Spain
August 1514

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Institute of Historical Research

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G. A. Bergenroth (editor)

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1866

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229-236

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'Spain: August 1514', Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2: 1509-1525 (1866), pp. 229-236. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93631 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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August 1514

Aug. (?)
S. E. V. L. 1554. f. 16-23.
181. King Ferdinand The Catholic to the Knight Commander Brizeño.
He is to tell the Cardinal of Gurk that the King of France had offered to make peace with him and the Emperor, declaring himself ready to marry his daughter Renée to the Infante Ferdinand, and to give her the duchy of Milan as dower, as well as himself to marry Madame Eleanor, his and the Emperor's granddaughter. When this was settled he concluded a truce with France, the Emperor taking it upon himself to procure the ratification of it from the King of England. A short time afterwards, however, the Emperor changed his mind, and said he would preserve Milan for the Duke.
The offers of the King of France are great. He promises to transfer his claims on Milan to the Infante Ferdinand, and to renounce all his claims on Naples, Navarra, &c. ; to pay the King of England all the money due to him, and to assist him in concluding such a treaty with the Scots as will be most agreeable to him. If the King of France were married to Madame Eleanor, the Infante Ferdinand to Madame Renée, and the Prince (Charles) to the Princess of England, such family ties would secure the peace of the world.
Hopes that the Cardinal of Gurk will persuade the Emperor to accept the conditions of the durable peace now offered by France. The Cardinal has on a former occasion said that the great difficulty in the settlement of peace consists in the circumstance that the Pope and the Italians will never consent that Milan shall be in the possession of France or of the Infante, and that the King of England is quite determined to conquer some portion of France, and to keep it as an indemnification for his expenses. He is to tell the Cardinal, in his (King Ferdinand's) name, that if the Emperor, the King of France, and he have decided on any measure respecting Milan, neither the Pope nor the other Italians are the men to prevent the measure from being executed And with respect to the King of England, the difficulty would not be great, as the Emperor has it always in his power to persuade him, by his gentle and winning words, to do, or to consent to what he (the Emperor) wishes.
[Many details follow respecting the Italian armies, the prospect of an enterprise on Venice, &c.]—No date. No signature.
Indorsed : "Knight Commander Brizeño."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 16.
1 Aug.
S. E. Pat. Re. Cap. c. l. Cas. d. A. L. 2. f. 37.
182. Maximilian, Emperor Elect, to All Persons.
Confesses that the King of France has lent him, in the name of King Ferdinand the Catholic, the sum of 100,000 gold écus de soleil, which are to be employed by him in the conquest of the duchy of Milan.
Promises to hold all the cities, towns, fortresses, and castles in the duchy of Milan which shall be conquered by the soldiers paid with this money, or by any others of his soldiers, in the joint name of the King of France and King Ferdinand, and to deliver them afterwards to such person or persons as the King of France and King Ferdinand shall designate to him.—Gemund, the 1st of August 1514.
(Signed)
Maximilian.
(Seal.)
Indorsed : "Acknowledgment of the Emperor Maximilian that he has received from the King of France, in the name of King Ferdinand, 100,000 scudos for the conquest of the duchy of Milan."
French. Autograph. p. 1. On parchment.
7 Aug.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon Hist. K. 1639. No. 40.
183. Treaty between Louis XII., King Of France, and Henry VIII., King Of England.
Louis of Orléans, Duke of Longueville and Marquis of Rothelin ;
Johannes Selve, Doctor of Law and President of the Supreme Court of Normandy ;
Thomas Bohier, Knight ; in their quality as ambassadors of the King of France ; and,
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk ;
Thomas, Bishop of Lincoln and Archbishop elect of York ; and,
Richard, Bishop of Winchester, in their quality as ambassadors and commissioners of the King of England, conclude the following treaty :—
1. Perfect peace, friendship, and alliance are henceforth to subsist between the contracting parties, their heirs, their subjects, and their allies.
2. The treaty of peace is to take effect immediately after its signature. It is to last during the joint lives of the contracting parties, and one year after the death of the king who first dies.
3. All hostilities between the contracting parties, their heirs, subjects and allies, are to cease during the abovementioned period.
4. The subjects of either of the contracting parties are at liberty to travel in all the dominions of the other contracting party. They must, however, not be accompanied by more than 100 armed men.
5. All the burdens laid on the merchants of either of the contracting parties during the last two years are abolished.
6. All merchants, Florentines, and Genoese, are at liberty to enter into, or to sail from any port of the contracting parties whenever they like. It makes no difference whether their vessels belong to them or to others, or whether they are French or English, or of any other nation.
7. Neither of the contracting parties is to undertake, or to permit to be undertaken by his subjects and confederates, anything in prejudice of the other contracting prince, his subjects or confederates.
8. The King of France binds himself not to permit armed bands to be formed in the towns of Boulogne, Devres, Montreuil, Fiennes, and other similar places, with the intention of molesting and injuring the subjects of the King of England.
9. If the subjects of either of the contracting parties are taken prisoners by the armed fores of the other contracting party, and the cause of their arrest is not perfectly clear, the decision is to be referred to the conservators of this peace, and their delegates. The arrested persons are to be set at liberty, and their property is to be delivered to them as soon as they give sufficient securities.
10. No letters of marque and reprisals are to be given to the subjects of one of the contracting parties against subjects of the other contracting party, except in case of denial of justice, and even then only against the principal delinquents and their agents.
11. This treaty of peace remains in force, even if the subjects of the contracting parties should infringe some of its dispositions. Reparation is to be made in such cases to the injured parties.
12. Both contracting princes bind themselves not to permit any enterprise to be undertaken in their dominions in prejudice of the other contracting party, be the persons who frame it his subjects or not.
13. The rebels of either of the contracting parties are not to be permitted to live or remain in the dominions of the other contracting party.
14. The contracting parties bind themselves to give one another assistance in defending their dominions or in reconquering such territories as belong to them. The party who requests the assistance is to pay the expenses.
The succour which the King of England is to give the King of France is to consist of 5,000 archers or other infantry, or any smaller number, if the war is to be carried on by land. If the war isto be carried on by sea the succour is to consist equally of 5,000 men, together with the necessary ships, artillery, &c.
The succour which the King of France is to give the King of England is to consist of 600 lances, together with horses and armour, &c. 600 lances, equipped in the French fashion, amount to a force of 5,000 horse. If the King of England undertakes a naval war the succour of the King of France is to consist of 5,000 men, together with the necessary ships, artillery, &c.
15. If any other prince or republic should make war upon one of the contracting parties, the reason of which war is to be sought in the stipulations of this treaty, the other contracting party is bound immediately to send succour to his ally, and to pay his own expenses.
The succour given by the King of England to the King of France is to consist in such case of 6,000 men, together with the necessary ships, artillery, &c., if the war is a naval war, and of 6,000 well armed troops if the war is to be prosecuted on land.
The succour given by the King of France to the King of England is to consist of the same number of soldiers, &c.
16. If the contracting parties decide to make war on any other prince or republic, neither of the contracting princes is to assist the enemy, directly or indirectly, or to permit the enemy to be assisted by his subjects, allies, &c.
17. In this treaty are included—
On the part of France :
Pope Leo X. and the Holy See ;
The Sacred Empire ;
Hungary ;
Scotland ;
Portugal ;
Denmark ;
Savoy, Lorraine ; the Dukes of Gueldres, Venice, Florence ; the Bishop of Liege ; the Marquises of Mantua, of Monferrat, of Saluzzo, and the Seigneur of Sedan :
On the part of the King of England :
Pope Leo X., the Holy See, and all the territories and places belonging to it ;
The Sacred Roman Empire ;
Prince Charles of Spain and Austria ;
Margaret of Austria, aunt of Prince Charles, and daughter of the Emperor ;
The King of Denmark ;
The Dukes of Cleves, of Juliers, of Venice, and of Florence, together with their states ;
The Confederation of the Hanse Towns ;
Anthonius, Seigneur de Ligne, and the Swiss.
18. If, however, the Scots, with the connivance of their King, his council or his officers, continue to make armed incursions into England after the 15th of September, or if any private Scotch subject, without the connivance of the King, &c., makes such incursion with 300 armed men or more, and the King of Scotland or his lieutenant does not make reparation within 40 days, the inclusion of Scotland in this treaty is to be null and void.
If, however, a private Scotch subject has undertaken an incursion without the connivance of the King, his council, &c., and the invading force has consisted of less than 300 armed men, the provisions of the last treaty of peace for such a case remain in full force.
19. The King of Scotland and Prince Charles are at liberty to declare their entrance into this league within three months, the other allies within twelve months, and the Pope is at liberty to do so at any time.
20. The inclusion of the allies in this treaty does not refer to the duchy of Milan, to Genoa, to the county of Asti, and other dominions situated within the territory of the duchy of Milan, on which the King of France pretends to have well-founded claims.
21. King Louis of France binds himself to renew the old privileges of English merchants in Bordeaux, and, if asked, to grant new ones.
22. The conservators of the peace are—
On the part of England :
The Lord Chancellor of England ;
The Lord Treasurer ;
The Lord Privy Seal ;
The Lord Admiral ;
The Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, and
The Governor of Calais ;
On the part of France :
In the duchy of Aquitaine, the Duke of Valois, Count of Angoulême ;
In Picardy, the Seigneur de Fiennes, Governor of that province ;
In Languedoc, the Duke of Bourbon ;
In Burgundy, the Seigneur de la Tremouille, Governor of that province ;
In Normandy, the Great Seneschal ;
In Brittany, the Seigneur de Rieux, Governor of that province ;
In Champagne, the Seigneur de Dorval, Governor of that province ;
For the high seas, the Admirals of France, Aquitaine, and Brittany.
All and every one of these conservators of the peace are empowered to see that satisfaction be given to the injured party in case any subject or subjects of one of the contracting parties inflict injuries on any subject or subjects of the other contracting party. An appeal from their decision is open to the councils and to the respective kings.
23. Both contracting parties are bound to swear to this treaty of peace.
24. This treaty is to be published in England and France within 15 days.
25. The King of England binds himself not only to ratify this treaty, but to have it ratified by the three estates of the realm in the next parliament.
Both contracting parties bind themselves to use all their influence at Rome, in order to obtain the confirmation of this treaty by the Pope.
26. The ratified copies of this treaty are to be exchanged within 40 days after its date.
Signed and sealed by the above-mentioned ambassadors.— London, the 7th of August 1514.
Indorsed : "Copy of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. 1514."
Latin. Copy. pp. 14.
7 Aug.
P. A. d. l'E. K. 1639. No. 40a.
184. Treaty between Louis XII., King Of France, and Henry VIII., King Of England.
Another copy of the same treaty.
Article 8 of this copy contains the following stipulation :—
The King of England binds himself not to suffer armed bands to be formed in the towns of Calais, Ham, Guisnes, &c., with the intent of molesting the merchants and subjects of the King of France.
Indorsed : "Treaty between France and England. 1514."
A translation in the Romance language is included.
Latin. Copy. pp. 18.
7 Aug.
P. A. d. l'E. Mon. Hist. K. 1639. No. 41.
185. Treaty between Louis XII., King Of France, and Henry VIII., King Of England.
This is a translation into Spanish of the preceding treaty. At the end of this document is written the word "read."
12 Aug. (?)
P. A. d. l'E. N. P. d. S. K. 1638.
186. King Ferdinand The Catholic to the Bishop Of Tripoli (fn. 1) and Gabriel De Orti, his Chaplain, Envoys Extraordinary to the King Of France.
Has always desired that such a firm alliance should prevail between the Emperor, the King of France, and him, that the whole world would not be strong enough to disunite them. Such a peace would be of incalculable advantage to themselves, to their successors, to the Church, and to the whole of Christendom. The reformation of the Church, which is so necessary, would be the consequence of such a peace. (fn. 2)
Has fulfilled all his promises to the King of France, and has succeeded in persuading the Emperor, the Queen of Castile, and the Prince (Charles) to conclude peace with France on the conditions settled between the King of France and him, to wit, the marriage of the King of France, the affair concerning Milan, and all the other affairs settled between them. The Emperor has sent Gabriel de Orti to him, with full power to conclude without delay, in his name and in the name of the King of France, the marriages, (fn. 3) and the treaty of peace. Desires not to lose any time ; sends him, Gabriel de Orti, back to the King of France, with power definitively to conclude and to sign the treaties touching the marriages with the King of France, in his name, as well as in that of the Emperor, the Queen of Castile, and the Prince (Charles).
They are to tell the King of France that he is quite determined to conclude the treaty of peace and the marriages with him, even if the Emperor and the Prince should refuse to do so.
Does not yet believe that the King of France has married the sister of the King of England, who was betrothed to Prince Charles, although he, the Bishop, wrote to him, saying that such a marriage was in contemplation. Should, against all expectation, the news prove to be true, and should the King of France say that, as he is married to the sister of the King of England, he cannot marry Madame Eleanor, he is then to insist only on the marriage of the Infante Ferdinand with Madame Renée, on the conditions already settled concerning the duchy of Milan and the other affairs. Before, however, he abandons the scheme of marrying the King of France to Madame Eleanor, he must try to obtain positive knowledge whether the King of France is married to the sister of the King of England or not ; for if the King of France is not married, he is to insist upon his fulfilling his promises, and consummating the marriage with Madame Eleanor as has been stipulated.
Should the King of France repeat his request that the Infante, on marrying Madame Renée, and receiving the duchy of Milan from the King of France, should also receive a state from him (King Ferdinand), he is to answer that the Infante is lawful heir to one half the inheritance of the Emperor, and that all the rights of the second son of King Philip and the Queen of Castile are reserved to him. He is, therefore, even without receiving a new state, a great prince.
The demand of the King of France, that he should leave the crown of Naples to the Infante Ferdinand, is a new thing, and was not mentioned during the whole course of the negotiations. Should it, however, be insisted upon, he may say that as soon as the treaties of amity and of the marriage between the Infante and Madame Renée are concluded, the Emperor and the Prince (Charles) might easily be persuaded to exchange with the Infante the kingdom of Naples for his inheritance in Germany. He is, however, to take care that this question does not delay the conclusion of the treaties.
Count Pedro Navaro is to be set at liberty without ransom as soon as the treaties are concluded.
With respect to the dower of Madame Eleanor, the King of France is to remember that in case the Prince and the Infante should die without heirs, she would be heiress to the crowns of Castile and Aragon, in preference to the descendants of the Queen of Portugal and the Queen of England. Besides this eventual right of inheritance, he would give her 100,000 crowns, or even 200,000, if the King of France would not content himself with less. The dower could not, however, be raised in the current year 1514.
Wishes that the manner in which the enterprise on Milan is to be carried out should remain for his own decision. In case the King of France should not consent to this request, he is to see that the contingent of France does not consist of more than 5,000 German troops and 600 heavy cavalry, and that the captain of them be either Jean Jaques Trivulzio or the Marquis of Mortara.
The fortress of the Laterna in Genoa must be delivered to him soon.
The King of France must immediately give orders to his captain to deliver to the Viceroy of Naples such places in the duchy of Milan as he may conquer.
The marriage of the King of France with Madame Eleanor must be consummated as soon as possible.
The King of France must try to reconcile the Emperor to the Venetians.
Indorsed : "Instructions of what the Bishop of Tripoli and Gabriel Horti, my chaplain, are to say to the King of France, and what they are to negotiate concerning the treaty of peace and the marriages concluded with the King of France." (fn. 4)
Spanish. Draft. pp. 6.
12 Aug. P. A. d. l'E. M. H. K. 1639. No. 42. 187. King Ferdinand Of Spain to Fray Bernard De Mesa, Bishop Of Tripoli, and Don Gabriel De Orti, his Chaplain.
Empowers them, in his own name, in the name of the Emperor, of Prince Charles, and of Queen Juana, to conclude with the ambassadors and commissioners of the King of France :—
a. A treaty of peace.
b. A treaty of marriage between King Louis XII. of France and the Princess Eleanor, daughter of the late King Philip and Queen Juana.
c. A treaty of marriage between Prince Ferdinand, son of the said King Philip and Queen Juana, and Madame Renée, second daughter of King Louis XII. of France.—Valladolid, the 12th of August 1514.
(Signed)
Yo el Rey.
Pedro de Quintana.
Latin. Copy. pp. 13.

Footnotes

1 Bernard de Mesa, ambassador in England since December 1514.
2 "... y della ha de salir la reformacion de la Yglesia de que hay tanta "necesidad ..."
3 The marriage between the King of France and Madame Eleanor, granddaughter of King Ferdinand and sister of Prince Charles and the Infante Ferdinand, and the marriage between the Infante Ferdinand and Madame Renée of France, daughter of the King of France.
4 Gabriel de Orti, alias Horti, left Valladolid on his mission to the King of France on the 12th of August 1514.


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