Spain
May 1509

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Institute of Historical Research

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G. A. Bergenroth (editor)

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1866

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7-19

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'Spain: May 1509', Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2: 1509-1525 (1866), pp. 7-19. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93604 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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May 1509

11 May (?)
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 114.
3. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla.
A courier has just arrived from Flanders in eight days. In France he met on the road another courier, travelling in great haste from England to Spain, who told him that the King of England was dead, and that the Prince of Wales had peacefully ascended the throne. The courier from England who was the bearer of this news was, however, not following the direct road, but travelling in the direction of Lyons. He has not yet arrived. If the news of the death of the King of England is true, it would have been necessary to send a flying courier at once by the shortest possible route. Cannot understand for what reason the courier was sent to Lyons. Suspects he (the Knight Commander of Membrilla), thinking that the King of France was still at Lyons, had written something respecting the death of King Henry to the Spanish ambassador at the French court. As, however, the King of France has already gone to Milan, it is to be feared that the courier may have followed him to Italy, and that a long time will elapse before he arrives in Spain. Sends, therefore, this courier to England. It is, in this conjuncture, of the greatest importance to him to be well informed, and to know his (the ambassador's) opinion on the line of conduct which ought to be observed in England.
If the King of England is really dead, the French as well as others will enter into all kinds of intrigues to prevent the marriage of the new King with the Princess Katharine from taking place. He must, therefore, by all the means in his power persuade the new King of England to marry the Princess without any delay. The marriage is of great importance, not only with respect to the Princess, but also on general political grounds, since it will secure to him the friendship and alliance of the King of England.
Is determined to grant to the new King all the advantages which were denied to his father, on the sole condition that the marriage is immediately consummated.
If the King of England is dead, he must, as soon as he receives this despatch, go to the new King, give him the enclosed letter, and explain to him at length everything contained in it, making use of the best arguments that occur to him and the sweetest words he can imagine. That done, he must deliver his credentials, and tell the new King of England in his (King Ferdinand's) name that his (the King of England's) age and position as a King without heirs render it imperatively necessary for him to take a wife without delay, and to beget children. Begs the King of England most earnestly not to defer any longer the consummation of his marriage with the Princess Katharine, who is already his wife. The dower shall be punctually paid.
The late King of England required various concessions to be made by him. Did not grant them, as the late King had been a bad friend and ally in the lifetime of King Philip. But every circumstance is now in favour of the young King whom he considers as his son. Is ready to concede to him what he had denied to his father. He is to say this to the King of England in the kindest and "sweetest" manner possible. It is of great importance that the marriage be consummated without further delay, since, if it were to be deferred, his enemies would find means to undo it. But he must never admit that the marriage can be dissolved. On the contrary, he must always speak of it as though nothing can be changed in that respect.
Sends him bills on merchants in England to the amount of 100,000 scudos. Begs, however, that the consummation of the marriage may not be postponed till the bills fall due. As the merchants who have signed them live in England, the payment is perfectly secure.
Sends him his power and the power of Queen Juana, by which he is formally authorized to renounce their right ever and under any circumstances to ask for the repayment of the dower of the Princess Katharine.
He is likewise authorized by the same powers to ratify the treaty of marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary.
Should he think it expedient to corrupt some of the most influential councillors of the King, he may offer them money.
All his ingenuity and all his industry must be brought to bear on the one affair of the marriage. All other transactions are to be postponed. He must not speak to the Princess about her confessor, unless the present confessor opposes the marriage.
Is ready to renew the treaty of alliance, concluded between him and the late Queen Isabella, on the one part, and the late King Henry, on the other part, if the present King of England should desire it. Promises to ratify whatever treaty he concludes with the King of England, in order to remove all obstacles to the marriage.
Cannot see any difficulty serious enough to prevent the marriage. It will be advantageous to England as well as personally to the new King of whom he will take as much care as he would of his son, the Infante Don Juan, if he were alive.
He must continually send couriers by land and by sea till the affair of the marriage is concluded.
Had determined to send a prelate as ambassador to England ; changed his mind, however, as soon as the news of the death of King Henry arrived. To send a new ambassador to England would cause delay in the negotiations respecting the marriage.
He may communicate to the Princess of Wales as much as he thinks fit.
Recommends him over and over again to do his utmost in this affair, and continually to write.—No date. (fn. 1) No signature.
Spanish. Draft. pp. 7.
11 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 121.
4. King Ferdinand The Catholic to King Henry VIII.
Has heard with great sorrow the news of the death of King Henry, his father. The death of such a prince as he was is a great loss to his family and to his friends. The only consolation is that he died a good Catholic.
Has gained a son by losing a brother ; will consider him always as his son. It is to be hoped he has ascended the throne unopposed. Should that, however, not be the case, and should he want aid, he has only to say so, and a powerful army, consisting of men-at-arms, infantry, and artillery, ships, and engines of war, will be sent without delay from Spain to his assistance. Would even, if necessary, come in person to England at the head of a powerful army, and act in the same way as he would if the fate of his own dominions were at stake.
Has written to the Knight Commander of Membrilla about the marriage of the Princess Katharine. The Knight Commander will communicate with him respecting the said marriage.—Valladolid, the 11th of May 1509.
Signed by the King.
Signed by Miguel Perez Almazan.
Spanish. Duplicate. pp. 2½.
11 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 112.
5. King Ferdinand the Catholic to Katharine, Princess Of Wales.
A courier who has arrived in eight days from Flanders has told him that the King of England is dead. Has written to the Knight Commander of Membrilla, his ambassador in England, and has told him what he must do in case this news be true, in order to bring her marriage to a speedy conclusion. Sends at the same time instructions to the ambassador respecting what he must do in case the King should still be alive. As the ambassador will communicate to her all his instructions, it is not necessary to repeat them here.
Has her welfare and especially the speedy conclusion of her marriage more at heart than anything else on earth. Hopes she will assist his ambassador in his negotiations, for he has always served her faithfully, and has never written letters to Spain which could prejudice her in any respect.
Had intended to send a prelate as ambassador to England, in order to conduct the negotiations of her marriage. As, however, it is said that the King of England is dead, he has thought it advisable not to change his ambassador, since such change would cause delay.—No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Princess of Wales. In cipher."
Spanish. Draft p. 1.
11 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 120.
6. Juana, Queen of Castile, to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla.
Her father, King Ferdinand the Catholic, and her mother, the late Queen Isabella, concluded, in former years, various treaties with the late King Henry of England. Among them there was a treaty concerning the marriage of her sister, the Princess Katharine, with Henry, Prince of Wales, now King of England ; and another, of alliance and friendship between Spain and England.
Empowers him to confirm and ratify these treaties in her name, and to conclude any other treaties which he may judge necessary or convenient.
Empowers him further to promise in her name that the repayment of the dower of the Princess Katharine will never nor under any circumstances be asked for by her.
Authorizes him to ratify the treaty of marriage between the Archduke Charles and the Princess Mary of England, which has been concluded by the Emperor Maximilian, the Princess Margaret, and the Archduke Charles, on the one part, and the late King Henry of England, on the other part. He can, if necessary, change the the words of that treaty, "Most illustrious King of England, our brother," into "Most illustrious King of England, our son."
This power is to be signed by King Ferdinand, her father.—Valladolid, the 11th of May 1509.
(Signed)
Yo el Rey.
Miguel Perez Dalmazan.
Latin. Autograph. Duplicate. pp. 3.
11 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 111.
7. Miguel Perez Almazan to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla.
Holds him in great esteem, and ardently desires for his sake that he may succeed in the business which he has in hand, for, if he fails, he will be even more unfortunate than the Princess herself. On the other hand, success will reflect great credit on him, and bring him great advantages. Hopes he will do his utmost to bring this marriage affair to a satisfactory conclusion.
The first thing to be done is to obtain a paper, signed and sworn to by the King, confirming what has already been concluded ; that is to say, if there should be any delay about the wedding. The next step to be taken is that the King and the Princess must contract their marriage per verba de prœsenti. Although the marriage has already been contracted per verba de prœsenti, it will be well to repeat the act, now that the King has ascended the throne. The third step is to have the ceremony of the wedding performed. The whole affair would be safe if the marriage per verba de prœsenti were repeated once more by the present King.
The bills of exchange for the payment of the 100,000 scudos of which the King of Spain speaks in his despatch cannot be forwarded by this courier. The money is so dispersed in Spain that time is necessary to collect it. Will do his best to make the delay as short as possible. The bills will be sent by another courier as soon as practicable. The King of Spain wishes this messenger to start immediately, as he is the bearer of the powers by which he is authorized to settle the marriage itself. The courier with the bills will soon follow this messenger. He can say that the bills of exchange are already in his hands. As soon as the marriage is concluded, but not before, he may ask for some delay of the payment. Most probably, however, the money will be in England before it is wanted. King Ferdinand desires him to speak with the Spanish merchants, and to take care that the money which they have in hand, and which is not yet sent to Spain, should on no condition be sent away.—Valladolid, the 11th of May 1509.
Indorsed : "England."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 2.
11 May?
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 113.
8. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla, and Ambassador in England.
After having written the other letters which go by this courier he received his despatches of the 23rd and 27th of April, containing the news that the King of England is really dead. As his other despatches provide for the present contingency, there is nothing to be added to them, except that he must always bear in mind that the marriage of the Princess of Wales with the King of England is the most important business that ever was, or ever will be, confided to him.
In answer to what he has written respecting certain scruples of conscience which were mentioned to him, viz., whether the King would commit a sin by marrying the widow of his deceased brother, he must say that such a marriage is perfectly lawful, as the Pope has given a dispensation for it, while the consequence of it will be peace and friendship between England and Spain, besides which the marriage of the Princess Mary with Prince Charles depends on it.
The King of England, having been betrothed to the Princess of Wales, would, moreover, commit a sin by breaking his engagement to her. He may take example from the King of Portugal, who has married two sisters, and who is blessed with a numerous offspring, and lives very cheerfully and happily. Hopes the same happiness is reserved for the King of England, who will enjoy the greatest felicity in his union with the Princess of Wales, and leave numerous children behind him.
He is to treat this affair with the greatest delicacy and caution. Thinks it would be desirable to gain over the commissioners who are negotiating this business, or at least the one who is most influential.
Told John Stile that he was not willing to ratify the marriage of the Archduke Charles with the Princess Mary. Did so only because he wishes that the English should be informed by him, and not by the English ambassador in Spain, of the agreeable news that he is now ready to ratify the marriage.—No date. (fn. 2)
Spanish. Draft. pp. 1½.
12 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 119.
9. King Ferdinand the Catholic to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla, and Ambassador in England.
Among many other treaties, a treaty of marriage between Henry, Prince of Wales, and his daughter, the Princess Katharine, and a treaty of alliance between Spain and England, were concluded by him with the late King Henry of England. These treaties were to be binding on themselves and their successors.
Has received the news that the late King of England is dead. Is deeply afflicted by the death of his good brother, but consoles himself with the thought that, if he has lost a brother, he has gained a son.
It is his firm intention that the treaties concluded with the late King should remain in full force after his death, and he has no doubt that the new King of England is animated by the same friendly sentiments towards him. Wishes, if possible, to render his friendship and relationship with the new King of England even closer and more intimate than they were before. Is, therefore, ready not only to ratify the existing treaties, but to add some new articles to them, and even to contract a new bond of affinity with his son. His intention is to take as much care of the interests of the new King of England as though they were his own affairs.
In nominating him as his ambassador at the court of the new King of England, he authorizes him to ratify in his name the existing treaties between England and Spain, to conclude new articles, to modify the stipulations of the old treaties, and to promise that the repayment of the dower of the Princess Katharine shall never be asked for by him. Empowers him, further, to ratify the treaty of marriage between the Archduke Charles and the Princess Mary, sister of the new King of England, which has been contracted by the Emperor and the Princess Margaret, in the name of the said Archduke Charles, on the one part, and by the late King Henry of England, on the other part. Finally, authorizes him to contract new treaties, or a new treaty, with respect to the marriages in question, if he thinks it necessary or convenient to do so, and leaves it to him to settle the conditions of this treaty or treaties with the new King of England.— Valladolid, the 12th of May 1509.
(Signed)
Yo el Rey.
Miguel Perez Dalmazan.
"The King commands Miguel Perez Dalmazan to write out a similar power in the name of Queen Juana."
Written on the margin in the handwriting of Almazan : "Fiat."
Latin. Draft. pp. 6.
14 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 118.
10. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla.
Sent him a despatch by Juan de Azcotia who left on the 11th and promised to be in London in eleven days. Sends herewith a duplicate of the above-mentioned despatch.
Has meanwhile negotiated the affair concerning the payment of the 100,000 scudos with merchants in Spain. Sends their bills of exchange on merchants in England. Almazan will write more about the money. The payment of the dower will no longer be an impediment to the consummation of the marriage.
Hears that John Stile has sent unfavourable reports to England. Has spoken with him and has told him to write henceforth only good news. Has, likewise, said to him that he is willing to ratify the marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary, and to grant all the demands which he had denied the late King of England. Told him that the best thing that can be done is to conclude an alliance between himself, the Emperor, and the King of England. John Stile answered that he believed the marriage of the Princess Catharine would soon be concluded, and he promised to send a favourable account to his master. The letters of John Stile which are enclosed must be delivered to the King immediately.
Is really disposed to ratify the marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary, on condition, however, that the wedding of the Princess Katharine takes place without delay. He must reconcile himself with the Princess Katharine, and arrange with her the line of conduct to be observed. She can give him valuable advice. She wrote formerly that there was no doubt her wedding would soon be celebrated, if the old King of England were to die.
He cannot render him a greater service than to bring about the consummation of the marriage of the Princess Katharine. —14th of May 1509.
Indorsed : "Membrilla."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 2.
14 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 117.
11. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Katharine, Princess Of Wales.
Has written to her and to his ambassador by Juan de Azcotia. Has since spoken to John Stile, and told him to send favourable information to England and especially to recommend her marriage.
Had refused, as long as the late King of England lived, to ratify the marriage of Prince Charles with the Princess Mary, to renounce his eventual claims on her dower, or to pay the whole remaining 100,000 scudos of her dower in money. Had done so, because he knew that the late King Henry was neither his nor her friend. But now that he is dead, the marriage of Prince Charles with the Princess Mary will be ratified, all his claims on her dower renounced, and the whole 100,000 scudos paid in coin. Thus, all impediments to her marriage are removed.
Her marriage, and that of Prince Charles, are of great political importance, since they will secure an alliance and friendship between himself, the Emperor, Prince Charles, and the King of England. The present state of Europe renders this alliance highly desirable and even necessary.
She must now show what she is capable of, and bring the long negotiations about her marriage to an end.
His ambassador will ask her advice. Reminds her that she once wrote that her marriage could be easily concluded, if the late King of England were to die. She must write to him at length.
Is ready to place his person and his kingdom at the disposal of the King of England, if her marriage with him takes place.
Indorsed : "14th of May 1509."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 2.
18 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 124.
12. Miguel Perez Almazan, First Secretary Of King Ferdinand, to Katharine, Princess Of Wales.
In the lifetime of King Henry VII., King Ferdinand the Catholic refused to accede to some demands which the late King of England made, knowing perfectly well that the late King of England was not his friend, and had no intention to marry her, whilst he lived, to his son, the present King. The old King of England was always beset by the fear that his son, the present King, might during his lifetime obtain too much power by his connexion with the house of Spain.
As soon, however, as the death of King Henry VII. was known, King Ferdinand granted to the present King all that he had refused to his father. He loves her most of all his children, and, on her account, looks on the present King of England as though he were his own son. King Ferdinand will henceforth communicate to King Henry all his secrets, and expects in return that King Henry will conceal nothing from him. This absolute confidence between the two Kings is necessary, in order that King Ferdinand, like a true father, may give his advice about everything to the King of England.
King Ferdinand is in good health and spirits. The Queen (fn. 3) is well after her confinement. The Queen Infanta (fn. 4) enjoys good health.
In Spain there is peace, justice, health, and plenty.
If she wishes to have persons sent to serve her, she must tell him. Promises to persuade the King to send them immediately. —Valladolid, the 18th of May 1509.
Indorsed : "England."
Spanish. Holograph. Draft. pp. 8.
18 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 115.
13. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Gutier Gomez De Fuensalida, Knight Commander Of Membrilla, and Ambassador in England.
Sent him despatches and letters by Juan Azcotia, who left on the 11th of May, and promised to be at Calais in eleven days. Enjoined him in those despatches to do his utmost to conclude the marriage between the new King of England and the Princess Katharine as soon as possible. Sent him by the same courier his power and the power of Queen Juana to ratify the marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary of England ; to renounce all their claims concerning the eventual repayment of the dower of the Princess Katharine, and to promise, in his name, that the whole 100,000 scudos due on account of the dower should be paid in money. Did so in order to show the new King how much more he loved him, and how much more highly he valued his friendship than that of his father.
On the 17th of May despatched another courier, Peti Juan, who was likewise to travel to Calais in eleven days. He was the bearer of the duplicates of the same papers which were forwarded by Juan Azcotia. He had likewise taken with him the bills of exchange for the dower of the Princess. Had done all in his power to obtain the money which was necessary, but as the small sum of 7,000 ducats was still deficient, it was decided that the bills of exchange should be sent by another courier.
When, at last, the courier with the bills of exchange was ready to start, his letter of the 8th of the current month arrived, in which he said that he had already arranged with the Privy Council all that was necessary to secure the marriage of the Princess, and that nothing remained to be done, except to pay the dower. Thanks God for this good news. Is satisfied with the manner in which he has conducted the negotiations. Though he has begged him to send the money in cash from Spain to England, he does not think it advisable to do so. For, if the money were sent by sea, there would be a danger of its arriving too late ; and if it were sent by land it would be exposed to the danger of being taken by the French. In both cases the marriage of the Princess would be endangered.
The bills of exchange which he has procured are not only sufficient to pay the remaining portion of the dower, but they amount to even more, as may be seen from the enclosed memoir. But these bills fall due in the month of September, and he writes that the English, unwilling to wait so long a time, have obtained from him a promise to pay 50,000 scudos at once, and the remaining 50,000 scudos within forty days afterwards.
Has, therefore, procured a new order of payment from Augustin de Vivaldo. He must communicate with the merchants in England to whom the order is directed, and arrange what will be the best manner in which to pay the money, whether on the stipulated days or the whole sum at once. The bills of exchange which he has drawn in England on Spain will be honoured, and the order of Augustin Vivaldo will of itself amount to more than the 100,000 scudos which are to be paid, as the enclosed memoir shows.
He must speak with the King and his Councillors, and tell them that he is ready to pay the remainder of the dower, to renew the treaty of alliance with England, and to ratify the treaty of marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary. If the English insist on it, he can even pay the money and ratify the treaties of alliance and marriage between Prince Charles and the Princess Mary before the Princess Katharine is married to the King of England. Having done so much, he (King Ferdinand) expects that the marriage of the Princess Katharine will be concluded without any further delay. He must give the King of England to understand that he (King Ferdinand) loves him as though he were his own son, as well on account of his own merits as on account of the Princess his wife whom he prefers to all his other children. Both these marriages, that of the King of England with the Princess Katharine, and that of Prince Charles with the Princess Mary, are advantageous to the King of England and to his dominions, as well as to Spain and to the states of Prince Charles and of the Emperor. They form an indissoluble bond between them, and secure their mutual friendship. He must explain this to the King of England and his Council.
At present he may content himself with renewing the treaty of alliance which was concluded with the father of the present King. Afterwards a more intimate friendship ought to be concluded. But the King of England is to be told at once, that he would always have regarded his concerns as though they were his own, even if no treaty of alliance had ever been concluded between them.
Is very sorry to hear what has passed between him and the Princess Katharine. Knows that he has served him always with the greatest loyalty ; but in the present state of things the best thing he can do is to forget what has happened, and not to speak a word about it to any one, employing all his energy to conclude speedily the business of the marriage. Expects from him that he will even beg the Princess to forgive him. For God's sake, he must not complain of her to any one in England. Even if he suffers injustice, he must not forget that he will serve his King better by submitting to it than by any other way. Has told the Princess to treat him with respect and kindness.—No date. (fn. 5)
Spanish. Draft. pp. 4.
18 May.
S. E. Pat. R. T. c. I. L. 2.
14. Account of the 200,000 Scudos which are to be paid by King Ferdinand The Catholic as Dower of the Princess Katharine.
The dower of the Princess Katharine amounts to 200,000 scudos, every scudo worth 350 maravedis=70,000,000 maravedis.
The treasurer Morales has paid 100,000 scudos or 35,000,000 maravedis.
The Princess has taken to England gold and silver of the value of 2,259,233 maravedis.
Further paid in gold and silver 2,885,925 maravedis.
Jewels 732,000 maravedis.
In addition paid 2,340,000 maravedis.
The Knight Commander of Haro took to England 24,115,000 maravedis.
67,332,158 maravedis.
To make up the sum of 70,000,000 maravedis 2,667,842 maravedis are, therefore, required.
Bills of exchange are sent herewith to the amount of 3,710,000 maravedis, so that the whole 70,000,000 maravedis, and 1,042,158 maravedis more, have been sent to England.
(Signed)
Joan Lope de Llazarraga, accountant and trustee of the Queen (Isabella).
Spanish. Autograph. pp. 4.
18 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 5. f. 123.
15. King Ferdinand The Catholic to Katharine, Princess Of Wales.
Has received her letter of the 6th of the current month. Is thankful to God for the conclusion of her marriage. Loves her more than any of his other children. She has always been a dutiful and obedient daughter to him. Her marriage is a very grand and very honourable one. Besides, there was no possibility, in the whole world, of marrying her to any one but her present husband. Great as his joy is, it will be greater when he hears that the wedding ceremonies have been performed. It will then be known in England what he is capable of doing for her sake, and she will be much honoured in England.
In order to show the King of England how highly he values his friendship, he has consented to the marriage of Prince Charles, and has ordered the 100,000 scudos of her dower to be paid in coin. The treaty of alliance between Spain and England will now be renewed, but a treaty of much more intimate friendship will be concluded after the wedding ceremonials have taken place. Looks upon the King of England as his real son, and expects he will confide in him as in his true father.
Is much vexed to hear what his ambassador has done and said. Sent him to England only to serve and assist her in concluding her marriage. He was ordered to obey her in all things. Thinks he has acted rather from ignorance than from malice. Would send another ambassador, if her affairs would not suffer thereby ; but delay is dangerous. The wedding ceremonials must be performed as soon as possible. She must, therefore, forgive the ambassador, and treat him with courtesy. He must be present at her wedding. Intends to recall the present ambassador as soon as she is married, and to send another who will be obedient to her in all things.
Francesco de Grimaldi must also be treated courteously by her till she is married, as he is to pay her dower.—No date. (fn. 6)
Indorsed : "Princess of Wales."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 3.
30 May.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. 3. f. 32.
16. Francesco Grimaldi, Luigi De Vivaldo, and Dominico Lomelyn, Merchants.
Bind themselves to pay to the King of England or his agents 45,000 ducats, on account of the dower which King Ferdinand the Catholic has promised to pay on occasion of the marriage between his daughter the Princess Katharine and the King of England.—London, Wednesday, the 30th of May 1509.
Spanish. p. 1.

Footnotes

1 The power of Queen Juana for the Knight Commander of Membrilla, mentioned in this despatch as being sent by the same courier, being dated the 11th of May, it is probable that this despatch is of the same date. On the 11th of May, twenty days had elapsed since the death of King Henry, a period which seems to be very long, especially if it is borne in mind that the courier who brought the first news had travelled in eight days from Flanders to Valladolid, and that the time allowed to Astudillo for going from Valladolid back to Calais was eleven days. But it is possible that King Ferdinand, although he had heard on the 2nd or 3rd of May that King Henry was dead, may have waited some days, hoping to receive confirmation of the news.
2 It seems that this despatch was sent by the same courier who took the letters of the 11th of May to England.
3 Germaine.
4 The Queen Infanta was Juana, daughter of King Ferdinand, and widow of King Philip.
5 Although this draft has no date, it is probable that the despatch was sent with the letter of Almazan to the Princess of Wales which is dated the 18th of May 1509. King Ferdinand acknowledges in this despatch the receipt of the letter from his ambassador in England dated the 8th of May. Only ten days would have elapsed since that date. But, as couriers had travelled on other occasions in eleven days from London to Valladolid, and in eight days from Brussels to Valladolid, it does not seem impossible that a letter which had left England on the 8th of May should reach Valladolid on the 18th of the same month. Even if this despatch had been written some days later than the letter of Almazan to the Princess Katharine, it would be impossible to assign it to any other date. It cannot have been written much later than this, because on the 30th of May, that is to say, twelve days afterwards, the orders of Augustin Vivaldo, which were enclosed in this despatch, were partly executed in London.
6 From the contents of this letter it is clear that it was written at the same time as the preceding letter to the Knight Commander de Membrilla was despatched. We assign, therefore, to both letters the same date.


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