Venice
December 1510

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Institute of Historical Research

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Rawdon Brown (editor)

Year published

1867

Pages

41-42

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'Venice: December 1510', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 2: 1509-1519 (1867), pp. 41-42. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=94158 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Contents

December 1510

Dec. 22. Sanuto Diaries, v. xi. p. 496.92. Andrea Badoer to the State.
Dated London, 30th September to 24th October.
Had written on the 3rd and 9th September; but all persons passing through France were searched, and some couriers with letters were maltreated and imprisoned. In date of the 3rd, wrote that they must send his wife to England, as he had promised the King that she should bring the security for the loan. Had so contrived that double the amount would be obtained, and as much more as the Signory may need, provided the security be sufficient and valid. Has done good service. It would be well to send his wife with the galleys. Tells his son-in-law, Francesco Gradenigo, to get appointed master of one of them. The Signory must give his wife at least 400 ducats, as he had written to her to make many purchases. His most recent letters from the State were in date of June. The merchants Morosini, Marcello, Foscari, and Grimani were coming to Venice, and it would be heard from them whether he is asleep, or passes his time with ladies or prostitutes, or at the tavern. Complains of Lorenzo Giustinian, a sorry rogue and a liar, who, on his departure with Hironimo Giustinian, did not go to shake hands with him (Badoer); within the last quarter of a century never had a merchant quitted London with worse fame. Laments having to stay there at his time of life; but is nevertheless content to do so for his country's sake, though obliged to live at great cost; and should nothing else come of it, his name will not be forgotten hereafter, as a good example for others. Says the Signory bad not written to him for six months, though letters had been received by Pasqualigo and by the son of Hironimo Grimani. Would fain have leave to return home. Is also without letters from the ambassador at Rome. Through him (Badoer) the King wrote to the Emperor and to France, and despatched three heralds with very courteous letters and prayers to the Emperor to incline him to the agreement; after which the King caused an ambassador to be sent, who is yet there. Owing to this mission the Emperor revoked divers hostile projects, meditated by him against the Signory, and now the King will do the State this pecuniary service. Cannot find anyone to convey the present letters at any price.
In a postscript of the 25th October, mentions having forwarded the letters, and that he was on his way to the court, to make provision that the Venetian despatches may not be stopped by France, either going or coming.
[Italian.]
Dec. 31. Sanuto Diaries, v. xi. p. 510.93. Receipt by the Signory of a Letter from Peregrin Venier, dated Palermo, 10th November.
. . . . . . How a Biscay an bark from England had been wrecked off Ivica, having a cargo of 7,000 pieces of coloured kerseys, bound for Scio; but 4,000 pieces had been saved, and they hoped to recover the rest, though of this he had great doubts. Bid not know the name of the master. On the preceding day a bark from Hampton had passed, bound also for Scio with kerseys and cloths belonging to the Genoese and Ragusans.
[Italian.]