Venice
June 1613

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Institute of Historical Research

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Horatio F. Brown (editor)

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1905

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545-558

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'Venice: June 1613', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 12: 1610-1613 (1905), pp. 545-558. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=95718 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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June 1613

June 1. Senato, Terra. Venetian Archives.845. Vote of Salary for Gregorio Barbarigo, appointed Ambassador to England.
Two hundred ducats of gold in gold a month.
One thousand ducats of gold as a gratuity.
Three hundred ducats of lire 6 soldi 4, for equipages.
One hundred and eighty six ducats, year's salary and board for chaplain.
Thirty-three ducats, eight grossi, for four months' pay of interpreter.
One hundred and fifty ducats for couriers and post.
One hundred and sixty crowns for four months' secret service money.
One hundred ducats to the Secretary.
Twenty ducats a piece to each of the two Couriers.
Four hundred ducats worth of plate.
Ayes 158.
Noes 0.
Neutrals 10.
[Italian.]
June 2. Senato, Mar. Venetian Archives.846. That, to please the Ambassador of the King of Great Britain, the cause now pending between Andrea Fontana, Brothers, merchants, of the one part, and James Griff (? Grieve) of the other, on account of a sequestration obtained by Fontana, over certain goods lying in the German Exchange House, be transferred to the Cinque Savii Sopra la Mercantia, with power, citatis citandis, auditis audiendis et servatis scrvandis, to pronounce judgement. The judgement of the majority to be final.
Ayes 133.
Noes 6.
Neutrals 27.
[Italian.]
June 7. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.847. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Four days ago Gabaleone arrived. He had left Turin on the 9th of last month. In Paris he received news of the suspension of arms between Mantua and Savoy, and he hopes that the settlement will only be an affair of a few hours now, but is not certain of this. The ordinary post from Venice brings no news of peace in that quarter. In this doubtful condition of affairs I sent the day before yesterday to Greenwich to ask for audience. To-day his Majesty has gone to Theobalds. I will press for audience in order to say to his Majesty that as he in the first instance showed a disposition to interpose his authority with the Duke, and would have done so had he not heard that all differences had been arranged, so now I begged him in your Excellencies name to secure, if so it pleased him, that Savoy should lay down arms, restore what he has taken from Mantua, and make good his claims by civil process. I shall guide my conduct by his answer and will report fully to your Excellencies. The day before yesterday the French Ambassador told me that his Queen would send a large force over the Alps, under Lesdiguières, if Savoy did not restore the places he had taken. Lesdiguières was urging this, and the Dukes of Maine and Guise had sought her leave to go to the assistance of Mantua with large forces. He showed me a letter from the Governor of Milan to the Queen, briefly reporting events and saying that he has forces sufficient to keep Savoy in his place without the need for her to send troops. This was followed by a second letter from the Governor saying that he was arming, and that in view of the increased forces of Savoy he did not think it prudent to adventure himself. It is certain that Lesdiguières will now pass the Alps, as the Queen is bound by her word, by blood and by interest. Gabaleone, who came to see me yesterday, told me that on his arrival in Paris he found the Queen angry and the whole Court in a commotion, but having brought very humble letters from the Duke and having set out his Master's case, the excitement subsided. He produced a manifesto of the Duke in which he declared that he regretted that Mantua had placed the affair in the hands of the Governor of Milan instead of appealing to her Most Christian Majesty. The Duke of Mantua has not as yet made any report to the Queen. The whole affair arose over letters of Nevers. I gathered, however, that the Queen was waiting the hourly arrival of Condé and de Bouillon to come to a decision as to whether Lesdiguières should cross the Alps or not. The Duke of Savoy has remarked that it would have been better to place the affair in the hands of your Excellencies, as being a powerful Italian Prince, capable of arranging the business; even if Mantua had had recourse to Spain or to some great Power, that would have done, but to choose a mere Governor was unbecoming. Peace will be reached. All the Princes desire it and the Duke is willing.
On Monday the Ambassador dined with the King; he was served in State by the great officers. Half-way through dinner the Prince covered, which is unusual in the presence of the King. A little after the King caused the Ambassador to be covered. The King drank to the health of the Duke. The Prince tilted at the ring in the King's presence. The King spoke little to the Ambassador and did not touch on business. Gabaleone will stay on; the Marchese Villa will take his leave.
I am told by those who know that the King finds the larger part of Savoy's claims are reasonable, but that he was in the wrong to take up arms, as he could have maintained his rights in another fashion. People here think Savoy moved without orders from Spain; but that Spain may seize the occasion to spread.
London, 7th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 7. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.848. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ambassador sent by the King of Denmark to the King of Spain is the Grand Chancellor; he has one other envoy with him and twelve gentlemen in his suite, each with two servants, about eighty persons in all. He sailed on April 28th with three ships, and as he had a fair passage he should now be landed and be near the Court. On Easter Tuesday Calmar was handed to Sweden. Denmark hopes to keep Helsingborg on payment of five hundred thousand dollars and the remission of the million due to the Crown. Denmark is going to abolish the heavy dues imposed on shipping passing through the Sound. This will be a great advantage to all north Europe, but especially to these Kingdoms. The Danish Envoy pointed out to me the powerful position of his Master, who now possesses eight hundred miles of seaboard; he has taken the best of the Swedish ships and added them to his own fleet.
The Dutch desired to consult the Queen of France before binding themselves closer to the Princes of the Union. Then the Prince produced his proposals, and all was settled. He then went to Middelburg, and then returned to the frontier to meet the Princess. The last touches have been given to the treaty between the Dutch and the Hanseatic towns. The Dutch envoys have left after coming to an arrangement about uniting their forces in the East Indies against Spain. The enterprise will be conducted under the auspices of the Dutch, as his Majesty is at peace with Spain. Envoys will be sent to Holland to plan the operations. Meantime the King agrees that his subjects shall not trade in places acquired by Dutch blood and money, without paying an equivalent. In Flanders one thousand three hundred horse have been disbanded, and two regiments dismissed. The Spanish are always suggesting a definite peace with the Dutch, who show no disposition towards it. The King has written to his Ambassador in Holland to send him full particulars of the treaty between the Dutch and the Turk.
Parliament will meet in Ireland on the 18th of this month. There has been some difficulty in electing the Lower House; but the imprisonment of some and the punishment of others has served as a warning.
London, 7th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 8. Minutes of the Senate. Venetian Archives.849. To the Captain of the Great Galleys.
You will see from enclosed copy of a passage in a despatch from our Secretary in Milan, that Peter Eston, an English pirate, has made an offer to the Duke of Savoy to raise for him some privateers if they get leave to fly the flag of Savoy. If you fall in with any such you are to treat them as pirates.
Ayes 72.
Noes 2.
Neutrals 2.
[Italian.]
June 8. Minutes of the Senate. Venetian Archives.850. To the Commissioner (Proveditore) with the Fleet.
Warning him to be on the look out for Eston and English pirates flying the flag of Savoy.
Ayes 172.
Noes 2.
Neutrals 2.
[Italian.]
851. The same to the Governor General in Dalmatia.
June 11. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.852. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The King gave me audience this morning at Greenwich. I spoke to him, as I said I would, begging him, in the name of the Republic, to interpose his authority so that the Duke of Savoy should lay down arms and, restoring the status quo ante, should support his claims by legal procedure, as his Majesty would have done had he not been informed that the matter was already settled. But now, seeing that war was actually spreading, I again renewed the request. The King replied in these terms: “I am not master of the Duke of Savoy, nor can I apply pressure. His Envoy in France told my Ambassador, who repeatedly wrote to me, that all was at peace; then my Ambassador and others assured me that there is war. Then Gabaleone, who has recently arrived, brings letters of credence from the Duke, who adds that he desires peace, that he has given a promise in France that he will willingly abide by my decision. They speak in one way and act in another. What can one do? The moment I heard that war was going on I made suitable representations to the Ambassador (Villa) and to Gabaleone. It is now nine days that I caused a courier to be sent by the Ambassador to the Duke asking him to tell me clearly his mind and what he means to do. I have also written to France to enquire what language he uses there and to act in concert; all this to oblige the Republic, on whose account chiefly I have taken these steps.” I replied that it would be impossible to review the situation with greater prudence, and for his action I returned thanks in your Excellencies' name. I pointed out that the continuance of the war must be to the Duke's disadvantage, as all Sovereigns desire peace. The King observed that I was quite right and that not even the Duke's Ministers approve; his own Ambassador refused at first to credit the report. I seem to gather three points from the King's remarks; first, displeasure that he had spoken to me on the strength of Jacob's assurances, which he believed; second, the conviction that the Duke is in the wrong to have taken up arms, and may easily find himself in difficulties; third, a readiness not only to use his good offices, but to go even further in the endeavour to reach an accord, and this to gratify your Excellencies. I concluded by saying that as he had secured peace between Denmark and Sweden, and removed the roots of discord between Denmark and Holland it was only natural that he should also bring about quiet in the dissensions caused by Savoy. The King was pleased, and said that in five or six days the courier would be back, and that then he would tell me the fruit of his action and the intentions of the Duke; for the present he could say nothing more positively. I made a humble reverence and took my leave. The French Ambassador tells me that the Pope has proposed that the captured places should be deposited in his hands along with the revenues of Monferrat to pay the garrisons and other expenses. This would be a mere spoliation of Mantua, who has written to the Queen of France that he is resolved not to compromise his position. I am told that your Excellencies' Ambassador in France has communicated your resolution, and that a meeting of Princes, Marshals and Governors has decided to raise six new regiments and to strengthen the old ones; in three weeks they will march. The Ambassador showed the passage in a letter, said to be from Villeroy, in which these words occur “If the Duke of Savoy puts us to this expense he'll have to pay for it.”
London, 11th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 12. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.853. Christopher Valier, Venetian Ambassador in Constantinople, to the Doge and Senate.
Encloses the terms of the Capitulations between the Turks and the Dutch.
Dalle Vigne di Pera, 12th June, 1613.
[Italian; deciphered.]
June 12. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.854. Zorzi Giustinian, Venetian Ambassador in France, to the Doge and Senate.
There has appeared here the copy of a declaration made at Geneva and Bern by the English Secretary resident at Turin. In it he assured those people, in his Master's name, that the arms of the Duke of Savoy would not be employed against them, and he begged them on their side to pass their word not to move against the Duke. The Secretary's language shows that he is interested in and participates in the movement of the Duke. That has caused a great scandal, as it is absolutely contrary to the declarations of the English Ambassador here, that his Majesty was displeased with the Duke's action. The Ambassador at once forwarded the manifesto to the King, and it seems that the Secretary, seduced by rewards and fair promises, has exceeded his duty and acted without orders. This may bring about his ruin.
The English Ambassador has at last settled the old difficulty about the debt to the English Crown. It amounts to a million, and was at first made payable by the United Provinces. It was subsequently reduced by the King of England to gratify the States. The Queen wished it to be stated that this reduction was effected through her, while the King, on the other hand, insists that the thanks are due solely to him. Now that this difficulty has been removed, they will proceed at once to the question of marriage.
The Duke of Lennox will stop here on his way back from Heidelberg; he has the necessary powers. The Duke will ask for himself the command of the Scottish Guard. The Duke of York held the post, but now that he is Prince it no longer becomes him. His request will be granted, both on account of the match and for his own position, be being already lieutenant.
Paris, 12th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
1613. June 14. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives855. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
On the 28th the Commissioners of Lübeck swore the treaty with the Dutch, on behalf of the Hanseatic towns, and left the next day. The confederation between the Dutch and the Princes of the Union has been drawn upon those strict terms which the King desired and the Palatine put forward, but with the proviso that it shall never be prejudicial to the Empire, France or England, with whom the Dutch have relations.
The Princess, accompanied by Prince Maurice, has continued her journey towards the frontiers of the States. Maurice will attend her to Düsseldorf. The Elector has arrived in his States. The Dutch have news that their fleet in the East Indies is making progress and they are fitting out fresh forces in Amsterdam. Thus though at peace with Spain in Europe they are at open war with her in the Indies.
Three days ago the Savoyard Ministers had letters from the Duke, via France, and yesterday Gabaleone had an interview of three quarters of an hour with Rochester. One, who was in the Chamber, told me that the Viscount was but little pleased with what Gabaleone said and gave a very curt reply. Gabaleone is staying on here as Lieger with suite and carriages. He asks whether in the course of his negotiations he is to address himself to the King, and, if so, is he to seek audience.
The Queen is expected at Hampton Court on Wednesday, and there the Savoy Ambassador (Villa) will kiss hands, present the Duke's gifts and take his leave; he is anxious to return, as here he is doing little. Affairs are entrusted to Gabaleone, who is a very able, successful minister. Thanks to the presents he has brought for various personages and those formerly given, he has friends. Here they talk much of war in Italy, nor are there wanting those who say they intend to go there.
London, 14th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 14. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.856. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Acknowledges receipt of despatches of 23rd and 25th May; informing him of the recall of the Venetian Ambassador from Turin, after certain improper expressions used by the Duke; also that the Duke is said to intend to purchase twenty-five ships in England, to be employed in the Adriatic to the damage of Venice; and instructions to beg his Majesty to prevent pirates from taking service with Savoy. “I at once sought audience, and as soon as possible I will carry out your orders.
“Sir Henry Wotton, who visited me a short time ago, told me that the letters which recently reached the Savoyard Ministers brought news that the Prince of Piedmont has gone to Spain. The Prince of Ascoli, on orders from the Governor of Milan, has pushed on to Nizza della Paglia, with Italian and Spanish troops. His Highness respected the Royal Ensigns. The Envoy at once sought audience to report all to the King. As to the journey of the Prince of Piedmont he says the Duke may have some other business with the King of Spain. He assured me all would end quietly; the Cardinal Duke will wed his sister-in-law, and the King of Spain is actually in secret treaty for the Infanta Catherine.
“The French Ambassador told me that the Queen has taken steps so that neither Spain nor Savoy shall be able to raise levies in Switzerland.”
London, 14th June, 1613.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 18. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.857. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Yesterday at two p.m. the King gave me audience at Greenwich. I said “Sire, the Duke of Savoy, in the course of some remarks, announced that he intended to procure twenty-five ships in England, and with them and his own galleys to proceed to ravage the Adriatic. The Republic has no doubt of the Duke's intent, nor yet of your Majesty's good will. It now begs that you should issue orders preventing pirates, with whom these kingdoms swarm, from taking service with Savoy.” At the first words the King looked annoyed and seemed to be hearing something quite unexpected. He was about to speak when I forestalled him in the gentlest manner possible, assuring him that there was no lack of confidence on the part of your Excellencies, who were quite convinced of his benevolence. The only request was for vigorous orders that neither men nor ships should be taken from England without his knowledge. The King replied that the Duke may have said it, but he could not put it into effect nor did he dream of doing so. His Majesty assured me that the Duke had never said a word to him on the matter, not even about raising a single man; nay, he talks of nothing but peace and implores intervention. He went on to say “I will now tell you, as I promised, what my Ambassador informs me is the intention of the Duke. If the Duke wished to make the attempt of which you tell me, he would not speak to me of peace. He has put out all his power, now that he sees against him all the Princes of Italy, except the Pope who is neutral; so too France and Spain, at least in appearance. He used the words you report with a view to his own safety.” I said that the order your Excellencies begged for was precisely to meet this point. The King said that in England it was impossible for anyone to raise a single man without his knowledge. The Duke had spoken to no one about it; “No one will raise men nor hire vessels here; that I can promise you.” As I insisted, the King stopped pacing about and said “The French Ambassador told me three days ago, that now he knew that Spain had stabbed his Mistress and thrown itself on the side of Savoy. If Savoy has begun and carried on the war by himself he must be mad. I can't believe it.” I gather three points from the King's remarks; he remains devoted to your Excellencies; he is of opinion that the Duke acted rashly and by himself; and that having done all he could with his forces he is now trying to strengthen his position in every way. On my taking my leave the King said “Rest assured of me; not a man will leave the kingdom nor a single ship my ports without its being known to me. I shall redouble my vigilance, and I will do the same in the efforts I make with the Duke and others in the interests of peace.”
London, 18th June, 1613.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
June 19. Consiglio de' Dieci, Parti Secrete. Venetian Archives.858. That the imprisonment of Paolo Emilio Fumanelli be commuted into relegation to Palma. (fn. 1)
Ayes 8. Ayes 8.
Noes 0. Noes 0. Not carried.
Neutrals 1. Neutrals 1.
[Italian.]
June 20. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.859. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Savoy is certainly endeavouring to induce the King to intervene, and in concert with the Queen of France to bring all to a peaceful termination. My representations to his Majesty have opened the way for the Ambassador of Savoy, who, while waiting a reply, does all he can to gain those who are in the King's good graces. He has declared that all the goods plundered from English ships by the English pirate (Eston), who is now in Turin, are under safe custody and will be restored to their owners. (”Ha dichiarato che le merci depredate a sudditi della Maestà sua dal corsaro Inglese che si trova in Turino, son custodite e si restituirano prontamente a padroni.”) As to a matrimonial alliance they offer the King carte blanche. They do not however make much way.
Orders have been issued that no one may leave the country without announcing his departure, nor may persons of importance go abroad without permission. The King told me that he had heard from his Ambassador in Holland touching the reported treaty to assist the Turk against Christians. Barneveldt has shown surprise and resentment and absolutely denied its existence. He had begged the Ambassador not to allude to it in the Assembly, for the merest suspicion that the King of England entertained a shadow of a doubt on such an impious charge would be enough to damage the good name of that government. He told me he had heard from the French Ambassador that the Turk and the Persian were going to war again.
News of disturbances in Ireland has arrived. Parliament is still sitting there. Foot and horse have been raised in the counties and among the nobles. Spain, however, shows every intention of keeping quiet. The Dutch constantly send fresh forces to the East Indies, which greatly disturbs the Spanish, for they recognise that the origin of their greatness was due to the Indies and they may prove the source of their disaster. The Commissioners who were to go to Holland to arrange for a conjunction of forces have not left yet. I have news from the Hague that if such a conjunction takes place they propose to move in the West Indies as well.
London, 20th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 20.
Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.860. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The French Ambassador told me that in the audience he had three days ago of the King he mentioned the rumour that the English Secretary in Turin had gone with Count Ruffia to Geneva, that he had left Ruffia at the gates, and had been received by the Government, whom he urged to keep aloof from the quarrels of the two Dukes and to refuse transit. He induced them to consent by assuring them that the difficulties would soon be settled and that then the troops collected would be turned against them, and so their only safety lay in standing neutral, which is what the Duke wants. To all this the King had replied “I am amazed at this. That person is no Secretary of mine, but a certain individual left behind by Wotton without my orders. (io mi marviglio di eiò; collui non è mio segretario ma un tale lasciato dal Vuton senza mio ordine.) The King appeared annoyed that this person should have acted so. He asseverated that he knew nothing about it, and added that it might be some trick of the Duke's to gain prestige, just as he had engaged a few English pirates and talked of them as “the English troops.” The Ambassador pointed out to me that the Duke's object was to prevent the passage of French troops. Geneva was under French protection and France paid the garrison. He remarked on the affront which the Duke had courted by sending his Ambassador to a small town like Geneva without first of all finding out whether he would be received or not. The English Secretary begged that if they could come to no agreement they should at least keep the negotiation and the presence of the Ambassador a secret.
London, 20th Geneva, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 21. Collegio, Secreta. Esposizioni Principi. Venetian Archives.861. The English Ambassador came to the Cabinet and spoke as follows:—
The communication I am about to make in the name of my Master may perhaps appear inopportune, but I trust that a consideration of the distance and the slowness of the post may excuse all.
If during the later movement of the Turk my Master came to no open decision it was not for lack of goodwill, but because he desired to show it in deeds, not words. Although the Turk's movements showed his object to be quite other than the territory of this Republic, still my Master was quite ready to assist with all his forces and those of his friends and dependents. He has told me to say this before you expressly, and though it may now seem superfluous it may serve as an assurance of his continuous good will.
I have just received letters from the Palatine, who is deeply sensible of your Serenity's kindness as regards his marriage. He will write himself.
The Doge returned thanks. “As your Lordship is here we may say that as regards your petition on behalf of Fumanelli for a change of prison to relegation to Palma, we all are disposed to assent, but the matter must come before the Council of Ten, and requires all seventeen votes.”
The Ambassador again recommends Fumanelli on the ground of pity, and also that he may be of service. It is sometimes possible to dispense with the rigour of the law; he begs for this favour on behalf of two devoted servants, Fumanelli and himself. If the former should ever offend again the Ambassador will pay the penalty. The Doge promises to do what they can. The Ambassador returns thanks for the favour shown to the Scot whom he had recommended. He sees that he is not neglected, in spite of the fact that the Government is much occupied during these days. He hears that the quarrel between Mantua and Savoy has been settled. He would like to be assured of the truth, so that he may communicate it to his Master.
Seeing that his Serenity appeared embarrassed the Ambassador said “Most Serene Prince, pray pardon me. I see that I have over-stepped the bounds of duty;” but his Excellency Donato at once replied that the news pointed to the confirmation of peace. As far as at present advised they held this for true and his Excellency might safely write it. The Ambassador said that he was the first to inform the King of the rupture and would like to be the first to inform him of the peace.
[Italian.]
June 22. Consiglio de' Dieci. Parti Secrete, Venetian Archives862. The motion of the 19th June for the commutation of the sentence on Fumanelli into relegation to Palma was again put.
In the committee of nine.
Ayes 16. Ayes 9.
Noes 0. Noes 0.
Neutrals 1. Neutrals 0.
[Italian.]
June 25. Minutes of the Senate. Venetian Archives.863. To the Ambassador in England.
We have received your despatch of May 30th, conveying to us the offer of the King to come to our aid, especially if attacked from Constantinople. His Majesty's Ambassador here has made a similar communication. We enclose our letter of thanks and a copy of our answer to the English Ambassador. You will seek audience and make a communication to his Majesty in that sense.
Ayes 156.
Noes 3.
Neutrals 4.
[Italian.]
June 25. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.864. That the English Ambassador be invited to attend in the Cabinet to hear as follows: Thanks for the King's offer of assistance, especially against the Turk, and for his promise of help from his allies and confederates.
Ayes 156.
Noes 3.
Neutrals 4.
[Italian.]
June 25. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.865. To the King of Great Britain.
Thanks for his offers of help, especially against the Turk.
Ayes 156.
Noes 3.
Neutrals 4.
[Italian.]
June 25. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.866. To the Ambassador Priuli in Spain or to his Successor.
His Majesty the King of Great Britain, talking with our Ambassador Foscarini, said that in 1606 the King of Denmark had declared himself ready to come to our assistance, and would be so on every other occasion. Should a Danish Ambassador arrive in Spain you are to visit him, and to show that you are aware of this excellent disposition in his Master.
Ayes 156.
Noes 3.
Neutrals 4.
[Italian.]
June 26. Collegio, Secreta. Esposizioni Principi. Venetian Archives.867. This morning the thanks of the Senate for the King's offer of assistance was read to the English Ambassador.
The Ambassador returns thanks for the communication and also for the release of Fumanelli from prison. The King of England has not been content with promising his own support, he has also secured the support of others, his relations and confederates, among them of the King of Denmark. If the Republic pleases to acknowledge these offers that would be a satisfaction to his Master. He begs pardon if he has gone too far, but his duty as an Ambassador compels him.
[Italian.]
June 27. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.868. To the King of Denmark.
The King of Great Britain has frequently assured us of your Majesty's good will. Return thanks for this.
Ayes 174.
Noes 2.
Neutrals 8.
[Italian.]
June 27. Minutes of the Senate, Venetian Archives.869. To the Ambassador in England.
Being informed by the English Ambassador that his Master would be pleased if we thanked the King of Denmark for his good disposition towards us, we have written to the King a letter; copy of which is enclosed. You will communicate this to his Majesty.
That the Cabinet be authorized to communicate to England news about Monferrat.
Ayes 174.
Noes 2.
Neutrals 8.
[Italian.]
June 28. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.870. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The same day that I sent my last the Ambassador Cornwallis' late Secretary, (fn. 2) who has been sent as Consul to the Spanish seaboard, arrived in London. He has made the journey in nine days and was at once, after seeing his Majesty, passed on to the Council, before whom he laid a statement that on his arrival in Spain he found another Englishman, appointed by the King of Spain, in possession of his office; and he was informed by those whose duty it was that the King of Spain would not have Protestants in his kingdom, and so he had appointed an English Catholic to the post.
The King was enraged at this, so too the Council. Four days after an express arrived from the Ambassador in Spain, containing soft phrases from the Duke of Lerma. The King at once wrote claiming the withdrawal of the other and the admission of this person whom he had appointed.
The Spanish Ambassador has been insulted by the people, who made a riot about his carriage; his grooms were thrashed and two of them carried off to prison, but immediately released on the complaint of the Ambassador to the King, but without any apology. Later on fire was flung into his house.
The Council has decided against him in the case of two Spanish ships plundered by the French outside the line; they have been adjudged lawful prize, although the Ambassadors both by word of mouth and in writing interested themselves in the matter on the Spanish side.
The Deputies from the Irish Parliament, two noble peers, two knights and two lawyers, have kissed the King's hand and presented their petition. The main point is that the Irish no long time ago, were, in part, all but savages, and in the reign of Elizabeth they obeyed none but their own chiefs. After the accession of the King, gradually they are growing obedient to the law. This does not please some of their great ones, though all obey. The Deputies are already satisfied, for such is the benignity of the King that whoever speaks to him is sure to be graciously received and to go away quite content.
London, 28th June, 1613.
[Italian.]
June 28. Original Despatch, Venetian Archives.871. Antonio Foscarini, Venetian Ambassador in England, to the Doge and Senate.
The Ambassador of France has just informed me that the Duke of Savoy with twelve thousand foot and sixteen cannon is besieging and bombarding San Damiano. The Governor of Milan reports to the Queen of France that he has received orders to assist Mantua if Savoy will not listen to reason. He has sent to tell the Duke to retire from San Damiano, otherwise he will invest Vercelli. The Ambassador himself told me that one should not give too much credence to these words and promises; he suspects that the Spanish wish to delay until France has attacked Savoy and then to declare themselves.
There are very recent despatches from the English Ambassador in Spain, saying that the Secretary Varghas has gone to Italy with orders for the Governor of Milan of the same nature as those which the Governor reported to her Most Christian Majesty.
Several persons of quality intended to take service with the Duke of Savoy both with men and with ships, but on its becoming known that I had made representations to his Majesty and on the issue of the orders in conformity with the King's word no one thinks any more of doing so, some of them even deny that such was their intention, and some hold their tongues. It is quite certain that the Envoys of Savoy have not asked the King for help, nor yet for leave to raise ships; the Earl of Northampton swore this to me. He added that their negotiations for a match are meeting opposition and are at a stand. It has done the Duke harm that he is suspected of Spanish leanings and that he is hostile to the Most Serene Republic; the Earl did not conceal this from me. The readiness of the King in all that concerns your Excellencies' convenience or pleasure could not be greater, nor the orders he has issued more efficacious.
London, 28th June, 1613.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 This motion had been proposed and failed on the 18th March, 1613.
2 Francis Cottington.