Venice
August 1617, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Allen B. Hinds (editor)

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1908

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578-591

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'Venice: August 1617, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Relating to English Affairs in the Archives of Venice, Volume 14: 1615-1617 (1908), pp. 578-591. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=95974 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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August 1617, 16–31

Aug. 16. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Milano. Venetian Archives.867. Antonio Maria Vincenti, Venetian Secretary at Milan, to the Doge and Senate.
The Rector of the College of Jesuits here is called Father Filippo Rinaldi, a Florentine; he is here and neither he nor any other of that church of Brera has left Milan. The other church of the same order, San Fedele, not having a college, does not possess a rector but only a provost. His name is Father Thomaso Ceronio, a Genovese. He left Milan some days ago and has not yet returned. There is a strong opinion that he was intending to change his religion, and he may be called a fugitive. At Lucerne he was seen to be on the way to Basel, and they thought that he might be going to England. This action of his has been kept as secret as possible by the fathers of that monastery, and to save the reputation of their company they first spread a report that he had become a Carthusian, and now they say that he has gone to Flanders by the order of their General, upon important affairs, although so far as can be ascertained his departure was taken for the reasons given above. Meanwhile his duties are performed by the Vice Provost, the Father Alessandro Gerardini. This is as much as I have been able to gather by proceeding with caution. The task has proved difficult because the fathers are very reserved upon all matters concerning their monastery and are under a strict oath of secrecy, especially upon affairs of this nature. I have used my own methods, which are not liable to suspicion, and as a consequence I have not yet been able to entirely fulfil the commands of your Excellencies in this matter.
Milan, the 16th August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 17. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Spagna. Venetian Archives.868. Piero Gritti, Venetian Ambassador in Spain, to the Doge and Senate.
The Secretary of England was pleased with the office which I performed with him by order of your Excellencies. He said that when he spoke to the ministers here they had not been able to hide their satisfaction about the affair of the galleys, but told him it was a great piece of luck. Don Baldassar di Zunica at once sent the news on its arrival.
Madrid, the 17th August, 1617.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 18. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni, Venetian Archives.869. On the approaching return of the king of England from Scotland it is fitting that an ambassador of ours should be present at that Court in fulfilment of our promise and in the interests of our service in the present serious state of affairs and Sig. Lunardo Moro being already selected for the embassy of Savoy, whence the Ambassador Donato should proceed to England:
That the said Sig. Lunardo Moro shall leave this city within eight days and proceed immediately to the embassy of Savoy upon pain of 1,000 ducats to be levied by the Avogadori di Commun and the Savii of our Cabinet. That 2,000 ducats be given to him as a donation beyond the usual assignment, so that he may the better execute this resolution. That the Ambassador Donato proceed to England without delay upon his arrival. That as the Ambassador Moro will have to follow the duke to the field, he shall have an assignment of 400 crowns a month such as the Ambassador Donato now enjoys.
Ballot without the two heads of donation and salary.
Ayes 114.
Noes 11.
Neutral 26.
In the Cabinet, ballot upon the donation and salary.
Ayes 9. Second ballot, Ayes 10
Noes 5. Noes 3. 4/5ths.
Neutral 3. Neutral 4. pending.
[Italian.]
Aug. 18. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.870. To the Ambassador at the Imperial Court.
The royal galleys have gone from Brindisi towards Messina to join the reinforcements and watch the Turkish fleet. Some ships have remained at Brindisi. Our fleet is in Dalmatia, awaiting the movement of the Spaniards and guarding the Gulf.
In Friuli on the 10th the enemy attacked some of our posts, but were repulsed and pursued a good way, leaving 300 dead and wounded. A Dutchman distinguished himself, killing ten of the enemy single handed. This has greatly encouraged our forces and stopped the further progress of the enemy.
We learn in letters of the 15th that the archducal forces attempted to surprise S. Floriano, but failed. Some of our companies have been raiding, and sacked five or six places, the chief one being Castagnovizza, carrying off some useful booty.
The like to the following:
London. Spain. Milan.
The Hague. Turin. Naples.
Rome. Zurich. Florence.
France. Scaramelli. Mantua.
Ayes 120.
Noes 0.
Neutral 2.
[Italian.]
[Aug. 19.] Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.871. To the Proveditore of Zante.
Notification of the sending of provisions by an English ship, master John Humphrey (Omfré), in charge of Dimitri Rucani, in accordance with the deliberation of the Senate of the 19th inst. [Aug.].
The like, mutatis mutandis, to Cephalonia.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.872. Georgio Gaurilopulo and Dimitri Ruccani have offered to go to the assistance of Zante in its distress. That the Prov. alle Biave be directed to lade in an appointed ship 30 thousand of rice, 50 of biscuit and 300 stare of beans, to be taken by the one appointed by the Cabinet.
Ayes 117
Noes 5
Neutrals 3
[Italian.]
Enclosure.873. Dimitri Ruccani represents the wretched state of his native island of Zante, owing to the plague and the consequent lack of trade; he offers to take biscuits, rice and beans thither in an English ship, which is ready and safe.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.874. Memorandum of what is to be sent to Zante.
Biscuit, 80 miera.
Rice, 30 miera.
Beans, 700 stara.
To be laden upon a small English berton or ship, master John Moiier.
The cost of these goods may be deducted from the new custom on raisins, which the aforesaid master may lade or others for him either in Zante or Cephalonia. If the raisins be laded at Cephalonia orders may be given that the hire be debited to the fiscal chamber of Zante.
[Italian.]
Enclosure.875. Representation of Zuane Gaurilopulo of the wretched condition of Zante, devastated by the plague, which has destroyed its trade, by which it lives and by the provision of foreign food stuffs; suggests that provision of rice, biscuits and beans be sent thither.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Savoia. Venetian Archives.876. Lunardo Moro to the Doge and Senate.
A few days ago your Serenity sent for me, saying that it was necessary to provide as soon as possible for the embassy in England, and that I should declare what I could do with regard to going to Savoy to release the Ambassador Donato, so that he might proceed to this post. I represented the difficulties which stood in the way of this appointment despite my zeal to serve the republic. The principal object of my going was to allow the Ambassador Donato to proceed to England, but it is now quite clear that he cannot arrive there at the time that your Excellencies have promised the king. Your Serenity replied with customary graciousness, but I still wish to represent the great objections to my selection.
From my house, the 21st August, 1517.
[Italian.]
Aug. 21. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Savoia. Venetian Archives.877. Antonio Donato, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
News has been brought to Naples by an English ship that Ossuna's fleet has withdrawn, and the great ships are coming to the coast of Nice while the Marquis of Santa Croce will bring the squadron of Spain to attack His Highness.
Asti, the 21st August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 22. Senato, Secreta, Dispacci, Savoia. Venetian Archives.878. Antonio Donato, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
I hear that they are at work upon drawing up articles for a league, to be sent post to England. They will send Gabaleone for this and possibly they will give the articles to me also. His Highness wishes to make sure of his friends and draw closer to them so that he may not succumb to the malice of the Spaniards, but this is not the time for such negotiations and they will completely destroy all attempts to arrange a peace.
Asti, the 22nd August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 22. Senato, Secreta, Dispacci, Napoli. Venetian Archives.879. Gasparo Spinelli, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the Doge and Senate.
It is reported that the English captain who commanded the brigantines and fustarelle of His Excellency, after having taken a quantity of booty and captured quite recently a marciliana of oil, would have made them unload upon a Ragusan ship, which happened to be in the roadstead of Pescara, and put therein all the booty and arms which were in the brigantines, if it had not escaped with many, it is not known whither. It is also reported that Anastasio dal Zante, who was pilot of Sig. Pellegrini di Rossi, has escaped with one of those brigantines, they say in the direction of Corfu. His Excellency is much upset by these misfortunes, although he pretends to care nothing about them.
Naples, the 22nd August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 22. Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.880. To the Rectors of Zante.
The English merchants Richard Beresford and John Gueild have been appointed by the Levantine company of that nation to reside in this island to look after the trade of the said company. The ambassador of their king, resident here, has warmly recommended them; and in dealing with so friendly a nation and with the subjects of a king with whom we enjoy such intimate relations, we direct you to protect and favour them, and cause others to do the like, so that the Company may the more readily send its goods to our states and that friendship and trade may be encouraged as we desire.
The like to the Rectors of Cephalonia.
Ayes 18
Noes 1
Neutral 2
[Italian.]
Aug. 22. Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.861. To the Bailo at Constantinople.
The English ambassador has notified us that Sig. George Albert, count of Erbach, prince of the Empire, has been taken by the Turks with twelve other German gentlemen, between Malta and Naples, some months ago, when he went to see that province. The ambassador showed that his king was very anxious for the count's release, because of his rank and birth, and begs for the use of our influence at the Porte. We report this request because by joining offices with the ambassador of that king we can show our desire to join with him everywhere, and upon all occasions to give him satisfaction, and especially in so proper a cause.
Ayes 18
Noes 1
Neutral 2
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.882. To Prince Maurice.
Letters of credence of Pietro Contarini, knight, who is being sent as ambassador extraordinary to the king of Great Britain.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Senato, Terra. Venetian Archives.883. To the King of Great Britain.
Letters of credence for Pietro Contarini, knight, chosen to act as ambassador extraordinary until the arrival of the ambassador Donato.
Ayes47Second ballot,Ayes40
Noes20Noes15
Neutral92Neutral107
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Senato, Terra. Venetian Archives.884. To the Queen of Great Britain.
Letters of credence for Pietro Contarini.
Ayes47Second ballot,Ayes40
Noes20Noes15
Neutral92Neutral107
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Collegio, Lettere. Venetian Archives.885. To the Lords of the three Leagues of the Grisons.
Letters of credence for Pietro Contarini, knight, who is being sent as ambassador extraordinary to the king of Great Britain.
The like to the following:
Zurich. The senate of Nürenberg.
The archbishop of Cologne. The landgrave of Hesse.
The archbishop of Mayence. The margrave of Baden.
The archbishop of Treves. The count Palatine.
The prince of Anhalt. The countess Palatine.
The margrave of Anspach. Strasburg.
The duke of Wirtemberg. The States General of Flanders.
The senate of Basel.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.886. When the Secretary Lionello was sent to Scotland upon the present troubles we informed His Majesty that on his return to England he should find an ambassador at Court to act in our name. We also confirmed the same to His Majesty's ambassador here in response to his offices in the Cabinet. As it is not possible for the Ambassador Donato to be there at the end of next month, when we understand that the king will have returned, the present exigencies require that some one be sent immediately, as well as the favour that His Majesty may show to the republic by a declaration, and our aforesaid promise:
Resolved that Ottaviano Bon proceed without delay from France to England to remain there until the arrival of our Ambassador Donato, and that he shall continue to enjoy the salary which he is now receiving until his return to this city.
Ayes 47
Noes 20
Neutral 92
[Italian.]
Second ballot, Ayes 40
Noes 15
Neutral 107
Aug. 24. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni Venetian Archives.887. To the Secretary Lionello in England.
In fulfilment of our promise to His Majesty that he should find an ambassador of ours at Court on his return from Scotland, we have decided to direct Ottaviano Bon to proceed immediately to reside with His Majesty as ambassador extraordinary until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato. When he arrives you will give him full information of the commissions which we gave you when you were sent to the king in Scotland, and the replies you received from His Majesty with whatever else concerns the public service, so that he may be able to perform his duties with the greatest possible advantage, just as you have served, to our entire satisfaction. We will write to the ambassador Bon about your return home, that he permit you to leave after he has obtained from you all the information that he thinks necessary, and to assign you 300 ducats for the journey.
Ayes 47
Noes 20
Neutral 92
[Italian.]
Second ballot, Ayes 40
Noes 15
Neutral 107
Aug. 25. Senato, Secreta, Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.888. This Council well knows how necessary it is that an ambassador should be present at the court of England on His Majesty's return from Scotland, out of regard to the promise made to His Majesty by the Secretary Lionello and to His Majesty's ambassador resident here, and for other important reasons connected with our service, the Ambassador Donato, who is destined thither, being unable to arrive in time.
Resolved that a noble be elected as extraordinary ambassador in England to stay there until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato. He may be taken from any place, convent, college, rule and office, and may not refuse upon the penalty provided for such cases; he should be obliged to leave within eight days upon the penalty of paying 1,000 ducats, to be taken from him by the Avogadori di Commun and by each of our Cabinet under oath. He shall receive 1,000 ducats as a donation to put himself in train, and 500 gold ducats a month for his expenses for which he shall not be bound to render account. For horses, trappings and chests, 300 ducats of lire 6, grossi 4, for which likewise he shall not be bound to render account. For extraordinary expenses 300 ducats, for which he shall render account on his return. For the secretary 100 ducats as a gift and to two couriers who accompany him, 40 ducats each.
That the secretary Lionello in England and His Majesty's ambassador resident here be informed of this decision.
Ayes 147
Noes 0
Neutrals 12
[Italian.]
Aug. 25. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.889. To the Secretary Lionello in England.
In fulfilment of our obligation to provide an ambassador of the republic at the court on His Majesty's return from Scotland, and in the interests of our service, we have to-day chosen Piero Contarini, knight, to reside as extraordinary ambassador with His Majesty until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato, with express instructions to leave here within eight days, so that we hope he will arrive in time for His Majesty's return to London. We direct you to inform His Majesty of this our resolution, to which we have been led by a desire to show our constant esteem and affection for that most glorious crown. You will see that the news reaches the Court by such way as you think best.
Vigore deliberationis exmi Senatus diei XXV. Augusti, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 24. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.890. To the Ambassadors in France.
While the affair of the Grisons remains in suspense, for which you, Bon, were chiefly sent to the Court, and as the English court has remained for a long while without an ambassador, we have resolved that you shall take leave of His Most Christian Majesty without any delay, and proceed to London, hastening your journey so that if possible you may be there on the king's arrival from Scotland, which, we understand, will take place about the 26th or 27th of next month, in accordance with the promise made by our Secretary Lionello and given to the ambassador resident here.
We send you enclosed letters of credence for the king, queen and prince of Wales; when introduced to their Majesties you will protest our constant esteem and our wishes for every prosperity and greatness for that crown, and that we trust in him in everything that concerns the common service. You will state that these motives have led us to send you to stay until the arrival of the Ambassador Donato, who is delayed by important affairs in Savoy.
You will get the Secretary Lionello to give you all the instructions for his mission to Scotland and the replies given to him, guiding yourself by them in pressing for a royal declaration in our favour and for action corresponding to our devotion to His Majesty's good pleasure, cultivating the good understanding with him and obtaining what is possible from him.
We recognize the inconvenience of laying this fresh charge on your years, but our appreciation of your worth and ability leads us to make use of them at this important crisis, while we feel confident that you will embrace the task. You will make use of the Secretary Lionello as much as you think necessary, and you may allow him to return home, providing with money up to 300 ducats for his journey.
You, Gussoni, will continue in the embassy in accordance with the instructions given to you both.
Ayes 47
Noes 20
Neutral 92
[Italian.]
Second ballot, Ayes 40
Noes 15
Neutral 107
Aug. 26. Collegio, Secreta. Esposizioni Principi. Venetian Archives.891. M. Antonio di Franceschi reports that he went yesterday to the ambassador of England and informed him that the republic had appointed Sig. Pietro Contarini, as extraordinary ambassador to his king, and act until Sig. Donato, ambassador to Savoy, shall be able to relieve him. He replied with thanks, saying that he knew Sig. Pietro who had been ambassador in France and was experienced in the affairs of the states neighbour to those of His Majesty. He said that he would at once inform his king, who would be much gratified.
[Italian.]
Aug. 25. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.892. Giovanni Battista Lionello, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Three days ago I received your Serenity's letters of the 7th August with the exposition of the ambassador Wotton and the reply given to him by the Senate. I ascertained that no letters had come from Wotton by the same courier and this caused me much satisfaction, because my office with His Majesty of communicating information will prove the more acceptable, and he will recognize that it originates in the affection and confidence of your Excellencies towards him, and has not been provoked by Wotton. I saw Winwood this morning and communicated to him the three parts of the reply which your Excellencies commit to me, the negotiations for peace, the coming of the ambassador and thanking His Majesty for what he graciously said to me at the audience at Edinburgh. I related the whole so that he might be well impressed and be able to send an express courier to the king this evening. His Majesty will reach England in eight days and will proceed gradually towards these parts, and that is why, in the interests of the public service, I should wish that the ambassador was at hand whom your Excellencies have destined for this court.
In reply to my offices Winwood told me that he knew that peace would be very beneficial to Italy as circumstances certainly are not favourable for the continuation of the war, but he feared lest the princes interested should allow themselves to be again deceived by the Spaniards, for the more profuse they are with their promises the less they ought to be trusted. In this connection he heard recently from France that the marquis of Lanz is publishing the same idea at that Court and that the Spaniards have simply entered upon these new negotiations for the purpose of reinforcing their shrunken army and to repair the walls and fortifications of Vercelli which had suffered so much. However he praised the most serene republic for hearkening to the proposals; they were right to do so especially as they had been brought by the French ambassador, but he did not think that too much reliance should be placed upon them, and they should desist from opportunist decisions and resolutions, because this added to the other losses would prove harmful. That he would immediately send word of everything to the king, who will certainly be satisfied by the communication, and on his return to London some strong line will be taken. He feels very bitterly the loss of Vercelli and of the three galleys of the republic and the relief, which has entered Gradisca, events which have caused the same impression upon other well-affected ones and which on the other hand have greatly rejoiced the enemy, who found hopes for yet greater gains from this beginning.
The fact that in spite of the reports about the marriage in negotiation with the son of the king of Bohemia the king sent the last dispatch to Digby to go to Spain, so that he will be at sea at this moment, strengthens the belief that His Majesty proposes to use this mission to obtain money from the parliament, as related in my last dispatch.
Lord Roos, who six months ago was ambassador extraordinary in Spain, has left England secretly, almost with the appearance of flight, taking with him a servant and a Spaniard whom he had in his house. It is not known whither he is going or what his motives may be. All are surprised, indeed the more so because at present he enjoys an income of 20,000 crowns and certainly expects more than 100,000 crowns in addition on the death of his father and grandfather. (fn. 1)
All the magnates are in the country and all negotiations are suspended until the approaching return of the king, and so I can assure your Excellencies that nothing is passing here worthy of your notice.
What else the Jesuit revealed I cannot at present discover, as the person who gave me the information is now out of London.
I have two letters of your Serenity of the 21st July and two of the 28th with news of events. I see nothing to do but to acknowledge their receipt and use them when I have an opportunity.
London, the 25th August, 1617.
[Italian; the part in italics deciphered.]
Aug. 25. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Inghilterra. Venetian Archives.893. Giovanni Battista Lionello, Venetian Secretary in England, to the Doge and Senate.
Encloses account for couriers and the carriage of ordinary and extraordinary letters.
London, the 25th August, 1617.
[Italian.]
[The account is wanting.]
Aug. 26. Senato, Secreta. Comunicazioni dal Cons. de' X. Venetian Archives.894. The Pope is much perturbed because on Thursday morning Pasquino was found with both ears full. Strict enquiry has been made without any results. The pasquinade speaks very bitterly of the Government of the present pope.
Although the pope was very angry with the last ambassador, yet he has been somewhat mollified by his refusal to go as extraordinary ambassador to England. He knows the ability of the man by long experience, and feared lest he should bring off some great coup with the king of England to the detriment of the Spaniards; but what concerned him more was that if this gentleman left Rome now, fully informed about the Court, he would take it ill that he should go to England, where he might give the king precise information of what is now being done, and for the same reason, if any of the Roman Barons is going travelling through the world, he immediately forbids him to got to England, and particularly to the capital (conosce l'valore del personaggio per longa esperienza et temeva che non facesse qulache gran colpo, presso quel 141 a danni di 66 ma quel che più a lui importa si è che partito questo Sig. hora da 115 informatissimo di tutta la corte sentiva male che andasse in 126 dove haverebbe potuto a puntino informare 64 di quanto qui al presente si tratta; et per la istessa cagione, quando alcuno di questi Baroni Romani va per lo mondo a diporto, subito le prohibisce l'andar in 126 et massime ad urbem Regiam). (fn. 2)
Rome the 20th August, 1617
[Italian.]
Aug. 28. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Germania. Venetian Archives.895. Zori Giustian, Venetain Ambassador in Germany, to the Doge and Senate.
The emperor and Maximilian are awaiting the arrival of Ferdinand. The negotiations with Saxony have resulted satisfactorily, and he obtained what he wanted from the elector, that the assembly for his nomination as king of the Romans should be held at Ratisbon in February.
Meanwhile they are suspicious about the journey of the Palatine, that he will oppose, and that from Sedan he will proceed to France and England for this purpose. There is a fear that he is negotiating with the elector of Bavaria, who belongs to his house, who could do a great deal for him with the help of the elector of Cologne, and France and England would help him in order to take the empire from the house of Austria, so that his plan is to protract matters, as if the emperor dies and the Palatine has the administration during the interval, he may direct affairs with great advantage. But the emperor will send an express person to him and to the elector of Brandenburg to inform them of the negotiations with Saxony and to treat for the aforesaid assembly.
Prague, the 28th August, 1617. Copy.
[Italian.]
Aug. 28. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Zante Venetian Archives.896. Almoro Barbaro, Proveditore of Zante, to the Doge and Senate.
I have not received any hint whether my frequent despatches have reached your Serenity. I was told to send word of the course of the plague here and its consequences, and I do not wish to be taxed with negligence. On the 25th I announced a considerable improvement, the fire which has raged for four months continuously and carried off about 2,000 persons seems almost entirely spent. I have begun to purge the city, so that it may be free as soon as possible. But it grieves me to see this town and island abandoned by the usual flow and traffic of foreigners and ships, as the trade has been entirely taken away, so that your Serenity has suffered as well as individuals. There are hardly any bids for the customs, and where one was let out for 1,000, now it fetches 500 at most. Ships have not come here for a long time, because they would not risk their goods upon uncertain hopes.
Zante, the 28th August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 29. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci. Signori Stati Venetian Archives.897. Christoforo Surian, Venetian Secretary in the Netherlands, to the Doge and Senate.
A report is current here that count John Ernest has lost from 40 to 50,000 florins at play in the camp. More than one person has asked me about it, and I replied that I knew nothing. It is also asserted that the earl of Oxford had a large share of the gain. This was written to the English ambassador, but it is not believed that the loss can be so great.
The Hague, the 29th August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 29. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Napoli, Venetian Archives.898. Gasparo Spinelli, Venetian Secretary at Naples, to the Doge and Senate.
A fleet is still kept near Genoa, the common idea being that they want to surprise Nice or Villafranca, but others suspect designs upon Genoa or attempts upon Toulon or Marseilles. Some again say that the galleons are to proceed to Spain, owing to their suspicions of English and Dutch ships which might arrive in those parts.
Naples, the 29th August, 1617.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni. Venetian Archives.899. To the Ambassadors in France.
Notification that Piero Contarini has been chosen for the embassy in England and will leave shortly. The Ambassador Donato cannot proceed to England for awhile owing to indisposition and because he has no successor.
Ayes 140
Noes 0
Neutral 3
[Italian.]
Aug. 30. Senato, Secreta. Deliberazioni, Venetian Archives.900. To the Ambassador with His Highness of Savoy.
Progress of negotiations. Disposition of Spanish fleet. Assistance in money for Savoy. Notification that as the ministers of the king of Great Britain have everywhere declared that His Majesty would be pleased to see an ambassador on his return from Scotland, Piero Contarini has been chosen to act as extraordinary ambassador until Donato is able to go. Another ambassador will be chosen for Savoy or soon as possible.
Ayes 149
Noes 0
Neutral 0
[Italian.]
Aug. 30. Cons. di' X. Parti Secrete. Venetian Archives.901. That the letters of the Secretary in England of the 11th inst. upon the conversation of the Secretary Winwood with him about the ambassador Wotton, be communicated by a Secretary of this Council to the Savii of the Cabinet, and, if they think fit, to the Senate, after first enjoining the strictest secrecy, by taking oath upon the missals from each person, and that a copy of the letters be left. (fn. 3)
Ayes 16
Noes 0
Neutral 3
The oath of Secrecy was given to all who were in the Council.
The communication was made to the Cabinet on the 31st and a copy left in the hands of Giovanni Rizzardo, the Secretary.
[Italian.]
Aug. 30. Senato. Secreta. Comunicazioni dal. Cons. de' X. Venetian Archives.902. Advices of Captain Jacques Pierre to Venice upon the designs projected at Naples by the duke of Ossuna with the marquis acting for the archduke, the English captain Robert Allyau and the Venetian Master Domenico, to seize Venice, with suggestions how to meet them.
They said it would be easy to attack the city with 2,000 picked musketeers led by picked captains and brought upon four galleons. These were to come ostensibly laden with wool and other things with the soldiers concealed beneath. They were to wait in the port of Malamocco until they could obtain barques to land 1,000 in the piazza of S. Marco and 1,000 at the Arsenal. They reckon on the assistance of two or three hundred men in this city. The duke of Ossuna was to keep twenty galleys ready to render necessary help. The plan to be executed in March or else in October or November. The nobility were to be informed that offices and dignities would be conferred upon them alone. The bells should be rung to summon all to come and take the oath of fealty to the king.
After discussing the above matters the duke sent for me to the palace, and asked me if I had not previously had some barques at Naples for the service of the Archduke Ferdinand. I said yes, and he asked for particulars. He took me in the Arsenal, and told the master there to give me all that I required to make similar light barques as secretly and as quickly as possible. On the following day the duke told me that he would only have four made, in order not to excite suspicion, as he proposed to send me and Captain Allyau with those barques to the country of the archduke, taking with us two chief masters with pitch and coarse calico to have as many as twenty made, and man them with Uscocchi. He obtained information about the channels from the Venetian Domenico and two other Venetians, who were in the galleys and whom he released. Domenico promised to pilot them safely to the piazza of S. Marco.
As soon as I heard all this I sent word to Sig. Gasparo Spinelli. He asked me what I wanted. I replied nothing at present except that the republic shall duly recognise my services. I also informed Sig. Simon Contarini, who told me that he had orders to send me to Venice as soon as possible. I stayed in Rome under the pretext of wishing to recover some money, but really to find out about a league of which a French Capuchin called Father Joseph of Paris and others had told me, between the pope, the emperor, the king of France, the king of Spain, the king of Poland and some princes of Germany, ostensibly against the Turk, but really against Venice, the Spaniards wishing to deceive France and the other princes.
The republic can easily frustrate these designs of Ossuna, by keeping four or five sentinel galleys in this port to prevent a surprise, and searching all galleys that come.
Jacques Pierre.
Venice, the 30th August, 1617.
[Italian, 10 pp., autograph signature.]
Aug. 31. Senato, Secreta. Comunicazioni dal Cons. de' X. Venetian Archives.903. In the Council of Ten.
That the anonymous letter from Rome of the 26th inst., sent to Sig. Comelio Celso in Venice, be communicated by a secretary of this Council to the Savii of the Cabinet, enjoining secrecy upon them, and to the Senate, if they think fit.
[Italian.]
Aug. 31. Senato, Secreta. Dispacci, Savoia. Venetian Archives.904. Antonio Donato, Venetian Ambassador in Savoy, to the Doge and Senate.
His Highness is urgently pressing for a reply from your Serenity to his demands. He said it was clear that the Spaniards would keep Vercelli and he could only recover it by the sword. If disarmmament followed with Vercelli still in their hands he knew that he would lose all Piedmont. He therefore preferred to die sword in hand rather than let it fall from his grasp, and he was sure that his people would rather be poor under Savoy than fat under Spain. He was sure he would not be abandoned by the republic. He had the same confidence in the States and would receive some further help from the king of Great Britain and the princes of Germany, but your Excellencies were his chief support.
Asti, the 31st August, 1617.
[Italian.]

Footnotes

1 The Lord Roos, pretending a journey into Yorkshire in good equipage, with sixteen or twenty men, and being on his way as far as Huntingdon and Stilton, there left them till his return from London, whither he feigned to be called back upon some urgent occasion. But there hath been no news of him till Thursday last, that an unknown French foot-post brought Mr. Secretary a letter from him, without date of time or place, wherein he complains that the diabolical dealings of the Lady Lake have driven him to absent himself, excusing himself towards him very much for not acquainting him with it; but within twenty-five days he should hear further from him the reasons of his departure . . . This is all we hear of him, yet saving that the fellow said he left him at Calais, and had charge to deliver the letter to his own hands. Chamberlain to Carlton, Aug. 9/15, 1617. Birch: Court and Times of James I., ii, pp. 25, 26. He actually went to Rome as a convert with letters of introduction from Gondomar. Gardiner: Hist. of England, iii, pp. 189, 190. He was in the direct line of succession to the famous Lord Burghley. His grandfather, Thomas Cecil, earl of Exeter, died Feb, 1623, aged 80; his father, William Cecil, earl of Exeter, survived until 1640. Lord Roos died before either, in 1618. G.E.C. Complete Peerage.
2 The following reading of the cipher are given on a flyleaf: 81 Ambr, 64 Inghilterra, 141 Red'Inghilterra, 66 Spagnoli, 126 Inghilterra.
3 Also found in Senate, Secreta, Comunicazioni dal Cons. de' X. See page 574.