Spain
December 1514

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Institute of Historical Research

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G. A. Bergenroth (editor)

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1866

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246-251

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'Spain: December 1514', Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2: 1509-1525 (1866), pp. 246-251. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93635 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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December 1514

1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
193. Pension paid by the King Of France to the Duke Of Norfolk.
The King of France has given orders to pay to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, Treasurer and Marshal of England, a pension of 1,030 écus d'or a year, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 875 livres Tournois has been paid on account to the Duke of Norfolk, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ½.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
194. Pension paid by the King to Thomas Wolsey, Archbihsop Of York.
The King of France has given orders to pay Thomas, Archbishop of York and Primate of England, a pension of 1,000 écus d'or a year, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the late treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 875 livres Tournois has been paid on account to the Archbishop of York, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
195. Pension paid by the King Of France to Richard Fox, Bishop Of Winchester.
The King of France has given orders to pay Richard, Bishop of Winchester and Lord Privy Seal, a pension of 1,050 livres Tournois a year, in recompense for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 525 livres Tournois has been paid on account to the Bishop of Winchester, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
196. Pension paid by the King Of France to Charles Somerset, Earl Of Worcester.
The King of France has given orders to pay Charles Somerset, Earl of Worcester, Lord Chamberlain of the King of England, a pension of 3,500 livres Tournois a year, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the late treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 1,750 livres Tournois has been paid on account to "Messire Charles de Somerset," who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ½.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
197. Pension of the King Of France to Sir [Edward?] Poynings.
The King of France has ordered a pension of 1,050 livres Tournois a year to be paid to the Seigneur Poynings, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 525 livres Tournois has been paid on account into the hands of the Archbishop of York, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ½.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
198. Pension paid by the King Of France to Sir Thomas Lovel.
The King of France has ordered a pension of 3,035 livres Tournois a year to be paid to Sir Thomas Lovel, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 175 livres Tournois has been paid on account to Sir Thomas Lovel, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
199. Pension of the King Of France to Sir William Compton.
The King of France has ordered a pension of 700 livres Tournois a year to be paid to Sir William Compton, first valet de chambre (fn. 1) of the King of England, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 350 livres Tournois has been paid on account to Sir William Compton, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
1 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
200. Pension of the King Of France to the Secretary Meautis.
The King of France has ordered that Mr. Meautis, Secretary of the King of England, be paid a pension of 50 écus d'or a year, for services rendered to him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 87 livres Tournois has been paid on account to Mr. Secretary Meautis, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 1st of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
6 Dec.
S. E. L. Suelt. L. 3.
201. Luis Caroz De Villaragut, Spanish Ambassador in England, to the Friar Juan De Eztuniga, Provincial Of Aragon.
He is to speak to King Ferdinand, in his name, as follows.
First, he is to describe to him his arrival, reception, and departure.
The Queen of England greatly requires some discreet and intelligent person who could take care, as well of her soul as of the government of her house and her person, and who could give her advice how to behave towards the English and towards the Spaniards, and how she could best further the interests of the King of Spain.
He is to tell King Ferdinand what he has himself observed concerning the disposition entertained by the Queen to render services to him (King Ferdinand), and her treatment of him (Don Luis). Has been always treated by her in the same manner since the first day he came to England.
The Queen has the best intentions, but there is no one to show her how she may become serviceable to her father. The principal fault rests with her confessor, Friar Diego Fernandez, who has told her that she ought to forget Spain and everything Spanish, in order to gain the love of the King of England and of the English. She has become so much accustomed to this idea that she will not change her behaviour, unless some person who is near her tells her in every case what she ought to do in order to be useful to the King her father. The few Spaniards who are still in her household prefer to be friends of the English, and neglect their duties as subjects of the King of Spain. The worst influence on the Queen is exercised by Doña Maria de Salinas, whom she loves more than any other mortal. Doña Maria has a relation of the name of Juan Adursa, who is a merchant in Flanders, and a friend of Juan Manuel. He hopes, through the protection of Juan Manuel, to be made treasurer of the Prince of Castile. By means of Juan Adursa and Doña Maria de Salinas, Juan Manuel is able to dictate to the Queen of England how she must behave. The consequence is that he can never make use, in his negotiations, of the influence which the Queen has in England, nor can he obtain through her the smallest advantage in any other respect.
Is treated by the English not as an ambassador, but like a "bull, at whom every one throws darts."
The King of England behaves in the most offensive and discourteous manner whenever his affairs (King Ferdinand's) are treated. Is persuaded that, if God does not change the mind of the King of England, he will really carry out what he intends, viz., to do as much harm to him (King Ferdinand) as he can.
If King Ferdinand does not "put a bridle on this colt," (fn. 2) and permits him to continue his bad behaviour, it will afterwards be found impossible to control him. Begs King Ferdinand to watch the King of England very closely, and to decide upon some vigorous measures against him, telling him that they are the consequence of his bad behaviour towards him. It is probable that the King might thus become sensible of the wrong he has done, and if not, his councillors would make him listen to reason, for they do not like to be at enmity, or to go to war, with any prince whatever.
The English maltreat the Spanish captains, and forbid them to take any cargo on board for a voyage to the East. They say that there is an old statute which forbids all captains to take in cargoes for the East without a licence from the King. The members of the Council tell him that this statute is enforced, not in order to do harm to the Spaniards, but only because the King of England sends six ships to the East, which have the privilege of first loading as much merchandise destined for those countries as they can. If they cannot carry all the merchandise which is to be sent from England to the East, the Spanish captains will be at liberty to load it on their ships. That is, however, only a pretext, as the English wish to prevent English captains from being forbidden to take in cargoes in Spain. The Spaniards complain very much ; and, in fact, it is a heavy loss to them to be forced to sail from England with empty ships.
Seeing that he was of no use in England, he had begged King Ferdinand to give him permission to leave that country. Was directed, however, in the answer to remain in England, and told that he would be recalled as soon as circumstances permitted. Thinks that King Ferdinand was induced to give him this answer on account of the letter of the Queen of England, who did not state the facts as they were in reality. Begs the King to consider the matter once more, and to see whether it would not be best to recall him. Thinks that any other ambassador would find a more willing ear in England than he.—Given on the 6th of December 1514.
Indorsed : "Memoir or instructions of the ambassador Don Luis Caroz to the Provincial of Aragon."
Superscribed : "What the Reverend Father Friar Juan de Eztuniga, Provincial of Aragon, is to say in my name to the King my Lord."
Spanish. Original copy. pp. 5.
6 Dec.
M. Re. Ac. d. Hist. Salazar. K. 6. f. 255.
202. Luis Caroz De Villaragut, Spanish Ambassador in England, to the Friar Juan De Eztuniga, Provincial Of Aragon.
This document is a contemporary copy of the preceding.
10 Dec.
P. A. d. l'Emp.
203. Pension paid by the King Of France to the Earl Of Shrewsbury.
The King of France has given orders to pay the Sieur Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, a pension of 1,000 ecus d'or a year, for good services rendered him on occasion of the conclusion of the late treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 875 livres Tournois has been paid on account to the Earl of Shrewsbury, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 10th of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
16 Dec.
P. A. d l'Emp.
204. Pension of the King Of France to Clarenceux King-At-Arms of the King Of England.
The King of France has ordered that a pension of 50 ecus d'or a year be paid to Clarenceux King-at-Arms of the King of England, for good services rendered him on occasion of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between the King of France and the King of England. The sum of 87 livres Tournois has been paid on account to the Clarenceux King-at-Arms, who has acknowledged the payment in his receipt dated the 16th of December 1514.
French. Original book of accounts. p. ¼.
22 Dec.
S. E. C. d. C. L. 1. f. 403.
205. Bishop Of Tripoli. (fn. 3)
The Bishop of Tripoli was sent by King Ferdinand the Catholic as standing Ambassador to England. He left Valladolid on the 22nd of December 1514. His salary was five ducats a day.
The entries of the payments of his salary follow.
Spanish. Original book of accounts. pp. 4.
End (?)
S. E. Fl. L. 496. f. 28.
206. King Ferdinand The Catholic to the Knight Commander Juan De Lanuza, his Ambassador in Flanders.
Has read with great pleasure that certain provisions have lately been made concerning the government of the person and the states of the Prince (Charles), and that he has been nominated one of the governors. Nothing in the world was more necessary than that provision. Has full confidence in his fidelity as an Aragonese. He is to thank the Emperor and Madame Margaret for what they have done, and to tell them that he is now convinced that they earnestly intend to further the real interests of the Prince, and to remain on good terms with him. All his proposals are made with only one object in view, viz., to preserve and increase friendship between the Emperor, the King of England, and him, and to counteract the influence of their bad servants, who are trying to sow disunion between them. His brother, Don Carlos, lost his crown because he permitted himself to be persuaded by his faithless servants to be an enemy of his father.
It would be a good thing if Monsieur de Chièvres could be removed from his place ; but the most important thing to be done is to get rid of Don Juan Manuel, who is the worst and the most dangerous person near the Prince. If Don Juan Manuel is delivered to him as a prisoner, Artieta is to carry him to the place which he has indicated. Should, however, the state of the weather not permit this, Artieta is to bring Don Juan to Castile.
Indorsed : "The Catholic King to Mosen Juan de Lanuza."
Spanish. Draft. pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 Chief gentleman of the bedchamber.
2 The King of England.
3 Bernard de Mesa, Bishop of Tripoli, afterwards Bishop of Elna and Bishop of Badajoz.


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