Venice
June 1561

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Institute of Historical Research

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Rawdon Brown and G. Cavendish Bentinck (editors)

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1890

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316

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'Venice: June 1561', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 7: 1558-1580 (1890), pp. 316. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=94971 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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June 1561

June 12. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.263. Paulo Tiepolo, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The day before yesterday I arrived here, where I found the King and the Court had not yet all assembled, owing to the smallness and inconvenience of the lodgings, which are almost all in ruins, for the inhabitants do not care to knock even a nail in for repairs, and let everything go to ruin, in order that the courtiers may renovate the buildings. So many years have elapsed since the Court was here that some officials will have to rebuild half their lodgings.
The Spanish Bishops who had assembled for the affairs of the Council have made their report to his Majesty, who has determined that at any rate they are to attend it, and to depart after the first rains in August; but the Bishops hold to their opinion of not choosing by any means to consent to treat matters already determined at the Council of Trent, and this they will announce to his Holiness.
Madrid, 12th June 1561.
[Italian.]
June 18. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.264. Paulo Tiepolo, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The Bishop of Terracina has arrived as resident Papal Nuncio at this Court. He brings the confirmation of the grant already made to his Majesty of 300,000 ducats annually, to be derived from the Spanish clergy, for the maintenance of fifty galleys; and also a promise of power to levy money from the clergy for their construction, and to fit them out. But for this purpose his Majesty desired, besides the 300,000 ducats, to have the entire fourth from the clergy, as usually paid hitherto, amounting to about 200,000 ducats annually, and also authority to sell feudal property belonging to these bishoprics and yielding the annual revenue of 25,000 ducats, from which he would hope to get a net amount of more than one million and a half of ducats; which two favours the Pope had already conceded to his Majesty, but subsequently on granting the 300,000 ducats, his Holiness cancelled them, so as not to dissatisfy the prelates of Spain at a moment when the Council is to be held; but the King now insists on the grant of what he desires.
Don Luis Vanegas has lately returned from Portugal, and brings back word that for the present the Queen will continue in the government together with the Cardinal, as she has done hitherto; and that the galleys demanded by King Philip as coast-guard for Spain shall be sent with troops and ammunition to the places held by the King of Portugal in Africa, to the Gut of Gibraltar, as the Moors are harassing those parts, and in this way the galleys may likewise serve for coast-guard as desired. With regard to the marriage of a daughter of the King of Bohemia to that King, the Queen, the Cardinal, and all the chief personages show themselves well inclined towards it; but they will not give their word for one who is yet an infant, and who cannot be in any way bound.
Madrid, 18th June 1561.
[Italian; the portion in italics deciphered by Signor Luigi Pasini.]


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