Spain
1518

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Institute of Historical Research

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G. A. Bergenroth (editor)

Year published

1866

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290-294

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'Spain: 1518', Calendar of State Papers, Spain, Volume 2: 1509-1525 (1866), pp. 290-294. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=93639 Date accessed: 01 November 2014.


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1518

1 May
P. A. d. l'E. S. H. K. K. 349.
263. French Pensions paid to English Subjects.
On the 1st of May 1518 the following sums of money were paid to the following persons, as halt-yearly instalments of their pensions from the King of France :—
[Here follow the same entries as in the preceding document.]
French. Book of accounts concerning the payment of pensions to the King of England and to English subjects. pp. 2.
2 Oct.
S. E. Pat. Re. T. c. I. L. l.
264. Treaty between the Pope, the Emperor Elect, the King Of France, the King Of Spain, and the King Of England.
The tyrant of the Turks threatens to conquer more countries belonging to the princes of Christendom. It is, therefore, the duty of all Christian princes to postpone their disputes with one another, and to defend the Holy Church and the Christian religion. Exhorted by Pope Leo X., they have concluded a holy league, of which the principal members are—
The Pope,
The Emperor elect,
The King of France,
The King of Spain, and
The King of England.
A general peace of Christendom will be the immediate consequence of this league. Its articles are the following :—
1. Peace and goodwill are henceforth to be observed between the contracting parties, their heirs and successors, subjects, and dominions.
2. As far as the defence of the Christian Church and the Pope, or of the states and possessions of any one of the contracting princes is concerned, all the members of the league are to be "friends of the friends, and foes of the foes" of any one of them.
If any one of the contracting parties or of those who are included in this treaty attacks, invades, or does any other injury to the states, dominions, towns, castles. &c., of any other member of this league or any prince who is included in this treaty, the injured party is at liberty to require by letters patent the aid of all the other contracting parties. Those who are thus requested are bound, together with the injured party, to send letters and ambassadors to the aggressor or aggressors, asking him or them to desist from further hostilities, and to make full reparation.
If the aggressor or aggressors continues or continue his or their hostilities in spite of this exhortation to maintain peace or if he or they refuses or refuse to make full reparation, all the other confederates are bound to declare war with the aggressor or aggressors within one month after being summoned to do so. Within two months after the declaration of war, they are to begin actual hostilities by attacking or invading the dominions of the aggressor or aggressors with an army strong enough to conquer the enemy. Every one of the contracting parties is bound to pay his own expenses.
3. If the aggressor, whether he be one of the principal contracting parties or only included in this treaty, possesses dominions, towns, or ports near the French, Spanish, English, or German seas, the Kings of France, of Spain, and of England are bound to make war upon him, not only by land but also by sea. The fleets sent are to be so numerous, and so well provided with men, guns, and all other engines of war, as to be sufficiently strong to attack and conquer the fleets or armies of the enemy. The fleets must, within one month after the declaration or commencement of war, be at sea, each party paying its own expenses. All the ships are to sail at once to the seas which are nearest the states and possessions of the enemy, and to remain there, cruising and doing as much harm to the enemy, his friends, and abettors, as they can. As often as it may be necessary to resist the enemy with united forces, the different fleets of the contracting parties are to assemble in one place, and to act in common. None of the contracting parties is at liberty to recall his fleet, or to diminish the number of his vessels and armed men, without the consent of all the other contracting parties. Should any of these fleets be reduced to smaller proportions in a battle, or by shipwreck, or by any other reason, the prince or the princes to whom it belongs is or are bound, within one month, to raise the number of ships and armed men to their former proportions.
4. The stipulations of the preceding article do not refer to an attack or rebellion of the subjects of any of the contracting parties against their government, except in case they have been instigated, assisted, or favoured in their undertaking by one of the other contracting parties, in which case all the other contracting parties are bound to make war not only upon the rebellious subjects, but also upon those who favour or abet them.
5. If any one of the contracting parties, or of the confederates who will hereafter become members of this league, intend to attack the enemies of the league, and wish for that purpose to march their troops through the states, territories, cities, seaports, &c., of one of the other contracting parties, or their confederates, the party requested to permit the passage of the troops of a confederate through his states is bound not only to raise no difficulties, but even to assist them, and to provide them with provisions, vehicles, &c., the prince who makes the request paying the expenses.
6. None of the contracting parties, nor any of the confederates who will afterwards accede to this treaty, are to permit their subjects to take service in the army of one of the other contracting parties who is at war with a member of this league ; nor is any member of this league to make use of foreign soldiers, even if they should be offered to him without pay, against any of the other members of this confederacy or their subjects. Whoever does so will be regarded as having broken this league, which, in such a case, remains in full force for all the other contracting parties.
7. None of the contracting parties are to take under their protection any subject or subjects of any other contracting party, or of any prince included in this treaty, without the express consent of the prince to whom such subject or subjects belong ; nor are they permitted to assist them or to give them counsel.
8. The contracting parties bind themselves not to undertake anything in their towns, seaports, &c., that could be prejudicial to any one of the other contracting parties or their subjects ; or to permit others to undertake or attempt anything of that kind.
9. None of the contracting parties, or of those who are included in this treaty, are to permit the rebels and traitors of any other of the contracting parties, or of their confederates, to stay in their territories, nor are they and their subjects to assist and to aid them. When required to do so, each of the contracting parties is to deliver the rebels found in his dominions, within 20 days, to the other contracting party who claims them as his subjects.
10. Included in this treaty are—
The King of Denmark,
The King of Scotland,
The King of Portugal,
The King of Hungary,
The King of Navarra,
Madame Margaret,
The Infante Ferdinand, brother of the King of Spain ;
The Duke of Savoy,
The Duke of Lorraine,
The Doge and the Republic of Venice,
Florence and the House of Medicis,
The Duke of Urbino,
The Duke of Gueldres,
The Duke of Ferrara,
The Marquis of Mantua,
The Marquis of Monferrato,
The Marquis of Saluzzo,
The Hanse Towns,
The Swiss Confederacy.
11. This treaty is to be communicated to the Pope, who is at liberty, within four months, to enter into it as one of the principal contracting parties, confirming it by a bull, and naming his confederates.
If any one of the other principal contracting princes should not already have sent sufficient power to England to conclude this treaty, he is to send such power to ratify the treaty, and to swear to it within four months. If he permits that time to elapse without having fulfilled these formalities, and afterwards asks the King of France and the King of England to admit him as principal party into this confederacy, he is not to be considered as one of the principal contracting parties, but only as included in this treaty, although he has in the preamble of it been mentioned as one of the principal contracting parties.
12. All former treaties remain in full force, except in so far as they are in contradiction to this treaty.
13. All Christian princes are at liberty to declare, within the space of eight months, their intention to become members of this league, in which case the principal contracting parties are bound to accept them and to defend them, at the expense, however, of the party asking to be assisted.
14. The Kings of France and of England, who are the originators of this league, bind themselves towards one another that, if either of them be invaded or attacked by any prince or power, the other will lead in person the army which is to assist the attacked prince. Even if none of the other Christian princes should become members of this league, it is to remain in full force in so far as France and England are concerned.
15. All the confederates are to swear to this treaty.
16. The principal contracting parties are to ratify this treaty, and to exchange the ratifications, within four months. —London, the 2nd of October 1518.
Latin. Contemporary copy. pp. 14.
1 Nov.
P. A. d. l'E. S. H. K. K. 349.
265. French Pensions paid to English Subjects.
On the 1st of November 1518 the following sums of money were paid to the following persons, as half-yearly instalments of their pensions from the King of France :—
Livres Tournois.
To the Duke of Norfolk 875
To the Duke of Suffolk 875
To Thomas, Cardinal, Archbishop of York 1,400
To the Bishop of Winchester 525
To Charles Somerset, Earl of Worcester 1,700
To George, Earl of Shrewsbury 875
To Sir Thomas Lovel 175
To William Compton 350
To John Meautis, Secretary of the King of England 87
To Clarenceux King-at-Arms 87
French. Book of accounts concerning the payment of pensions to the King of England and to English subjects. pp. 2.
10 Dec.
M. Bib. Nat. MSS. E. 59. f. 10v.
266. King Charles Of Spain to the Bishop Of Worcester, Ambassador of the King Of England in Rome.
Has been informed of the signal services he has rendered to him in Rome. Would be glad to show his gratitude if any opportunity for doing so should offer. Has recommended the business of Johannes Roscius, his nephew, to the Viceroy of Naples.—Zaragossa, the 10th of December 1518.
Latin. Original register of the Secretary Gaspar Arghensis. p. ½.


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