar of State Papers and Manuscripts in the Archives and Collections of Milan: 1385-1618 (1912), pp. 548-556. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=92290 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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1532

1532.
Jan. 7.
Potenze
Estere.
Francia.
Milan
Archives.
882. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Bishop of Winchester has arrived here, a man of great wealth and high in the estimation of the English king. For the time being he is ambassador of his Majesty together with a person called Doctor Benet. These two with the ordinary ambassador of the English king resident with the Most Christian, are negotiating very secretly, and although they keep silence, it is known that in part they are discussing matters pertaining to the divorce. At the same time there is a suspicion that they are trying to get the Most Christian to declare himself together with you the enemy of the emperor, in case of need, as I have already advised your Excellency, reporting that the English king was certainly trying for this from the visit of Bayona to England and his return here. But in any event, in the general opinion, the Most Christian will give them plenty of fair words in secret, but he will take good care not to commit himself to public acts and demonstrations, and there is no one to advise him to do it. Almost all his Majesty's Council will not hear a word of war, or give occasion for offence anywhere; nor will they do so for a long time, unless with the emperor absent in Spain they win over some Italian power.
The nuncio has letters of the
17th ult. from Rome stating that the commissioners for the divorce have proceeded to some acts by order of the Consistory. Since I wrote on the 4th I have learned on good authority that the process of proceeding to a solemn act of the marriage is pressed by the agents of the Most Christian upon the pope, and that his Holiness so far has not put it aside, but indeed entertains the idea favourably, while he always offers excuses secretly for the delay and unwillingness because of the emperor, as I have said before. To-day I introduced the point adroitly with a friend. He would not admit it but he could not deny its truth and said he felt certain it would not take place (ho cavato da bono loco com anchora la praticha del divenire ad acto solenne del mariagio se sollicita per li agenti del Christianissimo con Nostro Santita et che sua Santita sino ad hora non l'ha rejecta, anzi la intertene con bone parole excusando sempre secretamente il differire et non volere sopra lo Imperatore como ho predicto. Et hogi havendolo ditto dextramente con l'amico con bono fundamento quasi non volendo dirlo, non l'ha saputo negare, dicendomi tenere per certo non hara loco).
Abbeville, the 7th January, 1532.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Jan. 16.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
883. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Consistory to-day lasted nearly until the 22nd hour, in discussing the English marriage suit. They had many debates about the matrimonial suit beween the King and Queen of England. The imperial ambassadors, who are acting for the queen, keep demanding a sentence, and ask for justice. The English, assisted by the French, asked for delay, as they have consistently done for some months past, saying that they want to fetch doctors and advocates from various places; and as these are old men and far away, they cannot get here very soon, owing to the bad roads and the cold of this winter season. Finally to-day, after a long discussion in the Consistory, they gave them the whole of the present month, though that must be the absolute term.
This has caused great dissatisfaction to the Imperialists, so that it could hardly be greater, as they say that before the festivals they had a promise from his Holiness to give them dispatch immediately after the festivals. Nevertheless the Collegio did not think it advisable to spur the English horse so hard, and drive him to desperation. But the Imperialists will not and cannot take it in good part, as they have arranged their operations and sent information to their superiors of exactly the opposite tenor from what has happened, owing to the promise which they received. However, they have to swallow it, as for the moment there is no other course open to them.
Rome, the 16th January, 1532.
[Italian.]
Jan. 25.
Sezione Storica.
Autografi.
Sovrani.
Milan
Archives.
884. Henry VIII, King of England, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
In praise of Augustino Scarpinello, the duke's ambassador, who has asked for leave to return home, which has been granted to him.
From the palace at London, the 25th January, 1531.
[Signed] Henry R.
[Countersigned] Petrus Vannes.
[Latin.]
Feb. 21.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
885. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The English ambassador, who left here for England some time ago, has arrived at Bologna on his way back, and is expected any day. According to what they say, another is to come after him.
Rome, the 1st February, 1532.
[Italian.]
Feb. 5.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
886. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The English ambassadors here are advised that the sentence about the divorce will go against them. They boast loudly that they will make a new rule (regimento) in ecclesiastical matters, and urge the Most Christian to do the same. They have most secret discussions in which these ambassadors take part, but we are unable to find out about them.
The Most Christian will not thwart but rather assist the operations of the Vayvoda, and they say that severe strictures have been passed upon the Most Christian in England, by Laschi, the Vayvoda's ambassador, who was destined for this Court, and was detained by the King of the Romans on his way.

Rouen, the 5th February, 1532.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Feb. 15.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
887. Ferrante Gargano, Milanese Ambassador at Ferrara, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Letters of the 8th from Cologne bring word that as regards the matrimonial cause of the King of England, they are going to make a Consistory and give public audience therein, in which Succo, auditor of the Rota, who has charge of that case, is to report quod juris.
The English king has sent by Doctor Benetto a very strong and imperative (molto gagliarda et brava) letter to his Holiness, with a very strong remonstrance, and the emperor has similarly written to the pope with his own hand, complaining of him for the same cause, so that both sovereigns express their dissatisfaction.
Ferrara, the 15th February, 1532.
[Italian.]
April 6.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
888. Camillo Gilino, Milanese Ambassador to the Emperor, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Yesterday the emperor sent Monsig. di Bellanson to the Most Christian and Monfalconetto to the King of England, to inform them of the coming of the Turk, and ask them as Christians and kinsmen to help him to avert this imminent storm. I understand that the emperor has performed this office, not from any hope he has of receiving help from the two kings, but merely to enlighten the world as to their dispositions, and also to show that he does not mistrust them in such a common necessity.
Ratisbon, the 6th April, 1532.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
May 28.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
889. Giorgio Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Il Maromellia arrived at Chiatiobriano four days ago. I have not been allowed to go there, as the Most Christian objects to any public representative going, and only the English ambassador is lodged and made much of.
Rhenes, the 28th May, 1532.
[Italian.]
May 29.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
890. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The man who came to bring the offer of 50,000 foot in the name of the Most Christian and 40,000 in the name of England, has not yet departed. One who has seen the letter directed to his ambassador here says that he is to make a moderate protest, saying that he does not mean to leave Italy to destruction, and if it is abandoned by others, he means to succour it, as the wolf succours the lamb. God open his eyes so that he may recognise his error in time.
Rome, the 29th May, 1532.
[Italian.]
June 2.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
891. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The ambassador of the King of Scotland presses hard to have the daughter of the Most Christian for his king, saying that she was promised to him. They have not yet given him an answer.
Tours, the 2nd June, 1532.
[Italian.]
June 19.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
892. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
This morning letters arrived from the Imperial Court, when the Authorisations were not yet open, because the Imperial ambassadors found themselves in the Consistory, cited by the English, upon the article of admitting the excusator without a mandate for a proxy, a matter now disputed in public Consistory for two months on end without any decision being reached. The contents of these letters have not yet been made public.
Rome, the 19th June, 1532.
[Italian.]
Aug. 18.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
893. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
A Scottish gentleman (fn. 1) has arrived here, a man of exemplary goodness and sanctity. He was a soldier of the King of Scotland, and has had a wife and five children. He is about forty-five years of age, of red and white complexion (albarosso), rather small of stature. He was taken prisoner by a Scottish lord to obtain some of his possessions, who kept him many days without food. He did not die owing to Divine assistance. He vowed to go to his devotions in a distant country and eat nothing until he had fulfilled his vow. He did this, and wishing to visit the church of the Apostles he was directed hither by Messer Dario to a friend, as a man of miraculous abstinence. The pope tested him for eleven days, keeping him shut up in a sealed room well secured, after he had first been stripped and given other clothes. He ate nothing except that on the sixth day he asked for a little pomaranzo brusco as he had a bitter taste, owing to a cold. They gave him this, when he held it in his mouth and then spat it out. On the morning of the Assumption he communicated in St Peter's with the gentleman who guarded him, who had made some holes in the wall of his room to see what he did He says that he was praying almost all the time, sometimes repeating certain Psalms which he has in print in this Scottish idiom He wants to go to Jerusalem. The pope has spoken with him, and almost all the Court wanted to see him and many to speak with him by interpreter, because he does not know grammar or any other idiom. He does not ask or accept money or garments. He does not foretell future things, call himself a saint or prophesy, but says he is a sinner like other men, and this abstinence is by the grace of God. He agrees to be tested, not for ostentation, but because it may be seen that the Divine power operates in any one. In short, one can find nothing but good in him. They have his pulse felt every day by a physician so that he may not perish of some melancholy humour. They have always found it uniform. His Holiness has given him plenary indulgence, and leave to go on his journey when he pleases.
Rome, the 18th August, 1532.
[Italian.]
Sept. 5.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
894. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Holiness told me that he heard nothing from France that threatened immediate war, but only that he was preparing for the conference with the King of England. He also confirmed to me the visit of the son of that king to the Court of France with some other young nobles of that island, and that some French nobles are going to the English Court.
Rome, the 5th September, 1532.
[Italian.]
Sept. 15.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
895. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
His Majesty celebrated mass this morning in the church of this castle. He has the knights of the Order with him, but no ambassadors except the English. He solemnly confirmed and swore to the peace and perpetual friendship with the English king.
The Grand Master left Tours for Paris the day before yesterday. He said he would only stay five days and go on to Calais. I was told this morning that he will not start until the beginning of October. If that is the case he will probably see the Most Christian again before he leaves for Paris. Well-informed people say he is going about the conference between the two kings, which they say now will take place about the end of October. We do not yet hear what they will discuss.
The articles between the kings were signed several days ago. The contents are not known, but I believe they will be soon, at least in part.
Amboise, the 15th September, 1532.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Sept. 23.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
896. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
They are anticipating the conference with the English king, which they say will take place on the 30th October, with very few people. They say there will only be some sixty horse with the Most Christian.
Rome, the 23rd September, 1532.
[Italian.]
Sept. 26.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
897. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The Cavalier Casale will leave in three or four days, to assist at the conference between the Most Christian and the English king, his master.
Rome, the 26th September, 1532.
[Italian.]
Sept. 28.
Carteggio.
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
898. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Messer Augustino Scarpinello arrived here yesterday evening, younger than when he left Pavia for England.
Rome, the 28th September, 1532.
[Italian.]
Oct. 2.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
899. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Mons. Hieronimo of Navarra has written and printed a work in favour of the Queen of England's claims. He has handed me a copy to send it to your Excellency. I await an opportunity for sending it.
Rome, the 2nd October, 1532.
[Italian.]
Oct. 2.
Carteggio.
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
900. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
As soon as the majority of the public representatives had arrived her in Abbeville, on their way to Boulogne, the legate, in the name of the Most Christian, who had written to him to that effect, sent to inform these representatives that they should wait here until his Majesty's return, saying that the English king had left the representatives accredited to him on the other side of the water, and he desired that those here should be left behind, away from Boulogne. Thus every one remained, except the English ambassador, whose duty it was to be present at the conference. The Venetian ambassador, who had gone on to Boulogne, was compelled to depart, and come back here.
In my case also, the moment I dismounted at Abbeville, which was on the 16th inst., I was told of this by the Secretary Barilliono, in the name of the legate. Accordingly, I took steps to obtain advices about the events at Court from some good servant of your Excellency. Thus, to-day, I hear that on the 20th the Most Christian left Boulogne and went to lodge at Marchexa, a place adjoining the district of Calais. On the 21st his Majesty accompanied by the leading nobles and magnates of France, but without servants, entered the said district to within two leagues of Calais, to meet the English king. After they had embraced the eyes of both were observed to betray their emotion (furono visti ambidoi alli occhi intenerirse) and they uttered nothing but words of salutation in that act. The Most Christian placed himself on the right and they set off towards Boulogne. At a distance of about two leagues they were met by the Dauphin and his brothers, accompanied by the legate, the cardinals and councillors. These saluted and bowed to the English king and the two eldest thanked his Majesty for his good offices and his efforts for the release of the Most Christian and themselves from the hand of his Imperial Majesty. After this, both sovereigns resumed their journey. As soon as they reached French territory the English king was placed on the right hand, and in this manner they arrived at the gates of Boulogne, where they separated to go to their respective quarters.
On the 22nd the Most Christian went to visit England. They only discussed agreeable matters, from what one can learn, as the interview took place on foot, with the leading men and grandees standing, by. On the 23rd they met in council, and after some space their Majesties withdrew to their quarters. They left in council the Grand Master, the Admiral, the Legate and the Secretary Villandri, with the Bishop of Winchester, the Earls of Norfolk and Suffolk and an English secretary. We have not heard what they discussed, but the general opinion is that this conference was nothing more than a formal confirmation on the spot of what had already been arranged and agreed upon, of which nothing more is known than what I have already written to your Excellency. This, according to the Grand Master, is a determination to assist Christendom, and, if necessary, to arm by sea and land at the right time. One thing is, that owing to the successes of the emperor against the Turk, according to the news, a good many plans will fall through.
In a day or two the Most Christian will go to Calais, where the beloved wife of the English king is with some nobles. She herself and all her Court are greatly esteemed and honoured by his Majesty, and although many think that that king will make the marriage without the authority of the pope or any other declaration, serious men are not able to believe this. The Most Christian's Court made their display by superbly embroidered garments, those of the English king by gold chains and decent clothes. As a matter of fact the display did not come up to that of the other conference.
Abbeville, the 24th October, 1532.
[Italian.]
Nov. 11.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
901. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
Nothing further has been done about the new marriage of the English king. Of the conference, both kings and their ministers say that if the Turks begin war against Christendom next year, the year following or the year after that, the Most Christian will arm and they have arranged the way.
Amiens, the 11th November, 1532.
[Italian; deciphered.]
Dec. 3.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
902. Giovanni Stefano Robio, Milanese Ambassador in France, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
The natural son of the English king has come to stay at this Court.
Paris, the 3rd December, 1532.
[Italian.]
Dec. 28.
Carteggio
Generale.
Milan
Archives.
903. Zorzi Andreasio, Milanese Ambassador at Rome, to Fracesco Sforza, Duke of Milan.
To-day his Holiness announced a special congregation. Of the ambassadors, the three imperial (Mayo, Musetola and Burgo), the French, the English and myself attended. His Holiness spoke of the peril to Christendom from the Turkish preparations, and implored the help of.Christian princes. The ambassadors made reply. Casale for England, said that his king would not fail to give his usual assistance to the Church and his Holiness, with similar fair words.
Rome, the 28th December, 1532.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 John Scott. See Froude: Hist. of Eng., vol. i, page 294.

Annotations

86 jacob.ellis - (Tuesday 31 Mar 2009 15:38:43)
Entry number 900, first paragraph, for 'had arrived her in Abbeville' read "had arrived here in Abbeville".
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